Our Admissions Policy

Admissions Statement

The University is committed to providing an admissions service which is both professional and fair, and which facilitates entry to the University for high quality candidates who will engage with and contribute to the intellectual and cultural vitality of the institution. The University seeks to undertake this action by identifying merit and potential and ensuring that its admissions process is fair and transparent to all regardless of background.

Our admissions policy applies to the admission of full and part-time undergraduate and postgraduate taught applicants, including Certificate, Diploma, Bachelor and Masters programmes and adheres to the current University's Corporate Plan.

The University of East Anglia recognises the precepts of the Quality Assurance Agency's Code of Practice.  The University recognises the following legislation as relevant to the admissions process;

  • Equality Act (2010) (incorporates the Age Discrimination Act, Equal Pay Act, Sex Discrimination Act, Race Relations Act and Disability Discrimination Act)

  • All relevant Data Protection laws

  • Freedom of Information Act 2000

  • Human Rights Act 1998

  • Race Relations Act 1976 and Race Relations Amendment Act 2000

  • Special Education Needs and Disability Act 2001

This policy is the responsibility of the Head of Admissions and is reviewed annually by the Admissions, Recruitment and Marketing Executive.

Admissions policy

 

1. Entry requirements

All of our courses have an entry requirements tab and you can check these by using our course finder.

The UEA Academic Calendar publishes each year the General Admissions Requirements for Undergraduate Taught Programmes. Candidates must satisfy both minimum general entry requirements and course specific entry requirements. In certain cases it may be possible for a student who does not meet specific elements of the University's general entry requirements to gain admission. Where the admissions office wishes to make an offer on academic grounds to an applicant in this situation, they will refer the case to the Head of the relevant School for their agreement. The University will only make offers to applicants who demonstrate that they are academically equipped to successfully complete their proposed course of study.

In providing information to the University prospective students are required to make submissions which are full, unambiguous and honest, and any offer made by the University is made in good faith. Where inaccurate information has been dishonestly provided to the University or where wilful misrepresentation or omission has occurred, a student may be precluded from admission to the University.

All International students entering study must have a Tier 4 visa which satisfies the minimum requirement financially and for English language, as laid out by the UK Visa and Immigration Department (see UKVI website for current details). 

Some courses are exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act and those offered a place of study when asked, must declare any criminal convictions or cautions they may have, and will be required to secure a satisfactory disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). Such disclosure is usually sought because the relevant professional body requires it but in some cases the University and/or the organisation with which it arranges placements may have identified a potential level of exposure to children or vulnerable adults which makes such a check appropriate. In such cases where admissions teams wish to make an offer on academic grounds to an applicant it must be clear that this is subject to a satisfactory disclosure.

Applications should be dealt with in accordance with guidance provided by the UEA Student Disclosure Service.

2. How we handle an application

An application must be made by the following way;

a) Undergraduate Full Time courses via UCAS Service

b) MA Social Work via UCAS Service

c) PGCE Master Level Initial Teacher Training via UCAS Teacher Training Service

d) Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies via Central Applications Board

e) Doctorate in Clinical Psychology and Doctorate in Educational Psychology via the appropriate Clearing House

f) All other courses at UEA via the University online Application Service

Our primary criterion is our assessment of a candidate's academic achievements to date, and potential for the future. Necessarily, the nature, content and mode of delivery of the course of study for which the candidate has applied will influence the weighting we give to particular academic aptitudes and achievements in this assessment.We consider it both necessary and appropriate to take the personal and educational circumstances and history of each applicant into account when making this assessment; admissions teams will be sensitive to the opportunities a student may have had to achieve and any obstacles that may have affected academic progress and may consider such mitigating circumstances accordingly.

The process of consideration of applications for entry at the University of East Anglia necessarily reflects the demand for particular courses. For many courses the University receives substantially more applications than the number of places available. In such circumstances our selection processes and criteria are oriented towards providing opportunities for the candidates who we judge will secure the greatest academic benefit from completing the course and who, in turn, will make the most positive contribution to the academic community of the University.

Selection Interviews  

Where interviews are an integral part of the selection process offers will not be made unless an interview is conducted.  Where a selection interview is not compulsory the University may nonetheless invite candidates to visit the University for a selection interview and to provide an opportunity to discuss their application further and to meet staff in Schools of Study prior to making a decision.

Selection interviews are held for the purpose of determining whether or not an offer of admission is to be made to the applicant and/or the terms of any conditional offer to be made. Applicants will be advised of the date and expected location, duration and whether any written test or submission of work will be required during the interview.

UEA Interview policy (see below)

Extenuating circumstances guidance for applicants

Extenuating circumstances are not normally considered in advance of the receipt of a full application (usually via UCAS). We expect any extenuating circumstances affecting exam performance and grades to have been reported to the school and exam boards under their special consideration processes. 

We may not be able to consider any extenuating circumstances affecting predicted grades if we are subsequently informed after the application deadline. Extenuating circumstances that may affect interview performance should be reported to us as soon as possible prior to or after interview.

3. Offers of a place to study

Changes made to of study after the point of offer   

Where a significant change has been made to the name, content or structure of a course for which an applicant has been made the offer of a place, the admissions teams shall write to that applicant outlining the changes and providing advice as appropriate. This may include advice concerning possible alternatives if the student does not wish to apply for the original course.

Time Limit For Considering Applications

Unless a candidate is to be invited to attend a selection interview, the University will aim to respond to all applications no more than 14 working days after receipt of the completed application.

Where a candidate is invited to attend for a selection interview, either at the interview or within 3 days they will be informed of the time frame of when they will hear about a decision.

Offers Conditional on Academic Results

a) ‘Typical' Offers

The University indicates ‘typical' offers in its prospectus and on the website. These reflect the conditional offer made to a typical applicant after full consideration of their application. ‘Typical' offers are not, therefore the ‘default' or ‘standard' offer and are not made in substitution for a full and thorough consideration of an application.

b) Matriculation

The terms of any conditional offer must ensure that the applicant will have fulfilled the University's matriculation requirements on entry or have been granted an appropriate waiver.

Non-Academic Pre-Requisites For Admission

Occupational Health Checks & DBS Clearance

Entrance to particular courses may require a satisfactory health check or DBS clearance. Where such a check may be required this should be stated for the relevant course entry.

Academically Unconditional Offers

An academically unconditional offer of admission implies that the University is satisfied that the applicant has met all academic requirements for admission. If such an offer is made, the University will make it clear if there are non-academic requirements (e.g. the satisfactory provision of a DBS and Occupational Health Check) that remain to be fulfilled and by when.

Fully Unconditional Offers

A fully unconditional offer of admission implies that the University is satisfied that the applicant has met all the requirements for admission, both academic and non-academic. Where such an offer is made, the University will make it clear that this is the case.

Communicating Offers To Applicants

Communication of offers will set out the terms of an offer clearly, unambiguously, and will set out what the procedure is for responding to that offer unless such guidance is already provided by an agency such as UCAS. Any course administered through UCAS (Undergraduate and UTT) will transmit the official offer through them.

An offer will be made by the University in one of the following ways;

a) Undergraduate Full Time courses via UCAS Service

b) MA Social Work via UCAS Service

c) PGCE Master Level Initial Teacher Training via UCAS Teacher Training Service

d) Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies via Central Applications Board

e) Doctorate in Clinical Psychology and Doctorate in Educational Psychology via the appropriate Clearing House

f) All other courses at UEA via direct correspondence

Offers Outside UCAS: Time Limits For Acceptance

a) Where an offer is made that specifies a deadline by which a response is to be received, the deadline will provide reasonable time for the applicant to reply.

b) Where no deadline is specified, offers should indicate that the offer is for admission on a specific date of registration (normally at the beginning of a specific academic year) and will lapse if the student has not registered by that date.

Rejection

Before issuing a rejection admissions teams should consider whether the applicant might be offered a place on a suitable alternative course. Where a candidate's application is unsuccessful, communication with the candidate should be prompt, courteous and explicit.

Recording Decisions

It is the responsibility of the admissions teams to ensure that an adequate and appropriate record is kept of the grounds on which any decision is based. 

4. Record keeping

Corporate Information Systems

Admissions staff are responsible for maintaining accurate and up-to-date records on the University's corporate information systems that relate to admissions.

Documentary Records

A confidential documentary record should be maintained of:

Additional information regarded as pertinent to consideration of an application. Any interview conducted for selection purposes. The basis of any decisions (including rejection) or other significant transactions.

This is of particular importance where non-academic factors are involved.

Statistics

Admissions, Recruitment and Marketing (ARM) undertakes statistical monitoring of applications and applications processing on behalf of the University.  ARM are also expected to monitor year on year data in respect of courses for which they are responsible in order to be able to respond appropriately in terms of planning and admissions policies. 

The Admissions office has a University Policy for Record Keeping.

5. Applicants with additional support needs

Please see our policy for applicants with additional support needs. (see below)

6. Admission of applicants under the age of 18

Please see our policy for admission of applicants under the age of 18.  (see below)

7. Feedback policy

The University recognises that provision of constructive feedback is an element of good customer care and will provide such feedback to applicants who have been unsuccessful in gaining an offer of a place of study on request from that applicant. Feedback on specific applications will not be offered to other parties (e.g. parents or teachers) without the express consent of the applicant.

Requests for feedback must be made by the applicant in writing within three months of the date that the application was unsuccessful. The Admissions Service will endeavour to provide feedback in writing within 15 working days of receipt of a request for feedback, or inform applicants when feedback will be provided.

Feedback is usually made in the form of a standard set of text which indicates into which rejection category the applicant was placed. Additional comments about specific cases may be included, which may take the form of advice as to how to improve any future applications. The University will not normally offer further feedback but it is at the discretion of the Admissions Officer to decide whether to enter into further correspondence after the provision of initial feedback or to review a decision. Any decision to overturn a rejection must be made in the context of the admissions criteria applied to all other applications to that course of study.

8. Appeals and complaints procedure

Please see our appeals and complaints procedure (see below)

9. Assessing applications from staff or their near relatives

Please see our applications from staff or their near relatives policy (see below)

10. Assessing applications with a declared criminal conviction

Please see our criminal conviction policy (see below)

11. Student transfer policy

Please see our student transfer policy (see  below)

Interview policy

 

Interviews may be required for the following groups of applicants:

  1. A selection of applicants who are pre-screened on other admissions criteria are invited to interview.

  2. A selection of applicants who have a  non-traditional educational background.

  3. Applicants who are applying for direct entry i.e. Year 2.

The University of East Anglia will require an interview for one or more of the following reasons:

  1. It is a requirement of a professional body.
  2. an interview to assess suitability to undertake the course and/or to seek evidence of ability for a particular profession.
  3. If a course is selecting (i.e. the demand for a course is higher and a limited number of offers), interviewing may be used to form part of the decision-making.

The University of East Anglia will use one or more of the following formats for the interview:

  1. A group interview to assess skills of interaction.
  2. A multiple-mini interview (MMI).
  3. A semi-structured interview which can allow conversation to enable interviewees to give a fuller account of themselves.
  4. An interview where questions are not prescribed but interviewers have a clear set of themes or areas to explore.

Interviewers and Interviewer Training

Selection interviews will be conducted by a member of staff who has received appropriate training in selection interviewing. Training should ensure competence, consistency of approach and fairness.  

Set criteria and Benchmarking

Details about how interviewees' responses will be recorded and scored, will be agreed in advance of the interviews.  Any specific criteria that will be used to score against, including any essential or desirable criteria and how a final score will be arrived at, will be agreed prior to interviews commencing.   

Interview Dates/Schedule

Interviews held on site should be set up in advance and applicant notified that they have an invitation to interview as soon as possible.

Inviting applicants to Interview

The Admissions Office is responsible for inviting selected applicants for interview.

Wherever possible a range of dates will be offered to an applicant to give them the opportunity to choose when they have their interview but please note this is not always possible.

Upon invitation the following correspondence will be shared with the interviewee:

  • Date, duration and location of the interview.
  • Format of the interview (including an overview of schedule if available).
  • A request for any information needed from the applicant either before they arrive or to bring with them on the day (essay, work experience form, qualifications, ID, audition piece).
  • Details of where to report to and a phone number in case of emergencies on the day.
  • Travel information.
  • For the interviewee to contact us, Student Support Service should they require any additional support for their interview (where appropriate  will be informed to assist with the provision of additional support).
  • If there are other activities other than the interview, when and what these are (e.g. numeracy and literacy test, presentation, campus tour, demos, lunch).

Non-Attendance

The Applicant must be made aware of the consequences of non-attendance. Applicants will be reminded a maximum of two times that they need to book on to an interview.

Before an applicant is rejected for non-attendance, the Admissions Team will check to see if there is an alternative non-interviewing course for which the applicant is eligible.

The Interview

Recording Selection Interviews

In the interests of equity, all selection interviews for a particular course should be structured in a consistent manner, following an agreed format.   

There may be the need to ask questions that do not influence the outcome of the interview e.g. placements, module choices.  A clear distinction needs to be made between the two, and the interviewer should indicate when this is the case.

An interview report form should be completed in respect of each selection interview recording a suitable transcript/commentary and a final recommendation. Where significant numbers of selection interviews are conducted, a ‘matrix sheet' for record keeping may be of use.

Time Keeping

The Interviews must keep to time throughout the day so as not to cause unnecessary anxiety for waiting interviewees.

Contingency interview slots should be in place in case an applicant has an unforeseen delay in attending an interview.

All efforts should be made to ensure the interview is not interrupted, except if this has been agreed in advance e.g. if an interview is being assisted by a time-keeper.

Conduct of Interview

Any telephone, mobile phone or equipment not being used for an interview should be turned off or diverted.

Interviews should, where possible be conducted by a minimum of two people, with a minimum of one whom has undergone the full interview training.  Other interviewers may be external professionals and/or service users.  Where there is only one interviewer, the door to the room that is being used should remain open, with appropriate signage indicating that an interview is in progress.  The interviewer(s) should introduce themselves and the procedure for the interview.

At the end of an interview or interview day, the applicant should be given an indication of when they will hear the outcome (but they must not be given the decision in the interview).

Telephone/ Skype/Video Conference Interviews

Every effort should be made to recreate the length and format of the interview to mirror an interview conducted in person.  This includes completing identical paperwork.

It is important to verify the identity of the applicant to ensure the correct person is to be interviewed.   In most cases a copy of the photo in a passport will be provided to identify the person being interviewed.

Please note not all courses permit interview by telephone or Skype.

After the interview

Interviewers should identify themselves on score or report forms.

All paperwork and other material including audio recordings of interviews and interview report forms and scoring sheets will be securely stored for the appropriate length of time in accordance with the Admissions retention of records policy.

Applicant Feedback

The University recognises that provision of constructive feedback is courteous and will provide such feedback to applicants who have been unsuccessful in gaining a place when confirming the decision.   Feedback on specific applications will not be offered to other parties (e.g. parents or teachers) without the express consent of the applicant.

More detailed requests for feedback must be made by the applicant in writing within three months of the date that the application was unsuccessful.

Feedback is automatically sent in the form of a standard set of text.   Where an interview is for a selecting course, often the feedback is ‘Course applied for is highly competitive; the application was unsuccessful relative to strength of applicant field'.  However, additional comments may be included, which may take the form of advice as to how to improve a future application. 

The University reserves the right to make academic and non-academic judgements outside of the published guidelines in complex and exceptional cases but the reasons must be documented.

Applicants with additional support needs

 

The underlying objective of the University's admissions procedures is to facilitate the entry of those applicants who will engage with and contribute to the intellectual and cultural vitality of the institution. 

Applicants are encouraged by UCAS and on all UEA application forms to disclose their disabilities, although they have a legal right to choose not to do so. 

How we use information regarding a disclosed disability

  • To identify those students who require "reasonable adjustments" to access the learning, residential and social opportunities offered by the University and to ensure that they are provided with any information and advice which would help them make an informed choice of programme and institution.
  • To enable Student Support Service staff to make contact with applicants and, where appropriate, Schools and Accommodation Office, to ensure that the necessary package of adjustments is clearly identified and put in place for the start of the programme.
  • To ensure that there are no disability-related factors which would make it unlikely, despite the provision of "reasonable adjustments", that applicants could meet the learning outcomes of the particular programme(s) for which they have applied.  In relation to Health and other programmes which also lead to professional registration, this would include consideration of the impact of the disability on applicants' ability to meet the additional requirements of the relevant professional bodies i.e. Fitness to Practice.
  • To identify non-trivial health and safety issues, particularly in relation to laboratory or fieldwork elements of a programme.
  • To alert applicants to any actions they need to take before taking up their places including applications for funding for disability-related costs for which they may be eligible.

The procedure

When an applicant declares a disability, the admissions teams decide whether or not they wish to make an offer on academic grounds or offer an interview.  If the decision is not to make an offer of a place or invite to interview then the normal admissions processes continue without any action in relation to the disability. 

If an interview is required an applicant will be invited and asked if there are any adjustments required for the interview process.  The applicant can confirm the details with the admissions team and the application may be referred to the Disability Co-ordinator in the Student Support Service and the relevant Admissions Director in the school of study to ensure that reasonable adjustments are put in place.

If an interview is not required the offer will be made, without any interaction with the applicant or Student Support Services.

Once an applicant is an offer holder, Student Support Services will be sent details of any self-declared support requirements.  The Disability Co-ordinator or other appropriate member of the Student Support Service staff may wish to make contact directly with the applicant to discuss their academic, daily living and any other disability issues including funding.  Sometimes this may take place in person.  In some cases, this discussion will be for the purposes of identifying "reasonable adjustments" and helping students prepare for a smooth transition to University life.  In others it may be material to reaching a judgment about the applicant's capacity to meet the learning outcomes of the programme with "reasonable adjustments".

At all stages of the application process an applicant is encouraged to make contact with the Student Support Services to discuss any personal requirements, this information will be treated in confidence.  All offer holders are contacted by email to encourage contact with the Student Support Services and to find out more about the support that can be provided.

This includes;

  • Information and advice on planning for university life and study
  • Specialist study skills tuition
  • Access and accommodation requirements
  • Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSA) applications and process
  • Assessment of study support needs
  • Examination arrangements
  • Accessing to relevant local services and advice to your home Social Services providers
  • Provision additional study support
  • Loan laptops and other equipment 
  • Assistance for Fresher’s Week and with registration if required
  • Campus orientation
  • Liaison with Faculties and Schools of Study
  • 1:1 confidential counselling
  • 1:1 advice and guidance meetings with a mental health or disability adviser

An offer holder may be required to complete and submit an ‘Information and Disclosure’ form and/or a ‘Notification of medical condition’ form to assist the Student Support Service’ with their advice and preparation for studying at the University.  If an applicant wishes to contact the Student Support Services directly they can be contacted at disability@uea.ac.uk

Courses with additional health checks

For specific programmes of study (all courses in Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, MPharm Pharmacy, Social Work and all PGCE courses) there are additional health requirement checks for professional bodies.  In order to assess your needs you are required to complete a health questionnaire for the UEA Occupational Health Service (OH).  All medical and sensitive personal information you provide will be held in confidence by the UEA Occupational Health service. 

The School of study will only be informed of the need to make adjustments if it is relevant to your educational needs, patient safety, or in the case of the PGCE courses assess your requirements in a placement setting.   An Occupational Health check, with any other additional information deemed relevant will be considered by a panel within the School of Study.  The panel may include external members. The purpose of the panel is to ensure that students are studying at the University are in a fit state, subject to the terms of Disability Discrimination Act 1998 to;

  1. benefit from their programme of study and pursue it for the required period with a reasonable chance of successfully obtaining the award for which they are registered;
  2. be able to not in any way prevent, hinder or disrupt the study or assessment of other students at the university, staff in the discharge of their duties or academic pursuits, or visitors to the University from carrying out their lawful business
  3. as a consequence of their required or necessary presence on campus, not constitute an unacceptable risk to the health or safety of themselves or others;
  4. be in a position to engage satisfactorily in any elements of study or assessment which take the form of placements, particularly those taking place in a professional and/or work-based setting.  

You are required to have full clearance to start the course and this must be maintained to complete the course.  If you do not have full clearance before or during your course, you will be required to withdraw from the course.

Admission of applicants under the age of 18

 

Policy and procedures for the protection of students on UEA undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes who are under 18 years old at entry;


1. Introduction

A very small proportion of the students admitted to courses at the University of East Anglia are under 18 years of age at the time of entry. Such students are minors in the eyes of the law and thus the University has an enhanced duty of care towards them until the date at which they attain their majority (their 18th birthday), even if this period is relatively brief.

This document has been written in order to:

  • define UEA policy in respect of admissions and welfare responsibilities for students who are under 18;

  • outline those key legal responsibilities that the university has in respect of those whom the law defines as children;

  • define the procedures that have been put into place to ensure that the University meets those responsibilities.

 

The policy of the University is to treat students who are under-18 years of age as much as possible in the same way that it treats all other students. Such students will be subject to the University’s normal rules and regulations and will be able to access the majority of the campus facilities and opportunities offered in the same way as all other students. However, the University will vary its normal procedures, or restrict access to some of its facilities and opportunities whenever it is deemed to be in the best interests of those who are minors, or when it is required to do so by the law. The University will also ensure that minors are provided with enhanced welfare arrangements, particularly when they are resident in University accommodation.

 

While the general principles of this policy will be adhered to in all cases of student minors, it may be necessary to make additional welfare arrangements for students who will be under 17 at the time of entry, particularly for those under 16, and/or to impose additional conditions of entry.

 

For applicants who are 16 or under, these will be considered individually by the Head of Admissions, the Student Support Service and the relevant Head of School after the offer has been made.

The University undertakes to ensure that those University staff members who have pastoral/adviser responsibilities for students under 18 are checked for their suitability to undertake such roles. It will also ensure that appropriate reporting arrangements are in place for University staff to contact the Designated Officer if they believe that any student covered by this policy is in any way at risk.

 

2. Legal framework

There are a number of particular and general pieces of legislation that have relevance for HEIs in respect of their responsibilities to students under 18 years of age. A brief summary of the implications of this legislation is provided below.

 

Contractual Capacity

Those under 18 years of age are not able to enter into binding contractual relationships in all circumstances. The law is complex in this area but contracts for University fees, accommodation and Student Loans are likely to be enforceable for those under 18 as these are likely to be defined as ‘necessaries’. However, it is possible that some contracts may fall outside this definition (for example, agreements for loans from University Hardship Funds) and thus might not be enforceable.

 

Data Protection

Minors over 16 have the same rights under the Data Protection legislation as those over 18. This means that the University will not disclose any information about such students without their specific consent. However, if the student fails to pay any sums agreed on contract then it might be necessary to disclose this to any guarantor and possibly to a debt collection agency.

 

Staff-student relationships

Section 16-19 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides a new criminal offence of absence of trust which relates to what might before have been perceived as consensual behaviour when it occurs within certain relationships of trust. Within the University context, such relationships of trust will include relationships between a student under 18 and a member of University staff such as an Adviser or lecturer, or a Senior Resident.

 

Sale of alcohol and other restricted goods and services

It is an offence for a person under 18 to purchase alcohol and for anyone to sell alcohol to such a person. It is also an offence to purchase alcohol on behalf of someone under 18, whether this is for consumption in licensed premises or publicly elsewhere. There are also age restrictions for a number of other goods including:

 

  • Solvents
  • Gas lighter refills
  • Fireworks
  • Knives, blades and axes
  • Some videos and DVDs
  • Video and computer games
  • Services, including entrance to venues in which films with an 18 certificate are being shown

An up-to-date list can be found on the PASS website.

 

Tier 4 (General) visa

Under the current guidance produced by the Home Office applicants can apply for a Tier 4 (General) student visa to study in the UK if they are 16 years old or older. This would mean that if an international applicant is 15 or younger when studying, we would be unable to support their application to study.

If you are under 18 when you make your visa Tier 4 (General) student application, you must include a letter from your parent(s) or legal guardian(s) to show that they support your application. Their letter must confirm all of the following:

  • their relationship to you
  • that they consent to your application as a Tier 4 (General) student
  • that they consent to your living arrangements in the UK
  • that they consent to your independent travel to the UK

If one parent or legal guardian has legal custody or sole responsibility of you, the letter must confirm this and be signed by that parent or legal guardian. If not, then both parents or legal guardians must give their consent and the letter must be signed by both of them.

A copy of this letter must also be brought with you to your Registration event at UEA.

 

3. UEA procedures and responsibilities

The University of East Anglia will nominate a Designated Officer with responsibility for oversight of child protection issues within the University. The Officer will have responsibility for monitoring the effectiveness of this policy including ensuring that relevant equality impact assessments are undertaken. 

Admission

The Admissions Service - within Admissions, Recruitment and Marketing (ARM) - are responsible for seeking consent from a parent/guardian based in the UK and will ensure that no identified student minor is able to register for their course until the consent has been received. The process will follow as below:

1. The applicant will be contacted first, to provide contact details of their parent/guardian. They will be asked to complete an online form

2. Once this information has been gathered, the parent/guardian will then be contacted and asked to complete an online form to give consent

3. The contact details of the parent/guardian will be stored on the University student management system in accordance to the DPA

The University is not able to assist parents/guardians in finding a suitable guardian. A list of accredited agencies is available from The Association of Educational Guardians for International Students (AEGIS)

 

The Admissions Service will commence the process of contacting applicants in early May and will continue to do so until the start of the academic year or until we have received contact details of all those applicants who fall under the policy.

 

The Admissions Service will provide details of applicants expected to register with the University, which will be made accessible to the members of staff requiring this information for other purposes.

These may include:

  • The Student Support Service 
  • The Head of School and Senior Adviser (for all Schools admitting minors)
  • The UEA Accommodation Office (if applicants apply for University Accommodation)
  • The Senior Resident Tutor
  • The Head of the International Student Advisory Team (in respect of International/EU students)
  • Academic Advisers
  • Staff in the School and the Learning Teaching Service (LTS) involved in allocating an Academic Adviser

Details provided by the Admissions Service, of the applicants expected to register with the University, include; name, course applied for, fee status, date of birth and age on entry.

 

The Admissions Service will begin providing information of applicants under the age of 18 who are expected to register for the new academic cycle, in July of that year.

 

Arrivals & Orientation

The Student Support Service (STS) offers a Meet and Greet Service from Heathrow and Norwich airports on the University’s designated Arrival days. We strongly advise all student minors to use the airport pick up service, unless satisfactory alternative arrangements have been made and agreed by both the parents and STS. During the Arrival days, students are met at the University by a member of staff or student ambassador who records their safe arrival and helps to settle them into accommodation. The International Students Advisory Team will contact those students who are due to arrive outside of these dates to ensure that they receive the same level of support. A 3-day Orientation programme and welcome reception is organised for all new international students before the beginning of their first semester.

 

Accommodation

Student minors will be required to live in University accommodation unless the University has been informed that they will be living in the home of their parent, guardian or other adult formally approved by the parent or guardian. Student minors will normally be allocated a single room.

The UEA Accommodation Office will endeavour to ensure that those cleaning staff members who normally service the rooms of student minors have an enhanced DBS check to confirm their suitability to undertake this role.

 

Other enhanced welfare arrangements

The University will ensure that further enhanced welfare arrangements are put into place for all students up until their 18th birthday. These are outlined below. Heads of School will ensure that student minors are allocated to an experienced Adviser (normally the Senior Adviser) who has had an enhanced DBS check to confirm his or her suitability to undertake this role.

The Adviser will meet with their student minors at the beginning of their course and then at least monthly in term time until they reach the age of 18.

Heads of School will ensure that any content, materials, resources and learning opportunities provided as a part of degree programmes taught in their School, and being attended by a student minor, are appropriate for such students, or that alternative arrangements have been made, or resources provided. Particular attention should be given to the implications for field trips and visits.

The Student Support Service will ensure that Senior Residents (SRs) are informed of the names of student minors in their parish. The SRs will notify the Student Support Service promptly if they have any concerns about the wellbeing of the students concerned. All SRs will be provided with a copy of this document and an opportunity to discuss its implications during their induction training.

The Student Support Service will ensure that student minors are fully briefed about the enhanced welfare arrangements that have been put in place for their protection, and reminded of the age restrictions that relate to the purchase of alcohol, certain videos/DVDs and computer games and other goods and services.

The Students’ Union will take all appropriate steps to ensure that it does not sell alcohol to a student under 18; this is particularly important in light of the fact that the University Campus Card does not give evidence of student age.

All UEA staff members have responsibility for contacting the Designated Officer if they have any concerns about the wellbeing or safety of student minors. The Designated Officer will take responsibility for ensuring that such concerns are investigated and any necessary action is taken, in accordance with relevant UEA procedures and following guidance on best practice from social services, the police and the NSPCC.

 

Emergencies

In certain circumstances, the University may be required to act on the student’s behalf. For example, dealings with the Police or medical emergencies, including mental health emergencies, might require the University to take action.  The University will only take such action when the parents/guardian of the student cannot be contacted within the timescale necessitated by the particular situation.

For further information or comments about this policy please contact the Student Support Service (+44 (0)1603 592761; email studentsupport@uea.ac.uk) or the Data and Systems Team within ARM on arm.dataandsystems@uea.ac.uk.

Admission appeals and complaints procedure

 

We recognise applicants may wish to ask why their application has not been successful or believe they have cause for complaint. Due to the level of competition for places there will inevitably occasions where an applicant is disappointed with our decision. To see our feedback procedure please click here.

These procedures outline the way the University of East Anglia handles appeals and complaints. These procedures do not cover our partner institutions.

Applicants will not be discriminated against in any further application should they make an appeal or complaint.

Appeals Procedure

An appeal is defined as request for a formal review of the outcome of an admissions decision[1]. An appeal should normally be raised in writing with the admissions office (admissions@uea.ac.uk) outlining the nature and detail of the appeal.

The admissions office will check that all information on the application had been taken into account, that there was no misinterpretation of the information and that procedures were followed correctly.

The admissions office will review the application and confirm within 10 working days whether the appeal has been rejected or upheld. Applicants should note that if the appeal has been rejected on academic grounds they cannot appeal the decision.

Complaints Procedure

The following procedure exists in order that applicants rejected by the University can challenge an admissions decision if they have reason to believe that the decision was subject to procedural irregularity, prejudice or bias, or that extenuating circumstances should be, and have not already been, taken into account. The challenge would be dealt with as a form of complaint.

The Appeals and Complaints Procedure cannot be used where our decision resulted from:

  • A failure on your part to fulfil academic requirements.

  • A failure on your part to fulfil non-academic requirements. For example an unsatisfactory DBS Enhanced Disclosure or an unsatisfactory health check

  • A Reference from a third party, such as a provider of a work or training placement which forms an integral part of the course to which you have applied.

Stage 1; Complaints procedure

The initial complaint should normally be raised in writing with the admissions office (admissions@uea.ac.uk) outlining the nature and detail of the appeal.

If the complaint is regarding a decision it should normally be made within 10 working days of the action. If no action has been taken by the University on your application, the complainant can write in at any time.

The admissions office will contact the complainant initially to acknowledge receipt. The University aims to respond within 15 working days of the acknowledgement. If it proves impossible to respond within 15 working days, the complainant shall be informed of the time scale for the receipt of a full response.

As part of this procedure the admissions team may request additional information or seek clarification by email.

When the admissions office responds they must confirm that the application was considered fairly and that the procedure for decision making was correctly applied. The response will explain the context in which the decision has been made. In the event that the complaint is upheld the admissions office will confirm this along with a proposed remedy.

Stage 2; Complaints procedure

The formal Admissions Complaints Procedure follows the stage one process. If you are dissatisfied with the outcome of Stage 1, the formal process will commence.

Making a Formal Complaint

  1. Any applicant who wishes to make a formal complaint about an admissions decision shall be referred to Admissions from where the Complaints Procedure will be coordinated.

  2. The applicant must write to admissions@uea.ac.uk requesting the UEA Admissions Complaints Form. The University will not accept complaints from third party or anonymous sources.

  3. Once the form has been received by the applicant they complete and send back within 10 working days from receipt, including supporting evidence where necessary.

  4. All complaints that are received from applicants, are recorded confidentially within the Admissions Office and monitored as appropriate. As part of any investigation, information may need to be shared with other persons or organisations whilst adhering to our Data Protection policy

  5. Failure on the part of the applicant to produce the requested documentation within a 10 working day period would result in the closure of the case by the Admissions Department.

Initial assessment of complaint

  1. On receipt of the written details from the applicant (hereafter known as the complainant) by Admissions, an initial assessment of the complaint shall be made. If the matters raised by the complainant concern an academic decision then action will be taken according to paragraphs 6-8 below.  If the matters raised, concern a decision relating to an applicant’s criminal conviction then action will be taken according to paragraph 9.  If the matters raised concern a decision relating to an applicant’s special educational needs then action will be taken according to paragraph 10.

  2. Admissions will contact the complainant to acknowledge the receipt, confirm who will be dealing with the assessment and when the complainant can expect to hear from the University. Investigations are undertaken and completed within 15 working days of the receipt. If it is not possible to complete the investigation within 15 working days, you will be contacted by the University giving the reasons why and if possible, a date when we expect the investigation to be completed by.

  3. In certain circumstances further information may be asked for by the panel to reach a decision, which may results in extending this timeframe.

Academic decisions

  1. On receipt of the written details from the applicant by the Admissions Office, an initial assessment of the complaint shall be made.  The assessment will be conducted by the Director of Learning and Teaching Services (LTS) and, depending on whether the application was for a taught or research programme of study, either the Director of Taught Programmes or the Director of Research Programmes, supported by Admissions.  An initial decision will be taken on whether the complainant has a substantive case that should be progressed through investigation.  If the initial assessment finds that there is no substantive case then the complaint should be rejected and the complainant informed of the decision with reasons for the judgment, which shall be final.

  2. If the initial assessment determines that there is a substantive case to be investigated then the University will be required to produce a written response to the complaint with supporting evidence (see point 6)

  3. The University will respond to the complainant in writing with details of the findings indicating the outcome, and if the complaint is upheld, what the remedy will be. The decision will be final.

Decisions concerning criminal convictions

12.  In the case where a decision to reject an applicant has concerned a criminal conviction, a formal route exists whereby an applicant rejected following an assessment of his/her convictions can apply to the Registrar for a review on the grounds of procedural irregularity, prejudice or bias, or extenuating circumstances. The decision of the Registrar is final.

Decisions concerning disability or special educational needs

13.  In the case where the University has not been able to offer a place to an applicant following an assessment of support needs, a formal route exists whereby an applicant can apply to the Registrar for a review on the grounds of procedural irregularity, prejudice or bias, or extenuating circumstances. The decision of the Registrar is final.


[1] Supporting Professionalism in Admissions, Statement of Good Practice on Applicant complaints and

appeals (www.spa.ac.uk/support/goodpractice/complaintsandappeals)

Applicants from staff or their near relatives

 

The University defines near relatives as "husbands or wives or children of members of staff”, however the University also considers that partners, parents, uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, those considered as next of kin and grandchildren of members of staff may also be regarded as near relatives.

The University will not unreasonably deny access to the University to any applicant on the basis of their relationship to another member of staff or their own position as a member of staff.

General procedure for assessing applications from near relatives of staff

1. All members of staff have a responsibility to disclose to the relevant Head of School and Admissions Team that they are in the employ of the University or are related to a prospective student

2. Where it has been identified by a School of Study that an applicant is a member of University staff or a near relative of a member of University staff, the Admissions Team will first decide whether the applicant is suitable on academic grounds; this may involve inviting the applicant for interview. The School and Admissions Team must make provision so that any potential conflict of interest is avoided in forming such a decision. In particular, members of staff must not participate in the interview and admission of any student to whom they are related. Arrangements must be recorded in writing

3. If the University wishes to make an offer on academic grounds the Admissions Team shall refer the application to the next stage of consideration.

4. The Admissions team shall assess the level of risk and grant a concession based on the evidence provided by relative. If the situation requires further discussion the Admissions Team will seek approval from the Pro-Vice Chancellor (Academic). The decision as to whether or not to admit and whether special conditions shall apply to that admission will take into account,

  • whether the applicant or a near relative of the applicant will have access to sensitive student records
  • whether the applicant or a relative of the applicant would be party to the assessment process or teaching or administration of the course in any way

A declaration will be made by the Head of School that relevant controls have been put in place to ensure that the applicant will not receive unfair advantage during their time at UEA as a consequence of their family relationship and that these conditions will be monitored by a named individual.

5. The Admissions Team shall inform the Applicant and School of Study of the decision, together with any conditions of entry. The Admissions Team shall then use a standard letter to accompany their offer.

General procedure for assessing applications from staff employed by the University

1. All members of staff have a responsibility to disclose to the relevant Admissions Team that they are in the employ of the University.

2. Where it has been identified by Admissions that an applicant is a member of University staff, the Admissions Team concerned will first decide whether the applicant is suitable on academic grounds; this may involve inviting the applicant for interview. The member of staff and their line manager/head of department must make provision so that any potential conflict of interest is avoided in forming such a decision. In particular, members of staff must declare their level of access to any University systems, especially those involved in the assessment processes.

3. If the University wishes to make an offer on academic grounds the Admissions Team shall refer the application to the next stage of consideration.

4. The Admissions Team shall assess the level of risk and grant a concession based on the evidence provided by the staff member and Line Manager/Head of Department. If the situation requires further discussion the Admissions Team will seek approval from the Pro-Vice Chancellor (Academic). The decision as to whether or not to admit and whether special conditions shall apply to that admission will take into account,

  • whether the applicant will have access to sensitive student records
  • whether the applicant would be party to the assessment process or teaching or administration of the course in any way

A declaration may be made by the applicant and their Line Manager/Head of Department that relevant controls have been put in place to ensure that the applicant will not receive unfair advantage during their time at UEA as a consequence of their staff position and that these conditions will be monitored by a named individual.

5. The Admissions Team shall inform the Applicant and School of Study of the decision, together with any conditions of entry. The Admissions Team shall then use a standard letter to accompany their offer.

If you wish to contact us about this policy please contact admissions@uea.ac.uk.

Criminal convictions policy

 

1. General Statement of Policy

The University is an institution with a concentration of young and potentially vulnerable people. Many such people live in accommodation provided for student use by the University. The University in considering whether to admit a student wishes to ensure that an applicant would not constitute an unreasonable risk to its staff or student members or property. Consequently it requires all applicants to declare whether they have a criminal conviction.

Relevant criminal convictions are currently defined as;

  • Any kind of violence including (but not limited to) threatening behaviour, offences concerning the intention to harm or offences which resulted in actual bodily harm
  • Offences listed in the Sex Offenders Act 2003
  • The unlawful supply of controlled drugs or substances where the conviction concerns commercial drug dealing or trafficking
  • Offences involving firearms
  • Offences involving arson
  • Offences listed in the Terrorism Act 2006

Convictions that are spent (as defined by the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974) are not considered to be relevant and should not be revealed.

Applicants should be aware that for programmes in  teaching, health and social work or programmes involving work with, children or vulnerable adults, any criminal convictions, including sentences and cautions (including verbal cautions), reprimands, final warnings and bind-over orders are exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. Individuals applying for those subjects will be asked to secure a disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), or Disclosure Scotland, or an overseas police check, whichever is relevant.

Applicants must inform the University if they are convicted of a relevant criminal offence at the point of application. Applicants can do this by contacting the ccsecretary@uea.ac.uk. Failure to inform the University may lead to an offer of a place for study, being withdrawn.

If an applicant receives a relevant conviction, as defined above, during the Admissions process they are required to inform the Criminal Convictions Secretary as soon as possible ccsecretary@uea.ac.uk

For applicants seeking advice on whether their convictions are spent or relevant, and should be declared may wish to contact Unlock who can provide specific advice in relation to HE applications and criminal convictions.

The University will not unreasonably deny access to the University to any applicant on the basis of criminal record. 

2. Securing Relevant Declarations

2.1 Application forms used by the University for a place of study may require applicants to state whether they have unspent criminal convictions using the following form of words:

“The University requires you to state whether you have a relevant criminal conviction. Please tick the ‘Yes’ box if you have a relevant criminal conviction you need to declare or leave the box blank if you do not. If you tick ‘Yes’ you may be required to provide details of any convictions.”

A statement should be included on the University application form when this question is asked, to the effect of:

“I confirm that, to the best of my knowledge, the information given in this form is correct and complete”.

As should the following note:

“Failure to disclose a criminal conviction on each application to the University may affect either acceptance on to a programme or continuation of studies on it”.

2.2 Applicants to full time undergraduate degree and PGCE programmes are received via UCAS and UTT; both agencies supply relevant advice about declarations in respect of criminal convictions

3. Process for Non-DBS Programmes

3.1 Where an applicant has declared a criminal conviction, the Admissions Service concerned will decide whether the applicant is suitable for an offer of a place of study on academic grounds. No indication of the likelihood of an offer being made should be given to the applicant at this stage.

3.2 Where the Admissions Service does not wish to make an offer to the applicant on academic grounds, they shall write to the applicant in the usual way to notify them of the unsuccessful decision. For applicants rejected on academic grounds this is the end of the procedure (although, as with all rejected applicants they have access to the Admissions Appeals and Complaints Procedure).

3.3 Where the Admissions Service does wish to make an offer on academic grounds they shall refer the application to the Criminal Convictions panel for the next stage of consideration.  They should not take any further action concerning the applicant until advised by the panel.

3.4 The Secretary of the Criminal Convictions panel will contact the applicant and request documentation regarding the offence. In the case of UK students this would be details of offence, sentence passed and date and any probation details, if relevant. This information should be sought by the applicant from the Probation Service or other appropriate authority.

3.5 Equivalent documentation may not be available to non-UK applicants. The Criminal Convictions panel will ask these applicants to make a formal statement which should be verified by an appropriate referee (e.g. applicant’s probation officer or solicitor).

3.6 Applicants are given a deadline of 2 weeks to confirm details of their conviction, unless the referral is within one week of a programme start date. In these cases, such as Clearing a deadline of 2 days will be given. Failure on the part of an applicant to provide the documentation within the specified period will result in a rejection of their application. For undergraduate applications the reject decision will be through UCAS. This deadline ensures that applicants do not miss essential information regarding their registration and course.

3.7 Applicants who apply through UCAS are subject to deadlines, including the Reject by Default (RBD). The University will make every effort to process applications within the UCAS timeframe, to prevent an RBD occurring. In some circumstances this may be not possible and the University will liaise with UCAS to allow an offer to be made if appropriate.

3.8 When the Secretary of the Criminal Convictions panel receives the required documentation from an applicant it is anonymised. The panel, on behalf of the University will make an assessment of the non-academic suitability for a place of study. The panel consists of the Head of Equality & Diversity and the Student Support Service. The decision as to whether or not to admit the applicant will take into account;

  • whether the criminal conviction has any bearing on the applicants suitability to become a member of the student body (e.g. violent or sexual crimes, drug dealing)
  • the length of time since the offence(s) were committed
  • whether the applicant has re-offended, and if so whether there is a pattern to the offences
  • whether the applicant’s circumstances have changed since the time of the offences.

and the panel will give particular consideration to whether the applicant, if admitted, would be likely;

  • to endanger staff or students of the University or those with whom the University interacts
  • to be a threat to University property
  • to unlawfully disrupt  the work of the University
  • to bring the University into disrepute

3.9 If it is decided that the applicant is acceptable for entry to the University, the Admissions Service shall be informed of the decision, together with any conditions of entry, by the Secretary of the Criminal Convictions panel. The Admissions Service will then continue processing the application.

3.10 If it is decided that the applicant is not acceptable for entry to the University, the Admissions Team will be informed of the decision by the Secretary of the Criminal Convictions panel and the applicant will be notified accordingly of the decision.

4. Process for Programmes requiring a DBS check

4.1 Schedule of Programmes

(a) Undergraduate programmes of study that require a criminal records/ disclosure check as a condition of entry:

  • Adult Nursing (BSc)
  • Childrens Nursing (BSc)
  • Learning Disabilities Nursing (BSc)
  • Medicine (MBBS)
  • Medicine with a Gateway Year (MBBS)
  • Mental Health Nursing (BSc)
  • Midwifery (BSc)
  • Occupational Therapy (BSc)
  • Operating Department Practice (DipHE)
  • Paramedic Science (BSc)
  • Pharmacy (MPharm and Integrated Programme)
  • Physiotherapy (BSc)
  • Speech and Language Therapy (BSc & MSci)
  • Social Work (BA)

(b) Postgraduate programmes of study that require a criminal records/ disclosure check as a condition of entry:

  • Approved Mental Health Professionals
  • Adult Nursing (MSc)
  • Advanced Practitioner programmes
  • Clinical Education programmes
  • Clinical Research programmes
  • Clinical Science
  • Coloproctology (MSc/PGDip)
  • Counselling (MA/PGDip)
  • Doctorate in Clinical Psychology
  • Doctorate in Educational Psychology
  • Health Economics programmes
  • Health Research (MSc)
  • Leadership in Dementia Care (PGCert)
  • Leading Innovation for Clinical Practitioners (MA)
  • Occupational Therapy (MSc)
  • Oncoplastic Breast Surgery (MS/PGDip)
  • Pharmacy
  • Physician Associate Studies (MSc)
  • Physiotherapy (MSc)
  • Primary Teaching (PGCE)
  • Regional Anaesthesia (MSc/PGDip)
  • Secondary Teaching (PGCE)
  • Social Work (MA)
  • Social Work Continuing Professional Development

4.2 Pre-Disclosure Checks and Offers

Where an applicant has declared a criminal conviction the process for non-DBS programmes will be followed (see from point 3 above)

4.3 If it is decided that the applicant is acceptable for entry to the University, the Secretary of the Criminal Convictions panel shall be informed of the decision, together with any conditions of entry. The information provided to the panel will be sent to the Fitness to Practice Coordinator responsible for the programme. The Fitness to Practice Coordinator will make an assessment of the applicant’s non-academic suitability for a place of study. The decision as to whether or not to admit the applicant will take into account any specific requirements stipulated by the accrediting bodies.

4.4 If it is decided that the application can progress the Criminal Convictions panel will be informed. In all cases there will be a condition that a place of study is still dependent upon a satisfactory DBS clearance.

4.5 If it is decided that the applicant is not acceptable for entry to the programme, the Admissions Team will be informed of the decision by the Secretary of the Criminal Convictions panel and the applicant will be notified accordingly of the decision.

4.6 If an applicant is successful in receiving an offer for a place of study, the University will make it clear if there are any non-academic conditions. This will include a satisfactory DBS check. The Student Disclosure Service are responsible for administrating this process.

4.7 Disclosures

There are several important rules governing disclosures:

(a) It is University policy that all programmes listed in 4.1 require a DBS check due to the level of exposure to vulnerable individuals.

(b) The University will not accept DBS disclosure that were obtained for any purpose other than the current application to the University i.e. they are not ‘portable’

(c) All DBS documentation should be received by the point of registration at the University

4.8 Convictions and Referrals

By completing the DBS application process the applicant is consenting that the original disclosure will be provided to the University. If information is declared on a DBS check the University will determine suitability to commence a programme. When determining suitability, a DBS disclosure will be reviewed by University representatives from the School and where appropriate, the professional body. Where information is considered by professional bodies the case will be anonymised. Until the applicant is notified of the outcome by the School, they are not able to commence the programme.

4.9 If it is decided that the applicant is not acceptable for entry to the programme of study, the Admissions Team will be informed of the decision by the School. The Admissions Team will withdraw the offer, as the applicant has not been able to pass the condition of a satisfactory DBS clearance. If appropriate an alternative course will be offered.

5. Appeals

5.1 An applicant may appeal against a decision on one or more of the grounds of procedural irregularity, prejudice or bias, or extenuating circumstances.

5.2 Where an applicant has been unsuccessful following a DBS review, the applicant has access to the University Admissions Appeals and Complaints Procedure.

5.3 Where an applicant has been unsuccessful following a Criminal Convictions panel review, the Registrar and Secretary shall consider any appeal, and their decision will be final. The Secretary of the Criminal Convictions panel shall inform the applicant of the outcome of the appeal, and notify the Admissions Team, the Student Support Service and the Head of Equality & Diversity.

6. Record Keeping

6.1 All documentation referring to criminal convictions and DBS checks are stored in secure area with password protection.

6.2 Where an applicant with an unspent conviction is granted admission to the University the of the non-academic considerations relating to the admission will be kept by Student Services for as long as the student in question is registered with the University. The record of the decision taken will be retained by the Admissions Service for a maximum of 2 years.

6.3 Applicants attending a professional course (stated in in 4.1) will need to refer to the School policy for retention on their information relating to Criminal Convictions.

This policy is subject to changes in legislation.

Admissions, Recruitment and Marketing (ARM)

Updated: September 2019 - Policy currently under review

Student transfer policy

 

Transferring is the process where by a current student at UEA or at another institution, moves from one degree programme to another.  This includes students transferring to UEA from another institution and transferring between UEA programmes.

This policy applies to students external to UEA; current UEA students; and UEA staff involved in the transfer process and is relevant to Taught programmes only.

Process for students transferring to UEA from another institution

The eligibility of a student from another institution to transfer to a UEA programme is determined by the relevant programmes’ entry criteria.

A student from another institution wishing to transfer to a UEA undergraduate programme should contact the Admissions Service at admissions@uea.ac.uk who will, following a preliminary check, advise if they should apply, which is via UCAS. Once the UCAS application is received it will be considered by the Admissions Service, often in consultation with the Admissions Director for the relevant subject.  Alongside the UCAS application the Admissions Service will request a current academic transcript and consider all previous academic qualifications.  Following approval of a request, the decision is communicated via UCAS.

Students wishing to transfer to a Postgraduate taught programme should contact the Admissions Service at admissions@uea.ac.uk  who will assess the information and, if appropriate advise the student to apply via the UEA direct application (on the UEA website).  Once the application is received, it will be referred to the relevant subject department for consideration.  Following approval, to transfer to a UEA programme the Admissions Service will provide confirmation.

At Undergraduate and Postgraduate level a student may be required to meet conditions of entry, for example successful completion of their current studies, the School of study may require specific course profile arrangements (including named modules) and will be required to provide evidence of the original certificate or transcript at registration.

If an application to transfer is rejected, the Admissions Service will consider whether the student is eligible for an alternative entry point.  All decisions are communicated by the Admissions service and should the application wish to appeal the decision are advised to consult the University’s admissions policy available here.

The exception to this process is where there is a formal route agreed by the University with a partner.

In some cases students will be seeking Accreditation of Prior Certificated Learning (APCL) or Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL), in these cases in addition to the above, guidance is provided via the APCL/APEL policy available here.

Current students wishing to transfer course are requested to complete one of the following forms;

FORM A available on LTS my.uea page  – Undergraduate students only

  • Transfer as advised by Exam Board
  • For changes to Year Abroad, Year in Industry, or Placement Year options (also includes transfers to and from DEV programmes with overseas experience programmes)
  • For year 3 and 4 transfer requests
  • Transfer from an Integrated Masters degree to BSc (same course)
  • Transfer from a BSc to an Integrated Masters degree (same course)

The transfer needs to be approved by the Learning and Teaching Service.

The relevant Teaching Hub for the programme the student wishes to transfer to will consider the course change request.  The Teaching Hub will check whether the modules comply with the new course profile requirements.  Where appropriate, students may be required to take specific modules in place of free choice modules.  If the student does not meet the requirements of the course profile, then a concession must be obtained showing full details.

FORM B available from the Admissions Service - Undergraduate students only

  • This form is for students who wish to transfer to another programme of study starting at year 1 or year 2 even if it is within the same School (excluding reasons stated in Form A and C).

The transfer needs to be approved by the Admissions Service and the Learning and Teaching Service.

Any transfer request will be subject to a place being available and entry requirements being met. The Student needs to be in good academic standing.  Transfer requests should be submitted by the end of week 2 of Semester 1. Transfers submitted in week 3&4 will require both agreement from the receiving School of Study and a concession from the Learning and Teaching Service Assistant Head and Academic Director of Taught Programmes. Late transfer requests may be refused.

Transfers into Year 2 are only approved if the student has already studied a substantial amount of the Year 1 course content of the programme.  In order to transfer to the second year of a programme whose first year includes any Core or Compulsory modules which have not already been undertaken, will need a concession from the University which the receiving Hub will seek.  Any offer may require passing all credits in the current course with a specified average year aggregate.

If the application to transfer is rejected at any point a clear account of the reason will be given by the relevant Teaching Hub or the Admissions Service.

FORM C available on LTS portal page  - Undergraduate students only

  • Students on a Science with Foundation Year course who wants to transfer to a degree programme.

The transfer needs to be approved by the Learning and Teaching Service.

The relevant Teaching Hub for the programme the student wishes to transfer will consider the course change request.  The Teaching Hub will check whether the modules comply with the new course profile requirements.  Where appropriate, students may be required to take specific modules in place of free choice modules.

FORM D available from Admissions Service reception – Postgraduate Taught students only

  • This Form needs to be completed by a postgraduate student who wishes to initiate a transfer to another programme of study even if it is within the same School

The transfer needs to be approved by the Admissions Service and the Learning and Teaching Service.

Any transfer request will be subject to a place being available and entry requirements being met. Students need to be in good academic standing.  Transfer requests should be submitted by the end of week 2 of Semester 1. Transfers submitted in week 3 will require both agreement from the receiving School of Study and a concession from the Learning and Teaching Service Assistant Head and Academic Director of Taught Programmes. Late transfer requests may be refused.

If the application to transfer is rejected at any point a clear account of the reason will be given by the relevant Teaching Hub or the Admissions Service.

Role of the Adviser

For all transfer requests the student must meet with their academic adviser, or in their absence the Senior or Deputy academic adviser for the current school of study.  This is an opportunity for the student to discuss with their advisor the reason(s) for the transfer request.  The Adviser is a source of advice and guidance for the requester.  The Adviser’s role is also to check that the student understands that transfers are subject to availability, provide advice on whether the transfer is possible (i.e. is the student in good academic standing, is the request beyond the 4 weeks), and a check on whether they need to speak to the International Student Advisory team (if the student is on a Tier 4 visa).

Tier 4 Students and Course Transfers

Any student entering UEA or wishing to transfer to another course, holding a Tier 4 visa are subject to the current UK immigration rules.

Any Tier 4 students who are transferring to another institution will have their UEA sponsorship withdrawn and students are advised to contact the new institution for details on how to apply for a new tier 4 visa, and to ensure the institution will sponsor them.

If a current UEA student is studying with a Tier 4 visa and wishes to transfer to another course at UEA, the student must make an appointment to speak to the International student advisory Team (ISAT) in the Student Support Service before proceeding with any transfer request.

Further information

In case of any enquiry relating to this policy, please contact admissions@uea.ac.uk.