Education for mobility and social justice Education for mobility and social justice

LDG is actively developing new knowledge of the influence of education on social and economic mobility and cultural and linguistic change in low income countries, (see also:


Rao has recently published the following articles in this area:

Rao, N. & M. I. Hossain, (2012) 'I want to be respected': Migration, mobility and the construction of alternate educational discourses in rural Bangladesh. Anthropology and Education Quarterly. 43(4): 415-428.

Rao, N and M.I Hossain (2011) Confronting poverty and educational inequalities: Madrasaas as a strategy for contesting dominant literacy in rural Bangladesh, International Journal of Educational Development.

Drawing on Rao's work on migration, education and gender (in collaboration with the Development Research Centre on Migration, University of Sussex), LDG organised a seminar on ‘Education and Migration' in 2007 leading to a Special Issue of Compare: a journal of comparative education on ‘Migration, education and socio-economic mobility' (Vol. 40:2, 2010 - later published as a book), edited by Rao, with articles by Maddox and Rao.
Rao has also presented papers based on this research at the University of Warwick (May 2008), Brunel University (May 2009) and the World Bank's Human Development Series (June 2009). In July 2008, LDG organized a one day seminar to take forward themes of marginalisation, exclusion and social justice, exploring cross-disciplinary and multidimensional approaches to poverty, inequality and mobility.  
LDG is also actively engaging with key policy development processes in this area. Themelis prepared a background paper for the 2014 UNESCO Education Global Monitoring Report - on Roma education, which is now hosted on the UNESCO website. The report sought to explore the potential of inclusive, curriculum-based innovation to improve learning outcomes through evidence from three countries: the UK, Bulgaria and Cyprus: S. Themelis and B. Foster (2013) Education for Roma: the potential of inclusive, curriculum-based innovation to improve learning outcomes’. Background paper commissioned by UNESCO as part of UNESCO’s 2013/14’ Education for All Global Monitoring’ report: Teaching and learning: Achieving quality for all. Available online:
Publications in this area include:

Aikman, S. (2012) Interrogating discourses of intercultural education: from indigenous Amazon community to global policy forum. Compare Vol. 42, 2, pp.235-259.

Aikman, S. (2010) ‘Education and Indigenous Justice in Africa' (Special Issue on Quality Education of International Journal for Educational Development). 
Rao, N. (2010) ‘Aspiring for distinction: gendered educational choices in an Indian village', Compare: a journal of comparative and international education, Vol. 40/2