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UCAS Course Code

W400

Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Bachelor of Arts

Course Organiser

Mr. Tony Gash


Drama at the University of East Anglia has been ranked 2nd in the 2015 Guardian University Guide. This programme allows you to combine a strong practical emphasis with the study of the theory, history and social significance of drama, complemented by detailed study of dramatic literature and aspects of visual and technical design. You will participate in a major practical project each year as well as undertaking a wide variety of applied drama work and there is also the opportunity for you to study on placement with professional companies.

The degree interweaves practice and theory throughout the three years and ranges across many periods (Classical Greek to contemporary), performance styles (naturalism to non-Western) and major theoretical and directorial approaches (Aristotle to Artaud, Stanislavsky to ‘physical’ theatre).  There is a core of required units (including projects and productions), nearly all of which use practical classes and workshops to approach and link text and performance, periods, cultures and approaches.  Technical classes, acting skills and voice work are part of the training offered.  Students may have the opportunity to spend a period of time on placement with a professional company or venue (in fields such as TV, radio and film, as well as theatre).  Most of the practical work takes place in the Studio, highly adaptable for all stage and auditorium configurations and with full support facilities.  In addition to required modules, students have a choice of a wide range of modules on dramatic literature, as well as in areas other than drama such as film, television and media, American studies, modern languages and history.

Course Structure

Year 1

From the start of the first year all drama students (whatever their programme) are introduced to a range of applied and technical theatre skills (including safe use of the Drama Studio and aspects of lighting, sound, stage management and stage design) as well as basic acting, group work and weekly voice classes. You also begin a study of the historical repertoire, reading dramatic texts from Ancient Greece to the present. Lectures explore history and conventions as well as interpretative and performance strategies for a selection of ‘key texts’. You also choose from a range of optional modules (including Literature in History, Key Issues in Film Studies and Introduction to Philosophy) which equip you to take further seminars in these areas later on. A spring semester module (currently focusing on Post-War British Drama) leads to performance work with staff and MA theatre directors.

In the Autumn semester of Year 1 there are two compulsory modules: Applied Drama and Technical Skills (comprising a number of different practical strands, including basic movement and voice work, aspects of technical theatre, and group-based classes and scene rehearsals on selected texts) and Introduction to World Dramatic Literatures (lectures/demonstrations on major plays and playwrights).  The third module can be chosen from film, history or literature.

During the Spring semester you follow Postwar British Drama (which includes some performance work) and Theatre: Theory and Performance.  You have a wide range of choice for the third module.

Year 2

The second year introduces a wide range of optional courses (such as detailed acting work in The Actor and the Text; seminars in, for example, Classical Drama, Shakespeare, Contemporary American Drama, Political Theatre or Creative Writing). There is an emphasis on World Performance, exploring non-western theatrical forms. Second-year practical work currently focuses on ‘out-reach’ work, taking performance into a variety of real-world contexts (recent projects include work with school children, the elderly and trainee medical personnel).  You can also choose (though this is entirely optional) an internship with a professional venue or company and spend the first semester on placement at a theatre, drama school or with a theatre, film or television company at home or abroad.  The only required elements are an assessed production and a unit devoted to the exploration of performance events, their nature and function.  Otherwise you choose units from the extensive drama offerings including scriptwriting and from other disciplines.

Year 3

The third year revolves around a final, full-scale, drama production and its related seminar and supervised individual performance projects.  Also available as final-year specialisms are a drama dissertation and special subjects in Shakespeare and in problems posed by the adaptation for stage of non-dramatic literary material.

Teaching and Assessment:

Key skills, issues and ideas are introduced in lectures given by all members of faculty, including literary critics, literary historians, and writers.  More specialist study is undertaken in small group seminars. These are chosen from a range offered within the School and across the University. You will also spend time studying and researching in the library or carrying out practical work or projects. In most subject areas, you are assessed at the end of each year on the basis of coursework and, in some cases, project and examination results. In your final year, you will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice and with the advice of tutors. There is no final examination. Your final degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and three.


UniStats Information

Why Choose UsChoosing to study within the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing at UEA means joining some of the most satisfied students in the UK.

In the 2014 National Student Survey, we received an overall satisfaction score of 95% in both English Studies and Drama, and 93% for Imaginative Writing. We were are also in the top 10 for English and Creative Writing in the 2015 Guardian University Guide. 

Here are some of the reasons why:

  • Our world-famous Creative Writing department attracts successful and aspiring writers from around the world
  • The School is home to the British Centre for Literary Translation
  • You can take part in our active and engaged student body
  • Discover endless opportunities to attend and get involved in our rich schedule of events, readings and performances

A broad range of courses

The School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing brings together writers, scholars, performers, teachers and students in an exploration of the powers and possibilities of literature. Our aim is to make creative writing and critical reading confront one another in ways that sharpen and enliven both.

We have a world-famous reputation for Creative Writing, and are also home to highly rated scholars with a focus on literature, translation and drama. With a strong focus on interdisciplinary learning, we work closely with other departments at UEA.

Known for student experience

In 2014 UEA was ranked in the top 3 in the UK for Student Experience by the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey  – as well as ranking joint third for overall satisfaction in the 2014 National Student Survey.

Student life at UEA is enhanced through an active Student Union, a myriad clubs and societies to join and a lively and engaged student body.

Literary festivals and events

Writers from across the globe travel to UEA to take part in our long-running literary festival organised by the Arthur Miller Centre and the Centre for Creative and Performing Arts.

The teaching staff and students also put on a number of events throughout the year, including readings, performances and plays.

The University’s significant contribution to creative writing was recognised with the recent prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education.

Teaching and research excellence

In the National Student Survey 2014, we achieved excellent teaching scores - 94% for Drama, 96% for English Studies and 91% for Imaginative Writing. 

As one of our students, you will benefit from our interdisciplinary approach, and have the scope to tailor your own degree as your interests develop throughout your time at UEA.

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF2014), a major Government analysis of university research quality, the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing has come 10th among UK English departments. 82% of our research has been rated either 4* (world leading) or 3* (internationally excellent). Our academic staff are writers, as well as teachers, and are at the forefront of research in their field. Many contribute articles to leading newspapers, appear on television and radio arts programmes, publish original research and write novels, short stories, poems and plays.

If you choose to study with us, you can expect to be inspired by leading figures in the literary world such as Kathryn Hughes, writer of the biographies of Mrs Beeton and George Eliot, Giles Foden, whose novel The Last King of Scotland was made into an Oscar winning Hollywood movie, and novelist Rachel Hore, a regular in the bestseller list.

Year

Compulsory Study (80 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

APPLIED DRAMA AND TECHNICAL SKILLS

Reserved for students on courses: W400U1, WQ43U1, WW84U1. A mixture of workshops, seminars, physical skills, technical classes, aiming to begin the process of training in all areas related to the delivery of an intelligent performance.

LDCD4016A

20

INTRODUCTION TO WORLD DRAMATIC LITERATURES 1

This module examines a wide range of influential plays in several genres, drawn from the work of major European dramatists, and with due attention given to issues of both text and performance. The plays are drawn from the work of Aeschylus, Euripides, Shakespeare, Webster, Wycherley, Moliere and Racine, as well as medieval and non-European theatre. A weekly lecture is accompanied by demonstrations/discussions of central scenes and/or video extracts.

LDCD4007A

20

POSTWAR BRITISH DRAMA

Reserved for students on courses: W400, WQ43, WW84 This volatile and rich period after World War II in Britain radically transformed the British Theatre and saw the rise of a number of innovative theatre companies throughout the second half of the twentieth century. This module examines British Theatre in context from the 1950s to the 1990s. The module will explore the work of seminal theatre companies, playwrights and directors in the United Kingdom and interrogate the performance styles through the lens of British social history through the decades. Through a detailed examination of dramatic texts, video clips, memoirs, journal articles and newspaper clippings, as well as practical workshops and participatory performances of work from the period under scrutiny, we will explore all aspects of theatrical performance from design to direction.

LDCD4003B

20

THEATRE: THEORY AND PERFORMANCE

Reserved for students taking degree programmes: WW84 Scriptwriting and Performance, WQ43 English Literature and Drama and W400 Drama. This module investigates theories of theatre through the reading and discussion of key theoretical texts, and through practical workshops exploring voice, movement and performance processes, while continuing elements of the technical skills training begun in Semester 1.

LDCD4017B

20

Option A Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANALYSING FILM

Analysing Film is designed to provide you with techniques and methods that can be applied to the textual analysis of films, alongside core study and practical skills that will be used throughout your university career. The module will cover a range of formal features and frameworks including image and sound production (notably narrative, camerawork, editing, soundtrack), and their relationships with the ways in which films construct meaning. You will be expected to engage with the range of possible approaches to audio-visual analysis, and apply the ideas under discussion to diverse examples from film. Key study skills include use of the library and internet for research, note-taking, and the conventions of academic writing such as essay planning, referencing, and avoiding claims of plagiarism.

AMAM4009A

20

INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES

This module seeks to foster an interdisciplinary awareness by examining literature as cultural response. It will introduce students to some landmark texts and theories of cultural studies, using Victorian and early modernist writing to explore these ideas, and examine cultural and historicist readings of both literary and popular prose. While it is a core module for those in Literature and History, it is suited to all those interested in interdisciplinary study. It is taught through seminars.'

LDCL4010A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

This module is designed to provide an introduction to medieval history both for first year historians and students from other schools. It surveys the history of medieval Europe, including England, from c.1000 to c1300, and also examines some archaeology, literature, art, and architecture from the period. The module also aims to introduce students to a range of primary sources, including some of the physical remains to be found in East Anglia.

HIS-4001A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN HISTORY

This module provides a wide-ranging introduction to the political, social and economic transformation of Britain and Europe from the late eighteenth century to the First World War. Among the themes it considers are industrialisation and its impact; revolution and reform; nationalism and imperialism; gender and society; great power relations; the impact of war and the collapse of the old Europe in 1917-18.

HIS-4003A

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY 1

This is the main introductory module to the study of literature. It aims to help new students to read historically, by offering a range of models of the relationship between literature and history, explored through the study of selected historical and literary moments. The module is taught by a weekly lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4008A

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY II

Literature in History II shifts our attention to writing from the 19th century to the present. Although we are still interested in historical context, our focus turns to the history of an idea about literature. Literary realism, or the idea that the novel can, and should, reflect real life, will be our central concern: after establishing what literary realism is and why it was such an important idea in the 19th century, we will examine how writers might agree with, or react against literary realism at different times, and finish by exploring the possibility of literary realism now. The module will allow you a full semester to grapple with a key aesthetic debate about the novel, engage with it through literary and critical texts, and help you to think about the implications of the question of what a novel can - or ought - to do. The module will be taught by weekly lecture and seminar, both of which are compulsory.

LDCL4019B

20

READING PLAYS

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON W400 ONLY. A seminar based module specially aimed at first year members of the Drama programme. It develops a vocabulary for the analysis and close reading of dramatic texts, including their implicit visual and interpersonal dynamics. The playwrights treated will vary each year.

LDCD4018B

20

READING TEXTS II

This module seeks to build on and develop the work of the Autumn semester, in particular that of Reading Texts and Reading Translations. The focus will fall again on small-group discussion and on the reading of a small number of texts - one creative, and one critical - chosen by the tutor from a set list. With this close attention to reading at its core, the module will also look at a number of the terms and ideas central to the study of literature and to the practice of interpretation. Not available to Visiting Students.

LDCL4011B

20

READING TEXTS: TUTORIAL CLASS

This module provides the opportunity to work closely on selected texts within the contexts of a small group. It aims to develop and explore modes of textual analysis. By the end of the module the students will have highly developed reading skills, a sense of the implications of interpreting texts and the individual research skills essential for a university degree. Not available to Visiting Students.

LDCL4009A

20

READING TRANSLATIONS: TUTORIAL CLASS

This module provides the opportunity to work closely with texts in translation, looking at how we read and analyse them and how we consider their relationship to the originals. We aim to develop the skills necessary for working with foreign texts in English translation. A thorough reading knowledge of another language besides English is essential.

LDCL4013A

20

WRITING TEXTS

This module explores the culture and anthropology of writing, and addresses issues such as the differences between writing and speaking, between literary and non-literary texts, and the writer's relationship with readers. In weekly lectures and seminar groups, we will look at the writing process itself - drafting, revising, editing, translating - and will explore how and why texts come into being, and how they work to position the reader or to generate readerly interaction. The module is taught by a lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4020B

20

Option A Study (100 credits)

Students will select 100 credits from the following modules:

Students on this programme are not permitted to take an Internship module (LDCD5014A/LDCD5015B0 as well as the Semester Abroad modules (LDCL5025B/LDCL5026B). At the end of Year 2, all students must have taken LDCD5022A: From Tragic to Epic Performance and LDCD5018B:Drama Outreach Project unless you have chosen a Semester Abroad or an Internship module. Those students who opt for a Semester Abroad or Internship must have taken either LDCD5022A: From Tragic to Epic Performance or LDCD5O18B: Drama Outreach Project. Students who select either of the Creative Industries Research Internship modules LDCD5014A/LDC5015B) must normally also select one of the Creative Industries Research Project modules (LDCD5019A/LDC5020B).

Name Code Credits

ADAPTATION: SHAKESPEARE ON STAGE AND SCREEN

This module explores the rich dramatic and cinematic traditions of Shakespearean adaptation. It considers a range of adaptations, from the seventeenth-century versions of Macbeth, King Lear and Henry V to more recent film versions of Shakespeare's plays, examining the light that adaptive transformations may cast on both the original plays and on the different social and cultural circumstances of the new productions. The module focuses in particular upon cinematic adaptations of Richard III, Henry V, The Tempest, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth and King Lear, though will also discuss many other examples from stage and screen. In seminars linked to weekly screening this module offers an introduction to the theory and practice of adaptation as well as an outline view of how to read Shakespeare on film.

LDCD5021A

20

AUDIO DRAMA: THE THEATRE OF THE MIND

Because sound is invisible, audio drama is sometimes thought of as more imaginative than visual drama. Audio theatre takes place in the mind rather than on stage. Through practice and theory this module explores audio drama and the invisible world of sound. We will do voice work, create sound effects, analyse music, and collaborate on an audio drama to be podcast over the Internet. Our practice will be sharpened by questioning how the aesthetics of sound compares to sight, how changes in sound technology influence culture, and how sound represents race, gender, and nationality. We will listen to a wide range of radio genres, including comedy, drama, music, and news, from "classic" shows like 'The Goon Show' and 'War of the Worlds' to the more recent 'Planet B' and 'Another Case of Milton Jones'. To create our final audio drama project, students will gain experience using audio recording and editing software.

LDCD5052A

20

COMEDY AND THE ABSURD IN DRAMA

How and why does comedy work as idea and theatrical practice? This module explores comedy across time and place, going back to both classical comedy (Aristophanes) and the roots of commedia dell'arte, and continuing through Moliere and Wycherley in the seventeenth-century, Goldoni in the eighteenth, Oscar Wilde and Alfred Jarry in the 1890s, and into the twentieth century with Beckett, Ionesco, Stoppard, Orton and Fo. The module ends with Richard Bean's 2011 adaptation of Goldoni in One Man, Two Guvnors. We'll study the theory, practice and politics of comedy in drama, encompassing comedy as social critique, comedy of ideas, theatre of the absurd, farce as confrontation, carnival and the grotesque, comic bodies, clowning, metatheatre and theatricality. There may be opportunities to view some of the plays on film and to participate in some practical workshops. The main mode is seminar discussion. Assessment is by means of a group seminar participation, a scene analysis and a longer written project. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment but this module is open to all.

LDCL5055B

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (AUT)

Supervised placements and internships in one or other of the performance orientated creative industries in Britain or elsewhere. As with LDCD5019A, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5014A

40

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (SPR)

Supervised placements and internships in one or other of the performance orientated creative industries in Britain or elsewhere. As with LDCD5020B, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5015B

40

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (AUT)

Either an extended piece of research and writing on a drama-related topic selected by the individual with the approval of the module organiser, or an approved and supervised solo performance piece. As with LDCD5014A, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5019A

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (SPR)

Either an extended piece of research and writing on a drama-related topic selected by the individual with the approval of the module organiser, or an approved and supervised solo performance piece. As with LDCD5015B, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5020B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 2 Creative Writing modules. The teaching uses structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of prose fiction and poetry. In the first half of the seminar students will write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. In the second half the focus will shift to the work of established authors, using sample texts as a stimulus to students' own writing.

LDCC5005A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (SPR)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 2 Creative Writing modules. The teaching uses structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of prose fiction and poetry. In the first half of the seminar students will write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. In the second half the focus will shift to the work of established authors, using sample texts as a stimulus to students' own writing.

LDCC5004B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (AUT)

This module enables students to test the range of their abilities as writers of poetry. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as voice, persona, sound, imagery, metaphor, structure and form. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aims: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing poetry and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LCCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5003A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (SPR)

This module enables students to test the range of their abilities as writers of poetry. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as voice, persona, sound, imagery, metaphor, structure and form. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aims: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing poetry and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LCCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5007B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (AUT)

This module enables students to test their abilities and potential as writers of prose fiction. It is not intended for beginners, or those with no experience of a formal creative writing environment. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as character, genre voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aim: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LIT STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LDCC5001A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5001A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (SPR)

This module enables students to test their abilities and potential as writers of prose fiction. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as character, genre, voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LDCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5006B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (AUT)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE SPRING MODULE (LDCC2W24) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/television.

LDCC5002A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (SPR)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE AUTUMN MODULE (LDCC2W05) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/TV.

LDCC5008B

20

DEVISED PERFORMANCE

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON W400, WQ43 AND WW84 ONLY. In this course, we will explore the concept of devised performance, in all of its various manifestations, and examine methods to develop devised theatre in the rehearsal room. Exploring the use of non-dramatic texts, thematic structures, storytelling, found text and abstract imagery, this class allows students to study and put into practice the devising techniques of companies such as the Wooster Group, Elevator Repair Service, Complicite, Kneehigh and SITI Company. You will learn about theories of narrative and dramatic structure, and experiment with a range of techniques used to generate material for performance outside of the traditional genre of the "playwright's theatre".

LDCD5053A

20

DRAMA OUTREACH PROJECT

Reserved for students on courses: W400U1, WQ43U1, WW84U1. Group practical theatre work which entails public performance to target audiences in the community or on campus.

LDCD5018B

20

ERASMUS EXCHANGE: SPRING SEMESTER

LDC students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme for the Spring semester must enrol for this module. Students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme to Dublin will need in addition to enrol for module LDCL5024A. Further details on the ERASMUS scheme are available from the Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5025B

60

FROM TRAGIC TO EPIC PERFORMANCE

Through readings of classical and neo-classical generic criticism, as well as through an investigation of performance and staging demands, the module examines classical, post-classical and early modern forms of tragedy, and contrasts them with the complex emergent forms of tragicomedy and (later) epic, which, in different ways, re-model or resist the central experience of tragic reception. The course will look at plays selected from different genres, countries and periods, e.g. classical Greek (Sophocles) and Roman (Seneca) French Neoclassical (Racine), Spanish golden age (Lope de Vega Calderon), English Jacobean (Middleton and Rowley, Ford), Japanese Kabuki, post-revolutionary German (from Schiller to Brecht). By positing strategies for reading and performing such plays, it will thus develop a deeper knowledge of stage history and of complex theatrical styles. It will also engage with critical discourse, especially in aesthetics and genre criticism (Zeami, Aristotle, Castelvetro, Dryden, Lessing, Brecht).

LDCD5022A

20

I AM

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS REGISTERED FOR COURSES Q300, Q3W8, QV31, QT37, W400, WQ43, WW84 ONLY. The purpose of this Module is to explore notions of personal identity and investigate how a heightened self-knowledge can benefit our relationship to and impact upon the world. In LDC, the question of human subjectivity is approached daily in the texts, novels, plays and poetry that constitute its curriculum. Using the rubric of Graduate Identity Theory, a programme of workshops will investigate how the study of these materials shapes our own self-image; our approach to life, and ultimately, our identity. Beginning with an introduction to Freud's theory of consciousness, we will be building a portfolio of material that considers the concept of identity from the ego to the online avatar. In activities such as creating blogs, tweeting and participating in other social media sites, we will experiment with the manipulation of identity and assess the impact of our online personas. The workshops and the production of an 'I Am (LDC)' portfolio are designed so that individuals can raise to consciousness their own unique attributes and make confident claims, through academic pursuit, about who they are and what they can do. The techniques of rhetoric, positive psychology and neuro-linguistic programme (NLP) will also be discussed as tools for esteem building and identity formation. Overall, the workshops will be designed to afford the opportunities to develop, practise and rehearse those identity claims so that upon graduation, identity can be affirmed by the new social and economic world that the individual will enter.

LDCL5054A

20

LITERATURE STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD (SPRING)

A semester spent at a university abroad with the approval of the School. Students interested in European universities should see the Erasmus exchange modules, LDCL5024A and LDCL5025B. In all instances you must consult with Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5026B

60

METHOD AND MEISNER

Students will be given the opportunity to explore what it is to direct and act truthfully for the camera with the intention of drawing out the most exciting and edgy filmic performances. This will be done through two methods. One, a weekly Meisner scene class in which actors and directors will learn the craft of film performance and two, a weekly hands on film making class in which they will be given the skills to go off and film the scenes themselves in their cinematic form using digital cameras. The students will be taken through the technicalities of camera use, story boarding and the use of different shots to create the sense of the scene. Through the practical, hands on process of making short films, students will gain a general understanding of the process and techniques of film making and through the Meisner and Method techniques, start to build a creative tool kit that is appropriate to working for the screen. The module is for LEVEL 2 DRAMA students only: W400, WQ43, WW84.

LDCD5054B

20

PERFORMANCE SKILLS: THE ACTOR AND THE TEXT

This module is reserved for Drama majors (W400), Drama/Literature Joints (WQ43), Scriptwriting and Performance (WW84), and Theatre Directing Masters students. Drama Minors wishing to apply must first seek approval for inclusion from Mr T. Gash. The main methods of study are through: (1) individual performance of poems and speeches, (2) scene classes, (3) character study of roles in classic plays.

LDCD5016A

20

POLITICAL THEATRE

This module examines the use of theatre and performance - by the State, by oppositional groups, by political activists and by theatre and performance practitioners - to solidify or challenge structures of power. The course looks at specific examples of how theatre and public spectacles have been used in the twentieth century to control or contest the political stage. Examining American, South America, African, Russian, and Eastern European performance in the twentieth century, this class will document and explore through specific performances, videos, dramatic texts and theoretical essays, how performance in theory and practice can be used to explore issues to race, ethnicity, gender, political upheaval and social change within a society.

LDCD5011B

20

SHAKESPEARE

The aim of this lecture-seminar module is to help you become a better reader of Shakespearean drama. He was writing between about 1590 and about 1610; obviously his plays speak to us over a great cultural distance, and we can find fresh ways of reading them by exploring the theatrical, generic and historical frameworks in which they were written and staged. The lectures, then, will introduce a range of contexts, and the seminars will seek to turn them to account in the reading of the dramatic texts themselves.

LDCL5040B

20

THE PRACTICE OF SCREENWRITING: ISSUES IN ADAPTATION

This module is a practical screenwriting class. Students will explore basic issues in screenwriting and will focus on the problems of creating new screenplays adapted from novels, short stories, articles and other sources. Classroom sessions will compare film adaptations to the original material, introduce concepts of screenwriting and screenplay form, and apply key tools of script analysis. The final project will offer the opportunity to write a short screenplay or the first act of a feature-length script. The module offers essential skills for anyone contemplating a screenwriting career. The module is taught by seminar and screening.

AMAP5117B

20

THE PRACTICE OF SCREENWRITING: ISSUES IN ADAPTATION

This module is a practical screenwriting class. Students will explore basic issues in screenwriting and will focus on the problems of creating new screenplays adapted from novels, short stories, articles and other sources. Classroom sessions will compare film adaptations to the original material, introduce concepts of screenwriting and screenplay form, and apply key tools of script analysis. The final project will offer the opportunity to write a short screenplay or the first act of a feature-length script. The module offers essential skills for anyone contemplating a screenwriting career. The module is taught by seminar and screening

AMAP5118A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing, participation in workshops, and one-to-one feedback sessions with your tutor provides formative assessment and allows you to learn to write journalism before your achievements are assessed. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - practices.

LDCC5009A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing, participation in workshops, and one-to one feedback sessions with your tutor provides formative assessment and allows you to learn to write journalism before your achievements are assessed. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - practices.

LDCC5010B

20

THEATRES OF REVOLT: NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPEAN DRAMA

Beginning with Ibsen and Strindberg, this module examines the development of modern forms of drama during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, addressing modern concerns - self and society, gender, sexuality, social and class conflicts, creation and destruction, the unconscious - and deploying experimental types of theatre by Chekhov, Maeterlinck, Wilde, Hauptmann, Buchner and Wedekind, as well as the two seminal Scandinavians. We will be looking at versions of Naturalism, Symbolism and Expressionism as modernist modes in drama and suggesting ways in which these shape and anticipate later developments. Assessment is by means of one scene analysis and one longer essay. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment.

LDCL5030A

20

Option B Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

"THE ARTS IN BRITAIN FROM SUTTON HOO TO THE BOOK OF KELLS, c. 600-850"

This module will focus on the visual arts and architecture in the British Isles beginning with the age of Sutton Hoo and the arrival of Christianity from Ireland and Rome. The formation of new kingdoms, the establishment of the church, contacts with Continental Europe and the enduring life of indigenous cultural traditions all contributed to the development of extraordinarily various, inventive and sophisticated new visual paradigms, in building, in stone carving, metalwork and the arts of the book.

AMAA5091A

20

19TH CENTURY AMERICAN WRITING

This module aims to build on and develop your knowledge of the range of American literature in the nineteenth century. We will consider the rise of a distinctly American literary tradition in modes like realism, the gothic, romanticism, naturalism and the detective story, looking to make new connections both among writers and between literature and such larger issues as slavery, economics and feminism.

AMAL5012A

20

20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

This module provides a broadly chronological view of American poetry from the start of the twentieth century to the present day. It wonders about what the consequences might be if we consider seriously Emerson's claim (made in 1844), that America might be seen as a poem. Through detailed examination each week of groups of three related poets, the module aims both to question what constitutes an American poetics, and to examine how this conception has changed over the course of the twentieth century. As well as tracing a trajectory in American poetry from modernist to postmodernist modes, one of its primary concerns is also to start exploring how ideas of what an American poetry might be are inflected differently in 'mainstream' and in more avant-garde (or 'experimental') poetries. Indeed, by explicitly thinking about these differences the module will pay particular attention to the ways in which ideas of nationhood, of political dissent and protest, of poetic 'groupings' and canon-formation, are instrumental in determining what we choose to see as America's representative poetry. By the end of the module students should have a wide knowledge of a range of different twentieth-century American poetries, as well as a strong sense of how the political, cultural and literary 'tastes' of America across the century have delivered it the sorts of poetry it deserves.

AMAL5011B

20

ADAPTATION: SHAKESPEARE ON STAGE AND SCREEN

This module explores the rich dramatic and cinematic traditions of Shakespearean adaptation. It considers a range of adaptations, from the seventeenth-century versions of Macbeth, King Lear and Henry V to more recent film versions of Shakespeare's plays, examining the light that adaptive transformations may cast on both the original plays and on the different social and cultural circumstances of the new productions. The module focuses in particular upon cinematic adaptations of Richard III, Henry V, The Tempest, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth and King Lear, though will also discuss many other examples from stage and screen. In seminars linked to weekly screening this module offers an introduction to the theory and practice of adaptation as well as an outline view of how to read Shakespeare on film.

LDCD5021A

20

ADOLESCENCE IN AMERICAN CULTURE POST-1950

This module will suggest that there is a preoccupation with adolescence in postwar and contemporary American culture, and will explore why this is the case. It will do so by introducing students to representations of adolescence in various disciplines, focusing particularly on literature, film, psychoanalysis and cultural studies. Questions to be explored will include: What is 'American' about adolescence? How do representations of adolescence vary according to factors such as gender, race and region? Is there a particular discipline or artistic form which is especially suited to depictions of adolescence?

AMAS5025A

20

AMERICA AND VIETNAM

This module examines the involvement of the United States in Vietnam, from the Second World War to the Paris Peace Accords of 1973. Focusing on the main period of US entanglement, 1963-1973, it uses documents, historical studies, film, and literary texts to illuminate the American experience in Vietnam and its domestic repercussions.

AMAH5041A

20

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

This course offers a critical introduction to understanding America's role in the world. It provides historical and political analyses of U.S. foreign relations, looking at the themes and traditions that have shaped America's increasing influence in global affairs during the twentieth century up to the present day. From the war of 1898 to the conflicts of the early twenty-first century, it examines how and why the U.S. relationship to the world has changed. Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? In discussing foreign relations, the course analyses political and diplomatic elites, but also, the role of foreign actors and private organisations, from religious groups to citizen organisations to NGOs, in defining America in the world.

AMAH5051A

20

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

This module offers a critical introduction to understanding America's role in the world. It provides historical and political analyses of U.S. foreign relations, looking at the themes and traditions that have shaped America's increasing influence in global affairs during the twentieth century up to the present day. From the war of 1898 to the conflicts of the early twenty-first century, it examines how and why the U.S. relationship to the world has changed. Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? In discussing foreign relations, the course analyses political and diplomatic elites, but also, the role of foreign actors and private organisations, from religious groups to citizen organisations to NGOs, in defining America in the world. It also engages with important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, modernization, and the 'cultural turn' - and connects these to emerging trends in the fields of American Studies and international relations.

HIS-5053A

20

AMERICAN MASCULINITIES

This interdisciplinary module will examine how national identity and white masculinity are entwined in a conflicting discourse of hegemonic and challenging narratives in the US. It will focus on a specific construction of white masculinity as it has become embedded and legitimized as the normative national identity against which all others are subordinated. The module will examine gender discourses that radically challenge this accepted link between masculinity, whiteness and national identity.

AMAS5018B

20

AMERICAN MUSIC

The first book published in the New World was a hymn book. Music, sacred and profane, has been at the centre of American lives ever since. Accordingly, this module will explore the history of American music - but it will also examine the way that its development tells a larger story. Focusing largely on the vernacular musical traditions we will encounter a wide range of musical styles and musicians, each of which has something vital to tell us about the shaping of America. After all, as Plato knew, "When the mode of the music changes, the walls of the city shake."

AMAS5023A

20

AMERICAN PARIS BETWEEN THE WARS

This module introduces some of the styles, ideas and ideologies of trans-Atlantic modernism as elements in the creation of a myth. It centres on the American expatriate colony in Paris and, from this, works to contextualise and re-imagine some of the century's most notorious literary and artistic moments. Initial studies of the little magazines, manifestos, publishers, painters and photographers provide a sense of the driving political and aesthetic energies of the period, while the module's middle weeks uses this context to re-read a group of expatriate novels. The final three weeks of the course shifts the emphasis to considerations of memory, memoir and the construction of myth.

AMAL5014A

20

AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

This module surveys the prose of some of the twentieth century's most important American women writers, writers who (or whose 'other' works) tend to disappear from reading lists that include books by women only out of duty. Along the way we will seek to interrogate the terms with which we begin: American, women and prose. Assuming that biology does not define literature, we will instead seek to understand the social pressures on these women writers, and their responses to them, in an effort to maintain the specificity, diversity and range of these women's literary pursuits.

AMAL5013A

20

AMSTERDAM IN THE GOLDEN AGE

This module is focused on one particular location, the city of Amsterdam. In the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century, Amsterdam became a major hub of world trade famous for its (relative) religious tolerance. With that came a flourishing of art and architecture, produced both for export and for the domestic market. The module explores the links between religious tolerance, nascent capitalism and an emergent market for art (as opposed to earlier, bespoke systems). In particular, we shall consider how and why existing artistic models - such as tulips and carpets from Turkey, Venetian paintwork, Japanese silks and Classical architecture - were adapted for new purposes. In terms of artists, we shall engage with the works of, amongst others, Jacob van Campen, Artus Quellinus, Pieter Lastman and Rembrandt van Rijn. The visit to Amsterdam will include tours of the Rijksmuseum, the Rembrandthuis, the Amstelkring and Amsterdam museums as well as visits to important monuments such as the Westerkerk and the Town Hall. At current prices, we estimate that the trip will cost around GBP250.

AMAA5024B

20

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

2500 years ago Parmenides invented metaphysics by arguing that there is one thing that never changes. Plato responded with a theory of Forms, stable realities quite unlike the world of appearances. But later in his life he attacked that theory. Why? And did Aristotle have a better answer to how reality relates to other things in this world? This module explores some of the most influential texts in the field and provides a sound foundation in central themes from classical philosophy. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5077A

20

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

2500 years ago Parmenides invented metaphysics by arguing that there is one thing that never changes. Plato responded with a theory of Forms, stable realities quite unlike the world of appearances. But later in his life he attacked that theory. Why? And did Aristotle have a better answer to how reality relates to other things in this world? This module explores some of the most influential texts in the field and provides a sound foundation in central themes from classical philosophy. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5077A

20

ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND, C. 500-1066

This module surveys the history of the English from their arrival in Britain in the fifth century until the end of the eleventh century and the conquest of England by the Normans. We shall cover topics such as the conversion of the English in the seventh century; the domination of England by Mercia in the eighth century; the Viking invasions and the reign of Alfred the Great; the emergence of Wessex as the dominant force in Britain in the tenth century; the conquest of England by the Danes in the eleventh century; and the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

HIS-5005A

20

ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN GEORGIAN NORWICH

18th century Norwich was a remarkable, fascinating and diverse city and offers a rich resource for the study of art and architecture of a particular time and place. The legacy of the wealthy and populous medieval city remained very much in the present, in terms of the parish churches and a huge housing stock, but also provides the background for our investigation of the importance of the city as a centre for the production and consumption of art and craft. The 18th century also saw considerable changes in the city, with important new civic or public buildings being introduced into the cityscape, including the Norwich and Norfolk Hospital and the Octagon Chapel. Works by artists of the Norwich School, as well as nationally notable antiquarians and cartographers also took a leading role in the city's own enquiry into its own past, present and future, and also in how the city was portrayed externally. At the heart of the module will be the interactions between and amongst art/architecture, people and place. Several of the sessions will be held in Norwich so that we can study the art and architecture first hand, and in many cases in situ.

AMAA5027B

20

ASPECTS OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE

This module provides an introduction to selected aspects of the French language, from the structure of words and sentences to types of variation. Topics include: varieties of French, phonetics/phonology, morphology and etymology, gender, collocations, contrastive French/English syntax, tense and aspect, modality, spoken and written French, non-standard French and other registers. Activities involve introduction to computer text analysis tools among other software. There is a two-hour seminar for this module and a lecture which is shared with LCSF5048A. A-Level French or equivalent is essential.

PPLF5005A

20

ASPECTS OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE

This module provides an introduction to selected aspects of the French language, from the structure of words and sentences to types of variation. Topics include: varieties of French, phonetics/phonology, morphology and etymology, gender, collocations, contrastive French/English syntax, tense and aspect, modality, spoken and written French, non-standard French and other registers. Activities involve introduction to computer text analysis tools among other software. There is a two-hour seminar for this module and a lecture which is shared with LCSF5048A. A-Level French or equivalent is essential.

PPLF5005A

20

AUDIO DRAMA: THE THEATRE OF THE MIND

Because sound is invisible, audio drama is sometimes thought of as more imaginative than visual drama. Audio theatre takes place in the mind rather than on stage. Through practice and theory this module explores audio drama and the invisible world of sound. We will do voice work, create sound effects, analyse music, and collaborate on an audio drama to be podcast over the Internet. Our practice will be sharpened by questioning how the aesthetics of sound compares to sight, how changes in sound technology influence culture, and how sound represents race, gender, and nationality. We will listen to a wide range of radio genres, including comedy, drama, music, and news, from "classic" shows like 'The Goon Show' and 'War of the Worlds' to the more recent 'Planet B' and 'Another Case of Milton Jones'. To create our final audio drama project, students will gain experience using audio recording and editing software.

LDCD5052A

20

AUSTEN AND THE BRONTES: READING THE ROMANCE

This module will consider three texts by Austen and the Brontes. A wide variety of literary and historical contexts will be discussed: feminisms, colonialism, impact of war, the social status of the woman writer, representations of governesses, madness and mad women, rakes, foreigners and strangers, minds and bodies, heroes and heroines. We investigate the ways that the lives of the authors of these novels have been told and read as romances. Opportunities will be available to work on film versions. Work on any text by these authors is welcomed in class and in coursework.

LDCL5035B

20

BEYOND PHILOSOPHICAL THEORIES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN

Ludwig Wittgenstein was one of the most influential philosophers in the 20th century. Central topics discussed are the 'Tractatus' conception of logic and language as well as the nature of philosophical problems and philosophical inquiry, including ethics. Students will benefit most from this module if they are already taken modules in the philosophy of mind or language. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5166B

20

BEYOND PHILOSOPHICAL THEORIES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN

Ludwig Wittgenstein was one of the most influential philosophers in the 20th century. Central topics discussed are the 'Tractatus' conception of logic and language as well as the nature of philosophical problems and philosophical inquiry, including ethics. Students will benefit most from this module if they are already taken modules in the philosophy of mind or language. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5166B

20

BORDERLANDS OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

Identified as the site "where the Third World grates against the First and bleeds", the US-Mexico border quite literally embodies the tense economic, historical and socio-political relationship between America and Mexico. This module provides an interdisciplinary reading of the Borderlands of the American Southwest, analysing a diverse range of literary texts, films and documentaries, art and performance art, and political essays that present conflicting images and experiences of 'America' from both the United States and Mexico. The border will be analysed not just as the point that divides 'civilisation' from 'savagery', but as an ongoing and established point of social and economic conflict, where traditional frontier ideology interacts with the ramifications of 'immigration', and with 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Topics for discussion will include lawlessness and law enforcement, violence and horror, illegal aliens and border crossing, myths and frontiers, NAFTA and economics, and the potentials and pitfalls of a borderland hybridity.

AMAS5043B

20

BRITAIN AND EUROPE

The UK's relationship with its continental European neighbours has historically been fraught with tension and difficulty. This module investigates and attempts to explain Britain's ambivalent attitude towards European integration and considers competing visions of Britain's post-war destiny. It tracks, through examination of internal debates in the two main political parties, the UK's changing European policy from aloofness in the 1950s through the two half-hearted applications for membership in the 1960s to accession in 1973 and the development of its reputation as an 'awkward partner'. It also examines the impact of EU membership on British politics and the British political system, assesses the success of Britain's efforts to shape the EU agenda, and critically evaluates the arguments for and against British membership, including those concerning British exceptionalism. This module is recommended for those students who intend to progress to the 'EU Studies with Brussels Internship' module (PSI-3A72) in Year 3

PPLI5055B

20

BRITISH FILM and TELEVISION

The module will explore the key issues in the analysis of British film and television. It will cover the conditions of their production, mediation and consumption, while also providing opportunities for close analysis of key texts, figures and periods. For example, it will examine the British film studios and the developing relations between film and television production; it will discuss the claims about the realist tradition within British film and television production, while simultaneously examining the centrality of spectacle within British film and television; it will analyse a range of British genres; it will explore debates over the situation of British stars and directors; it will study the preoccupation with historical materials in British film and television production; and, finally, it will scrutinize the concept of national cinema and observe the importance of international markets to both film and television production, an importance that dates back to the earliest days of both media. THIS MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY

AMAF5023S

20

BUILDING BLOCKS OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the key theoretical issues and debates that underpin the discipline of political science so that students understand the main methodological and ideological approaches to political science. It will also be of relevance to international relations students. The module will provide important foundations for the remainder of the politics major degree. It will be one of two compulsory modules for single honours Politics students. The first half of the module will focus on meta-theoretical concerns such as how to compare political phenomena and systems, ideas and material explanation, structure and agency, epistemology and ontology. The second part of the module will be concerned with the way in which these issues inform empirical political analysis. It covers the key empirical debates in political science about power, representation, accountability and policy making in the western democracies.

PPLX5160A

20

CATEGORIES AND CONCEPTS

This module introduces students to some of the most significant methodologies ('concepts') in the analysis of art, before considering some of the intellectual 'categories' which have been - and continue to be - central to thinking about cultural and artistic forms. The module offers both an introduction to some of the major approaches adopted by scholars in the humanities and social sciences, and a conceptual toolkit with which to engage critically with art and its meanings. Ideas and texts addressed in the module are drawn from a range of disciplines, including critical theory, politics, philosophy and aesthetics. The module is taught through a combination of two weekly lectures and one discussion seminar. The lectures offer an introduction to the relevant topic, and end with a question for us to discuss/debate in the final 10 minutes of the lecture period. The discussion seminars will consider key issues in the previous week's lectures and the weekly class readings which accompany them.

AMAA5090B

20

COMEDY AND THE ABSURD IN DRAMA

How and why does comedy work as idea and theatrical practice? This module explores comedy across time and place, going back to both classical comedy (Aristophanes) and the roots of commedia dell'arte, and continuing through Moliere and Wycherley in the seventeenth-century, Goldoni in the eighteenth, Oscar Wilde and Alfred Jarry in the 1890s, and into the twentieth century with Beckett, Ionesco, Stoppard, Orton and Fo. The module ends with Richard Bean's 2011 adaptation of Goldoni in One Man, Two Guvnors. We'll study the theory, practice and politics of comedy in drama, encompassing comedy as social critique, comedy of ideas, theatre of the absurd, farce as confrontation, carnival and the grotesque, comic bodies, clowning, metatheatre and theatricality. There may be opportunities to view some of the plays on film and to participate in some practical workshops. The main mode is seminar discussion. Assessment is by means of a group seminar participation, a scene analysis and a longer written project. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment but this module is open to all.

LDCL5055B

20

COMPARATIVE POLITICS

The aim of this module is to enable students to develop understanding of political systems in advanced Western states. Students graduating from the module will be able to demonstrate: - critical understanding of the main theories, models and concepts applied in the analysis of political systems and their comparison - knowledge of national political systems and their institutional dynamics, political processes and debates concerning the emergence of new political regimes, the politics of territory, parties and party systems, political leadership, legislatures, interest groups, the state and public policy, and identity and citizenship; - critical awareness of current debates in comparative politics - key skills, including critical evaluation, analytical investigation, written presentation, and oral communication.

PPLX5162B

20

CONCEALING AND REVEALING: ANCESTORS, SPIRITS AND KINGS

This module investigates what is represented in African art objects. Sometimes what is revealed by objects when in use is secondary in importance to what is concealed. The external agencies which motivate and empower objects may often lie in the domain of spirits. Kings themselves are often also regarded as spirits. How does that come through in the regalia kings wear, the places they live in and their decorative schemes? The module examines figural sculpture, the arts of divination and masquerade, shrines and funerary monuments. African Islam and Christianity are examined as further arenas for artistic and architectural expression. The final sessions look at the body as a site of artistic intervention and particularly at how it comes to articulate the complexities of identity in contemporary contexts.

AMAA5088B

20

CONSUMER CULTURE AND SOCIETY

This module explores the significance of consumption as a major form of social life. Drawing on a variety of theoretical perspectives, including sociology and cultural studies, it examines how taste, style and identity are defined by consumption and explores how consumerism ties in with wider debates about globalisation and geo- politics. In your assignments you will be asked to apply your knowledge of different theoretical perspectives and critically analyse specific examples of consumerism.

PPLM5061B

20

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION

The purpose of this module is to expose students to a range of prose works by important contemporary American writers. In particular, we will be concerned with some of the key concepts associated with contemporary American fiction, including the definition of the contemporary: postmodernism; metafiction; historiography; postcolonialism; and memory.

AMAL5015B

20

CONTEMPORARY BRITISH THEATRE (SUMMER SCHOOL)

This module offers insights into contemporary British theatre practice, with particular emphasis on seeing, discussing and writing about current examples of classical and contemporary drama in London and the East Anglia region. RESERVED FOR INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY.

LDCD5052S

20

CONTEMPORARY GALLERY AND MUSEUM STUDIES

As contemporary arts practice evolves, the space and functions of the museum are also changing. This module looks at the contexts of displaying contemporary art since the 1960s, including artist-led interventions in museums and galleries. These artistic interventions are relevant to museum professionals and art historians alike, because they go beyond the critique of museums' public spaces to question how museums work behind the scenes. Students on this module will gain an insight into contemporary art curating, the contribution that artists make to international debate, and some of the strategic issues that face museums and galleries today.

AMAA5011A

20

CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE CULTURE AND SOCIETY FROM NORTH TO SOUTH

Japan is often seen as a homogenous society, and Japanese themselves sometimes think like this. In reality, however, there are several ethnic minorities and migrant populations living in Japan. Besides, Japanese communities from north to south have developed their own particular cultures and identities. Japan is a multicultural society with different and sometimes conflicting value systems. This module offers a diversity of perspectives on Japan by focusing in on the local cultures of different cities and regions. Its aim is to equip students with good knowledge and understanding of contemporary Japanese identity, culture and society.

PPLJ5012A

20

CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE CULTURE AND SOCIETY FROM NORTH TO SOUTH

Japan is often seen as a homogenous society, and Japanese themselves sometimes think like this. In reality, however, there are several ethnic minorities and migrant populations living in Japan. Besides, Japanese communities from north to south have developed their own particular cultures and identities. Japan is a multicultural society with different and sometimes conflicting value systems. This module offers a diversity of perspectives on Japan by focusing in on the local cultures of different cities and regions. Its aim is to equip students with good knowledge and understanding of contemporary Japanese identity, culture and society.

PPLJ5012A

20

CONTEMPORARY WRITING

This module aims to take an open snapshot of different modes of writing in the recent British scene, not a post-war history of the novel. Together with the question of exactly what it means to be contemporary, we shall concentrate on a small number of thematic and/or formal features, looking in particular at more adventurous examples of recent literature.

LDCL5049B

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (AUT)

Supervised placements and internships in one or other of the performance orientated creative industries in Britain or elsewhere. As with LDCD5019A, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5014A

40

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (SPR)

Supervised placements and internships in one or other of the performance orientated creative industries in Britain or elsewhere. As with LDCD5020B, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5015B

40

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (AUT)

Either an extended piece of research and writing on a drama-related topic selected by the individual with the approval of the module organiser, or an approved and supervised solo performance piece. As with LDCD5014A, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5019A

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (SPR)

Either an extended piece of research and writing on a drama-related topic selected by the individual with the approval of the module organiser, or an approved and supervised solo performance piece. As with LDCD5015B, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5020B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 2 Creative Writing modules. The teaching uses structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of prose fiction and poetry. In the first half of the seminar students will write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. In the second half the focus will shift to the work of established authors, using sample texts as a stimulus to students' own writing.

LDCC5005A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (SPR)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 2 Creative Writing modules. The teaching uses structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of prose fiction and poetry. In the first half of the seminar students will write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. In the second half the focus will shift to the work of established authors, using sample texts as a stimulus to students' own writing.

LDCC5004B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (AUT)

This module enables students to test the range of their abilities as writers of poetry. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as voice, persona, sound, imagery, metaphor, structure and form. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aims: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing poetry and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LCCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5003A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (SPR)

This module enables students to test the range of their abilities as writers of poetry. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as voice, persona, sound, imagery, metaphor, structure and form. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aims: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing poetry and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LCCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5007B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (AUT)

This module enables students to test their abilities and potential as writers of prose fiction. It is not intended for beginners, or those with no experience of a formal creative writing environment. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as character, genre voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aim: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LIT STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LDCC5001A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5001A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (SPR)

This module enables students to test their abilities and potential as writers of prose fiction. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as character, genre, voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LDCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5006B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (AUT)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE SPRING MODULE (LDCC2W24) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/television.

LDCC5002A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (SPR)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE AUTUMN MODULE (LDCC2W05) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/TV.

LDCC5008B

20

CREATIVE WRITING:AN INTRODUCTION (SUMMER SCHOOL)

This module is for students with little previous experience of creative writing. We will be doing a set number of in-class exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation. On occasion we will study the work of established authors. Very often students will be asked to 'write about what they know', drawing on notebooks, memory, family stories, sensory impressions.... In both prose and poetry we will concentrate initially on generating material. In prose we will go on to look at character, dialogue, point-of-view, 'showing' vs 'telling', plotting, etc.. In poetry, we will begin to explore the possibilities of pattern and form, sound, voice, imagery, 'making strange', etc.. Students should equip themselves with a notebook for everyday use and a file or folder in which to keep handouts and all written work. Students will be required to complete exercises in class and for homework and should be prepared to read their work aloud.

LDCC5002S

20

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Through a combination of lectures and seminars, this module will explore the theory and practice of literary criticism from the origins of the study of English literature as an academic discipline to the present. In order to do this, we examine not only the work of literary critics and theorists, but also engage with developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary study.

LDCL5031A

20

CRITICAL THINKING

The main purpose of this module is to develop your critical skills as they pertain to thinking, reading, writing and looking. To deliver this, the module falls into two main sections. The first focuses on one particular methodology - object biographies - used in archaeology, anthropology, museum studies and art history. We shall examine this methodology in detail, breaking it down into its component sections. We shall then consider its strengths and its weaknesses; that is, we will subject it to a thorough critical evaluation. Then, in the second half of the module we shall focus more broadly on what critical thinking is, both in general and within each of the four disciplines taught in the School of World Art Studies. Building on this, the module ends by focusing on how you can apply critical thinking to your own thinking, reading, writing and looking. The module is taught through a combination of two weekly lectures and one discussion seminar. The lectures offer an introduction to the relevant topic, and end with a question for us to discuss/debate in the final 10 minutes of the lecture period. The discussion seminars will consider key issues in the previous week's lectures and the weekly class readings which accompany them.

AMAA5089A

20

CULTURAL THEORY AND ANALYSIS

This transdisciplinary module introduces a range of critical approaches to ideas of culture and encourages their assessment and application. As well as literature, we will be examining visual culture (art, film, advertising) and the practice of everyday life. Organised broadly historically and focussing on the twentieth century, we will consider different approaches to 'culture', including key debates around concepts of 'high' and 'low', popular and mass culture, culture and power, culture 'industries', gender and culture, modernism and postmodernism. Theorists to be studied may include Raymond Williams, F.R. Leavis, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Roland Barthes, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Dick Hebdige, Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler and Fredric Jameson. The main mode will be seminar discussion.

LDCL5032A

20

DEMOCRACY

This module considers how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece and looks at the critiques of democracy advanced by its opponents. The ideas and values underpinning democracy will be examined. The first part of the module focuses on texts by the major democratic thinkers including Locke, Rousseau and Mill. The second part concentrates on contemporary theories of democracy and examines the problems which democracy currently faces and evaluates the solutions proposed, including "electronic democracy" and "cosmopolitan democracy".

PPLX5051B

20

DEVISED PERFORMANCE

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON W400, WQ43 AND WW84 ONLY. In this course, we will explore the concept of devised performance, in all of its various manifestations, and examine methods to develop devised theatre in the rehearsal room. Exploring the use of non-dramatic texts, thematic structures, storytelling, found text and abstract imagery, this class allows students to study and put into practice the devising techniques of companies such as the Wooster Group, Elevator Repair Service, Complicite, Kneehigh and SITI Company. You will learn about theories of narrative and dramatic structure, and experiment with a range of techniques used to generate material for performance outside of the traditional genre of the "playwright's theatre".

LDCD5053A

20

DOCUMENTARY: HISTORY, THEORY, CRITICISM

This module will introduce students to the key issues in documentary history, theory and criticism. It will address definitional and generic debates; ethical issues; historical forms and founders; different categories, models and expository and poetic modes of documentary filmmaking; and social and political uses and debates. It will draw upon case studies from a range of different national and media contexts and give students grounding in key historical, methodological and ethical debates that they can draw upon in their future written and practical work.

AMAF5023A

20

DOING IT YOURSELF: PUNK AND AMERICA

Although the exact provenance of 'punk' remains a contested issue, since its emergence in the mid-1970s this transnational musical and cultural phenomenon has become very much a part of the American grain. Indeed, punk's capacity to adopt, appropriate, assimilate, and re-invent a vast and eclectic range of cultural styles, forms, and ideas, as well as its 'do-it-yourself,' places it in a longstanding American intellectual tradition of self-reliance and innovation. In this interdisciplinary module, we will attempt to define punk, and consider what it means to be punk, by examining its influence in music, film, poetry, and fiction. The unit will also explore the socio-political implications of punk in terms of gender, sexuality, and community, and question the possibility of punk in an increasingly globalised and commoditised world.

AMAS5042B

20

DRAMA OUTREACH PROJECT

Reserved for students on courses: W400U1, WQ43U1, WW84U1. Group practical theatre work which entails public performance to target audiences in the community or on campus.

LDCD5018B

20

EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module focuses on the geographical area covered by the Carolingian Empire - that is, the modern territorial units of France, Germany, Italy, and the Benelux countries. It begins in the late sixth century with the Merovingian dynasty and ends with the reform of the Papacy and the first crusade at the end of the 11th century.

HIS-5008A

20

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING

This module reads fiction, poetry, nonfictional prose, and drama of the eighteenth century, as a means with which to identify the dominant concerns of the epoch (class; gender; the politics of party; increasing secularisation), and to explore some of its debates (aristocracy versus middle class; prose versus poetry; classical or ancient versus modern or contemporary; religious versus secular). We read popular novelists, such as Eliza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Samuel Richardson, Laurence Sterne, and Henry Fielding; popular dramatists (Fielding especially); verse both well-known and more obscure (Pope, Gay, Smart); and excerpts from other contemporary sources (didactic, philosophical, political, religious). By the end of the module you will have acquired a knowledge of and sensitivity to the literary genres of the eighteenth century (novel, poetry, prose, drama); a knowledge of the political and cultural landscape; and a knowledge of the conditions of writing (print culture, the beginnings of literary criticism, the professionalization of literature).

LDCL5041A

20

EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

The module provides a problem focused introduction to epistemology and some related questions of metaphysics. Topics included may include perception, belief, scepticism, knowledge and related concepts like justification. The module is assessed by examination but students must also a seminar presentation and other formative work. This module will be offered biennially.

PPLP5093B

20

EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

The module provides a problem focused introduction to epistemology and some related questions of metaphysics. Topics included may include perception, belief, scepticism, knowledge and related concepts like justification. The module is assessed by examination but students must also a seminar presentation and other formative work. This module will be offered biennially.

PPLP5093B

20

ERASMUS EXCHANGE: AUTUMN SEMESTER

LDC students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme for the Autumn semester must enrol for this module. Students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme to Dublin will need in addition to enrol for module LDCL5025B. Further details of the ERASMUS scheme are available from the Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5024A

60

ERASMUS EXCHANGE: SPRING SEMESTER

LDC students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme for the Spring semester must enrol for this module. Students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme to Dublin will need in addition to enrol for module LDCL5024A. Further details on the ERASMUS scheme are available from the Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5025B

60

ERASMUS SEMESTER ABROAD

A semester abroad at an approved university within the Erasmus network.

AMAA5002A

60

ERASMUS SEMESTER ABROAD

A semester abroad at an approved university within the Erasmus network.

AMAA5003B

60

ERASMUS SEMESTER ABROAD

A compulsory semester abroad for students taking an Honours language programme in three years. Assessment will be in the foreign institution. This module is also available to other students on a 3-year programme who wish to pursue a period of study in a foreign university. Only available to students with Grade 'A' at A-Level in French or Spanish.

PPLX5028B

60

ERASMUS YEAR ABROAD

A study year abroad at an approved university within the Erasmus network.

AMAA5004Y

120

EU'S FUTURE AS AN INTERNATIONAL ACTOR

The module focuses on European political co-operation at the turn of the century and projections into the future. Issues include: the EU's attempts at foreign policy in international conflicts such as the Gulf War, former Yugoslavia, Georgia, co-operation with other International organisations, as an economic superpower vis-a-vis the United States and Japan, as the second largest developmental aid-donor to the Third World and a pioneering force behind environmental policy and energy policy - as a hesitant superpower in security and defence (Iraq, Iran, terrorism, the Congo, etc.). It is advisable - but not compulsory - to know a few basics as to the make-up and workings of the EU before embarking on this module.

PPLI5046B

20

EUROPEAN LITERATURE

This module examines examples of twentieth-century European writing (all read in translation). Rather than (merely) place writers in their national contexts, we will deal with topics, issues and formal experiments that complicate, sometimes transcend, national boundaries. In fact we will interrogate what 'European' might mean in relation to literature - where are the borders? Are continental Europeans fundamentally 'other'? And if so, how does this otherness manifest itself aesthetically, thematically, tonally and formally? We'll look at how writers from different countries frequently challenge the conventions of genre and the conventions of reading and interpreting. Among a range of important innovations (or continuities), we may explore varieties of 'European' modernism, New Objectivity, the absurd, the nouveau roman, noir, or magical realism. We will also ask how European writers have responded to the challenges, upheavals and catastrophes of the twentieth century and how they deal with the ethnic, religious and cultural diversity within Europe. The module includes a weekly lecture. Assessment is by means of an individually chosen project (3500 words) which is supported by individual and group tutorials, a dedicated guidance session and a formative proposal.

LDCL5033B

20

FAITH, DEATH and NIRVANA: THEMES IN PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

The module focuses on the claims of theistic religion, and on the nature of religion, including non-theistic religion. It seeks to clarify the concept of God. It also seeks to examine some of the standard arguments for and against the existence of God. In doing this, we see how some central issues in the philosophy of religion are inter-related with questions of epistemology, logic and mind. We will furthermore investigate conceptions of God which bypass the standard arguments for and against God's existence, which takes us close to the claims of Buddhism and other more or less non-theistic religions/philosophies. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5071B

20

FAITH, DEATH and NIRVANA: THEMES IN PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

The module focuses on the claims of theistic religion, and on the nature of religion, including non-theistic religion. It seeks to clarify the concept of God. It also seeks to examine some of the standard arguments for and against the existence of God. In doing this, we see how some central issues in the philosophy of religion are inter-related with questions of epistemology, logic and mind. We will furthermore investigate conceptions of God which bypass the standard arguments for and against God's existence, which takes us close to the claims of Buddhism and other more or less non-theistic religions/philosophies. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5071B

20

FILMS THAT MADE US AMERICAN: THE 1980S THROUGH THE MOVIES

The module will examine America in the1980s. It will look at youth culture, post-Vietnam revisionism and the 'remasculinization of America', yuppie culture, and the impact of both AIDS and drug addiction. Core factors of study in this module are the effects of both New Right morality upon the American socio-cultural landscape, and Ronald Reagan as postmodern president administrating to a 'celluloid America' of his own fantastic imagining. Overall, the module will offer the chance to analyse the tensions and contradictions of the decade as they were played out in both the content and structure of contemporary American film.

AMAS5019A

20

FRENCH LANGUAGE IN ACTION (LEVEL 5)

This module is for students who have A-Level French or equivalent. It is designed to increase your confidence in speaking French in public via the transferable skill of oral performance while enabling you to further your knowledge of French culture and society. You will study and practise delivery of an oral text in a number of forms such as news reports, documentary voice-overs, speeches, interviews, songs, stage and film performance texts. The summative assesment will involve the preparation and delivery of an agreed oral text as well as an essay. The formative assessment will involve a practice performance as well as a portfolio including a task for a preparation to the essay work.

PPLF5003B

20

FRENCH LANGUAGE IN ACTION (LEVEL 5)

This module is for students who have A-Level French or equivalent. It is designed to increase your confidence in speaking French in public via the transferable skill of oral performance while enabling you to further your knowledge of French culture and society. You will study and practise delivery of an oral text in a number of forms such as news reports, documentary voice-overs, speeches, interviews, songs, stage and film performance texts. The summative assesment will involve the preparation and delivery of an agreed oral text as well as an essay. The formative assessment will involve a practice performance as well as a portfolio including a task for a preparation to the essay work.

PPLF5003B

20

FRENCH POST-GCSE II

This year-long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE entry students and is the continuation of French post-GCSE I. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad.

PPLF5006Y

40

FRENCH POST-GCSE II

This year-long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE entry students and is the continuation of French post-GCSE I. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad.

PPLF5006Y

40

FROM AGINCOURT TO BOSWORTH: ENGLAND IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES

Through a close examination of the lives and reigns of four very different monarchs this unit investigates the workings of kingship and high politics in one of the most turbulent periods of English History (1415-1485). New interpretations of the Wars of the Roses, as well as original source material, will be studied.

HIS-5009B

20

FROM PUSHKIN TO CHEKHOV: NINETEENTH-CENTURY RUSSIAN FICTION

This module offers students the opportunity to study some of the great works of nineteenth-century Russian fiction by authors such as Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. Russian writers were convinced that their country's literature had been too dependent on European models and they set out consciously to create a distinctly 'Russian' tradition. What did this involve and why subsequently were the works of the authors like Dostoevsky and Chekhov received so rapturously when they became available in English translations at the beginning of the twentieth century? We will also examine this writing in its social, historical and political context, which raises questions regarding the significance of gender, censorship and empire.

LDCL5048A

20

FROM TRAGIC TO EPIC PERFORMANCE

Through readings of classical and neo-classical generic criticism, as well as through an investigation of performance and staging demands, the module examines classical, post-classical and early modern forms of tragedy, and contrasts them with the complex emergent forms of tragicomedy and (later) epic, which, in different ways, re-model or resist the central experience of tragic reception. The course will look at plays selected from different genres, countries and periods, e.g. classical Greek (Sophocles) and Roman (Seneca) French Neoclassical (Racine), Spanish golden age (Lope de Vega Calderon), English Jacobean (Middleton and Rowley, Ford), Japanese Kabuki, post-revolutionary German (from Schiller to Brecht). By positing strategies for reading and performing such plays, it will thus develop a deeper knowledge of stage history and of complex theatrical styles. It will also engage with critical discourse, especially in aesthetics and genre criticism (Zeami, Aristotle, Castelvetro, Dryden, Lessing, Brecht).

LDCD5022A

20

GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

HERITAGE AND PUBLIC HISTORY

Public history is history in the public sphere, whether in museums and galleries, heritage sites and historic houses, radio and television broadcasting, film, popular history books, or public policy within government. The central challenge and task of public history is making history relevant and accessible to its audience of people outside academia, whilst adhering to an academically credible historical method. This module explores the theory and practice of public history in the heritage sector. The module considers questions such as, how is the past used? What is authenticity? Who 'owns' historic sites? The module also offers the opportunity for undergraduates to work on a heritage project with a local heritage partner - the nature of this project varies each year depending on the availability of such partnership opportunities. PLEASE NOTE: The availability of places with partners this year means that the module will be limited to twelve undergraduate places. All students on the module will be required to engage in preparatory reading and writing over the course of the summer break.

HIS-5026A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH I

This course is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH I

This course is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH II

This course may be taken as a self-standing module or as a continuation of Higher Advanced English I. It is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are native or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5044B

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH II

This course may be taken as a self-standing module or as a continuation of Higher Advanced English I. It is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are native or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5044B

20

I AM

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS REGISTERED FOR COURSES Q300, Q3W8, QV31, QT37, W400, WQ43, WW84 ONLY. The purpose of this Module is to explore notions of personal identity and investigate how a heightened self-knowledge can benefit our relationship to and impact upon the world. In LDC, the question of human subjectivity is approached daily in the texts, novels, plays and poetry that constitute its curriculum. Using the rubric of Graduate Identity Theory, a programme of workshops will investigate how the study of these materials shapes our own self-image; our approach to life, and ultimately, our identity. Beginning with an introduction to Freud's theory of consciousness, we will be building a portfolio of material that considers the concept of identity from the ego to the online avatar. In activities such as creating blogs, tweeting and participating in other social media sites, we will experiment with the manipulation of identity and assess the impact of our online personas. The workshops and the production of an 'I Am (LDC)' portfolio are designed so that individuals can raise to consciousness their own unique attributes and make confident claims, through academic pursuit, about who they are and what they can do. The techniques of rhetoric, positive psychology and neuro-linguistic programme (NLP) will also be discussed as tools for esteem building and identity formation. Overall, the workshops will be designed to afford the opportunities to develop, practise and rehearse those identity claims so that upon graduation, identity can be affirmed by the new social and economic world that the individual will enter.

LDCL5054A

20

IMAGE, WORD AND MODERNITY IN BRITAIN, c.1800-1918

In this module, we will examine the interaction between the visual and the verbal in British culture during the nineteenth century, looking at images and/or texts produced by William Blake, the Pre-Raphaelite circle, Algernon Swinburne, Edward Burne-Jones, the English social realists, James McNeill Whistler, Aubrey Beardsley and Oscar Wilde, Walter Sickert, the Bloomsbury group and artists/poets of the First World War. In turn, we will consider the ways in which art historians, poets, novelists, literary critics and theorists have considered the often-vexed relationship between image and word. Thus, while largely chronological in form the course requires students to engage with the theoretical and critical literature on image/word relations, and considers issues such as the title, the calligram, ekphrasis, visual humour and the aesthetics of texts.

AMAA5012A

20

IMPERIAL RUSSIAN AND SOVIET HISTORY, 1861-1945

This module examines some of the main themes in Russian history between the Emancipation of the Serfs and the outbreak of the Second World War. We will look at the nature of industrialisation and the peasant economy, the autocracy and its fall in 1917, the revolutionary movement and the nationalities question. We will then examine how the Revolution of 1917 changed the state and the ways in which the Communists attempted to change society before 1929. We conclude by examining the country during the era of the five year plans and the impact of the Stalinist system on the Soviet Union before the outbreak of world war.

HIS-5019A

20

INDIGENOUS ARTS AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

This module begins by analysing what is meant by Indigenous arts and peoples. In particular, we shall consider the link between the anthropology of art and Indigenous identity. The module continues by examining issues related to the interpretation of indigenous arts in wide-ranging geographic and cultural contexts from North America, to India and Australia. It then questions Indigenous peoples' engagement with notions of ethnicity and heritage, as well as the formation of an 'Indigenous media' through film-making. The module aims to foster an inter-disciplinary approach.

AMAA5092A

20

INTERCULTURAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATION (LEVEL 5)

This module prepares students to become effective communicators in intercultural settings, especially focusing on multilingual business management, multinational companies and work within multicultural teams. The aim is that the student will develop intercultural competence, a crucial skill in our globalised world. In order to acquire this, different strategies should be fostered, such as seeking commonalities with others, overcoming stereotyping and prejudice, and developing flexibility and openness. Practical activities in small groups will be held in classroom sessions, with a special focus on intercultural communication problems in business. Theoretical approaches to intercultural communication will be provided in order to understand how to be successful in communication across cultures and to solve intercultural conflicts in Business contexts. Some of the benefits of being aware of intercultural communication are the ability to build intercultural understanding, the promotion of international business exchanges, and the facilitation of cross-cultural adaptation. Assessment will be commensurate with level.

PPLC5045A

20

INTERCULTURAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATION (LEVEL 5)

This module prepares students to become effective communicators in intercultural settings, especially focusing on multilingual business management, multinational companies and work within multicultural teams. The aim is that the student will develop intercultural competence, a crucial skill in our globalised world. In order to acquire this, different strategies should be fostered, such as seeking commonalities with others, overcoming stereotyping and prejudice, and developing flexibility and openness. Practical activities in small groups will be held in classroom sessions, with a special focus on intercultural communication problems in business. Theoretical approaches to intercultural communication will be provided in order to understand how to be successful in communication across cultures and to solve intercultural conflicts in Business contexts. Some of the benefits of being aware of intercultural communication are the ability to build intercultural understanding, the promotion of international business exchanges, and the facilitation of cross-cultural adaptation. Assessment will be commensurate with level.

PPLC5045A

20

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN PRACTICE (LEVEL 5)

This module explores how students can become more effective communicators in international or multicultural settings by developing their intercultural competence. It introduces them to theoretical approaches to intercultural communication and provides them with opportunities to analyse and understand the basics of effective communication across cultures. Students will be also encouraged to make links between module content and their own experiences and responses by keeping an intercultural journal. Classroom sessions will include small group work, practical activities to explore how theories can be applied in real-life contexts, analysis of case studies, and public lectures. Assessment will be commensurate with level.

PPLC5001B

20

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN PRACTICE (LEVEL 5)

This module explores how students can become more effective communicators in international or multicultural settings by developing their intercultural competence. It introduces them to theoretical approaches to intercultural communication and provides them with opportunities to analyse and understand the basics of effective communication across cultures. Students will be also encouraged to make links between module content and their own experiences and responses by keeping an intercultural journal. Classroom sessions will include small group work, practical activities to explore how theories can be applied in real-life contexts, analysis of case studies, and public lectures. Assessment will be commensurate with level.

PPLC5001B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level. The module is made up of three elements, each taught for one hour per week: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is not available to students with AS or A-Level French. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level. The module is made up of three elements, each taught for one hour per week: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is not available to students with AS or A-Level French. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

A continuation of Intermediate French I. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

A continuation of Intermediate French I. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module consists of three contact hours per week.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module consists of three contact hours per week.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent)

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent)

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent)

PPLB5034B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent)

PPLB5034B

20

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS

There are few areas of international politics which remain unregulated by international organisations or international norms. This module examines the historical development of international organizations and regimes, including the UN, NATO, European Union, International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. It looks at why sovereign states decide to establish international organizations, the factors which determine their design and evolution, and the extent to which their operation reflects underlying power and interests. It critically evaluates the main theories to explain cooperation between states and the development of international institutions, examines the role played in security, trade, finance, gender and environmental policy, and asks whether global governance is possible.

PPLI5054B

20

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS SINCE 1945

This module provides a brief historical and theoretical review of the cold war. It then goes on to look at some of the key issues of the post-cold war world. How far have international relations changed since the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989? What are the prospects for peace, stability and prosperity now that the ideological and military struggle between the USSR and the USA is over? Has international terrorism replaced communism as the main threat to the West?

PPLI5045A

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

This module will give students an essential grounding in International Relations theory, encompassing both the foundational theories of realism and liberalism, and contemporary debates about hegemony, neo-imperialism and post-positivism. The module is structured around the positivist/post-positivist divide and starts with classical realism and neo-realism, and liberalism and neo-liberalism. It then explores the English School and constructivism before turning to more critical theories like post-colonialism, feminism and gender studies, and postmodernism. We then bring IR theory up to date by looking at the debate over hegemony, emancipation and resistance. This module will be taught predominantly using lectures and seminars but will make use, where appropriate, of film and documentaries in order to explore different theoretical schools, both thematically and empirically.

PPLI5059A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

This module explores issues within, and perspectives on, international security. In the first part of the module, we explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system. The module examines the ways in which violent conflict and the use of force are managed in world politics. It surveys a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. Additionally, the responses of the international community to violent conflict including terrorism will be explored, looking broadly at the contested notion of the "Just War". Drawing upon historical and contemporary examples of war and violent conflict, it assesses the contributions of different actors and processes to the achievement of regional and world peace and security. The module's second part turns to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These will include constructivist, feminist, and sociological perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful, is it to think of issues such as pandemics, environmental degradation, poverty, and undocumented migration as security issues? What is gained and what is lost by so doing?

PPLI5056B

20

INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

Building on the Japanese holdings of the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, the module will survey major developments in ceramics, lacquer, metallurgy, sculpture, architecture, painting and photography. Cross-cutting themes will include links between ancient and modern, with East Asia and beyond, connoisseurship, collecting and exhibiting Japan's artistic and archaeological heritage. The course offers students a comprehensive introduction to the fascinating art and archaeology of the Japanese archipelago, from Okinawa to Hokkaido, and from prehistory to modern times.

AMAA5087B

20

INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE (LEVEL 5)

Japanese popular culture is becoming increasingly influential around the world. Important current manifestations are J-Pop (Japanese popular music), manga, anime, cospre (costume-play), computer games, and ketai-shosetsu (short novels for mobile phones). For understanding young Japanese and their relation to society, knowledge of Japanese popular culture is key. The aim of this module is to make students familiar with contemporary Japanese mass culture through consumption experiences, case studies and their analysis from socio-anthropological and historical perspectives.

PPLJ5146B

20

INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE (LEVEL 5)

Japanese popular culture is becoming increasingly influential around the world. Important current manifestations are J-Pop (Japanese popular music), manga, anime, cospre (costume-play), computer games, and ketai-shosetsu (short novels for mobile phones). For understanding young Japanese and their relation to society, knowledge of Japanese popular culture is key. The aim of this module is to make students familiar with contemporary Japanese mass culture through consumption experiences, case studies and their analysis from socio-anthropological and historical perspectives.

PPLJ5146B

20

INTRODUCTION TO THE EUROPEAN UNION

This module examines the development, structure, nature and functions of the European Union and looks at the history and theories of European integration from the 1940s to the present day. The module concentrates on the institutions and processes which run the EU, demystifies its main policies, examines critically the role of the Euro, and assesses the positions of the member-states on the EU's constantly developing agenda. The significance of the European Union in relationship to the rest of the world, its democratic credentials and its importance for understanding politics and governance are also considered. This module is recommended for those students who intend to progress to the 'EU Studies with Brussels Internship' module (PSI-3A72) in Year 3

PPLI5044A

20

INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION

This module will enable students to acquire the essential skills to undertake video production and create coherent video programmes. Practical instruction and familiarisation is supported by workshop sessions focusing upon elements of the relationship between technique and the inscription of mise-en-scene within film. Whilst specific craft skills are recognised there is greater emphasis upon the overall requirements of the production process, including elements of production management, and an understanding of how these components integrate to maximise the communication potential of a production. Learning is structured around the production of an individual portfolio of practical tasks supported by associated research tasks investigating the application of technique to the interpretation and reception of audio-visual texts, and a project executed within small production groups. An individual evaluation of learning during the module is also required.

AMAP5122B

20

INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION

This module will enable students to acquire the essential skills to undertake video production and create coherent video programmes. Practical instruction and familiarisation is supported by workshop sessions focusing upon elements of the relationship between technique and the inscription of mise-en-scene within film. Whilst specific craft skills are recognised there is greater emphasis upon the overall requirements of the production process, including elements of production management, and an understanding of how these components integrate to maximise the communication potential of a production. Learning is structured around the production of an individual portfolio of practical tasks supported by associated research tasks investigating the application of technique to the interpretation and reception of audio-visual texts, and a project executed within small production groups. An individual evaluation of learning during the module is also required.

AMAP5121A

20

JAPANESE AB INITIO HONOURS II

This year-long module is for year two Ab Initio students and is the continuation of Japanese Ab Initio Honours I. This module aims to enable students to build on and further enhance existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful context, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLJ5013Y

40

JAPANESE AB INITIO HONOURS II

This year-long module is for year two Ab Initio students and is the continuation of Japanese Ab Initio Honours I. This module aims to enable students to build on and further enhance existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful context, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLJ5013Y

40

JAPANESE POST GCSE II

This year long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE entry students and is the continuation of Japanese Post-GCSE I. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad.

PPLJ5014Y

40

JAPANESE POST GCSE II

This year long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE entry students and is the continuation of Japanese Post-GCSE I. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad.

PPLJ5014Y

40

LANGUAGE AND GENDER (LEVEL 5)

This module explores a variety of matters relating to language and its relationship to questions of gender and sexuality. Do men and women use language differently? Are the genders represented differentially in language and what might this show about socio-cultural ideologies and power structures? Is linguistic behaviour used to create and construct gender and sexual identities? Consideration will include such issues as stereotypical ideas of gendered language, sexist language, how same-sex conversations differ from mixed-sex conversations, how children are linguistically socialised into their gender categories, whether men are from Mars and women from Venus, and so on. Discussion and reading will be informed by a wide variety of ideas from fields such as anthropology, psychology, biology, sociology, and politics (especially feminism).

PPLL5059A

20

LANGUAGE AND GENDER (LEVEL 5)

This module explores a variety of matters relating to language and its relationship to questions of gender and sexuality. Do men and women use language differently? Are the genders represented differentially in language and what might this show about socio-cultural ideologies and power structures? Is linguistic behaviour used to create and construct gender and sexual identities? Consideration will include such issues as stereotypical ideas of gendered language, sexist language, how same-sex conversations differ from mixed-sex conversations, how children are linguistically socialised into their gender categories, whether men are from Mars and women from Venus, and so on. Discussion and reading will be informed by a wide variety of ideas from fields such as anthropology, psychology, biology, sociology, and politics (especially feminism).

PPLL5059A

20

LANGUAGE AND REALITY

Twentieth century philosophy is characterised by a preoccupation with language. This attention involved a great deal of reflection on language itself and also on the possibility that traditional philosophical problems might be resolved or dissolved by thinking about the language in which the problems are posed. The period also witnessed great upheavals, with the rise and fall of logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy, the development of formal theories of meaning, and the eventual resurgence of pragmaticism and metaphysics. The module will explore these major themes through consideration of the work of major thinkers from the last fifty years, including Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Kripke. This is a compulsory module for all students taking V500 Philosophy, and is available as an option for all other Philosophy students.

PPLP5087A

20

LANGUAGE AND REALITY

Twentieth century philosophy is characterised by a preoccupation with language. This attention involved a great deal of reflection on language itself and also on the possibility that traditional philosophical problems might be resolved or dissolved by thinking about the language in which the problems are posed. The period also witnessed great upheavals, with the rise and fall of logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy, the development of formal theories of meaning, and the eventual resurgence of pragmaticism and metaphysics. The module will explore these major themes through consideration of the work of major thinkers from the last fifty years, including Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Kripke. This is a compulsory module for all students taking V500 Philosophy, and is available as an option for all other Philosophy students.

PPLP5087A

20

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (LEVEL 5)

Different social groups and different speech situations give rise to a remarkable range of linguistic variety. In this module we will explore the kind of factors that govern such variety, the social meanings and ideologies with which it is associated, and some techniques of research. Issues covered include: language and social class, language and gender, language and education, code-switching, pidgins and creoles. Examples given are drawn from socio-linguistic practices in Britain and a variety of other cultural contexts. You are introduced to the main concepts and studies and given opportunities for class discussion. You are expected to make your own contribution by researching a particular area of interest. This module will be taught by a two hour lecture/seminar.

PPLL5017B

20

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (LEVEL 5)

Different social groups and different speech situations give rise to a remarkable range of linguistic variety. In this module we will explore the kind of factors that govern such variety, the social meanings and ideologies with which it is associated, and some techniques of research. Issues covered include: language and social class, language and gender, language and education, code-switching, pidgins and creoles. Examples given are drawn from socio-linguistic practices in Britain and a variety of other cultural contexts. You are introduced to the main concepts and studies and given opportunities for class discussion. You are expected to make your own contribution by researching a particular area of interest. This module will be taught by a two hour lecture/seminar.

PPLL5017B

20

LANGUAGE CONTRASTS AND TRANSLATION (LEVEL 5)

This module will provide a comprehensive overview of the key language contrasts relevant in the process of translation. It will focus on those aspects of various languages that are similar to English as well as those that are different in order to reveal the points of language-driven facilitation in translation as well as language-induced obstacles together with strategies how to surmount them. An introduction to the basic linguistic terminology relevant for applied translation will be the starting point. Diverse language typologies based on different linguistic level (morphology, syntax and semantics) will be presented and exemplified, using illustrative examples for the languages relevant to the students in the class. The topics covered would include the central grammatical categories (articles, modifiers, word-order, etc.) in the languages that the students are working on (e.g. French, Spanish, Italian, German, Russian, Chinese and others, depending on the intake). Students will be encouraged to make their own inference and check-list of points where the languages they work on differ based on the different typologies. We shall establish the use of a typological classification as a predictive tool in approaches to translation in a variety of applied contexts. The students will be introduced to essential research techniques that are of consequence for translation choices (eg, the use of corpora frequencies to detect the specifics of use for words, constructions and sentences in different languages). They will be taught to write argumentative essays and incited to develop their research skills and critical acumen. They will be encouraged to produce their own examples from original texts they choose to work on. The aim of this module is to equip students with the necessary knowledge of how different languages work in terms of their basic features at all levels of analysis (morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics) in order to enable more efficient and justified translation choices in different multilingual scenarios (commercial, legal, scientific, and others). Overall, this module is a study platform that would offer a solid theoretical background for select aspects of linguistic knowledge that is relevant to applied translation, including discussion of translation choices, errors in translation stemming from language contrasts or methodology in research and professional work. There will be opportunity for hands-on practical work in class, which would exemplify the application of theory to practice in a direct and straight-forward way. This module is also a springboard for potential MA cohort (MAATS and MAFLT in particular).

PPLT5147B

20

LANGUAGE CONTRASTS AND TRANSLATION (LEVEL 5)

This module will provide a comprehensive overview of the key language contrasts relevant in the process of translation. It will focus on those aspects of various languages that are similar to English as well as those that are different in order to reveal the points of language-driven facilitation in translation as well as language-induced obstacles together with strategies how to surmount them. An introduction to the basic linguistic terminology relevant for applied translation will be the starting point. Diverse language typologies based on different linguistic level (morphology, syntax and semantics) will be presented and exemplified, using illustrative examples for the languages relevant to the students in the class. The topics covered would include the central grammatical categories (articles, modifiers, word-order, etc.) in the languages that the students are working on (e.g. French, Spanish, Italian, German, Russian, Chinese and others, depending on the intake). Students will be encouraged to make their own inference and check-list of points where the languages they work on differ based on the different typologies. We shall establish the use of a typological classification as a predictive tool in approaches to translation in a variety of applied contexts. The students will be introduced to essential research techniques that are of consequence for translation choices (eg, the use of corpora frequencies to detect the specifics of use for words, constructions and sentences in different languages). They will be taught to write argumentative essays and incited to develop their research skills and critical acumen. They will be encouraged to produce their own examples from original texts they choose to work on. The aim of this module is to equip students with the necessary knowledge of how different languages work in terms of their basic features at all levels of analysis (morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics) in order to enable more efficient and justified translation choices in different multilingual scenarios (commercial, legal, scientific, and others). Overall, this module is a study platform that would offer a solid theoretical background for select aspects of linguistic knowledge that is relevant to applied translation, including discussion of translation choices, errors in translation stemming from language contrasts or methodology in research and professional work. There will be opportunity for hands-on practical work in class, which would exemplify the application of theory to practice in a direct and straight-forward way. This module is also a springboard for potential MA cohort (MAATS and MAFLT in particular).

PPLT5147B

20

LANGUAGE IN ACTION (LEVEL 5)

This module deals with the ways in which people use language to communicate in real life and it addresses some of the questions you may have wondered about if you are curious about the way language works in practice. It is concerned, for example, with the way in which simply speaking certain words ('I do') actually changes the state of social play. Questions addressed include: what are people doing when they engage in 'conversation'? Why is communication still problematic even when I am fluent in a foreign language? How does a word like 'this' refer to different things? How do we create implied meanings without actually saying what we mean? The main theoretical concepts are introduced and illustrated and ample opportunity is then given to the students to contribute and discuss their own examples to show how the concepts apply in different situations and in different cultural/linguistic environments. This module is relevant not only to language students but also to those students who are generally interested in communication. This module will be taught by a two hour lecture/seminar.

PPLL5019A

20

LANGUAGE IN ACTION (LEVEL 5)

This module deals with the ways in which people use language to communicate in real life and it addresses some of the questions you may have wondered about if you are curious about the way language works in practice. It is concerned, for example, with the way in which simply speaking certain words ('I do') actually changes the state of social play. Questions addressed include: what are people doing when they engage in 'conversation'? Why is communication still problematic even when I am fluent in a foreign language? How does a word like 'this' refer to different things? How do we create implied meanings without actually saying what we mean? The main theoretical concepts are introduced and illustrated and ample opportunity is then given to the students to contribute and discuss their own examples to show how the concepts apply in different situations and in different cultural/linguistic environments. This module is relevant not only to language students but also to those students who are generally interested in communication. This module will be taught by a two hour lecture/seminar.

PPLL5019A

20

LATER MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module examines the political, cultural and social history of later medieval Europe (circa 1100-1500) with a particular focus on France and Italy. The topics addressed include the formation of cities, the position of the papacy, lay piety, and the role of women.

HIS-5006B

20

LATIN FOR HISTORIANS

This module provides an introduction to the linguistic skills in medieval Latin which enable students to read administrative documents such as charters, accounts, court rolls, etc. It is particularly suited for those who intend proceeding to postgraduate study in aspects of the past, such as medieval history, which require a reading knowledge of Latin. This course is not intended for students who have already studied Latin to A level or equivalent.

HIS-5004B

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5056A

20

LITERATURE AND VISUAL CULTURE: AT THE FIN DE SIECLE

This interdisciplinary module investigates the interweaving of literature, painting and photography in Europe in the latter part of the nineteenth century, with a particular focus on France. It looks at the characteristic thematic preoccupations, styles and perceptual psychologies which drive Naturalism, Impressionism, Symbolism, Aestheticism and Decadence as modernist modes. We will be examining developments in the handling of narrative and poetry as well as experiments in theatre against the background of photography's emulation of painting, and painting's struggle to free itself from the academic. Writers to be studied include Baudelaire, Zola, Moore, Maupassant, Wilde, Yeats, Maeterlinck and Mirbeau alongside a selection of poets, painters and photographers of the period. Assessment is by means of a written image analysis and a longer individually designed project, both of which are supported by individual tutorials.

LDCL5046A

20

LITERATURE STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD (SPRING)

A semester spent at a university abroad with the approval of the School. Students interested in European universities should see the Erasmus exchange modules, LDCL5024A and LDCL5025B. In all instances you must consult with Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5026B

60

LOOKING AT PICTURES: PHOTOGRAPHY AND VISUAL CULTURE IN THE USA

Photographic portraits, family albums, anthropological illustrations, lynching postcards, advertisements, food packaging and fashion photos are just some of the pictures that will be "read" and analysed in this module. Students will explore how visual texts can contribute to an understanding of nationhood, class, race, sexuality and identity in the USA. Opening sessions will focus on ways of "reading" visual texts. [No previous experience of working with images is necessary]. Most of the semester will be devoted to analysing how photographic images both reflect and contribute to constructions of American culture.

AMAS5024B

20

MATERIAL WORLDS

Recent research in archaeology and anthropology has begun to reframe questions posed by the study of material culture and art. This module introduces some contemporary archaeological and anthropological perspectives on the study of material culture. Case studies are drawn from around the world.

AMAA5009A

20

MEDICINE AND GENDER

This module offers a broad historical treatment of gender issues in medicine, examining women as providers and recipients of healthcare from Ancient Greece to the NHS. Topics for study include the female body, obstetrics and gynaecology, the female healer and the medical profession, women, witchcraft and popular healing, scientific medicine and professionalisation, nurses, nursing and reform, and women's health.

HIS-5016A

20

MEDICINE AND SOCIETY BEFORE THE 17TH CENTURY

This module examines the theory and practice of medicine at all levels of English society during the medieval and early modern periods, and assesses the impact of medical ideas upon religious, literary and political thought. Topics include: the emergence of a healing profession and its attempts to secure a monopoly of practice; the role of women as both patients and practitioners; theories about the spread of disease and necessary measures for public health; medicine and the Church;and attitudes to mortality. Edited versions of original documents are used.

HIS-5014A

20

MEDIEVAL WRITING

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the study of medieval English literature. In a series of lectures and seminars students will work through a small but representative selection of medieval texts, including lyrics, romance, and fable, in order to develop a working knowledge of the language - Middle English - and appreciation of different forms and genres found in medieval writing. Medieval texts and contexts will be used as a means of familiarising students with medieval language, and form the basis for further modules in medieval writing that may be taken within the School.

LDCL5043A

20

METHOD AND MEISNER

Students will be given the opportunity to explore what it is to direct and act truthfully for the camera with the intention of drawing out the most exciting and edgy filmic performances. This will be done through two methods. One, a weekly Meisner scene class in which actors and directors will learn the craft of film performance and two, a weekly hands on film making class in which they will be given the skills to go off and film the scenes themselves in their cinematic form using digital cameras. The students will be taken through the technicalities of camera use, story boarding and the use of different shots to create the sense of the scene. Through the practical, hands on process of making short films, students will gain a general understanding of the process and techniques of film making and through the Meisner and Method techniques, start to build a creative tool kit that is appropriate to working for the screen. The module is for LEVEL 2 DRAMA students only: W400, WQ43, WW84.

LDCD5054B

20

METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

Students acquire knowledge of the theory and practice of a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. A variety of skills can be acquired - interviewing, observation, focus groups, taking fieldwork notes, computerised data analysis, report writing, etc. Assessment is via two individual research reports, one quantitative and one qualitative, the data being either provided to students or collected by them as part of a collaborative piece of primary research. This module is compulsory for students taking degrees in Politics and Society, Culture and Media. These two group of students will be taught in separate streams, and the material in each will be tailored to their subject-specific needs.

PPLX5047A

20

MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990

This module introduces students to German history in the twentieth century which was characterised by various radical regime changes and territorial alterations. Topics include German world policy and nationalism in the late imperial period; imperialism and expansionism during the First World War; the challenges of modernity in the Weimar Republic; the rise of Hitler and the formation of the Nazi empire in Europe; the post-war division of Germany and the legacy of the Third Reich; the nature of the GDR dictatorship and the problem of West German terrorism; as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification. Special attention will be given to questions of nationalism and national identity, issues of history and memory, and Germany's role in Europe and the world. On completion of this unit, students will have developed a solid understanding of one of the most dramatic periods of German history when the country oscillated between the two extremes of war and repression, on the one hand, and the return to peace and democracy, on the other.

HIS-5018A

20

MODERN ITALY, 1860-1945

This module studies the social, political and economic history of Italy from its unification in 1860 until the end of the Second World War. It will begin by looking at the process of unification, the difficulties encountered in governing the new nation-state and the problems of uneven social and economic modernisation. The module then focuses on the First World War and the rise of Fascism after 1918, before assessing the nature of Mussolini's regime and the reasons for its downfall.

HIS-5021B

20

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/I

This semester-long Japanese language module is compulsory for all second-year students of Japanese (single- or double-honours) who have previously taken Post A-Level Japanese 1/I and 1/II. In this module students use the contents based textbook Tobira, to learn about Japanese language and culture from various perspectives. The aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Japan.

PPLJ5155A

20

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/I

This semester-long Japanese language module is compulsory for all second-year students of Japanese (single- or double-honours) who have previously taken Post A-Level Japanese 1/I and 1/II. In this module students use the contents based textbook Tobira, to learn about Japanese language and culture from various perspectives. The aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Japan.

PPLJ5155A

20

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/II

This semester long Japanese language module is compulsory for all second year students of Japanese (single or double honours) who have previously taken Modern Japanese Language Honours 2/I. In this class students use the contents based textbook Tobira, to learn about Japanese language and culture from various perspectives. The aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Japan.

PPLJ5156B

20

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/II

This semester long Japanese language module is compulsory for all second year students of Japanese (single or double honours) who have previously taken Modern Japanese Language Honours 2/I. In this class students use the contents based textbook Tobira, to learn about Japanese language and culture from various perspectives. The aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Japan.

PPLJ5156B

20

MODERNISM

The purpose of this module is to study the literature of the early decades of the twentieth century - roughly 1900-1930 - in particular the work of those authors who attempted to break with received norms of literary style and content. The module is organised as a series of thematic and formal explorations that include attention to at least some of the following: the dissolution of character and gravitation towards psychological states such as fantasy and desire, with the emergence of the unconscious; narrative and temporal disruption, obtrusion of language and other sources of modernist difficulty, the afterlife of religion, as in interest in the unseen and supernatural; the significance of the city, the mass media, and other modern cultural forms; gender and the politics of modernism. The sequence of guiding lectures focuses discussion on a set of specific texts and themes, with their contexts, and these are taken up for consideration in the accompanying seminars. 'Modernism' is thus constructed gradually over the semester as a mosaic of closely related issues, each one reflecting on the others. As well as providing an overview of defining textual features, in prose and poetry, the module is concerned also with the critical reading of modernism in the light of contemporaneous criticism and theory as well as current analyses.

LDCL5045A

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN: THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

This module deals with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the start of the Cold War.

HIS-5017B

20

NATIVE AMERICANS

This seminar will study Native Americans within the broad context of American history, although the cultures of individual tribes will also be examined. Brief attention will be paid to pre-colonial times, but the main emphasis will be on the period after the white man's arrival.

AMAH5035B

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5100B

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5100B

20

NEW MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, new digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide students with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media. .

PPLM5053A

20

NEW WORLDS: THE EUROPEAN COLONIAL EXPANSION FROM COLUMBUS TO ABOLITIONISM

This module looks at the European colonial enterprise in America and Asia. Starting from the explorations in the Mediterranean we will then look at the expansion of European powers across the Atlantic and the Indian oceans: Columbus and the discovery of America, the first colonies of New England, the creation of trading posts in India and East Asia, and the missionary campaigns in China and Japan. Drawing on selected extracts from travel writings and ethnographic descriptions of previously unknown places and people, we will focus on the protagonists of these explorations - conquerors, adventurers, merchants and settlers - and their interaction with and exploitation of non-European people and cultures, and we will finally conclude by considering the debates which developed around these themes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

HIS-5044B

20

NEW YORK CITY: HISTORY AND CULTURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

AMAS5041B

20

NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) radically challenged traditional ideas of what philosophising involves and has had an enormous influence on subsequent thinkers. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in the context of Post-Kantian philosophy. Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5081B

20

NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) radically challenged traditional ideas of what philosophising involves and has had an enormous influence on subsequent thinkers. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in the context of Post-Kantian philosophy. Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5081B

20

NORMAN AND PLANTAGENET ENGLAND, 1066-1307

This module follows the history of England from the Norman Conquest of 1066 down to the death of Edward 1 in 1307. The aim of this module is to look at the political, ecclesiastical, social and intellectual history of England in this period and to place English history in the wider context of European history in the Middle Ages.

HIS-5007B

20

NORTH AMERICA /AUSTRALASIA COMPULSORY YEAR ABROAD

Year abroad in North America or Australasia. Reserved for students on V354402 and V0LX402.

AMAA5001Y

120

PERFORMANCE SKILLS: THE ACTOR AND THE TEXT

This module is reserved for Drama majors (W400), Drama/Literature Joints (WQ43), Scriptwriting and Performance (WW84), and Theatre Directing Masters students. Drama Minors wishing to apply must first seek approval for inclusion from Mr T. Gash. The main methods of study are through: (1) individual performance of poems and speeches, (2) scene classes, (3) character study of roles in classic plays.

LDCD5016A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

What is history? Is it reasonable to apply moral criteria to the historical process? In what sense, if any, can we understand history as progressive? On what basis can we divide history into epochs and how should we understand the change from one epoch to the next? Are there laws in history? From the 18th century enlightenment to Marxist historical materialism, strong claims have been made in response to these questions. They have come under severe attack from the later 19th century on to the present. The module will examine the arguments and concepts employed in this debate. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5076A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

What is history? Is it reasonable to apply moral criteria to the historical process? In what sense, if any, can we understand history as progressive? On what basis can we divide history into epochs and how should we understand the change from one epoch to the next? Are there laws in history? From the 18th century enlightenment to Marxist historical materialism, strong claims have been made in response to these questions. They have come under severe attack from the later 19th century on to the present. The module will examine the arguments and concepts employed in this debate. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5076A

20

PHILOSOPHY SEMESTER ABROAD - AUTUMN

The School of Philosophy has various ERASMUS arrangements with European Universities where it is possible to spend a semester abroad. For more information on this please contact the ERASMUS Director, Dr O. Kuusela.

PPLP5072A

60

PHILOSOPHY SEMESTER ABROAD - AUTUMN

The School of Philosophy has various ERASMUS arrangements with European Universities where it is possible to spend a semester abroad. For more information on this please contact the ERASMUS Director, Dr O. Kuusela.

PPLP5072A

60

PHILOSOPHY SEMESTER ABROAD - SPRING

The School of Philosophy has various ERASMUS arrangements with European Universities where it is possible to spend a semester abroad. For more information on this please contact the ERASMUS Director, Dr O. Kuusela.

PPLP5073B

60

PHILOSOPHY SEMESTER ABROAD - SPRING

The School of Philosophy has various ERASMUS arrangements with European Universities where it is possible to spend a semester abroad. For more information on this please contact the ERASMUS Director, Dr O. Kuusela.

PPLP5073B

60

PLAGUE AND DISEASE IN THE MEDIEVAL CITY

Plague and Disease in the Medieval City is an interdisciplinary module which examines the health and illnesses of the urban population in England and Northern Europe during the later Middle Ages. By using the unparalleled riches of Norwich's medieval buildings and landscape, students will investigate standards of living alongside patterns of disease and the relative effectiveness of both individual and corporate actions in halting the spread of plague within the medieval city. Supplementary iconographical, archaeological and documentary evidence from other cities, including Coventry, Winchester, York, London and Paris, will also be used. We will examine the main influences upon the developments within medicine and its practice from the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries. The impact of medical theory on urban politics and planning is also considered, as is the close connection between the Church and medicine, notably through the medium of religious iconography. The module will conclude by assessing the influences upon and developments within medicine and its practice which took place between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries and look at whether any of these were reflected in the changes which took place in Norwich during the same period. *THIS MODULE IS FOR INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY*

HIS-5001S

20

POLITICAL THEATRE

This module examines the use of theatre and performance - by the State, by oppositional groups, by political activists and by theatre and performance practitioners - to solidify or challenge structures of power. The course looks at specific examples of how theatre and public spectacles have been used in the twentieth century to control or contest the political stage. Examining American, South America, African, Russian, and Eastern European performance in the twentieth century, this class will document and explore through specific performances, videos, dramatic texts and theoretical essays, how performance in theory and practice can be used to explore issues to race, ethnicity, gender, political upheaval and social change within a society.

LDCD5011B

20

POLITICS AND MEDIA

Media is an inescapable part of contemporary political life. This module examines the many dimensions of media's political involvement. We start with arguments about media power, and then go on to look at questions of media bias, before turning to the ways in which political communication has changed (and is changing). We look at the role of the state in using and controlling media and the new techniques of media management. This leads to a discussion about media effects. We end by asking what is meant by a democratic media and how new media are changing the relationship between politics and media. This module links closely to Level 3 modules such as International Communication and Politics and Popular Culture.

PPLM5001B

20

POLITICS IN THE USA

Virtually alone among the world's modern democratic nations, the US does not have parliamentary government. This module is an introduction to the American system, in which power is divided between state and federal authorities, and further among legislative, executive and judicial branches. Does this open-textured system encourage democratic participation? Has it become so chaotic that sound policy making is discouraged?

PPLX5164B

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/I

This semester-long Spanish language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours Spanish students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post-A-Level Spanish Language I. Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. (Alternative groups may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLH5053A

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/I

This semester-long Spanish language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours Spanish students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post-A-Level Spanish Language I. Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. (Alternative groups may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLH5053A

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/II

This semester-long module is compulsory for all second-year Spanish Honours students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post A-Level Spanish language 2/I (or equivalent). Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. For one of the three weekly contact hours, students will be able to choose either Translation or Business as an option. (Alternative groups may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLH5154B

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/II

This semester-long module is compulsory for all second-year Spanish Honours students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post A-Level Spanish language 2/I (or equivalent). Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. For one of the three weekly contact hours, students will be able to choose either Translation or Business as an option. (Alternative groups may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLH5154B

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2 (CP)

This French Honours Language module is compulsory for all students taking an Honours French programme in three years. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the period of residence abroad in the Spring semester. Activities focus on promoting self-direction in language learning, and draw on a variety of resources, including electronic resources, for in-class, self-access and group project work (oral, aural, written). Seminars are taught in French. The assessment project will be undertaken during the Semester Abroad.

PPLF5002A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2 (CP)

This French Honours Language module is compulsory for all students taking an Honours French programme in three years. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the period of residence abroad in the Spring semester. Activities focus on promoting self-direction in language learning, and draw on a variety of resources, including electronic resources, for in-class, self-access and group project work (oral, aural, written). Seminars are taught in French. The assessment project will be undertaken during the Semester Abroad.

PPLF5002A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/I

This French Honours language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours French students. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the Year Abroad. Activities focus on promoting self-direction in language learning, and draw on a variety of resources, including electronic resources, for in-class, self-access and group project work (oral, aural, written). Seminars are taught in French. (Alternative groups will be available for seminars.)

PPLF5148A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/I

This French Honours language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours French students. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the Year Abroad. Activities focus on promoting self-direction in language learning, and draw on a variety of resources, including electronic resources, for in-class, self-access and group project work (oral, aural, written). Seminars are taught in French. (Alternative groups will be available for seminars.)

PPLF5148A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/II

This module is the continuation of the Post A-Level French Language 2/I module and is compulsory for all second year French Honours students. There is a core element to this module which takes up the objectives of Post A-Level French Language 2/I in a translation hour (D2 or E3) and a year abroad preparation oral class. There are two additional strands. Each student will take one of these strands: i) Introduction to Interpreting (obligatory for Translation and Interpreting Double Honours students) (A3*B4), or ii) French for Business and Law (obligatory for Language with Management Studies students) (A7*A8). Students on other degree programmes will be asked to state a preference in the Autumn semester.

PPLF5149B

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/II

This module is the continuation of the Post A-Level French Language 2/I module and is compulsory for all second year French Honours students. There is a core element to this module which takes up the objectives of Post A-Level French Language 2/I in a translation hour (D2 or E3) and a year abroad preparation oral class. There are two additional strands. Each student will take one of these strands: i) Introduction to Interpreting (obligatory for Translation and Interpreting Double Honours students) (A3*B4), or ii) French for Business and Law (obligatory for Language with Management Studies students) (A7*A8). Students on other degree programmes will be asked to state a preference in the Autumn semester.

PPLF5149B

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module will introduce students to the history of propaganda. It will ask students to consider what constitutes propaganda, and to understand the techniques of propaganda, as well as its purposes and effectiveness. It will consider the issue across the twentieth century and will do so by looking at the issue of propaganda in dictatorial regimes, such as Nazi Germany (and fascism more widely), as well as the communist dictatorships. It will also look at the role of propaganda in the Western democracies, looking especially at the issue of the British Empire and the Cold War. It will also look at the role of propaganda in radical politics and protest movements, such as the environmental movement. In doing so it will provide students with an understanding of important historical and ethical debates.

HIS-5050B

20

PUBLISHING (AUT)

The module will be conceptual as well as practical including discussions and exercises around the design, editing and publishing of a text and what constitutes an editorial policy. In the seminars students will be taught how to set up, run and market their own publications (a magazine/book/fanzine) as well as to justify their editorial, marketing and business strategies. This course will be assessed by a portfolio and a piece of coursework. Three sessions of training on Indesign publishing software will be provided as part of the course. This module will suit students who wish to engage with publishing on a creative and intellectual level as well as learning useful employability skills.

LDCL5028A

20

PUBLISHING (SPR)

The module will be conceptual as well as practical including discussions and exercises around the design, editing and publishing of a text and what constitutes an editorial policy. In the seminars students will be taught how to set up, run and market their own publications (a magazine/book/fanzine) as well as to justify their editorial, marketing and business strategies. This course will be assessed by a portfolio and a piece of coursework. Three sessions of training on Indesign publishing software will be provided as part of the course. This module will suit students who wish to engage with publishing on a creative and intellectual level as well as learning useful employability skills.

LDCL5029B

20

QUEENS, COURTESANS AND COMMONERS: WOMEN AND GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the issue of gender in European history, between 1500 and 1750. Using a variety of written and visual sources, and including a comparative element, it focuses on the following themes: definitions of femininity and masculinity; life-cycles; family, kinship, and marriage; social exclusion, charity and the welfare state; law, crime, and order; witchcraft and magic; honour, sex, and sexual identities; work; learning and the arts; material culture; the impact of European expansions.

HIS-5022A

20

RACE AND RACISM IN THE USA

This seminar will explore the origins and continued role in American culture of the idea of race. Where did the concept of race come from? And to what uses has it been put by various groups within America's pluralistic society? Restricted to students on programmes in American History or Literature, or who have previously done modules on race. Not available to first year students.

AMAH5046B

20

READING AND WRITING CONTEMPORARY POETRY

This module will focus on poetry written from the post-war context up to the present day. The poets studied will be drawn principally from an Anglo-American tradition and may include such writers as Frank O'Hara, John Berryman, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, Sharon Olds, James Tate, Yusef Komunyakaa, Carol Ann Duffy, Carolyn Forche among others. Using the reading and study of post-war poetry, students will be able to write creatively and/or critically for assessment. The module would build upon Creative Writing modules and also complement level two modules such as Modernism, and Poetry and Painting, as well as level three modules such as Lyric, Words and Music, Poetry After Modernism, and poetry dissertations. This module is open to Literature and English Literature with Creative Writing Students.

LDCL5057B

20

READING SHAKESPEARE'S ENGLAND

This is a module which invites students to reach back into the past and read Shakespeare's plays in their original historical and performance context. By doing so students will develop an ability to read and analyse the rich language of the plays as well as gaining a more detailed appreciation of how they relate to the turbulent and dynamic period in history in which they were first written and performed. Students will have the opportunity to watch performances of at least two plays, at the reconstructed Globe in London and in Stratford-Upon-Avon, and our visits to medieval castles, Tudor country mansions and other sites of interest will animate the physical settings of the stories Shakespeare tells.

LDCL5001S

20

REFORMATION TO REVOLUTION

This module examines three centuries of European history connecting two unprecedented revolutionary epochs: the Reformation of the sixteenth century and the American and French revolutions at the end of the early modern era. We will look at key themes and movements in these centuries, including the politics of the Reformation; the Mediterranean work of the Ottomans and Habsburg Spain; the Dutch Golden Age; the great political and religious struggles of the seventeenth century, including wars in the British Isles, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Baltic; the Russia of the Romanov czars and Peter the Great; the growth of centralised states and absolutism in France, Prussia and Austria; the Enlightenment; the rise of the Atlantic economies; and the challenge to the Old Regime from revolutionary politics.

HIS-5025A

20

REVOLUTIONARIES, RADICALS AND RENEGADES (AMS SUMMER SCHOOL)

This module asks students to consider the complex transnational operations of radical and revolutionary movements throughout the history of the Americas. In particular, it explores the literary and philosophical connections between British and American (conceived broadly as the American hemisphere) thinkers and artists from the Revolutionary Era, through the Civil Rights Movement to the present. Two weeks of the module will be based at UEA London where students will participate in field trips and visit cultural institutions such as the British Library, British Film Institute and National Theatre.

AMAF5001S

20

ROMANTICISM 1780-1840

Romantic Literature is often thought of as poetry, primarily work by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and Bryon. But the signs and forms of Romantic sensibility can also be found in a much broader constituency of writing practice: the novel, letter writing, the essay, political and aesthetic theory, and writing of all kinds taken as social critique. This module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars.

LDCL5034B

20

RURAL ENGLAND 1660 TO 1900

This module will encourage you to consider broad questions in relation to life in rural England and, specifically, as it related to individuals in England between 1660-1900. Topics to be covered will include changes in land use and technology; landowners: affluence and decline; rural crime; housing - types and conditions; family life; childhood; education; poverty and health care.

HIS-5038B

20

RUSSIA AND THE WORLD

In the first half of this module students study the rise and fall of communism in the Soviet Union. The module then goes on to consider the nature of the post-Soviet political system in Russia and looks at both continuities and discontinuities from the Soviet period. In particular, the module considers whether Russia has reverted back to Soviet-style dictatorship.

PPLX5043B

20

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (AUTUMN SEMSTER)

X05 This module offers HIS students on the V100 programme the opportunity to spend the Autumn semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5031A

60

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (SPRING SEMSTER)

X04 This module offers HIS students on the V100 programme the opportunity to spend the Spring semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5030B

60

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING: RENAISSANCE AND REVOLUTION

This module aims to introduce you to the poetry, drama and prose of one of Britain's most exciting periods of cultural, political and intellectual transformation: the seventeenth century. That century saw radical change of many kinds, most obviously the execution of the monarch after the civil wars, but also in attitudes to religion, history, women's place within society, and the relationship between the territories that make up 'Britain'. And the century saw vigorous and impassioned defences of old orthodoxies too. Through a sustained series of close-readings of texts each week, the module invites you to reflect on the complicated ways social and historical transformations brought about transformations in literary forms. Attention will be paid to the social and material contexts in which literature circulated. Authors we will study include famous names, like John Milton, Ben Jonson, and Andrew Marvell, and a host of lesser-known figures too, including Lucy Hutchinson, Amelia Lanyer, Edmund Waller, and Henry Vaughan. By the end, we hope you will have not only a good grasp of the varieties of seventeenth-century writing (including non-literary texts), but also the ways in which literature and history might inform and challenge one another.

LDCL5042A

20

SHAKESPEARE

The aim of this lecture-seminar module is to help you become a better reader of Shakespearean drama. He was writing between about 1590 and about 1610; obviously his plays speak to us over a great cultural distance, and we can find fresh ways of reading them by exploring the theatrical, generic and historical frameworks in which they were written and staged. The lectures, then, will introduce a range of contexts, and the seminars will seek to turn them to account in the reading of the dramatic texts themselves.

LDCL5040B

20

SOUTHERN LITERATURE

"Tell us about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all."- William Faulkner. The development of Southern writing in the twentieth century is one of the most compelling stories in the history of American literature. In this module we will examine the ways in which a wide variety of writers-including some of the most important voices of the twentieth century- tried to tell about the South. We will explore what, if anything, gives Southern literature a distinct voice, and consider the nature of its regional identity in the wake of the so-called Americanization of Dixie. We will, of course, consider the issue of race and racism in the South, and its concomitant effect on Southern writing, black and white. And whilst debating the changes that Southern literature has undergone, we will also explore the significant changes which have affected the South itself, and its role in the life of the nation.

AMAL5037B

20

SPANISH AB INITIO HONOURS II

This year-long module is for Year 2 Ab Initio students and is the continuation of Ab Initio Honours I. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students join Post A-Level Spanish I/II for some lectures and seminars.

PPLH5009Y

40

SPANISH AB INITIO HONOURS II

This year-long module is for Year 2 Ab Initio students and is the continuation of Ab Initio Honours I. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students join Post A-Level Spanish I/II for some lectures and seminars.

PPLH5009Y

40

SPANISH POST GCSE II

This year-long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE students and is the continuation of Spanish post-GCSE I. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students join Post A-Level Spanish I/II for some lectures and seminars.

PPLH5010Y

40

SPANISH POST GCSE II

This year-long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE students and is the continuation of Spanish post-GCSE I. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students join Post A-Level Spanish I/II for some lectures and seminars.

PPLH5010Y

40

STUDY ABROAD MODULE

The School of PPL has various arrangements with overseas Universities where it is possible to spend a semester studying abroad. For more information on this please contact Dr Elizabeth Cobbett (International exchanges), Dr V Koutrakou (ERASMUS exchanges) - or the Study Abroad Office. Assessment types may vary, depending on university abroad.

PPLX5049B

60

STUDY ABROAD MODULE

The School of PPL has various arrangements with overseas Universities where it is possible to spend an ERASMUS semester studying abroad. For more information on this please contact Dr Elizabeth Cobbett - or the Study Abroad Office. Assessment types may vary, depending on university abroad. Please note that international exchanges with universities in the USA, Canada, New Zealand and Australia are ONLY available in the Spring Semester.

PPLX5050A

60

SUBTITLING AND DUBBING (LEVEL 5)

This module is an introduction to aspects of subtitling and dubbing in different media and multimedia contexts (television, radio, cinema, world wide web), and to issues associated with these activities in the age of globalisation. A range of materials and processes will be considered (e.g. film subtitling, subtitling for the deaf and hard-of-hearing, subtitling and dubbing in news reports or documentaries, subtitling and dubbing in the context of multimedia localisation) to investigate key features and concerns involved in transposing text across communication channels, media, forms and codes. Assessment commensurate with level. Taught with LCS-3T17 and LCST6020A.

PPLT5022A

20

SUBTITLING AND DUBBING (LEVEL 5)

This module is an introduction to aspects of subtitling and dubbing in different media and multimedia contexts (television, radio, cinema, world wide web), and to issues associated with these activities in the age of globalisation. A range of materials and processes will be considered (e.g. film subtitling, subtitling for the deaf and hard-of-hearing, subtitling and dubbing in news reports or documentaries, subtitling and dubbing in the context of multimedia localisation) to investigate key features and concerns involved in transposing text across communication channels, media, forms and codes. Assessment commensurate with level. Taught with LCS-3T17 and LCST6020A.

PPLT5022A

20

TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR SUBTITLING AND DUBBING (LEVEL 5)

This module provides first-hand experience of subtitling and dubbing. There will be an opportunity to become familiar with software used for interlingual and intralingual subtitling and dubbing at professional level while undertaking practical exercises involving cueing, text compression and segmentation, respecting time and space constraints and conforming to conventions of good practice. The different types of technological tools used for audiovisual translation at professional and amateur levels will be explored, analysed and assessed. Selected film/TV series/documentary extracts in several languages will be used. Practical activities will present participants with the challenges posed by the interplay of audio, image and text. Assessment commensurate with level.

PPLT5026B

20

TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR SUBTITLING AND DUBBING (LEVEL 5)

This module provides first-hand experience of subtitling and dubbing. There will be an opportunity to become familiar with software used for interlingual and intralingual subtitling and dubbing at professional level while undertaking practical exercises involving cueing, text compression and segmentation, respecting time and space constraints and conforming to conventions of good practice. The different types of technological tools used for audiovisual translation at professional and amateur levels will be explored, analysed and assessed. Selected film/TV series/documentary extracts in several languages will be used. Practical activities will present participants with the challenges posed by the interplay of audio, image and text. Assessment commensurate with level.

PPLT5026B

20

TELEVISION STUDIO PRODUCTION

AVAILABLE ONLY TO STUDENTS ON COURSE(S): U1G450302, U1QW36301, U1TW76301, U1TW76401, U1W610301, U1WV63301, U1P300302. This module introduces students to television studio production, using the resources of the campus television studio. Once students have learned the basic skills of both live and recorded studio production (including directing, vision and sound mixing, camera-work, lighting, floor management and editing), they work towards the production of a short television programme. They are also required to write a report analysing and evaluating the production process and the finished product. PLEASE NOTE - This module needs a minimum of 12 students enrolled to run, if the target enrolment is not met there is a chance the module will be withdrawn.

AMAP5120A

20

TELEVISION STUDIO PRODUCTION

AVAILABLE ONLY TO STUDENTS ON COURSE(S): U1G450302, U1QW36301, U1TW76301, U1TW76401, U1W610301, U1WV63301, U1P300302. This module introduces students to television studio production, using the resources of the campus television studio. Once students have learned the basic skills of both live and recorded studio production (including directing, vision and sound mixing, camera-work, lighting, floor management and editing), they work towards the production of a short television programme. They are also required to write a report analysing and evaluating the production process and the finished product. PLEASE NOTE - This module needs a minimum of 12 students enrolled to run, if the target enrolment is not met there is a chance the module will be withdrawn.

AMAP5119B

20

THE AMERICAN FAMILY

The idea of the "family" has been integral to American's conceptions of themselves as a nation and as individuals. This module will explore the centrality of the family to the American nations and the ideas and ideal that surround its model form: "mother", "husband", "wife", "child". One of its primary objectives will be to demonstrate that the ideal of the family, born in the wake of the revolutionary era and the rise of the middle-classes in the antebellum North, has never been the majority experience for Americans, either in the nineteenth century or in the contemporary period. Case studies will be explored reflecting on different family forms in the United States from a historical perspective and are likely to include the familial experiences of African Americans, Native Americans, Gay and Lesbian Couples, single parenthood, and marital breakdown. The module will make use of a variety of primary materials including historical sources, legislation, novels, folklore and song.

AMAS5040A

20

THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT CYPRUS

Cyprus has played a key role in international relations between east and the west since the Early Bronze Age. Its archaeological heritage is beautifully preserved and can be experienced at sites like Neolithic Khirokitia, the Late Bronze Age royal city of Salamis, and the Roman trading port of Kourion. Cyprus was the nexus of many important trade routes, from Asia Minor to Egypt and from the coast of the Levant to Italy and Greece. In antiquity it was famed for its great wealth and its own natural resources, such as copper, wine and olive oil The course will introduce you to the archaeology of Cyprus through a combination of 2-hour in-class tutorials and a week-long field trip to Cyprus, including on-site lectures and material handling sessions. The cost for the field trip is GBP400 per person (excluding flights) and includes accommodation, transport on all site visits, breakfast and lunch each day and a final evening BBQ. Room and Board is provided in Lefkosia by the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI) and in Lemba village, camping accommodation will be provided at the Lemba Archaeological Research Centre (LARC).

AMAA5026B

20

THE BEATS AND THE LIMITS OF WRITING

This module covers the writers known as 'The Beats' in terms of their antecedents, the literary and cultural traditions in which they worked, and the social and critical debates that raged during their heyday. Students will be asked to read widely, to compare and contrast different writers' styles, and to make informed judgements about the writers' relationships to the times in which they wrote. The module aims to foster an understanding of the Beat literary phenomenon in literary, political and social contexts. It will also examine the debts Beat writers owed to 'American Renaissance' writers including Emerson and Whitman, to wider ideas of the 'avant-garde' in the Twentieth Century generally, and to European Romantic traditions. It will investigate how a Beat poetics developed as a response to Cold War 'consensus culture', and sought to establish a countercultural (though distinctly American) 'tradition'.

AMAL5076A

20

THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1857-1956

This module surveys the history of the British Empire from the mid-nineteenth century to the Suez Crisis, seeking to explain the Empire's growth and the early stages of its contraction. It examines the nature and impact of British colonial rule, at the political, economic and social/cultural levels, addressing the development of the 'settler' colonies/Dominions, the special significance of India and the implications of the 'New Imperialism'. Problems to be considered include theories of 'development' and 'collaboration', the growth of resistance and nationalism, and Britain's responses to these, and the impacts of the two World Wars and the Cold War on Britain's Imperial system.

HIS-5013B

20

THE COLD WAR

This module explores the way in which American society and culture was shaped during the years of the Cold War, the tense standoff between the two "superpowers" between the end of World War II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. The work includes consideration of the key events, issues, and concepts in the history of the Cold War, from the division of Europe and the Marshall Plan, the emergence of the Truman Doctrine, the impact of the Chinese Revolution, through the Cuban missile crisis, the period of detente in the 1970s and the chilling of US-Soviet relations during the "second Cold War" of the early 1980s. Particular attention is given to the impact of those events in the USA, upon the ways in which Cold War anxieties were represented - and, also, the ways in which anxieties about American society became meshed in the Cold War. Discussion will range across issues from the bomb and the space race to the family, gender, and race. Throughout, particular use will be made of visual sources and film.

AMAH5048B

20

THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This module analyses the emergence, development and end of the Cold War. In doing so it examines political, ideological and legal aspects of conflict between and within states, issues of sovereignty, nuclear strategy and arms control, as well as peacekeeping, disarmament and non-violent resistance. Alongside political developments, themes such as everyday life, culture, sport and the existence of alternatives during the Cold War era will also be considered.

HIS-5024B

20

THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEWS (LEVEL 5)

The module seeks to provide an understanding of how the special cultural product we call 'news' is created. It examines the changing economic, political, legal and cultural contexts of newspaper production in a variety of media (print, web, broadcast). It presents and assesses different theories about how these contexts (or 'structures') impact on the day to day practice of journalism and the nature of the news message. An important part of the module involves tracing the reflections and refractions of these wider processes in actual news media discourse. We will use frequent practical analysis exercises to test and challenge the theories of new production and the practices of new production in today's fast-changing news environment. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to 'read' news media in a very different way to before.

PPLL5016B

20

THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEWS (LEVEL 5)

The module seeks to provide an understanding of how the special cultural product we call 'news' is created. It examines the changing economic, political, legal and cultural contexts of newspaper production in a variety of media (print, web, broadcast). It presents and assesses different theories about how these contexts (or 'structures') impact on the day to day practice of journalism and the nature of the news message. An important part of the module involves tracing the reflections and refractions of these wider processes in actual news media discourse. We will use frequent practical analysis exercises to test and challenge the theories of new production and the practices of new production in today's fast-changing news environment. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to 'read' news media in a very different way to before.

PPLL5016B

20

THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR: WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS

This module explores female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. It will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes. It will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5029B

20

THE ENGLISH CIVIL WARS

This module looks at the causes, course and significance at what, in terms of relative population loss was probably the single most devastating conflict in English history; the civil wars of 1642-6, 1648 and 1651. In those years, families, villages and towns were divided by political allegiances and military mobilisation. Hundreds of thousands died, not just from warfare, but also from the spread of infectious disease, siege and the disruption of food supplies. In the rest of the British Isles, suffering was even more profound. The execution of the King in 1649, intended to bring an end to the wars, divided the country ever more deeply. By the late 1640s, radical social groups had emerged who questioned the very basis of authority in Early Modern Society, and made arguments for democracy and for the redistribution of land and power. Karl Marx thought that English revolution marked the beginnings of capitalism. Was he right? Focussing on ordinary men and women as well as upon important generals, politicians and monarchs, this module examines the following issues: the causes of the civil war; the reign of Charles I; the start of the warfare in Ireland and Scotland; the outbreak of the English Civil war; the course of the war; popular allegiances - why did ordinary people fight?; the Levellers, Diggers and Ranters; the crisis of 1647-9; the trial and execution of Charles I; gender, women and revolution; the experience of warfare; print and popular political gossip; the failure of the English Republic and the Restoration of Charles II. Particular use will be made of the primary source extracts and web resources.

HIS-5028B

20

THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1066 TO 1600: BUILT AND SEMI-NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS

This module will examine the development of the English countryside from late Saxon times into the eighteenth century. Topics covered will include woods and wood-pastures, enclosure, walls and hedges, the archaeology of churches and vernacular houses. There will be a substantial practical component to the module, involving the analysis of buildings, hedges and woods and other semi-natural environments.

HIS-5003B

20

THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5079B

20

THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5079B

20

THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE

Centred in New York City, the Harlem Renaissance was a period of intense cultural production and political activity amongst African Americans in the early twentieth century. This movement is often credited with ushering in the era of the 'New Negro' - a generation of defiant and empowered black Americans who claimed the right to "speak for themselves" in the face of race discrimination. Through an intensive interdisciplinary examination of African American fiction, poetry, political writing, music, painting and theatre, this module will assess the significance of the Harlem Renaissance both in the United States and overseas. Students will be asked to explore these issues by examining, among other works, the novels of Claude McKay, Nella Larsen and Zora Neale Hurston, poetry by Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen as well as the blues lyrics of Billie Holiday and Ma Rainey.

AMAS5039B

20

THE HISTORY OF NORWICH

This module will focus on the development of towns and cities in England from the Norman Conquest until the present day. We will use Norwich as our main case study, but will also draw on other comparative examples around England, such as London, York, Exeter or Leeds, to place Norwich within its wider context. This module will combine social, political and economic history with a detailed consideration of the built environment of the city; key buildings, open spaces and street patterns. There will be regular field trips into Norwich to explore historic buildings, collections and landscapes.

HIS-5040A

20

THE HOLOCAUST IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

This module aims to explore representations of the Holocaust in American literature. Students will explore how the Holocaust is represented by American Jewish and non-Jewish authors. Students will consider whether, and how, the Holocaust is 'Americanised' by American writers; they will consider some of the ethical and philosophical debates concerning representation of the Holocaust in art; they will examine how American Jewish writers engage with the Holocaust to negotiate questions of Jewish identity; and they will consider the problematic uses and definitions of the term 'holocaust' in American culture.

AMAL5016B

20

THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY

Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module explores the relationship between media culture and social identities. Discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, it critically reflects upon the relationship between media culture and social power and considers how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, students should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption.

PPLM5042B

20

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST

This module provides a historical background to the Middle East and its politics. It is concerned with politics within the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. The module encourages students to think critically about the links between some key concepts in the comparative politics of non-Western countries, including historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/neo-colonialism, the role of culture and identity and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

PPLX5058B

20

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

This module will examine the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Saxon period. We will examine the field archaeology of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, discuss in some detail the landscapes of Roman Britain, and assess the nature of the Roman/Saxon transition. We will then investigate the development of territorial organisation, field systems and settlement patterns during the Saxon and Medieval periods. The module provides an introduction to archaeological theory and methods, as well as giving a broad overview of the development of society, economy and environment in the period up to c.1300.

HIS-5002A

20

THE PAPACY, CHRISTIANITY AND THE STATE, 1050-1300

In these centuries the pope became the most influential figure in Europe. He could depose emperors, mobilise vast armies to fight on crusade, and intervene in disputes in far-away realms. This module explores the origins of papal power and its impact on emerging nations in the west.

HIS-5048A

20

THE PRACTICE OF SCREENWRITING: ISSUES IN ADAPTATION

This module is a practical screenwriting class. Students will explore basic issues in screenwriting and will focus on the problems of creating new screenplays adapted from novels, short stories, articles and other sources. Classroom sessions will compare film adaptations to the original material, introduce concepts of screenwriting and screenplay form, and apply key tools of script analysis. The final project will offer the opportunity to write a short screenplay or the first act of a feature-length script. The module offers essential skills for anyone contemplating a screenwriting career. The module is taught by seminar and screening.

AMAP5117B

20

THE PRACTICE OF SCREENWRITING: ISSUES IN ADAPTATION

This module is a practical screenwriting class. Students will explore basic issues in screenwriting and will focus on the problems of creating new screenplays adapted from novels, short stories, articles and other sources. Classroom sessions will compare film adaptations to the original material, introduce concepts of screenwriting and screenplay form, and apply key tools of script analysis. The final project will offer the opportunity to write a short screenplay or the first act of a feature-length script. The module offers essential skills for anyone contemplating a screenwriting career. The module is taught by seminar and screening

AMAP5118A

20

THE RISE AND FALL OF BRITISH POWER

This module examines Britain's expansion and decline as a great power, from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the 1950s. It considers the foundations of British power, the emergence of rivals, Britain's relationship with the European powers and the USA, and the impact of two World Wars and Cold War. It investigates the reasons for Britain's changing fortunes, as it moved from guarding the balance of power to losing its empire.

HIS-5011A

20

THE SHORT STORY (AUT)

What is a short story? What do short story writers have to say? What about short story critics and theorists? Is the short story a narrative in miniature? Or is there more to a short story than simply being 'short'? And why are critics so concerned with whether the short story is alive or dead? These are the kind of questions this module will investigate by asking you to think as a short story reader, theorist, critic and writer. Reading will be drawn from short story writers - and writing about the short story - roughly spanning the 19th century to the present, and from a range of cultural contexts. Our interest will not be to establish a history of the short story, but instead to explore the range of thematic preoccupations, changing definitions, and critical debates surrounding the form. Students will have the opportunity to respond to these questions in critical and/or creative forms of assessment. Writers studied might include Edgar Allan Poe, Katherine Mansfield, Julio Cortazar, Anton Chekov, Ali Smith and Ryunosuke Aqutagawa.

LDCL5058A

20

THE SHORT STORY (SPR)

What is a short story? What do short story writers have to say? What about short story critics and theorists? Is the short story a narrative in miniature? Or is there more to a short story than simply being 'short'? And why are critics so concerned with whether the short story is alive or dead? These are the kind of questions this module will investigate by asking you to think as a short story reader, theorist, critic and writer. Reading will be drawn from short story writers - and writing about the short story - roughly spanning the 19th century to the present, and from a range of cultural contexts. Our interest will not be to establish a history of the short story, but instead to explore the range of thematic preoccupations, changing definitions, and critical debates surrounding the form. Students will have the opportunity to respond to these questions in critical and/or creative forms of assessment. Writers studied might include Edgar Allan Poe, Katherine Mansfield, Julio Cortazar, Anton Chekov, Ali Smith and Ryunosuke Aqutagawa.

LDCL5060B

20

THE US SUPREME COURT, 1900 - TODAY: THE RIGHTS REVOLUTION

The 20th Century saw a major expansion in the role of the Supreme Court in American politics and society. Changing understandings of individual rights and liberties spurred a constitutional revolution in areas of civil rights and individual freedoms. Legal and social changes occurred alongside changing interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights to fundamentally alter the way many Americans related to each other and to the government. Following World War Two the Court became increasingly active in areas of public policy, deciding cases involving freedom of speech, religion and the press, campaign finance, gun control and the right to bear arms, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, same-sex marriage, abortion, and the death penalty, among many others. This module introduces students to the role and operation of the Court as well as to the historic events it has been involved with since the early 20th Century. From repeatedly striking down New Deal legislation in the 1930s to halting the recount of votes in Florida in the 2000 election, from holding the state had no responsibility for the protection of individuals in the first two decades of the 20th Century to expanding understandings of "equal protection of the laws" in the second half of the century, the module will encourage students to consider the role of law in shaping and influencing American history and politics, as well as asking how and why the Court ruled in particular ways. Through a combination of Court opinions and academic studies, students will be asked to consider key issues in 20th and 21st Century US history and the role of the law and Constitution in shaping them. Students are challenged to consider how understandings of key legal "rights" have changed over time and what this tells us about the Court, the Constitution, and about American society more broadly. Students considering taking this module are encouraged to also consider "The US Supreme Court, 1789-1900: (Re)making the Nation" which introduces students to the role and activities of the Court in the 19th Century and, as such, provides a useful background for this module.

AMAH5034B

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing, participation in workshops, and one-to-one feedback sessions with your tutor provides formative assessment and allows you to learn to write journalism before your achievements are assessed. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - practices.

LDCC5009A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing, participation in workshops, and one-to one feedback sessions with your tutor provides formative assessment and allows you to learn to write journalism before your achievements are assessed. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - practices.

LDCC5010B

20

THEATRES OF REVOLT: NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPEAN DRAMA

Beginning with Ibsen and Strindberg, this module examines the development of modern forms of drama during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, addressing modern concerns - self and society, gender, sexuality, social and class conflicts, creation and destruction, the unconscious - and deploying experimental types of theatre by Chekhov, Maeterlinck, Wilde, Hauptmann, Buchner and Wedekind, as well as the two seminal Scandinavians. We will be looking at versions of Naturalism, Symbolism and Expressionism as modernist modes in drama and suggesting ways in which these shape and anticipate later developments. Assessment is by means of one scene analysis and one longer essay. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment.

LDCL5030A

20

THREE WOMEN WRITERS

The writings of Edith Wharton, Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf intersect with discourses of 'new women' and gender as well as feminism, and social and cultural history. This second level seminar develops historicist and generic understanding as well as exploring women's identity through these authors' writings, which move between realism and modernism. Special attention to just one writer is possible in the final essay. Particular attention will be given to some of Virginia Woolf's lesser known writing.

LDCL5050B

20

TOPICS IN BRITISH POLITICS

Some people are arguing that British politics is in crisis - tumbling electoral turnouts, decline of political parties, cynicism about the political class, high levels of apathy etc. We examine and make sense of this problem (if it is a problem), by examining in depth three or four topics. Recently these have included: changing patterns of electoral behaviour and campaigning; the issue of electoral reform; the evolving role of political parties in the face of social and technological change.

PPLX5048B

20

TRANSLATION AND ADAPTATION (LEVEL 5)

This module will consider translation and adaptation (understood as the transferral of a cultural product from one medium to another) in a range of media (for example, film, television, theatre, literature, and computer games) and the issues associated with these processes in these media. The module is taught in English and inter and intra-lingual work will be examined. The module is open to students who do not have a foreign language. Assessment commensurate with level. Taught with LCS-3T22 and LCST6021B.

PPLT5024B

20

TRANSLATION AND ADAPTATION (LEVEL 5)

This module will consider translation and adaptation (understood as the transferral of a cultural product from one medium to another) in a range of media (for example, film, television, theatre, literature, and computer games) and the issues associated with these processes in these media. The module is taught in English and inter and intra-lingual work will be examined. The module is open to students who do not have a foreign language. Assessment commensurate with level. Taught with LCS-3T22 and LCST6021B.

PPLT5024B

20

TRANSLATION ISSUES ACROSS MEDIA (LEVEL 5)

This module is particularly relevant to language and translation students, but will appeal to students from across the University with an interest in language issues associated with the globalisation of communication and the media. It considers a range of materials (texts and their translations, multilingual publications and packaging, film subtitles, dubbed soundtracks, IT-mediated text) to explore issues involved in the transposition and translation of (spoken and written) text into other media and other languages across different genres, literary and non-literary. Taught in English. Receptive knowledge of one other main European language required. Taught with LCS-3T25 and LCST6032A. Assessment commensurate with level.

PPLT5031A

20

TRANSLATION ISSUES ACROSS MEDIA (LEVEL 5)

This module is particularly relevant to language and translation students, but will appeal to students from across the University with an interest in language issues associated with the globalisation of communication and the media. It considers a range of materials (texts and their translations, multilingual publications and packaging, film subtitles, dubbed soundtracks, IT-mediated text) to explore issues involved in the transposition and translation of (spoken and written) text into other media and other languages across different genres, literary and non-literary. Taught in English. Receptive knowledge of one other main European language required. Taught with LCS-3T25 and LCST6032A. Assessment commensurate with level.

PPLT5031A

20

TRANSLATION WORK EXPERIENCE (LEVEL 5)

The module builds on partnership with public services locally and abroad to give home and visiting/exchange students the opportunity to work jointly on professional translation briefs (e.g. translation from, and into English, of information for local museums or museums in France or Spain). Work involves translating to specifications, background research and product delivery/presentation. Assessment is by a variety of means including a critical report. Module open subject to availability of briefs - a back-up module choice is essential. One hour per week timetabled, other commitments to be arranged. Taught with LCS-3T15 and LCST6019A. This module is only available to Post A-level language students.

PPLT5023A

20

TRANSLATION WORK EXPERIENCE (LEVEL 5)

The module builds on partnership with public services locally and abroad to give home and visiting/exchange students the opportunity to work jointly on professional translation briefs (e.g. translation from, and into English, of information for local museums or museums in France or Spain). Work involves translating to specifications, background research and product delivery/presentation. Assessment is by a variety of means including a critical report. Module open subject to availability of briefs - a back-up module choice is essential. One hour per week timetabled, other commitments to be arranged. Taught with LCS-3T15 and LCST6019A. This module is only available to Post A-level language students.

PPLT5023A

20

TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND

This module seeks to identify patterns of continuity and change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with a view to defining the early modern period in practice. Through an examination of both political and constitutional history from the top down, and social and cultural history from the bottom up, it seeks to understand the period dynamically, in terms of new and often troubled relationships which were formed between governors and governed. Topics include: Tudor monarchy, the Protestant Reformation, the social order, popular religion and literacy, riot and rebellion, the Stuart state, the civil wars, crime and the law, women and gender.

HIS-5010A

20

TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN, 1914 TO THE PRESENT

This module examines the themes of conflict and consensus in Britain from the Great War to the present day, both through the study of political life and also by assessing the impact of economic, social and cultural change. There are opportunities to re-evaluate issues such as the impact of war on society, "landmark" General Elections such as those of 1945 and 1979, the nature and durability of consensus politics in the 1950s, or Britain's role in the contemporary world.

HIS-5023A

20

VICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN BRITAIN

The module will cover the main themes in British history between 1848 and the eve of the First World War. Starting with the Great Exhibition of 1851, it will examine themes such as religion and the impact of Darwin; the emergence of 'democracy' and political parties in the age of Gladstone and Disraeli; the critics of Victorian and Edwardian society; the Irish question and the domestic impact of Empire; the rise of labour and the 'crises' of Liberalism and Conservatism; the monarchy under Queen Victoria and Edward VII; the women's suffrage movement; the decline of the aristocracy and the nature of Edwardian patriotism as Britain faced the prospect of war.

HIS-5052B

20

VICTORIAN WRITING

This module aims to equip you with a knowledge of writing from across the nineteenth century, in a variety of modes (fiction, poetry, science, journalism, cultural criticism, nonsense). We will examine authors including George Eliot, Tennyson, Dickens, Darwin, Arnold, Charlotte Bronte, and the Brownings, among others. You will thus develop an awareness of how different kinds of writing in the period draw on, influence, and contest with each other. Likewise, you will acquire a sense for the cultural, political and socio-economic contexts of nineteenth-century writing, and some of the material contexts in which that writing took place (serial publication, popular readership, periodical writing, public controversy).

LDCL5047B

20

VIRTUE, REASON and PLEASURE: THEMES IN MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgments and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as examine critically the idea that what one needs to understand the phenomenon of morality or to engage successfully in moral thinking is a moral theory. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5074A

20

VIRTUE, REASON and PLEASURE: THEMES IN MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgments and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as examine critically the idea that what one needs to understand the phenomenon of morality or to engage successfully in moral thinking is a moral theory. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5074A

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 2 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 3, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 1.

PPLX5064A

20

WORDS AND IMAGES

The module aims to explore the relationship between words and images in contemporary literature. As well as developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss how these two media can be combined, the module will survey shifts in the generic conventions of such literature over the last few decades so that students will develop an awareness of the various narrative techniques that such texts employ and be able to discuss these aspects in an informed and critical manner. The theoretical approach will consider narrative, ekphrasis, and critical work in the area by Scott McCloud, Perry Nodelman and Ivan Brunetti, amongst others. The module will analyse established texts by writers and artists such as Art Spiegelman, Alan Moore and Joe Sacco as well as more recent texts. Students will be assessed through critical and/or creative engagement. The module will build upon the level one Writing Texts module and will complement Words and Music and Children's Literature at level three.

LDCL5053B

20

YEAR ABROAD

A compulsory year abroad for students taking one or more honours language(s). Satisfactory completion of the year abroad, as defined by the School Board, is necessary for registration in the following year.

PPLX5027Y

120

Compulsory Study (90 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 90 credits:

Name Code Credits

DRAMA PRODUCTION (YEAR 3)

Reserved for 3rd Year Students taking Degree Programmes: W400, WQ43 or WW84 This module covers the development and delivery of a full-scale theatre production (usually of a scripted, possibly classical play): involving planning, rehearsal, technical contribution, performance and self-evaluation.Please note; students enrolled on the Third Year Production module are expected to be available during all business hours of the working week throughout the Autumn semester, in addition to evening and weekend rehearsals during the final weeks of the process.

LDCD6007A

60

DRAMA PROJECTS

Reserved for 3rd Year Students taking Degree Programmes: W400, WQ43 or WW84 Individual performance projects with supervision, leading to presentation (usually before the external examiner).

LDCD6011B

30

Option A Study (30 credits)

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CONTEMPORARY DRAMA AND FILM

This module will examine emergent voices and trends in recent theatre, film and television (mainly British but with some American or European contributions). Issues covered include the (questioned) demise of explicitly political drama and the appearance of previously silenced voices (e.g. gay and lesbian themes, feminist playwrights and writing ethnicity, physical theatre practitioners).

LDCD6103B

30

CREATIVE WRITING DISSERTATION (SPR)

This is an advanced level module which is for final year CW minors. The module allows students an opportunity to write a substantial short story (approximately 6000 words) or drama script (60 pages) or collection of poems (15-25 poems, totalling between 270 and 290 lines) and to develop an understanding of their own motivations, influences and processes through the production of a reflective self-commentary (2000 words). This module aims to encourage independent learning and the initiation and development of new creative material in a way that provides a grounding in the disciplines necessary both for postgraduate research and the professional practice of writing.

LDCC6004B

30

DRAMA AND LITERATURE: THE QUESTION OF GENRE

This seminar will explore the boundaries between drama and other genres (kinds, art-forms, media) in an attempt to investigate a number of interrelated theoretical questions. We shall explore these issues via various types of activity - practical criticism, critiques of literary theory, performance analysis, personal theatrical adaptations. The set texts are works of literature which do not quite fit generically - particularly plays that seem to be in some sense 'epic', or novels in some sense 'theatrical', ranging from Shakespeare in the 17th century through to Gay and Fielding in the 18th and Dostoyevsky and Chekhov in the 19th.

LDCL6017B

30

DRAMA DISSERTATION

An independently researched dissertation of 8,000 words on some aspect of drama or dramatic literature, performance theory and practice. This may treat drama in the medium of theatre, TV, film or radio, or it may take the form of a drama script (45 - 60 minutes running time).

LDCD6010B

30

LITERATURE AND OPERA

Sixteenth-century Italian literati created opera as the rebirth of Greek Tragedy. From its basic form as word-plus-music to its repeated reforms that have put now text, now music, now drama first,opera and literature have constantly complemented and competed with each other. This module explores the relationship between opera and various kinds of literature, including drama, prose, and poetry. We will ask "How can an orchestra narrate?" "How is an opera libretto like a movie script?" "Why do certain literary texts invite musical adaptation more than others?" and "What is the 'best' literary analogy for opera: drama, poetry, or the novel?" Students will also compare various operas with their literary sources in order to better understand how different media represent race, gender, and nationality. Composers will include Brittten, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Rossini, and Weill. Authors will include Shakespeare, Wilde, Brecht, James, Scott, Joyce and Aeschylus.

LDCL6101B

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love.

LDCL6056B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Year Abroad

During your second year, you may opt to transfer your studies to another European university for one or both semesters, choosing from universities in countries such as Greece, France, Germany and Switzerland. Alternatively, and depending on the availability of places, you may spend a second-year semester at an Australian university, such as Macquarie, Sydney.

 

Entry Requirements

  • Qualification: BA (Hons)
  • A Level: AAB including a Drama-based or Literature-based A-level
  • International Baccalaureate: 33 points overall including a minimum of 5 in HL English or Theatre Studies
  • Scottish Highers: At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAB including Drama/Theatre Studies or English Literature
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAABB including English or Theatre Studies
  • Access Course: Please contact the university for further information.
  • BTEC: DDD in a relevant subject
  • European Baccalaureate: 80% overall incl English Literature or Drama/Theatre studies

Entry Requirement

Applicants to this course are expected to have or be taking one of the following A-levels: Drama and Theatre Studies, Drama, Performance Studies, English Literature, English Language & Literature.  Applicants should usually offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at A-Level. Students taking the IB programme should hold or be taking a Drama-based or English-based subject at Higher Level, and should normally offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at Higher Level.

 

 

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.
 

Interviews

We operate an initial shortlisting process for this course on the basis of the information an applicant provides on their UCAS form. Candidates who are shortlisted will be invited to interview and audition and offers are only made after a successful interview and audition. These take place on Visit Days and include an opportunity to look around the campus, view accommodation, meet current students, talk to staff members and find out more about the course. The interview and audition itself will be with a member of our Drama team. Candidates are asked to perform a short monologue from a selection provided and there is also a discussion which generally covers topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and English at Grade C or above.

Assessment

For the majority of candidates the most important factors in assessing the application will be past and future achievement in examinations, academic interest in the subject being applied for, personal interest and extra-curricular activities and the confidential reference. We consider applicants as individuals and accept students from a very wide range of educational backgrounds and spend time considering your application in order to reach an informed decision relating to your application. Typical offers are indicated above. Applicants to this course who are shortlisted will also be required to attend for interview and audition.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.


Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Literature, Drama and Creative Writing)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.