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UCAS Course Code

W400

Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Bachelor of Arts

Course Organiser

Mr. Tony Gash


BA DramaDrama at the University of East Anglia has been ranked joint first for overall satisfaction and teaching out of all English mainstream universities, according to the 2013 National Student Survey. This programme allows you to combine a strong practical emphasis with the study of the theory, history and social significance of drama, complemented by detailed study of dramatic literature and aspects of visual and technical design. You will participate in a major practical project each year as well as undertaking a wide variety of applied drama work and there is also the opportunity for you to study on placement with professional companies.

The degree interweaves practice and theory throughout the three years and ranges across many periods (Classical Greek to contemporary), performance styles (naturalism to non-Western) and major theoretical and directorial approaches (Aristotle to Artaud, Stanislavsky to ‘physical’ theatre).  There is a core of required units (including projects and productions), nearly all of which use practical classes and workshops to approach and link text and performance, periods, cultures and approaches.  Technical classes, acting skills and voice work are part of the training offered.  Students may have the opportunity to spend a period of time on placement with a professional company or venue (in fields such as TV, radio and film, as well as theatre).  Most of the practical work takes place in the Studio, highly adaptable for all stage and auditorium configurations and with full support facilities.  In addition to required modules, students have a choice of a wide range of modules on dramatic literature, as well as in areas other than Drama such as Film and Television, American Studies, Modern Languages and History.

Course Structure

Year 1

From the start of the first year all drama students (whatever their programme) are introduced to a range of applied and technical theatre skills (including safe use of the Drama Studio and aspects of lighting, sound, stage management and stage design) as well as basic acting, group work and weekly voice classes. You also begin a study of the historical repertoire, reading dramatic texts from Ancient Greece to the present. Lectures explore history and conventions as well as interpretative and performance strategies for a selection of ‘key texts’. You also choose from a range of optional modules (including Literature in History, Key Issues in Film Studies and Introduction to Philosophy) which equip you to take further seminars in these areas later on. A spring semester module (currently focusing on Post-War British Drama) leads to performance work with staff and MA theatre directors.

In the Autumn semester of Year 1 there are two compulsory modules: Applied Drama and Technical Skills (comprising a number of different practical strands, including basic movement and voice work, aspects of technical theatre, and group-based classes and scene rehearsals on selected texts) and Introduction to World Dramatic Literatures (lectures/demonstrations on major plays and playwrights).  The third module can be chosen from film, history or literature.

During the Spring semester you follow Postwar British Drama (which includes some performance work) and Theatre: Theory and Performance.  You have a wide range of choice for the third module.

Year 2

The second year introduces a wide range of optional courses (such as detailed acting work in The Actor and the Text; seminars in, for example, Classical Drama, Shakespeare, Contemporary American Drama, Political Theatre or Creative Writing). There is an emphasis on World Performance, exploring non-western theatrical forms. Second-year practical work currently focuses on ‘out-reach’ work, taking performance into a variety of real-world contexts (recent projects include work with school children, the elderly and trainee medical personnel).  You can also choose (though this is entirely optional) an internship with a professional venue or company and spend the first semester on placement at a theatre, drama school or with a theatre, film or television company at home or abroad.  The only required elements are an assessed production and a unit devoted to the exploration of performance events, their nature and function.  Otherwise you choose units from the extensive drama offerings including scriptwriting and from other disciplines.

Year 3

The third year revolves around a final, full-scale, drama production and its related seminar and supervised individual performance projects.  Also available as final-year specialisms are a drama dissertation and special subjects in Shakespeare and in problems posed by the adaptation for stage of non-dramatic literary material.

Teaching and Assessment:

Key skills, issues and ideas are introduced in lectures given by all members of faculty, including literary critics, literary historians, and writers.  More specialist study is undertaken in small group seminars. These are chosen from a range offered within the School and across the University. You will also spend time studying and researching in the library or carrying out practical work or projects. In most subject areas, you are assessed at the end of each year on the basis of coursework and, in some cases, project and examination results. In your final year, you will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice and with the advice of tutors. There is no final examination. Your final degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and three.


Why Choose UsChoosing to study Literature, Drama and Creative Writing at UEA means joining some of the most satisfied students in the UK.

Out of all mainstream UK universities, we have been ranked overall joint first for student satisfaction for Drama, and joint fourth for English Studies in the 2013 National Student Survey.

Here are some of the reasons why:

  • Our world-famous Creative Writing department attracts successful and aspiring writers from around the world
  • The School is home to the British Centre for Literary Translation
  • You can take part in our active and engaged student body
  • Discover endless opportunities to attend and get involved in our rich schedule of events, readings and performances

A broad range of courses

Our School brings together writers, scholars, performers, teachers and students in an exploration of the powers and possibilities of literature. Our aim is to make creative writing and critical reading confront one another in ways that sharpen and enliven both.

Our School has a world-famous reputation for Creative Writing, and is also home to highly rated scholars with a focus on literature, translation and drama. With a strong focus on interdisciplinary learning, we work closely with other Schools at UEA.

#1 for student experience

In 2013 UEA was ranked number one in the UK for Student Experience by the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey – as well as ranking joint second for overall satisfaction in the 2013 National Student Survey.

Student life at UEA is enhanced through an active Student Union, a myriad clubs and societies to join and a lively and engaged student body.

Literary festivals and events

Writers from across the globe travel to UEA to take part in our long-running literary festival organised by the Arthur Miller Centre and the Centre for Creative and Performing Arts.

The teaching staff and students also put on a number of events throughout the year, including readings, performances and plays.

The University’s significant contribution to creative writing was recognised with the recent prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education.

Teaching and research excellence

In the National Student Survey 2013, we achieved excellent teaching rankings and scores - joint first for Drama and second for Imaginative Writing, scoring 99 and 97 per cent respectively.

As one of our students, you will benefit from our interdisciplinary approach, and have the scope to tailor your own degree as your interests develop throughout your time at UEA.

Our academic staff are writers, as well as teachers, and are at the forefront of research in their field. Many contribute articles to leading newspapers, appear on television and radio arts programmes, publish original research and write novels, short stories, poems and plays.

If you choose to study with us, you can expect to be inspired by leading figures in the literary world such as Kathryn Hughes, writer of the biographies of Mrs Beeton and George Eliot, Giles Foden, whose novel The Last King of Scotland was made into an Oscar winning Hollywood movie, and novelist Rachel Hore, a regular in the bestseller list.

UniStats Information

Year

Compulsory Study (80 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

APPLIED DRAMA AND TECHNICAL SKILLS

Reserved for students on courses: W400U1, WQ43U1, WW84U1. A mixture of workshops, seminars, physical skills, technical classes, aiming to begin the process of training in all areas related to the delivery of an intelligent performance.

LDCD4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO WORLD DRAMATIC LITERATURES 1

This module examines a wide range of influential plays in several genres, drawn from the work of major European dramatists, and with due attention given to issues of both text and performance. The plays are drawn from the work of Aeschylus, Euripides, Shakespeare, Webster, Wycherley, Moliere and Racine, as well as medieval and non-European theatre. A weekly lecture is accompanied by demonstrations/discussions of central scenes and/or video extracts.

LDCD4007A

20

POSTWAR BRITISH DRAMA

Reserved for students on courses: W400, WQ43, WW84 This volatile and rich period after World War II in Britain radically transformed the British Theatre and saw the rise of a number of innovative theatre companies throughout the second half of the twentieth century. This module examines British Theatre in context from the 1950s to the 1990s. The module will explore the work of seminal theatre companies, playwrights and directors in the United Kingdom and interrogate the performance styles through the lens of British social history through the decades. Through a detailed examination of dramatic texts, video clips, memoirs, journal articles and newspaper clippings, as well as practical workshops and participatory performances of work from the period under scrutiny, we will explore all aspects of theatrical performance from design to direction.

LDCD4003B

20

THEATRE: THEORY AND PERFORMANCE

This module investigates theories of theatre through the reading and discussion of key theoretical texts, and through practical workshops exploring voice, movement and performance processes, while continuing elements of the technical skills training begun in Semester 1. This module is only available to students of the degree programmes: WW84 Scriptwriting and Performance, WQ43 English Literature and Drama and W400 Drama.

LDCD4005B

20

Option A Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANALYSING FILM AND TELEVISION

The module is designed to provide students with core study skills and techniques and methods of textual analysis. The module will cover the analysis of a range of formal features and frameworks such as narrative, mise-en-scene, camera work, editing and sound used in the analysis of film and television. The study skills covered will include use of the library and internet for research, as well as note taking, essay planning and the conventions of academic writing. In the process the module will cover issues such as referencing and plagiarism. It will be taught by lecture, seminar and screening.

FTMF4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES

This module will introduce students to the development of cultural studies in this country and the work undertaken in the field. While it is a core module for those in Literature and History, it is suited to all those interested in interdisciplinary study and the history of academic disciplines, and it will introduce students to a range of approaches in study. It is taught through seminars.

LDCL4010A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

This module is designed to provide an introduction to medieval history both for first year historians and students from other schools. It surveys the history of medieval Europe, including England, from c.1000 to c1300, and also examines some archaeology, literature, art, and architecture from the period. The module also aims to introduce students to a range of primary sources, including some of the physical remains to be found in East Anglia.

HIS-4001A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN HISTORY

This module provides a wide-ranging introduction to the political, social and economic transformation of Britain and Europe from the late eighteenth century to the First World War. Among the themes it considers are industrialisation and its impact; revolution and reform; nationalism and imperialism; gender and society; great power relations; the impact of war and the collapse of the old Europe in 1917-18.

HIS-4003A

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY 1

This is the main introductory module to the study of literature. It aims to help new students to read historically, by offering a range of models of the relationship between literature and history, explored through the study of selected historical and literary moments. The module is taught by a weekly lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4008A

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY II

This module follows on from Literature in History I, taking in more recent history, and including discussion of how writers of the present make use of the past. The module is taught by lectures, with an accompanying seminar. Attendance at both lectures and seminars is compulsory.

LDCL4012B

20

READING PLAYS

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON W400 ONLY. A seminar based module specially aimed at first year members of the Drama programme. It develops a vocabulary for the analysis and close reading of dramatic texts, including their implicit visual and interpersonal dynamics. The playwrights treated will vary each year.

LDCD4006B

20

READING TEXTS II

This module seeks to build on and develop the work of the Autumn semester, in particular that of Reading Texts and Reading Translations. The focus will fall again on small-group discussion and on the reading of a small number of texts - one creative, and one critical - chosen by the tutor from a set list. With this close attention to reading at its core, the module will also look at a number of the terms and ideas central to the study of literature and to the practice of interpretation. Not available to Visiting Students.

LDCL4011B

20

READING TEXTS: TUTORIAL CLASS

This module provides the opportunity to work closely on selected texts within the contexts of a small group. It aims to develop and explore modes of textual analysis. By the end of the module the students will have highly developed reading skills, a sense of the implications of interpreting texts and the individual research skills essential for a university degree. Not available to Visiting Students.

LDCL4009A

20

READING TRANSLATIONS: TUTORIAL CLASS

This module provides the opportunity to work closely with texts in translation, looking at how we read and analyse them and how we consider their relationship to the originals. We aim to develop the skills necessary for working with foreign texts in English translation. A thorough reading knowledge of another language besides English is essential.

LDCL4013A

20

WRITING TEXTS

This module explores the culture and anthropology of writing, and addresses issues such as the differences between writing and speaking, between literary and non-literary texts, and the writer's relationship with readers. In weekly lectures and seminar groups, we will look at the writing process itself - drafting, revising, editing, translating - and will explore how and why texts come into being, and how they work to position the reader or to generate readerly interaction. The module is taught by a lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4014B

20

Option A Study (100 credits)

Students will select 100 credits from the following modules:

Students on this programme are not permitted to take an Internship module (LDCD5014A/LDCD5015B0 as well as the Semester Abroad modules (LDCL5025B/LDCL5026B). At the end of Year 2, all students must have taken LDCD5022A: From Tragic to Epic Performance and LDCD5018B:Drama Outreach Project unless you have chosen a Semester Abroad or an Internship module. Those students who opt for a Semester Abroad or Internship must have taken either LDCD5022A: From Tragic to Epic Performance or LDCD5O18B: Drama Outreach Project. Students who select either of the Creative Industries Research Internship modules LDCD5014A/LDC5015B) must normally also select one of the Creative Industries Research Project modules (LDCD5019A/LDC5020B).

Name Code Credits

ADAPTATION: SHAKESPEARE ON STAGE AND SCREEN

This module explores the rich dramatic and cinematic traditions of Shakespearean adaptation. It considers a range of adaptations, from the seventeenth-century restoration versions of Macbeth, King Lear and The Tempest to more recent film versions of Shakespeare's plays, examining the light that adaptive transformations may cast on both the original plays and on the different social and cultural circumstances of the new productions. Through exploration of specific adaptations of Macbeth, King Lear and Henry V, The Tempest, A Midsummer Night's Dream and Hamlet, the module explores the place of Shakespeare's plays on the Caribbean stage, in Japanese film, in Germany and Britain in the 1930s and 1940s, and in more contemporary twentieth and twenty-first-century culture.

LDCD5021A

20

AUDIO DRAMA: THE THEATRE OF THE MIND

Because sound is invisible, audio drama is sometimes thought of as more imaginative than visual drama. Audio theatre takes place in the mind rather than on stage. Through practice and theory this module explores audio drama and the invisible world of sound. We will do voice work, create sound effects, analyse music, and collaborate on an audio drama to be podcast over the Internet. Our practice will be sharpened by questioning how the aesthetics of sound compares to sight, how changes in sound technology influence culture, and how sound represents race, gender, and nationality. We will listen to a wide range of radio genres, including comedy, drama, music, and news, from "classic" shows like 'The Goon Show' and 'War of the Worlds' to the more recent 'Planet B' and 'Another Case of Milton Jones'. To create our final audio drama project, students will gain experience using audio recording and editing software.

LDCD5052A

20

COMEDY AND THE ABSURD IN DRAMA

How and why does comedy work as idea and theatrical practice? This module explores comedy across time and place, going back to both classical comedy (Aristophanes) and the roots of commedia dell'arte, and continuing through Moliere and Wycherley in the seventeenth-century, Goldoni in the eighteenth, Oscar Wilde and Alfred Jarry in the 1890s, and into the twentieth century with Beckett, Ionesco, Stoppard, Orton and Fo. The module ends with Richard Bean's 2011 adaptation of Goldoni in One Man, Two Guvnors. We'll study the theory, practice and politics of comedy in drama, encompassing comedy as social critique, comedy of ideas, theatre of the absurd, farce as confrontation, carnival and the grotesque, comic bodies, clowning, metatheatre and theatricality. There may be opportunities to view some of the plays on film and to participate in some practical workshops. The main mode is seminar discussion. Assessment is by means of a group seminar participation, a scene analysis and a longer written project. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment but this module is open to all.

LDCL5055B

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (AUT)

Supervised placements and internships in one or other of the performance orientated creative industries in Britain or elsewhere. As with LDCD2X35, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5014A

40

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (SPR)

Supervised placements and internships in one or other of the performance orientated creative industries in Britain or elsewhere. As with LDCD2X36, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5015B

40

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (AUT)

Either an extended piece of research and writing on a drama-related topic selected by the individual with the approval of the module organiser, or an approved and supervised solo performance piece. As with LDCD2X19, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5019A

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (SPR)

Either an extended piece of research and writing on a drama-related topic selected by the individual with the approval of the module organiser, or an approved and supervised solo performance piece. As with LDCD2X20, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5020B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 2 Creative Writing modules. The teaching uses structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of prose fiction and poetry. In the first half of the seminar students will write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. In the second half the focus will shift to the work of established authors, using sample texts as a stimulus to students' own writing.

LDCC5005A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (SPR)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 2 Creative Writing modules. The teaching uses structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of prose fiction and poetry. In the first half of the seminar students will write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. In the second half the focus will shift to the work of established authors, using sample texts as a stimulus to students' own writing.

LDCC5004B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (AUT)

This module enables students to test the range of their abilities as writers of poetry. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as voice, persona, sound, imagery, metaphor, structure and form. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aims: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing poetry and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LCCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5003A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (SPR)

This module enables students to test the range of their abilities as writers of poetry. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as voice, persona, sound, imagery, metaphor, structure and form. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aims: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing poetry and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LCCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5007B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (AUT)

This module enables students to test their abilities and potential as writers of prose fiction. It is not intended for beginners, or those with no experience of a formal creative writing environment. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as character, genre voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aim: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LIT STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LDCC5001A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5001A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (SPR)

This module enables students to test their abilities and potential as writers of prose fiction. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as character, genre, voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LIT STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LDCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5006B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (AUT)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE SPRING MODULE (LDCC2W24) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/television.

LDCC5002A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (SPR)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE AUTUMN MODULE (LDCC2W05) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/TV.

LDCC5008B

20

DEVISED PERFORMANCE

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON W400, WQ43 AND WW84 ONLY. In this course, we will explore the concept of devised performance, in all of its various manifestations, and examine methods to develop devised theatre in the rehearsal room. Exploring the use of non-dramatic texts, thematic structures, storytelling, found text and abstract imagery, this class allows students to study and put into practice the devising techniques of companies such as the Wooster Group, Elevator Repair Service, Complicite, Kneehigh and SITI Company. You will learn about theories of narrative and dramatic structure, and experiment with a range of techniques used to generate material for performance outside of the traditional genre of the "playwright's theatre".

LDCD5053A

20

DRAMA OUTREACH PROJECT

Reserved for students on courses: W400U1, WQ43U1, WW84U1. Group practical theatre work which entails public performance to target audiences in the community or on campus.

LDCD5018B

20

ERASMUS EXCHANGE: SPRING SEMESTER

LDC students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme for the Spring semester must enrol for this module. Students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme to Dublin will need in addition to enrol for module LDCE2A01. Further details on the ERASMUS scheme are available from the Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5025B

60

FROM TRAGIC TO EPIC PERFORMANCE

Through readings of classical and neo-classical generic criticism, as well as through an investigation of performance and staging demands, the module examines classical, post-classical and early modern forms of tragedy, and contrasts them with the complex emergent forms of tragicomedy and (later) epic, which, in different ways, re-model or resist the central experience of tragic reception. The course will look at plays selected from different genres, countries and periods, e.g. classical Greek (Sophocles) and Roman (Seneca) French Neoclassical (Racine), Spanish golden age (Lope de Vega Calderon), English Jacobean (Middleton and Rowley, Ford), Japanese Kabuki, post-revolutionary German (from Schiller to Brecht). By positing strategies for reading and performing such plays, it will thus develop a deeper knowledge of stage history and of complex theatrical styles. It will also engage with critical discourse, especially in aesthetics and genre criticism (Zeami, Aristotle, Castelvetro, Dryden, Lessing, Brecht).

LDCD5022A

20

GOODBYE TO BERLIN? LITERATURE and VISUAL CULTURE IN WEIMAR GERMANY

This module aims to explore some of the exciting developments in verbal and visual culture of the Weimar Republic between the First and Second World Wars, e.g. experimental theatre, Weimar cinema, cabaret, visual arts, the Bauhaus, etc. Texts considered will include writings by Brecht et al. Thomas and Heinrich Mann, and less familiar authors as well as key films by e.g. Pabst (Threepenny Opera), Lang (Metropolis), von Sternberg (Blue Angel) and others. A particular focus is likely to be representations of gender on page, stage and screen. Active seminar participation is expected. NB: A knowledge of German, while useful, is not a prerequisite; translations are available.

LDCL5051B

20

I AM

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS REGISTERED FOR COURSES Q300, Q3W8, QV31, QT37, W400, WQ43, WW84 ONLY. The purpose of this Module is to explore notions of personal identity and investigate how a heightened self-knowledge can benefit our relationship to and impact upon the world. In LDC, the question of human subjectivity is approached daily in the texts, novels, plays and poetry that constitute its curriculum. Using the rubric of Graduate Identity Theory, a programme of workshops will investigate how the study of these materials shapes our own self-image; our approach to life, and ultimately, our identity. Beginning with an introduction to Freud's theory of consciousness, we will be building a portfolio of material that considers the concept of identity from the ego to the online avatar. In activities such as creating blogs, tweeting and participating in other social media sites, we will experiment with the manipulation of identity and assess the impact of our online personas. The workshops and the production of an 'I Am (LDC)' portfolio are designed so that individuals can raise to consciousness their own unique attributes and make confident claims, through academic pursuit, about who they are and what they can do. The techniques of rhetoric, positive psychology and neuro-linguistic programme (NLP) will also be discussed as tools for esteem building and identity formation. Overall, the workshops will be designed to afford the opportunities to develop, practise and rehearse those identity claims so that upon graduation, identity can be affirmed by the new social and economic world that the individual will enter.

LDCL5054A

20

LITERATURE STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD (SPRING)

A semester spent at a university abroad with the approval of the School. Students interested in European universities should see the Erasmus exchange modules, LDCL5024A and LDCL5025B. In all instances you must consult with Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5026B

60

PERFORMANCE SKILLS: THE ACTOR AND THE TEXT

This module is reserved for Drama majors (W400), Drama/Literature Joints (WQ43), Scriptwriting and Performance (WW84), and Theatre Directing Masters students. Drama Minors wishing to apply must first seek approval for inclusion from Mr T. Gash. The main methods of study are through: (1) individual performance of poems and speeches, (2) scene classes, (3) character study of roles in classic plays.

LDCD5016A

20

POLITICAL THEATRE

This module examines the use of theatre and performance - by the State, by oppositional groups, by political activists and by theatre and performance practitioners - to solidify or challenge structures of power. The course looks at specific examples of how theatre and public spectacles have been used in the twentieth century to control or contest the political stage. Examining American, South America, African, Russian, and Eastern European performance in the twentieth century, this class will document and explore through specific performances, videos, dramatic texts and theoretical essays, how performance in theory and practice can be used to explore issues to race, ethnicity, gender, political upheaval and social change within a society.

LDCD5011B

20

SHAKESPEARE

The aim of this lecture-seminar module is to help you become a better reader of Shakespearean drama. He was writing between about 1590 and about 1610; obviously his plays speak to us over a great cultural distance, and we can find fresh ways of reading them by exploring the theatrical, generic and historical frameworks in which they were written and staged. The lectures, then, will introduce a range of contexts, and the seminars will seek to turn them to account in the reading of the dramatic texts themselves.

LDCL5040B

20

THE PRACTICE OF SCREENWRITING: ISSUES IN ADAPTATION

This module is a practical screenwriting class. Students will explore basic issues in screenwriting and will focus on the problems of creating new screenplays adapted from novels, short stories, articles and other sources. Classroom sessions will compare film adaptations to the original material, introduce concepts of screenwriting and screenplay form, and apply key tools of script analysis. The final project will offer the opportunity to write a short screenplay or the first act of a feature-length script. The module offers essential skills for anyone contemplating a screenwriting career. The module is taught by seminar and screening.

FTMP5017B

20

THE PRACTICE OF SCREENWRITING: ISSUES IN ADAPTATION

This module is a practical screenwriting class. Students will explore basic issues in screenwriting and will focus on the problems of creating new screenplays adapted from novels, short stories, articles and other sources. Classroom sessions will compare film adaptations to the original material, introduce concepts of screenwriting and screenplay form, and apply key tools of script analysis. The final project will offer the opportunity to write a short screenplay or the first act of a feature-length script. The module offers essential skills for anyone contemplating a screenwriting career. The module is taught by seminar and screening

FTMP5018A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, running stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing and participation in workshops count towards assessment. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - journalism practices.

LDCC5009A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, running stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing and participation in workshops count towards assessment. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - journalism practices.

LDCC5010B

20

THEATRES OF REVOLT: NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPEAN DRAMA

Beginning with Ibsen and Strindberg, this module examines the development of modern forms of drama during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, addressing modern concerns - self and society, gender, sexuality, social and class conflicts, creation and destruction, the unconscious - and deploying experimental types of theatre by Chekhov, Maeterlinck, Wilde, Hauptmann, Buchner and Wedekind, as well as the two seminal Scandinavians. We will be looking at versions of Naturalism, Symbolism and Expressionism as modernist modes in drama and suggesting ways in which these shape and anticipate later developments. There will be opportunities to view some of the plays on film. Assessment is by means of seminar participation, one piece of textual analysis and one longer essay. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment.

LDCL5030A

20

WORLD PERFORMANCE

This module is reserved for students on Drama programmes and Visiting Students similarly following theatre, drama and/or performance degree programmes only. It will include practical exploration, observation and analysis of video material and discussion of the nature and function of performance events. The examination is a drama practical - each person has a 15-minute slot. The module aims to initiate awareness of traditional performance forms and practices beyond the 'west' (in particular, Japan, Bali and China) through workshop and discussion, underpinned by 'anthropological' and multicultural' theories of performance; and to offer some comparisons both with contemporary practice in the countries of origin and with aspects of western theatre training. Students will be invited to develop their own appropriate performance forms for the examination.

LDCD5013B

20

Option B Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

A CHOICE OF ANY HUM MODULE AT LEVEL 5 (PRE-REQUISITES PERMITTING).

Name Code Credits

Compulsory Study (90 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 90 credits:

Name Code Credits

DRAMA PRODUCTION (YEAR 3)

This module covers the development and delivery of a full-scale theatre production (usually of a scripted, possibly classical play): involving planning, rehearsal, technical contribution, performance and self-evaluation.

LDCD6007A

60

DRAMA PROJECTS

Reserved for 3rd Year Students taking Degree Programmes: W400, WQ43 or WW84 Individual performance projects with supervision, leading to presentation (usually before the external examiner).

LDCD6011B

30

Option A Study (30 credits)

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CONTEMPORARY DRAMA AND FILM

This module will examine emergent voices and trends in recent theatre, film and television (mainly British but with some American or European contributions). Issues covered include the (questioned) demise of explicitly political drama and the appearance of previously silenced voices (e.g. gay and lesbian themes, feminist playwrights and writing ethnicity, physical theatre practitioners).

LDCD6103B

30

CREATIVE WRITING DISSERTATION (SPR)

This is an advanced level module which is for final year CW minors. The module allows students an opportunity to write a substantial short story (approximately 6000 words) or drama script (60 pages) or collection of poems (15-25 poems, totalling between 270 and 290 lines) and to develop an understanding of their own motivations, influences and processes through the production of a reflective self-commentary (2000 words). This module aims to encourage independent learning and the initiation and development of new creative material in a way that provides a grounding in the disciplines necessary both for postgraduate research and the professional practice of writing.

LDCC6004B

30

DRAMA AND LITERATURE: THE QUESTION OF GENRE

LDCL6017B

30

DRAMA DISSERTATION

An independently researched dissertation of 8,000 words on some aspect of drama or dramatic literature, performance theory and practice. This may treat drama in the medium of theatre, TV, film or radio, or it may take the form of a drama script (45 - 60 minutes running time).

LDCD6010B

30

LITERATURE AND OPERA

Sixteenth-century Italian literati created opera as the rebirth of Greek Tragedy. From its basic form as word-plus-music to its repeated reforms that have put now text, now music, now drama first,opera and literature have constantly complemented and competed with each other. This module explores the relationship between opera and various kinds of literature, including drama, prose, and poetry. We will ask "How can an orchestra narrate?" "How is an opera libretto like a movie script?" "Why do certain literary texts invite musical adaptation more than others?" and "What is the 'best' literary analogy for opera: drama, poetry, or the novel?" Students will also compare various operas with their literary sources in order to better understand how different media represent race, gender, and nationality. Composers will include Brittten, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Rossini, and Weill. Authors will include Shakespeare, Wilde, Brecht, James, Scott, Joyce and Aeschylus.

LDCL6101B

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love.

LDCL6056B

30

WORDS AND MUSIC

'Writing about music is like dancing about architecture'; or so the saying goes. On the contrary, words and music are intimately related, not only in those forms in which they meet head on - opera and song, most obviously - but also more fundamentally. It is in words that we make sense of what we hear, and via words that we pass on that sense, both of specific musical experiences and of music per se. And it is in words that we convey our sense of the sheer seductiveness of music, together with our ongoing frustration at its seeming elusiveness. Literary texts in particular offer evidence of a rich variety of responses to music, ranging from the deferential and star struck to the sceptical and resolutely tone deaf. This module will offer an opportunity to explore specific aspects of the relationship of words and music. To begin, the myth of Orpheus, perhaps the most influential story of the power of music, a story to which literature and music, both apart and together, have returned many times. To follow, we'll look at three specific areas of musico-literary interaction: song, the most potent alliance of words and music, an alliance which has given rise to a rich critical literature; specific literary texts in which music forms the object of attention (Beckett, Proust and Kafka, for example); and selected critical-theoretical texts that have sought to understand aspects of the relationship of words and music. Students will be encouraged to develop their own interests, especially as regards particular examples of, for example, poetry and song. Creative responses to the material will be encouraged and creative writing submissions allowed.

LDCL6106A

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Year Abroad

During your second year, you may opt to transfer your studies to another European university for one or both semesters, choosing from universities in countries such as Greece, France, Germany and Switzerland. Alternatively, and depending on the availability of places, you may spend a second-year semester at an Australian university, such as Macquarie, Sydney.

 

Entry Requirements

  • Qualification: BA (Hons)
  • A Level: AAB including a Drama-based or Literature-based A-level
  • International Baccalaureate: 33 points overall including a minimum of 5 in HL English or Theatre Studies
  • Scottish Highers: At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAB including Drama/Theatre Studies or English Literature
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAABB including English or Theatre Studies
  • Access Course: Please contact the university for further information.
  • BTEC: DDD in a relevant subject
  • European Baccalaureate: 80% overall incl English Literature or Drama/Theatre studies

Entry Requirement

Applicants to this course are expected to have or be taking one of the following A-levels: Drama and Theatre Studies, Drama, Performance Studies, English Literature, English Language & Literature.  Applicants should usually offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at A-Level. Students taking the IB programme should hold or be taking a Drama-based or English-based subject at Higher Level, and should normally offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at Higher Level.

 

 

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • TOEFL: Internet-based score of 88 overall (minimum 19 in the Listening and Writing components; 20 in the Reading component; and 21 in the Speaking component)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.
 

Interviews

We operate an initial shortlisting process for this course on the basis of the information an applicant provides on their UCAS form. Candidates who are shortlisted will be invited to interview and audition and offers are only made after a successful interview and audition. These take place on Visit Days and include an opportunity to look around the campus, view accommodation, meet current students, talk to staff members and find out more about the course. The interview and audition itself will be with a member of our Drama team. Candidates are asked to perform a short monologue from a selection provided and there is also a discussion which generally covers topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and English at Grade C or above.

Assessment

For the majority of candidates the most important factors in assessing the application will be past and future achievement in examinations, academic interest in the subject being applied for, personal interest and extra-curricular activities and the confidential reference. We consider applicants as individuals and accept students from a very wide range of educational backgrounds and spend time considering your application in order to reach an informed decision relating to your application. Typical offers are indicated above. Applicants to this course who are shortlisted will also be required to attend for interview and audition.

  • Qualification: BA (Hons)
  • A Level: AAB including a Drama-based or Literature-based A-level
  • International Baccalaureate: 33 points overall including a minimum of 5 in HL English or Theatre Studies
  • Scottish Highers: At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAB including Drama/Theatre Studies or English Literature
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAABB
  • Access Course: Please contact the university for further information.
  • BTEC: Please contact the university for further information.
  • European Baccalaureate: 80% overall incl English Literature or Drama/Theatre studies

Entry Requirement

Applicants to this course are expected to have or be taking one of the following A-levels: Drama and Theatre Studies, Drama, Performance Studies, English Literature, English Language & Literature.  Applicants should usually offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at A-Level. Students taking the IB programme should hold or be taking a Drama-based or English-based subject at Higher Level, and should normally offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at Higher Level.

2014

Typical A-level offer: AAB including Drama/Theatre Studies or English Literature/English Language & Literature

Typical International Baccalaureate offer: 33 including 5 in HL English or Theatre Studies

All equivalent qualifications considered, please contact the university for further information

Students should also have 5 GCSEs including English (grade C) and Mathematics (grade C).

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • TOEFL: Internet-based score of 88 overall (minimum 19 in the Listening and Writing components; 20 in the Reading component; and 21 in the Speaking component)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.
 

Interviews

We operate an initial shortlisting process for this course on the basis of the information an applicant provides on their UCAS form. Candidates who are shortlisted will be invited to interview and audition and offers are only made after a successful interview and audition. These take place on Visit Days and include an opportunity to look around the campus, view accommodation, meet current students, talk to staff members and find out more about the course. The interview and audition itself will be with a member of our Drama team. Candidates are asked to perform a short monologue from a selection provided and there is also a discussion which generally covers topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and English at Grade C or above.

Assessment

For the majority of candidates the most important factors in assessing the application will be past and future achievement in examinations, academic interest in the subject being applied for, personal interest and extra-curricular activities and the confidential reference. We consider applicants as individuals and accept students from a very wide range of educational backgrounds and spend time considering your application in order to reach an informed decision relating to your application. Typical offers are indicated above. Applicants to this course who are shortlisted will also be required to attend for interview and audition.

Fees and Funding

University Fees and Financial Support: UK/EU Students

We are committed to ensuring that Tuition Fees do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds.  Full time UK/EU students starting an undergraduate degree course in 2014 will be charged a tuition fee of £9,000.  The level of fee may be subject to yearly increases.

International Students:

Full time International students starting an undergraduate degree course in 2014 will be charged a tuition fee of £12,900.  The level of fee may be subject to yearly increases.

50th Anniversary Scholarships

We recently celebrated our 50th anniversary and to mark this we want to give our international undergraduate students an exciting opportunity.  Once you have an offer from UEA for September 2014, you can apply for our anniversary scholarship.

We will award 20 undergraduate students with scholarships covering 50% of the first year’s tuition fee. To find out if your are eligible and for details of how to apply please click here - www.uea.ac.uk/study/international/fees-and-funding/international-undergraduate-scholarships


Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Literature, Drama and Creative Writing)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.