Chemistry

BSc CHEMISTRY WITH A FOUNDATION YEAR

Key details 

BSC CHEMISTRY WITH A FOUNDATION YEAR

Start Year
2022
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Science
UCAS course code
8F10
Entry Requirements
CCC

Assessment for Year 1

We employ a range of assessment methods across our modules, evenly balanced between examinations and coursework. 

Our methods include literature reviews, exams, essays, course tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, and seminar presentations. 

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Assessment for Year 2

We employ a range of assessment methods across our modules, evenly balanced between examinations and coursework. 

Our methods include literature reviews, exams, essays, course tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, and seminar presentations. 

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Assessment for Year 3

We employ a range of assessment methods across our modules, evenly balanced between examinations and coursework. 

Our methods include literature reviews, exams, essays, course tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, and seminar presentations. 

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Register interest   
Open Days   

Assessment for Year 4

We employ a range of assessment methods across our modules, evenly balanced between examinations and coursework. 

Our methods include literature reviews, exams, essays, course tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, and seminar presentations. 

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Register interest   
Open Days   

Year 0 (Foundation Year)

Compulsory Modules (40 Credits)

Code CHE-3003B - (20 Credits)

A course in chemistry intended to take you to the level required to begin a relevant degree in the Faculty of Science. The module will help you to develop an understanding of: reactions of functional groups in organic chemistry; basic thermodynamics; spectroscopic techniques; transition metal chemistry and practical laboratory skills.

Code CHE-3004A - (20 Credits)

A module designed for you, if you are on a Science Faculty degree with a Foundation Year. You will receive an introduction to the structure and electronic configuration of the atom. You will learn how to predict the nature of bonding given the position of elements in the periodic table and therefore. You will be introduced to the chemistry of key groups of elements. You will become familiar with key measures such as the mole and the determination of concentrations. The module includes laboratory work. No prior knowledge of chemistry is assumed.

 

Options Range A (40 Credits)

Students will be assigned to the relevant mathematics course based on their previous qualifications.
Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Code MTHB3001A - (20 Credits)

Taught by lectures and seminars to bring students from Maths GCSE towards A-level standard, this module covers several algebraic topics including functions, polynomials and quadratic equations. Trigonometry is approached both geometrically up to Sine and Cosine Rule and as a collection of waves and other functions. The main new topic is Differential Calculus including the Product and Chain Rules. We will also introduce Integral Calculus and apply it to areas. Students should have a strong understanding of GCSE Mathematics.

Code MTHB3002B - (20 Credits)

Following MTHB3001A (Basic Mathematics I), this module brings students up to the standard needed to begin year one of a range of degree courses. The first half covers Integral Calculus including Integration by Parts and Substitution. Trigonometric identities, polynomial expressions, partial fractions and exponential functions are explored, all with the object of integrating a wider range of functions. The second half of the module is split into two: Complex Numbers and Vectors. We will meet and use the imaginary number i (the square root of negative one), represent it on a diagram, solve equations using it and link it to trigonometry and exponential functions. Strange but true: imaginary numbers are useful in the real world. The last section is practical rather than abstract too; we will be looking at three dimensional position and movement and solving geometric problems through vector techniques.

Code MTHB3005A - (20 Credits)

This is a course in mathematics for students who have studied Maths at GCSE level gaining a grade B/C or equivalent and/or more than two years ago. The course includes some AS level material relevant to science. This module is reserved for students on the Chemistry, Biology, Pharmacy, Environmental Science or Computing Foundation Years.

Code MTHB3006B - (20 Credits)

This module is ideal for you if you are studying a Science Faculty degree with a Foundation Year or Computing with a Foundation Year and have completed study of the module Introductory Mathematics for Scientists. You will build on the knowledge gained during the Mathematics for Scientists introduction module and advance your skills.

 

Options Range B (40 Credits)

Before taking any semester 2 modules, students must have taken the pre-requisite semester 1 module.
Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Code BIO-3001B - (20 Credits)

The topics covered will give you a basic grounding in biological processes including the fundamental characteristics of living things; basic metabolic processes; an understanding of evolution and knowledge of the levels of biological organisation with some focus given to organ systems. This module also gives you the opportunity to develop key transferable skills such as lab skills, report writing, assignment preparation, researching and evaluating evidence, giving and responding to presentations.

Code BIO-3002A - (20 Credits)

The topics covered on the module will give you a basic grounding in biological processes including the fundamental characteristics of living things; basic metabolic processes; an understanding of evolution and knowledge of the levels of biological organisation with some focus given to organ systems. This module also gives you the opportunity to develop key transferable skills which may include lab skills, report writing, assignment preparation, researching and evaluating evidence, giving and responding to presentations.

Code PHY-3010B - (20 Credits)

This module follows on from Introductory Physics and continues to introduce you to the fundamental principles of physics and uses them to explain a variety of physical phenomena. You will study gravitational, electric and magnetic fields, radioactivity and energy levels. There is some coursework based around the discharge of capacitors. The module finishes with you studying some aspects of thermal physics, conservation of momentum and simple harmonic motion.

Code PHY-3011A - (20 Credits)

In this module you will begin your physics journey with units, accuracy and measurement. You will then progress through the topics of waves, light and sound, forces and dynamics, energy, materials and finish by studying aspects of electricity. The module has a piece of coursework which is based around PV cell technology.

 

Year 1 

Compulsory Modules (100 Credits)

Code CHE-4001Y - (20 Credits)

You will be laboratory based to cover experimental aspects of the 'core' chemistry courses, Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds, Bonding, Structure and Periodicity, Light, Atoms and Materials and Analytical Chemistry. You will use spreadsheets for analysing and presenting data, which is also covered in this module.

Code CHE-4050Y - (20 Credits)

Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; error propagation in physical chemistry and physical principles through applied mathematics. The module also contains a broadly based series of lectures on science, coupled with activities based upon them. The twin objectives for this part of the module are to provide a contextual backdrop for the more focused studies in other concurrent and subsequent degree courses, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information.

Code CHE-4101Y - (20 Credits)

After a shared introduction to atomic structure and periodicity, you will be introduced to the concepts of bonding and hybridisation, conjugation and aromaticity, the mechanistic description of organic reactions, the organic functional groups, the shapes of molecules and stereochemical issues including the concepts of enantiomers, diastereoisomers and racemates.

Code CHE-4202Y - (20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the major areas of classical physical chemistry: chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, and electrolyte solutions as well as spectroscopy. Chemical kinetics will consider the kinetic theory of gases and the rate of processes, in particular either in the gas phase or in solution. The appropriate theoretical basis for understanding rate measurements will be developed during the course, which will include considerations of the order of reaction, the Arrhenius equation and determination of rate constants. Thermodynamics deals with energy relationships in large assemblies, that is those systems which contain sufficient numbers of molecules for 'bulk' properties to be exhibited and which, are in a state of equilibrium. Properties discussed will include the heat content or enthalpy (H), heat capacity (Cp, Cv), internal energy (U), heat and work. The First Law of Thermodynamics will be introduced and its significance explained. It is very important that scientists have an understanding of the behaviour of ions in solution, which includes conductivity and ionic mobility. The interaction of radiation with matter is termed spectroscopy. Three main topics will be discussed: (i) ultraviolet/visible (UV / Vis) spectroscopy, in which electrons are moved from one orbital to another orbital; (ii) infrared (vibrational) spectroscopy, a technique which provides important information on the variety of bond types that a molecule can possess; (iii) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which allows 'molecular skeletons' to be identified.

Code CHE-4301Y - (20 Credits)

After a shared introduction to chemical bonding, atomic and molecular structure and chemical principles, this module will provide you with an introduction to the structures, properties and reactivities of molecules and ionic solids. The first few lectures of this module are integrated with the module ‘Chemistry of Carbon Based Compounds’ and is supported and illustrated by the bonding, structure and periodicity experiments of the first year practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory A or Research Skills in Biochemistry. The latter part will concentrate more on fundamental aspects of inorganic Chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships between chemical bonding and the structures and properties of molecules.

 

Options Range A (20 Credits)

Code CHE-4051Y - (20 Credits)

Introducing important concepts in analytical chemistry, this module covers a range of qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques that underpin more complex instrumental analytical methodologies. Exploring these techniques, you will learn how to apply them to "real-life" analytical problems.

Code ENV-4015Y - (20 Credits)

You will cover differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers and statistical methods as part of this module. In addition to the theoretical background there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for those across the Faculty of Science that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The follow-on modules are Mathematics for Scientists B and C. Recommended if you have grade A*-C at A-level Mathematics, or equivalent.

Code PHY-4001Y - (20 Credits)

This module gives an introduction to important topics in physics, with particular, but not exclusive, relevance to chemical and molecular physics. Areas covered include optics, electrostatics and magnetism and special relativity. The module may be taken by any science students who wish to study physics beyond A Level.

 

Year 2

Compulsory Modules (60 Credits)

Code CHE-5101A - (20 Credits)

This course builds on Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds (the first year organic chemistry course). You will cover four main topics. The first 'aromaticity' includes benzenoid and hetero-aromatic systems. The second major topic is the organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds. Spectroscopic characterisation of organic compounds is reviewed and the final major topic is 'stereochemistry and mechanisms'. This covers conformational aspects of acyclic and cyclic compounds. Stereoelectronic effects, Neighbouring Group Participation (NGP), Baldwin’s rules, Cram’s rule and cycloaddition reactions are then discussed.

Code CHE-5201Y - (20 Credits)

The module covers a number of areas of modern physical chemistry which are essential to a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include the second law of thermodynamics and entropy, qunatum mechanics, the thermodynamics of solutions and chemical kinetics of complex reactions. The module includes laboratory work. Due to the laboratory-based content on this module students must have completed at least one Level 4 module containing laboratory work.

Code CHE-5301B - (20 Credits)

In this module, you’ll study the structure, bonding and reactivity patterns of inorganic compounds. The module is a prerequisite for the 3rd level inorganic course Inorganic Compounds: Structure and Functions. You’ll cover the electronic structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of transition metal complexes (ligand field theory), the chemistry of main group clusters, polymers and oligomers, the structures and reactivities of main group and transition metal organometallics, and the application of spectroscopic methods (primarily NMR, MS and IR) to inorganic compounds. You’ll have laboratory classes linked to the lecture topics and so you will need to have completed either of the level 4 practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory (A) or Research Skills in Biochemistry.

Options Range A (20 Credits)

Code CHE-5350Y - (20 Credits)

Specialist materials dominate the modern world, and it is our ability as chemists to control their properties. Understanding and controlling material properties is the central theme of this module. In this module you will learn about two key classes of material: polymers and inorganic solids. You'll gain a firm grounding in the specialist methods used to characterise these materials. This will enable you to appreciate the unique properties of these materials, and how they can be controlled. In the practical element of the module, you'll gain skills in synthesising and characterising polymers and inorganic solids. In the polymers thread, you'll begin by gaining an appreciation of the role they play in society and why they are unique. You'll then encounter methods we can use to understand the properties of polymers, and how we can control them. You'll also explore the wide range of mechanisms that can be used to make organic polymers. In the thread focussed on inorganic materials, you'll explore the ionic model for inorganic solids, before gaining an appreciation of the synthesis and characterisation methods that allow access to these materials. You'll then explore the variety of properties that solids can exhibit, including semiconduction and magnetism. This lecture-based content is complemented by the practical component of the course, where you'll gain hands-on experience in both synthesis and characterisation.

Code CHE-5501Y - (20 Credits)

The module covers the theory and practical application of some key instrumental techniques for chemical analysis. Molecular spectroscopy, chromatography and electroanalytical techniques are the important instrumental methods included. Laboratory practicals using these techniques will reinforce material covered in the lecture programme.

Options Range B (40 Credits)

Code CHE-5150Y - (20 Credits)

Medicinal chemistry is a highly interdisciplinary area and this module is designed to introduce a variety of topics in the field of medicinal chemistry. Some of the topics that will be discussed in a series of lectures include, Molecular and biomolecular interactions, Biomolecules: Proteins and nucleic acids, Phases of drug action, Pharmacokinetics, Proteins and receptors as drug targets, DNA as a drug target and development of antitumor agents.

Code CHE-5250Y - (20 Credits)

You’ll cover the foundation and basics of quantum theory and symmetry, starting with features of the quantum world and including elements of quantum chemistry, group theory, computer-based methods for calculating molecular wavefunctions, quantum information, and the quantum nature of light. The subject matter paves the way for applications to a variety of chemical and physical systems – in particular, processes and properties involving the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

Code CHE-5350Y - (20 Credits)

Specialist materials dominate the modern world, and it is our ability as chemists to control their properties. Understanding and controlling material properties is the central theme of this module. In this module you will learn about two key classes of material: polymers and inorganic solids. You'll gain a firm grounding in the specialist methods used to characterise these materials. This will enable you to appreciate the unique properties of these materials, and how they can be controlled. In the practical element of the module, you'll gain skills in synthesising and characterising polymers and inorganic solids. In the polymers thread, you'll begin by gaining an appreciation of the role they play in society and why they are unique. You'll then encounter methods we can use to understand the properties of polymers, and how we can control them. You'll also explore the wide range of mechanisms that can be used to make organic polymers. In the thread focussed on inorganic materials, you'll explore the ionic model for inorganic solids, before gaining an appreciation of the synthesis and characterisation methods that allow access to these materials. You'll then explore the variety of properties that solids can exhibit, including semiconduction and magnetism. This lecture-based content is complemented by the practical component of the course, where you'll gain hands-on experience in both synthesis and characterisation.

Code CHE-5501Y - (20 Credits)

The module covers the theory and practical application of some key instrumental techniques for chemical analysis. Molecular spectroscopy, chromatography and electroanalytical techniques are the important instrumental methods included. Laboratory practicals using these techniques will reinforce material covered in the lecture programme.

Code CHE-5601Y - (20 Credits)

This module will equip you with an understanding of the principles and techniques used in contemporary biophysical chemistry. You will learn experimental techniques for measuring thermodynamic and kinetic properties of biological molecules. You will gain firm grounding in the physical principles describing those properties and their use to provide quantitative descriptions of those properties. Using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry you will explore three major themes; i) spectroscopic properties of biomolecules, ii) thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins and enzymes, and, iii) methods defining biomolecule size and mass. Through weekly seminars you will benefit from putting your knowledge into practice, communicating your ideas and growing your confidence in quantitative data analysis and problem solving. During laboratory based practical work, you will develop your skills in sample preparation together with the collection and interpretation of spectroscopic data. Your participation in this module will give you the knowledge to appreciate how, and why, biophysical chemistry contributes to advances in medicine, sustainable energy solutions and healthy ageing.

Code PHY-5004Y - (20 Credits)

Exploring fundamental aspects of thermodynamics and condensed matter physics, you’ll be introduced to ideas about the electronic structure based on the free-electron Sommerfeld and band theories, along with the concept of phonons and their contribution to the heat capacity of a solid. Also you’ll consider the structure, bonding and properties of solids, in particular electronic conductivity and magnetism, as well as atomic structure and atomic spectroscopy, and Entropy in terms of a macroscopic Carnot cycle and the statistical approach. Two important distributions of particles will be treated; Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac. Changes of state, 1st and 2nd order phase transitions and the Clausius–Clapeyron equation will be described.

 

Year 3

Compulsory Modules (60 Credits)

Code CHE-6101Y - (20 Credits)

You will cover several key topics required to plan the synthesis of organic compounds, and to understand the properties displayed by organic compounds. The first topic is on synthesis planning, strategy and analysis, supported by a study of further important oxidation and reduction reactions. The second topic is on the various types of pericyclic reactions and understanding the stereochemistry displayed by an analysis of frontier orbitals. The third topic is on the use of organometallic compounds in synthesis with a particular emphasis on the use of transition metal based catalysts. The fourth topic is the synthesis of chiral non-racemic compounds, and describes the use of chiral pool compounds and methods for the amplification of chiral information, including asymmettric reductions and oxidations.The final topic is on physical organic chemistry and includes aspects of radical chemistry.

Code CHE-6201Y - (20 Credits)

The module covers a selection of advanced topics in Physical Chemistry including statistical thermodynamics, reaction mechanisms and theories of reaction rates, photochemistry, electrochemistry and diffraction techniques.

Code CHE-6301Y - (20 Credits)

This module concentrates on two important themes in contemporary inorganic chemistry: (i) the role of transition metals in homogeneous catalysis; (ii) the correlation between the structures of transition metal complexes and their electronic and magnetic properties. The structure and bonding in these compounds will be discussed as well as their applications in synthesis. There will be a series of problem-solving workshops interspersed with the lectures.

 

Options Range A (60 Credits)

One of CHE-6001Y or CHE-6002Y MUST be taken (i.e. is compulsory). Students who achieve a year aggregate of at least 50% in Year 2 are expected to take CHE-6001Y, those who do not achieve 50% must take CHE-6002Y.

Code CHE-5250Y - (20 Credits)

You’ll cover the foundation and basics of quantum theory and symmetry, starting with features of the quantum world and including elements of quantum chemistry, group theory, computer-based methods for calculating molecular wavefunctions, quantum information, and the quantum nature of light. The subject matter paves the way for applications to a variety of chemical and physical systems – in particular, processes and properties involving the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

Code CHE-6001Y - (40 Credits)

A supervised research project available only to students registered for the BSc programme.

Code CHE-6002Y - (20 Credits)

A supervised literature-based project available only to students registered for the BSc programme.

Code CHE-6151Y - (20 Credits)

This module is to provide an awareness of new bond construction in advanced organic chemistry. It has aspects of natural product chemistry and the associated bioactivity of natural compounds. The module will illustrate how advanced synthetic chemistry can be used to construct compounds that might find applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

Code CHE-6250Y - (20 Credits)

The module will consist of topics covering important areas of modern physical chemistry and chemical physics. The material will blend together experimental and theoretical aspects of photonics, condensed phase dynamics in molecular and macromolecular fluids and quantum and classical simulations.

Code CHE-6350Y - (20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide you with an understanding of the developing landscape and challenges in the broad area of energy generation and transduction. It has a particular emphasis on the science that underpins emerging technologies related to the hydrogen economy, photovoltaics and biological or solar fuels. Necessarily it encompasses cross-discipline aspects of chemistry, physics materials and biological science with the students gaining knowledge of how these disciplines interplay in the design and construction of new devices for energy harvesting and utilisation.

Code CHE-6601Y - (20 Credits)

The structural basis of the function of many proteins has been elucidated and this, together with the ready availability of chemical and biochemical techniques for altering proteins in a controlled way, has led to the application of proteins in a wide variety of biological and chemical systems and processes. These include their use as industrial catalysts and medicines, in organic syntheses and in the development of new materials. This module provides an introduction to the principles underlying this rapidly expanding and commercially-relevant area of the molecular biosciences and gives insights into their applications.

Code ENV-6008A - (20 Credits)

What do you know about the drivers of climate change? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the greenhouse gas that has, by far, the greatest impact on climate change, but how carbon cycles through the Earth is complex and not fully understood. Predicting future climate or defining ‘dangerous’ climate change is therefore challenging. In this module you will learn about the atmosphere, ocean and land components of the carbon cycle. We cover urgent global issues such as ocean acidification and how to get off our fossil fuel ‘addiction’, as well as how to deal with climate denialists.

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Entry Requirements

A Levels

CCC

T Levels

Obtain an overall Pass including a C In the core of the T Level and a Pass in the Occupational Specialism. Acceptable pathways: Design, Surveying and Planning for Construction or Digital Production, Design and Development or Education and Childcare

BTEC

MMM

Scottish highers

BBCCC

Scottish highers advanced

DDD

Irish leaving certificate

6 subjects at H4

Access course

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 credits at Level 3

European Baccalaureate

60%

International Baccalaureate

28 points

GCSE offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE

Additional entry requirements

A-Level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted

 

We welcome applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds.  If you have been out of study for the last three years and you do not have the entry grades for our three year degree, we will consider your educational and employment history, along with your personal statement and reference to gain a holistic view of your suitability for the course. You will still need to meet our GCSE English Language and Mathematics requirements. 

 

If you are currently studying your level 3 qualifications, we may be able to give you a reduced grade offer based on these circumstances: 

• You live in an area with low progression to higher education (we use Polar 4, quintile 1 & 2 data) 

• You will be 21 years of age or over at the start of the course 

• You have been in care or you are a young full time carer 

• You are studying at a school which our Outreach Team are working closely with 

 

Alternative Entry Requirements

 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level. 

Students for whom english is a foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading): 

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in all components) for Foundation year entry

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time. 

Gap year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application. 

Intakes

This course is open to UK applicants only. The annual intake is in September each year. 

Course Reference Number: 4786999

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of course-related costs. 

Course Reference Number: 4786999

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option. 

 

UCAS Apply is an online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges. 

 

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14. 

 

FURTHER INFORMATION  

 

Please contact us by email at Admissions@uea.ac.uk  or via the Admissions Live Chat Service . 

Course Reference Number: 4786999
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Science
UCAS course code
8F10
Entry Requirements
CCC
The Foundation Year will prepare you for an undergraduate degree in Chemistry, training and equipping you with everything you’ll need to progress to the next level. The course covers core modules across the science faculty, from chemistry and mathematics to biology and physics – you'll be able to tailor your experience to your interests. Completing the year successfully will grant you a place on our three-year programme, where you’ll explore how chemistry shapes and underpins our relationship with the world around us, from manufacturing materials to producing medicines. Our BSc Chemistry course is ranked 6th for Chemistry by 'The Complete University Guide 2022', and in the top 20 by 'The Guardian 2021'.
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