BA Media Studies

Video

Our students are provided with the option to study a range of topics, from science fiction cinema to television comedy, animation to popular music. Our courses are taught by scholars with a reputation for world-leading research – as well as by creative practitioners who have made award-winning BBC documentaries and written scripts for Hollywood movies.

Watch It
"My participation in the student TV society, UEA:TV, was almost certainly the thing that influenced my career the most. In immediately going for and securing a senior role, I was able to handle managing shoots, gear and people, and met my business partner"

In their words

Alex Morris, BA Film and Television Studies

Key facts

(Research Excellence Framework, 2014)

Article

Tim Snelson and his colleagues launch their website for their AHRC-funded project which looks at the undercroft on the London South Bank as an example of young people's attachment to subcultural spaces. You can also find the film 'You Can't Move History', which the project team made in collaboration with skaters and campaigners for the undercroft.

Read It
The BA Media Studies degree explores histories and theories of media, covering a diverse range of audio-visual, print and digital communications, and examining their social and aesthetic significance.

You'll benefit from our world-leading expertise and industry experience as you explore a global range of media industries and texts.

A first year covering all the essentials in the subject is followed by second and third years offering lots of student choice, enabling you to specialise in the areas that interest you the most.

Select from topics such as popular music or celebrity culture, and choose from a wide range of creative practice options in areas such as video, sound-based media, television studio work, magazine production, digital media, or an internship.

Students develop many transferable skills on this degree, including high-level digital literacy and communication skills, team working, and self-management, all of which open up a wide variety of careers.

Overview

The BA Media Studies degree explores histories and theories of media, covering a diverse range of audio-visual, print and digital communications, and examining their social and aesthetic significance. You’ll benefit from our world-leading expertise and industry experience as you explore a global range of media industries and texts.

A first year covering all the essentials in the subject is followed by second and third years offering lots of student choice, enabling you to specialise in the areas that interest you the most. Select from topics such as popular music or celebrity culture, and choose from a wide range of creative practice options in areas such as video, sound-based media, television studio work, magazine production, digital media, or an internship.

Students develop many transferable skills on this degree, including high-level digital literacy and communication skills, team working, and self-management, all of which open up a wide variety of careers.

Your Degree

Your degree in Media Studies begins with a year of compulsory modules designed to give you a broad understanding how the media industries work.

As your degree progresses, you are able to take more optional modules, allowing you to build a degree that suits your aims and aspirations. The final year also contains a dissertation, which is a project about media studies that you get to design.

Across your degree, you will take part in screenings, lectures, seminars, practical workshop sessions and tutorials to help you learn a range of skills and get ready for a wide range of possible careers. You will also have a Personal Advisor, an academic staff member who can give you specific advice about the modules you choose, give you pastoral support, and help you with careers advice. 

Year 1

During your first year you will be introduced to a range of theoretical and analytical approaches to media, placing the media in historical and contemporary contexts. 

Year 2

In your second year you will study compulsory modules on research and the expanding worlds of contemporary media. These will help you to develop your analytical and research skills. 

You will also be able to select modules from a wide selection of media options, covering topics such as gender, media promotion, popular music and animation.

You will also have opportunities to engage in practical work, with modules on adaptation, digital media, video and television production, as well as a media-focused internship in the creative industries.

Year 3

In your final year you will plan, research and undertake a dissertation. You will also take modules that deepen your subject knowledge, including topics like media representations of Muslim women, youth subcultures, media production cultures and television sitcoms.

You can also do modules that include some practical elements like magazine production or the Media Practice Project module in which you work with a supervisor to expand your practical studies in Year 2.

Assessment

Our assessment methods are designed to test a variety of skills. We use a diverse range of assessments to ensure that you leave your degree with a broad set of skills. These include essays, video projects, live TV shows, in-class presentations, reports, and examinations. 

There is no final examination and your degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and three

Want to know more?

Come along to an Open Day and experience our unique campus for yourself.

Study Abroad

Students who are enrolled on 3-year programmes in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities have the option of applying to study abroad at one of UEA’s Partner Universities, for one semester of the second year.   Please see our Study Abroad website for further information and criteria.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

ANALYSING TELEVISION

This module explores the many ways television has been examined, explored, understood, and used. It focuses particularly on the specifics of the medium; that is, how television is different from (and, in some ways, similar to) other media such as film, radio, and the internet. Each week will focus on a particular idea which is seen as central to the examination of television. The medium will be explored as an industry, as a range of texts, and as a social activity. While drawing on some examples from other countries, the primary focus will be on British television; similarly while some history will be explored, the main focus will be contemporary television.

AMAM4010A

20

INTERROGATING CULTURE

This module provides an introduction to the key debates over media and cultural theory. In the process, it focuses on the key movements and theorists and covers key debates over the concept of mass culture and the mass media, structuralism and poststructuralism, high/low culture, the culture industries, and hegemony. The module will be taught by lecture and seminar.

AMAM4030B

20

MEDIA CONVERGENCE

It is often claimed today that contemporary media are undergoing a process of convergence, in which the specificity of film and television is increasingly becoming blurred. This module examines the contemporary situation of the media by examining the ways in which the emergence of new media have repeatedly given rise to various species of futurological thinking. The module will also examine the various ways in which the integration of film and television with a range of new media (video, DVD, the internet etc.) is both changing and not changing their modes of production, their textual character and the conditions within which they are consumed. The module is taught by lecture and seminar.

AMAM4027B

20

MEDIA HISTORY

This module will explore media history from the perspective of the AMA's interests in critical media studies, cultural consumption and historiography. It will highlight the material, social and institutional contexts in which media forms have been produced, mediated and consumed and the ongoing power struggles therein. By working through different interpretations of how the media has intersected with long-term changes in society, the module will allow students to contrast 'top down' histories of industrial organisation, technological evolution and regulatory intervention with 'bottom up' histories of media as social activity.

AMAM4029A

20

MEDIA INDUSTRIES

This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the structure of the media industries and of the situation of media practitioners within them. It will therefore look at their economic and political organisation and regulation and the divisions of labour determined by these modes of organisation and regulation. In the process, it will cover a range of different media industries in Britain and the US, including the press, radio, film and television.

AMAM4028A

20

MEDIA REPRESENTATION

This module explores the roles the media plays in the formation of identities and subjectivities. It will ask students to think about the relationship between the media and social hierarchies of power, by looking at the similarities and differences of representations across media forms, genres and narratives. It will introduce students to approaches and issues including gender identities and feminist theory, otherness and post-colonialism, discourse and power, performative identity and queer theory, disability studies, posthumanism and animal studies.

AMAM4026B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

CONTEMPORARY MEDIASCAPES

This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the spatial dimensions of media access, production, participation and use/consumption. Module content is organised around the notions of space and place, thereby enabling an engagement with issues including: globalisation/the global; national media and media systems; regional and local media; community and 'grassroots' media, domestic and 'personal' media. Over the course of the module then, students will develop an understanding of the range and reach of media and the multiplicity of factors determining how, when and where populations are enabled to access and participate in media activities. Parallel to the above will be an exploration, through selected case study examples, of media and cultural policy issues, spaces/places of media production as well as a critical engagement with questions of power in relation to these. The module will also be adopting a contemporary focus by incorporating debates about the role and potential of digital media and communications technologies in enabling new forms of media production, distribution and participation.

AMAM5020A

20

RESEARCHING MEDIA

The module is designed to provide students with the key concepts and methods necessary to devise and execute an independent research project whether using traditional academic methods or practice based research. As a result, it will cover the key processes involved in devising and focusing a research project, reflexively undertaking the research itself and writing up one's results. In the process, students will be shown how to position their work in relation to an intellectual context; devise the research questions that are practical and realistic; and developing research methods through which to address these questions. The module will be taught by lecture and seminar.

AMAM5025B

20

Students will select 40 - 80 credits from the following modules:

Media Studies modules. If less than 80 credits are selected in this Option Range then additional credits can be selected from Option Ranges, B and/or C.

Name Code Credits

ANIMATION

Animation is one of the most popular and least scrutinised areas of popular media culture. This module seeks to introduce students to animation as a mode of production through examinations of different aesthetics and types of animation from stop motion through to cel and CGI-based examples. It then goes on to discuss some of the debates around animation in relation to case study texts. Example debates include: who animation is for (children?), the limits of the term "animation" in relation to CGI, the industrial frameworks for animation production (art vs commerce) and character vs star debates around animation icons. A range of approaches and methods will therefore be adopted within the module, including political economics, cultural industries, star studies and animation studies itself. The module is taught by seminar and screening.

AMAM5024A

20

DIGITAL MEDIA: THEORY AND PRACTICE

This module introduces students to the practical and theoretical study of representing media in digital form. By exploring the historical and contemporary aspects of various media, including text, audio-visual, creative software and games, it considers how the shift to digital has affected media production and consumption. Students will gain awareness of the technologies which underpin digital media, the interfaces for delivering media online, and the cultural and social aspects of digitisation. The module also covers the issues surrounding media archiving, reproduction and restoration in a digital age and the problems associated with ephemerality, future proofing, metadata philosophies and a study of digital media futurology. By the end of the module, students will be able to evaluate digital media in their contemporary and historical contexts, and understand the principles which influence the digital remediation of media forms. Students will be supported in gaining hands-on experience of the process of creating digital media, and use these creations to support the intellectual objectives of the module. These practical sessions will introduce students to: digitisation of text and images; digital asset management and metadata creation; image processing; digitisation of audiovisual media; and creating basic games. Each of these sessions will serve to illuminate particular theoretical issues, allowing students to develop the skills to understand the cultural and social impact of digital media.

AMAP5124B

20

DOCUMENTARY: HISTORY, THEORY, CRITICISM

This module will introduce students to the key issues in documentary history, theory and criticism. It will address definitional and generic debates; ethical issues; historical forms and founders; different categories, models and expository and poetic modes of documentary filmmaking; and social and political uses and debates. It will draw upon case studies from a range of different national and media contexts and give students grounding in key historical, methodological and ethical debates that they can draw upon in their future written and practical work.

AMAM5045A

20

FILM THEORY

This module explores aspects of film theory as it has developed over the last hundred years or so. It encompasses topics including responses to cinema by filmmaker theorists such as Sergei Eisenstein; influential formulations of and debates about realism and film aesthetics associated with writers and critics such as Andre Bazin, Siegfried Kracauer, Rudolf Arnheim and Bela Balazs; the impact of structuralism, theories of genre, narrative and models of film language; theories of authorship; feminist film theory and its emphasis on psychoanalysis; intertextuality; theories of race and representation; reception models. The module is taught by lecture, screening and seminar. Students will work with primary texts - both films and theoretical writings - and have the opportunity to explore in their written work the ways in which film theories can be applied to film texts.

AMAM5030A

20

GENDER AND THE MEDIA

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research methods, this module examines the role of media in constructing - and challenging - contemporary gender relations and understandings of a range of femininities and masculinities. The module explores both theoretical and methodological issues and covers theoretical approaches from feminist media studies, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory. It explores a range of media and visual cultures including television, magazines, sports media, music, digital media culture, etc.

AMAM5031A

20

POPULAR MUSIC

This module encourages students to explore the ways in which popular music has been understood by scholars in the field of media and cultural studies. The module will examine the debates over popular music industries, texts and audiences, and incorporate an exploration of a range of popular musical forms, including folk music, rock, pop, rap and/or hip-hop, and dance music cultures. It will also examine the relations of popular music to other media, such as television and the internet.

AMAM5046A

20

PROMOTIONAL CULTURE

The advertising and PR industries are central to public life: in business, politics and culture. Branding strategies reach into our intimate lives, whether this is through the ways that we promote ourselves in social media or how corporations collect, analyse and sell our data for marketing purposes. The purpose of this module is to introduce students to these developments, their histories, and the key ethical and political debates that surround them. It may include how PR has informed politics and ideology since the 1920s, through the rise of the advertising in 1960s Manhattan, to today's flow of brands across digital platforms. It may look at the promotional cultures surrounding the film and television industries, including product placement, corporate sponsorship, celebrity. It could examine the ways in which we are encouraged to become micro-celebrities, using promotional techniques online and offline in order to market ourselves in an increasingly visual and commercialized culture. It may ask to what extent brands are integral to our social lives and subjectivities, how far they forge intimate relationships with and between users. It will use case studies that may touch on vlogging, selfies, viral marketing, and issues or controversies affecting the promotional cultures such as sexualisation, corporate social responsibility, greenwashing, sustainability, and surveillance.

AMAM5049B

20

RECEPTION AND AUDIENCE STUDIES

This module will introduce students to the key theoretical frameworks and approaches within the tradition of reception studies. It will offer a critical exploration of the main debates and studies that have shaped the field, exploring both historical and contemporary contexts of media reception. In particular, in will consider the transcultural circulation of media, and the issues that arise when film, television and other media transfer between cultures with significantly different values and modes of reception. The module will encourage students to critically evaluate existing reception studies and equip them with the tools necessary to undertake their own small-scale reception study.

AMAM5035A

20

THEORISING TELEVISION

This module explores some of the key ways in which television has been theorised, conceptualised and debated. It will offer students insight into how the discipline of Television Studies has developed, as well as how television itself has developed - in terms of social roles, political functions and aesthetic form. A key interest will in be what television is for, for nations, societies, individuals and/or communities.

AMAM5047A

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Film and Television Studies modules. If 80 credits are selected from Option Range A, you cannot select any credits from this Option Range.

Name Code Credits

FILM GENRES

Film Genres introduces students to the range of theories and methods used to account for the prevalence of genres within filmmaking. The module investigates historical changes in how film genres have been approached in order to consider how genres have been made use of by industry, critics and film audiences. Genre theories are explored through a range of case studies drawn from one or more of a range of popular American film genres that may include the Western, melodrama, romantic comedy, the road movie, the buddy movie, film noir, the gangster film, the war film and action/adventure film. In exploring concepts and case studies relating to film genres the module aims to demonstrate the impact of genres within contemporary culture.

AMAM5033A

20

THE HOLLYWOOD STUDIO SYSTEM

This module will develop students understating of how silent-era, classical and post-classical Hollywood has developed as an industry, balancing the twin demands of creativity and commerce. The module will encourage students to analyse how Hollywood works as an industry, the kind of films it produces, and the ways in which they are consumed by domestic and global audiences. Students will engage with a variety of Hollywood films and be introduced to a range of theories and approaches for analysing how they are produced and consumed.

AMAM5042B

20

THE PAST IN BRITISH FILM AND TELEVISION

Literary adaptations, historical epics, war films, period dramas, documentaries, bio-pics and sitcoms: British cinema and television feature a range of styles and genres that deal with and represent 'the past'. This module examines the prominent position that historical narratives have occupied within British media culture of the last century. Their enduring popularity of 'the past' as a topic and mode of address among both filmmakers and audiences raises a range of aesthetic, ideological and practical issues. What techniques and conventions do they use to depict the past? What visions of the British past do they offer? What pleasures do they provide for their audiences? How important are foreign audiences and investment? Do narratives about the past provide escapist entertainment, or do they enable media practitioners (and audiences) to address contemporary concerns? Drawing upon a range of media, the module examines the depiction of the past in British film and television from the 1930s to the present. The module is taught by seminar and screening.

AMAM5044B

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Media Studies with Practice modules. If 80 credits are selected from Option Range A, you cannot select any credits from this Option Range

Name Code Credits

ADAPTATION AND TRANSMEDIA STORYTELLING

This module will introduce students to the key theories of screen adaptation and transmedia storytelling, from the earliest ideas of 'fidelity' to the source, to later approaches emphasising intertextuality, and the movement of narratives across different media. It will enable students to examine a series of different examples of narrative adaptation across media and transmedia contexts. Through the module's engagement with screenwriting practice, it will also enable students to explore the processes of adaptation from within, through working on their own screenplay exercise adapting an existing work.

AMAM5038B

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH I

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. It aims the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION

This module introduces the student to the grammar of film and television, particularly questions of narrative, storytelling, framing, composition, movement, editing, sound and lighting. In so doing, it will encourage students to engage in creative practices, in which they can experiment with these elements of filmmaking (elements that they will have already explored in Analysing Film / Analysing Television) and so gain a deeper and more practical understanding of how film language makes meaning. Furthermore, it will encourage them to understand the choices and decision making processes involved in creative practice and the pros and cons involved in any creative decision.

AMAP5123A

20

FILMS THAT MADE US AMERICAN: THE 1980S THROUGH THE MOVIES

The module will examine America in the1980s. It will look at youth culture, post-Vietnam revisionism and the 'remasculinization of America', yuppie culture, and the impact of both AIDS and drug addiction. Core factors of study in this module are the effects of both New Right morality upon the American socio-cultural landscape, and Ronald Reagan as postmodern president administrating to a 'celluloid America' of his own fantastic imagining. Overall, the module will offer the chance to analyse the tensions and contradictions of the decade as they were played out in both the content and structure of contemporary American film.

AMAS5019A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of the intermediate course in Arabic (PPLB5035A). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

An intermediate course in Greek for those students who have taken Beginners' Greek I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

A continuation of Intermediate Greek I. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

LOOKING AT PICTURES: PHOTOGRAPHY AND VISUAL CULTURE IN THE USA

Photographic portraits, family albums, anthropological illustrations, lynching postcards, advertisements, food packaging and fashion photos are just some of the pictures that will be "read" and analysed in this module. Students will explore how visual texts can contribute to an understanding of nationhood, class, race, sexuality and identity in the USA. Opening sessions will focus on ways of "reading" visual texts. [No previous experience of working with images is necessary]. Most of the semester will be devoted to analysing how photographic images both reflect and contribute to constructions of American culture.

AMAS5024B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN LANGUAGE 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A, or equivalent to B1 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN LANGUAGE 1/II

A continuation of post A-Level German I consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading of texts and discussion of relevant topics. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German', depending on student interest and enrolment.) Not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4021B

20

SOUND MEDIA: HISTORY, TECHNOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE

No previous experience of sound - related study or any technical experience is required to take this module. This module introduces students to the history and practice of sound-related media, from early recording devices, through to the mass media of the 20th century, including radio and music recording as well as the role of sound in contemporary media production. The peculiarities of audio-only media will be explored alongside their use and relevance in the age of the Internet and other digital technologies. The module will include elements of theory and practice, including exercises designed to enable students to understand the special nature of writing, performing and creating sound media. At the end of the module students will be able to#Place contemporary sound and media related production in a historical context#Have gained experience into the practice of sound n media production, including use of the relevant technology, writing, performing and distribution#Gain relevant skills via a series of formative and summative coursework and practice sessions.

HUM-5005A

20

SOUND MEDIA: INTERPRETATION, RECORDING AND PRODUCTION

No previous experience of sound - related study or any technical experience is required to take this module. This module introduces the student to the recording and production of sound-related media with an emphasis on the creative and contextual use of sound in contemporary academic research and practice. The study of the peculiarities of interpretation of audio-related media will both inform and be informed by the more practice-based activities of sound recording, distribution and production. At the end of the module students will be have#Developed a thorough understanding of the physical nature and creative use of sound via a rigorous practice- based academic study of the production of audio-related media#Gained an understanding of the methods of interpreting and analysing audio#Gained relevant skills, via a series of formative and summative coursework and practice, to support the above study.

HUM-5006B

20

TELEVISION STUDIO PRODUCTION

AVAILABLE ONLY TO STUDENTS TAKING UG AMA-FTM as a MAJOR and ON the FOLLOWING PROGRAMMES: U1G450302, and U1WV63302 This module introduces students to television studio production, using the resources of the campus television studio. Once students have learned the basic skills of both live and recorded studio production (including directing, vision and sound mixing, camera-work, lighting, floor management and editing), they work towards the production of a short television programme. They are also required to write a report analysing and evaluating the production process and the finished product. PLEASE NOTE - This module needs a minimum of 12 students enrolled to run, if the target enrolment is not met there is a chance the module will be withdrawn.

AMAP5119B

20

Students must study the following modules for 30 credits:

Name Code Credits

FILM, TELEVISION AND MEDIA STUDIES DISSERTATION (SPRING)

AVAILABLE ONLY TO STUDENTS ON COURSE(S): U1QW36302, U1TW76302, U1TW76402, U1W610302, U1WV63302, U1P300303 This module provides the opportunity to work on an independently researched dissertation on some aspect of Film, Television and/or Media Studies. You are able to choose whether you do the dissertation module in the Autumn or the Spring Semester of your final year, whichever fits in better with your schedule of modules. Topics are individually negotiated. They need not relate directly to material taught in previous modules, although it is expected that dissertations will draw on and reflect upon perspectives and methodologies introduced earlier in the degree course.

AMAM6080B

30

FILM, TELEVISION AND MEDIA STUDIES: DISSERTATION (AUTUMN)

AVAILABLE ONLY TO STUDENTS ON COURSE(S): U1QW36302, U1TW76302, U1TW76402, U1W610302, U1WV63302, U1P300303 This module provides the opportunity to work on an independently researched dissertation on some aspect of Film, Television and/or Media studies. You are able to choose whether you do the dissertation module in the Autumn or the Spring Semester of your final year, whichever fits in better with your schedule of modules. (See also AMAM6080B - note that you cannot take both modules.) Topics are individually negotiated. They need not relate directly to material taught in previous modules, although it is expected that dissertations will draw on and reflect upon perspectives and methodologies introduced earlier in the degree course.

AMAM6079A

30

Students will select 30 - 90 credits from the following modules:

Media Studies modules. If 90 credits are selected from this option range, no further credits can be selected from option range B.

Name Code Credits

CELEBRITY

The module will explore the phenomenon of celebrity and fame from its origins to the present day, moving across a range of different media, including film, television, print media and the internet. In the process, it will examine key approaches to the study of celebrity, paying particular attention to the cultural formation of celebrity and how it is bound up with structures of power (e.g. gender, class, ethnicity). It will feature a range of case studies that will include Classical Hollywood cinema, the coming of television, the supposed 'tabloidization' of print media, the birth of Reality TV, the growth of the celebrity scandal and the relationship between celebrity and the internet.

AMAM6090B

30

CREATIVE WORK IN THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES

This module offers students the opportunity to gain an understanding of the industries that many of them may well wish to work in. The media industries are those that produce culture, and so they naturally include television, film, music, publishing (books, newspapers and magazines) and so on. People often want to work in the media since this kind of work offers opportunities to be 'creative', to think independently and engage in activities which interest them already. But what does 'creativity' mean in different kinds of media work and what kind of conditions do those working in the media typically face? To explore such questions, we reflect on changes in the nature of work itself in modern societies. That is, when so much modern work is either temporary and precarious, with many in advanced industrial countries working longer hours than ever before, is there a danger that work is detracting from the quality of our lives rather than enhancing it? The module explores the potential to find pleasure, fulfilment (and a steady income), as well as pressure, frustration and precariousness in media work.

AMAM6086B

30

INVESTIGATING AUDIENCES: PARTICIPATORY CULTURES and IMMERSIVE MEDIA

Students will investigate changing audience practices and cultures in the age of media convergence. It will introduce some of the key research on, and theoretical debates around, audience practices in relation to changes in distribution, technology and evolving forms of engagement. The module will study social practices and fan cultures surrounding stereoscopic technologies, transmedia storytelling, branding, streamed media, event cinema, theme park attractions and other participatory cultures. Investigating Audiences will enable students to expand their critical and analytical skills, and also to develop their abilities as an audience researcher. They will evaluate and assess published academic writing on audience research methodologies, which will then enable them to exercise critical judgement in the design of their own empirical research project.

AMAM6108B

30

MAGAZINES

This module will explore magazines both as cultural objects and consumer products from the emergence of the medium in the 17th century to the present day. It will critically engage with the rapidly transforming structure, nature and operations of the industry in an increasingly digital age, understanding contemporary magazines as transmedia, multi-platform brands. This module will explore magazines as key sites for the negotiation of contemporary power relations. This will be examined through a series of case studies relating to the political economy of the magazine industry; promotional cultures; digital media; and gender, sexuality and the body. This module also contains a vocational strand that seeks to equip students with knowledge of contemporary magazine production processes. The content from this strand will be partially delivered by leading figures in the magazine industry.

AMAM6032A

30

TEENAGE KICKS: MEDIA, YOUTH AND SUBCULTURE

This module will address the historical development of the commercial youth market and introduce key debates relating to young people and their uses of mainstream and underground media. It will examine a range of theoretical approaches to youth culture, subculture and post-subculture, employing case studies of popular and alternative music, club culture, film, television, subcultural style and new digital technologies. It will address questions of ideology, identity and representation, most significantly issues of class, gender, race and ethnicity, and encourage students to discuss how cultural interests and practices are used to construct individual and group identities. It will focus primarily on the British post-war context - highlighting the influence of American popular culture, Black Diaspora and technological transformation on British youth - but will also examine young people's media use and subcultures in other national and transnational contexts. The emphasis will be on analysing the extent to which cultural power is negotiated and resisted through shared media consumption and subculture formation

AMAM6072A

30

TELEVISION COMEDY

This module explores key developments in TV comedy from the genre's inception to the present. We consider the status of the genre in television culture and broader debates associated with TV Studies. We also map the ways in which the genre responds to and reflects social and historical contexts and explore examples of the genre from a variety of nations and cultures. The module will explore ways in we can study humour and comedy, and how this has been theorised historically. Key topics related to television comedy will be explored as case studies, including areas such as representation, industry and production, and audiences. There will be a separate programme of screenings.

AMAM6100B

30

Students will select 0 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Film and Television Studies modules. If 90 credits are selected from option range A, no credits can be selected from this option range.

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN VIOLENCE

"Violence," the firebrand black militant H. Rap Brown infamously said, "is as American as cherry pie." Many Americans who lived through the turbulent 1960s understood what Brown meant even if they disagreed with his politics. Writing in 1969, the liberal historian Arthur M. Schlesinger conceded that, with the Vietnam War raging overseas and ghetto riots exploding at home on a yearly basis, in the wake of the assassinations of JFK, Martin Luther King, and Bobby Kennedy, and looking at the violent preoccupations of TV and movies, Americans must surely be judged "the most frightening people on the planet." Certainly, viewed from the relatively orderly perspective of Europe, the United States appears to have an exceptional relationship with violence - perhaps represented above all by a homicide rate far higher than other comparable industrialised nations. This module explores key themes in the history of violence in the United States. It takes an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on a range of sources, including film, photography and music, in order to understand how violence has shaped American society and culture.

AMAS6049A

30

GENDER AND GENRE IN CONTEMPORARY CINEMA

This module offers an overview of critical and theoretical approaches to gender and genre in contemporary cinema, focusing particularly on North American cinema. Topics explored may include: new women and new men - the articulation of gender in popular and 'independent' American cinema since 2000; feminism and authorship; the response of mainstream and independent cinema to the political and cultural contexts of postfeminism; race and the limits of feminist representation; masculinity, homosociality and Hollywood genre. The module is taught by seminar, tutorial and screening.

AMAM6062B

30

JAPANESE FILM: NATIONAL CINEMA AND BEYOND

This module explores the concept of Japanese cinema in relation to national, transnational and global discourses and seeks to reframe discussions of modern and past Japanese filmmaking. We will examine a variety of Japanese films and the ways in which they interact with the history, techniques and culture of Japan. We will also consider the social and commercial nature of Japanese filmmaking, including the ways in which Japanese films circulate the globe.

AMAM6087A

30

MEDIA PRACTICE PROJECT (AUTUMN)

This module provides the opportunity to work on a practice-based project investigating some aspect of Media, Film and/or Television studies. Projects are individually negotiated. Students are also expected to build upon an area of practice previously learned through experience on practice-based modules in the areas of audio-visual work, sound production, digital media or screenwriting, dependent on which type of practice module was previously studied. Students are also expected to produce practical work that refers to, and makes use of, relevant theoretical debates and issues. All projects will contain significant practical work, a developmental portfolio and an element of critical evaluation. Team-centred projects will be considered, but each team member must be able to demonstrate the validity of their individual project. ONLY AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS REGISTERED WITHIN AMA FTM.

AMAP6097A

30

MEDIA PRACTICE PROJECT (SPRING)

This module provides the opportunity to work on a practice-based project investigating some aspect of Media, Film and/or Television studies. Projects are individually negotiated. Students are also expected to build upon an area of practice previously learned through experience on practice-based modules in the areas of audio-visual work, sound production, digital media or screenwriting, dependent on which type of practice module was previously studied. Students are also expected to produce practical work that refers to, and makes use of, relevant theoretical debates and issues. All projects will contain significant practical work, a developmental portfolio and an element of critical evaluation. Team-centred projects will be considered, but each team member must be able to demonstrate the validity of their individual project. ONLY AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS REGISTERED WITHIN AMA FTM.

AMAP6098B

30

NATIVE AMERICAN WRITING AND FILM

This module considers Native American writing and film as sites of cultural and political resistance, analysing the ways in which a diverse range of Native authors, screenwriters and directors within the United States respond to contemporary tribal socio-economic and political conditions. Taking popular ideas of 'the Indian', this module considers the ways in which stereotypes and audience expectations are subverted and challenged. Topics include race and racism, indigeneity, identity, culture, gender, genre, land and notions of 'home', community, dialogue, postcolonial theory in its application to those who remain colonised, and political issues such as human rights and environmental racism.

AMAS6027B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Scene it Before

    Research from the School of Art, Media and American Studies, discovers many fans are fed up with trailers that give away too much of a movie’s plot line.

    Read it Scene it Before
  • Undergraduate Scholarships

    UEA has an awesome range of scholarships to support your undergraduate degree – make sure you check them out!

    Read it Undergraduate Scholarships

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB including at least one art or humanities subject
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points including at least one arts or humanities subject
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB including at least one arts or humanities subject
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB to include at least one ARTS/Humanities subject or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2 to include at least one ARTS/Humanities subject
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM in an Arts/Humanities subject
  • European Baccalaureate 75% including at least one arts or humanities subject

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

At least one GCE A-Level or equivalent in an arts or humanities subject is required.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (with no less than 6.0 in any component).

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business and Economics
International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications


GCSE Offer


Assessment


  • A Level ABB including at least one arts or humanities subject
  • International Baccalaureate 32
  • Scottish Highers At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB
  • Access Course Arts/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM in Arts/Humanities subject preferred.
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.5 Writing with no less than 6.0 in any component).

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business and Economics
International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However, for some students an interview will be requested. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Students will have the opportunity to meet with an academic individually on an Applicant Day in order to gain a deeper insight into the course(s) you have applied for.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.

Deferred Entry - We welcome applications for deferred entry, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

If you have alternative qualifications that have not been mentioned above, then please contact the University directly for further information.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English Language at Grade C or above.

Assessment

For the majority of candidates the most important factors in assessing the application will be past and future achievement in examinations, academic interest in the subject being applied for, personal interest and extra-curricular activities and the confidential reference.

We consider applicants as individuals and accept students from a very wide range of educational backgrounds and spend time considering your application in order to reach an informed decision relating to your application. Typical offers are indicated above. Please note, there may be additional subject entry requirements specific to individual degree courses.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Film and Television)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515

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