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UCAS Course Code

M123

Duration

4 years

Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Bachelor of Laws

School of Study

Law

Course Organiser

Ms. Gillian Daly


“The year I spent in the USA was probably the best year I ever had in education. It has often been a talking point in job interviews and no doubt helped me get where I am today: an associate solicitor in the Dispute Resolution Department of the City of London Office of Baker & McKenzie, one of the world’s largest law firms.”

Richard Pike, Law graduate

The LLB Law with American Law degree recognises the importance of the US in modern legal and commercial life. It presents an outstanding opportunity for students in two ways. First, students have the opportunity to study the US legal system and its foundations, the importance of the constitution and its role in modern US society and the role of lawyers in the US. Second, students spend a year studying alongside US law students at a leading law school in the United States. At the end of the four year degree not only will students obtain an English qualifying law degree they will also have a very good understanding of the US and its legal system.

Course Structure

The LLB Law with American Law degree offers a unique opportunity to study law with a transatlantic dimension. This is a unique programme offered by a UK Law School. You will cover all the compulsory English law modules whilst also acquiring an understanding of the US and its legal system.

Years 1 and 2:

  • A distinctive feature of this programme is that we offer specific training in American law during your first two years at the University of East Anglia. You will take compulsory English law subjects alongside American law modules specifically tailored to the course.
  • The subjects you will cover include the US legal system and its foundations, the importance of the constitution and its role in modern US society and the role of lawyers in the US.

Year 3:

  • The year abroad is spent at a leading US Law School. At present you may attend South Texas College of Law in Houston, Texas or the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, Alabama. While you are required to pass the year abroad, the marks do not contribute to your final degree classification.

Year 4:

  • The final year is spent at the University of East Anglia. You will take the remaining compulsory English law module alongside optional modules offered by the Law School and the University.

Assessment

Assessment on the LLB Law with American Law is by a mixture of examinations and coursework. Some optional modules are assessed entirely by coursework while others include seen, pre-release or open book exams. In addition, students are encouraged to submit non-assessed coursework regularly throughout the year, providing an opportunity for written feedback.

UniStats Information

Choosing UEA means joining some of the most satisfied students in the country. The Law School has an enviable reputation for excellence, and was ranked joint fourth for teaching out of all English Law departments in the 2014 National Student Survey. We are also proud to have many years’ experience of running Year Abroad programmes.

We offer a unique, socially responsible community of excellent research and teaching. This not only prepares you for a career in law and many other professions, but also provides engagement with the wider community through a vast range of pro-bono work undertaken by our undergraduates as part of our Law Clinic.

As a student at the Law School you will:

  • Gain valuable experience through pro-bono work as part of our Law Clinic
  • Benefit from exceptionally high quality teaching
  • Be part of a student body that has a 95% satisfaction rate, according to the 2014 National Student Survey
  • Be supported to build your future career with a strong focus on employability throughout your degree including internships and mentoring opportunities.

Employability

We produce highly employable students due to the programmes and opportunities we offer. The School enjoys excellent links with our alumni and our courses place a strong emphasis on employability, with a focus on mentoring, internships and transferable skills.

  • We maintain and develop excellent relationships with the wider legal community and beyond.
  • Employment features as a fundamental part of the curriculum with an active focus on Law in Practice (which develops career management skills).
  • The Legal Method, Skills and Reasoning module help develop useful transferable skills.
  • The School has one of the largest internship programmes of any law school in the UK with 40 places kept solely for UEA law students and a number of scholarships and prizes from law firms.
  • The Mentor Scheme matches second year students with established barristers and solicitors.

Student Experience

The School has a strong community engagement ethos, with a fundamental commitment to community service and to helping those who need the expertise and enthusiasm the School can offer. We have one of the largest pro bono operations of all law schools in the UK, with over half of our students engaging with the wider community.

2014 sees the Law School return to its 16th century home, Earlham Hall. Near the banks of the River Yare, the hall is an amazing building, reopening after extensive restoration and refurbishment.

UEA has a vibrant campus and an engaged student body. The University has been ranked in the top 3 for Student Experience by the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey 2014 – and for very good reason. The campus offers a whole host of activities and societies, making your student years rich and full of new experiences.

Year Abroad

If you choose to study LLB Law with American Law or Law with European Systems, you will spend your third year studying abroad. We have links with some prestigious and well-established Law Schools in the US and Europe.

Teaching Excellence and Facilities

Ranked joint fourth for Law teaching out of all English mainstream universities, with a 95% satisfaction score  (2014 National Student Survey), you will benefit from innovative and stimulating teaching across all areas of the curriculum. In the 2015 Guardian University Guide we also rated highly for teaching, with a 95% satisfaction score. This is supported by academics in the Law School having been awarded the University’s prestigious Excellence in Teaching prize a number of times. 

Research-led teaching is offered across all years of the degree, drawing on internationally excellent research in areas such as Media, Internet and Intellectual Property Law, Commercial Law and Competition Law. The results of the Research Excellence Framework (2014) rank the School of Law 21st in the country ahead of most of our competitors (Times Higher Education). Over 70% of research within our School is ranked world-leading or internationally excellent.

Year

Compulsory Study (120 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

This module involves an introductory study of: the nature of constitutions and of the UK's specifically, together with sources of the latter; the fundamental principles of the UK constitution (Parliamentary Sovereignty, the rule of law and the separation of powers); its key institutions (both Houses of Parliament, Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Civil Service) - and the relationship between them; challenges to the unitary state (from devolution and the EU); the framework for protecting human rights in the UK by means of the Human Rights Act; and the principles of judicial review. It will expose students to some basic critical perspectives and ideas.

LAW-4003A

20

CONTRACT LAW

This module considers the nature of contractual obligations, the legal principles which govern the formation, content and validity of contracts and the remedies available for breach of contractual obligations. It provides an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines of the English law of contract.

LAW-4006B

20

ENGLISH LEGAL PROCESS

This module examines the actors, institutions and processes that make up the English Legal System. In so doing, it provides students with an understanding of how criminal and civil cases proceed through the legal system. Topics studied include police powers, the decision to prosecute, juries, the judiciary, civil procedure and alternative dispute resolution.

LAW-4004A

20

LAW IN PRACTICE

This module addresses four important aspects of the 'Law in Practice' . . First, students will study key issues affecting contemporary legal practice, such as access to justice, the opening of the legal professions to competition from other providers, diversity in the legal professions , litigation costs/conditional fee agreements and professional ethics. Second, students will be exposed to perspectives on law that 'cut across' other law modules, such as thematic and contextual approaches to law (e.g. law and economics, socio-legal approaches). Third students will receive tuition in key skills (most of which are highly transferable) such as effective oral and written communication, negotiation, team-working, interpreting data and advocacy - together with opportunities to practice and develop these skills. Finally we will look, with the assistance of many external speakers, and career options and career management for law graduates. THIS MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW LLB STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-4001Y

20

LEGAL METHOD, SKILLS AND REASONING

This module introduces students to legal method (determining the meaning and application of statutes and law-making through cases), legal research, legal writing and legal reasoning about law and fact in a common law legal system.

LAW-4002A

20

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW

This module provides an introduction to the core principles of English criminal law and provides students with the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. Students will examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case-studies. Topics will include: homicide; causation; non-fatal offences against the person; property offences; defences; inchoate liability; complicity.

LAW-4005B

20

Compulsory Study (100 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LAW

This module will introduce students to the study of US Law and prepare them for the year abroad at a US Law School. Students will study the history and origins of US Law, the federal system and the court structure. They will examine the approach to legal education in the US and gain experience in the Socratic Method of teaching. They will also study the US legal profession alongside issues of civil and criminal procedure, including the role of lawyers working on capital punishment cases. THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED ON M123.

LAW-4007A

20

LAND LAW

This module aims to give an introduction to the types of interest in and rights over land, how they are created and conveyed and how they bind third parties. Topics covered will include the nature of land ownership, land registration, co-ownership and specific interests in land.

LAW-5008A

20

THE LAW OF TORT

Students will be taught general principles of civil liability for damage done by one person to another, including the law of Negligence (particularly in relation to personal injury), liability for statements, occupier's liability, nuisance, intentional torts and damages.

LAW-5016B

20

THE LAW OF TRUSTS

This Autumn module is concerned with the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. It considers the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trusts

LAW-5007A

20

US CONSTITUTIONAL METHOD

This will prepare the students in the fundamentals of American Law and the American Legal System before their year abroad in the USA. Topics covered include Constitutional Law, the judicial system, civil procedure, and aspects of property law, tort and contract law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-5010A

20

Option A Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANIMAL WELFARE LAW

The module will consider the law relating to animal protection and animal welfare in England and Wales, including the effect on domestic law of EU law and international law. In particular, it will consider, first, the original development of animal protection law, including the social and political context in which legislation was originally enacted. The module will then move on to consider in detail the move from individual, narrow, situation-specific legislation to the general protection offered by the Protection of Animals Act 1911, the first general animal protection legislation in the UK. After considering the significant development of animal protection legislation in the UK, the module will consider the field of animal welfare science, giving students a foundation in the basic welfare concepts on which the modern animal welfare law is based. After explaining the necessary concepts of animal welfare science, the module will move on to consider the development of law in the UK, which led to the Animal Welfare Act 2006, taking the law from its principal focus on prevention of cruelty towards an additional concern for a promotion of good welfare. The module will then consider the law relating to the protection/welfare of animals in specific situations, such as: - The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, as amended (including currently proposed amendments); - Scientific testing (including consideration of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and the associated regulatory regime); - Wild animals (including the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and the Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996); - Farm animals (including the Welfare of Farmed Animals Regulations 2007, as amended, and the EU Welfare of Animals (Transport) England Order 2006 and associated EU legislation); - Hunting (including the political and legal debates surrounding the Hunting Act 2004).

LAW-5019B

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

Individual Employment Law (Employment Law 1) is a single (Spring) semester 20-credit optional module. It examines individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law examines child law in England and Wales, focussing particularly on issues relating to parenthood, parental responsibility, children's welfare, children's rights, parental disputes over children, the regulation of international child abduction, public law issues surrounding child protection (including the accountability of local authorities in regard to the care and protection of children) and lastly the changing nature of adoption, and the reform of adoption law.

LAW-5012B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

This module builds on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and allows students to explore new topics. The module with be neither specifically consumer- nor commercial-based and will therefore be an ideal compliment to both consumer- and commercial-oriented options within the LL.B. The module will be focused upon doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. The attempt to balance theoretical analysis and practical application will be key to this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. Particular focus is placed on human rights, refugee law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

Compulsory Study (120 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at approved American Law Schools and pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-5003Y

120

Compulsory Study (20 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

EU LAW

This module will provide students with the fundamentals of EU law, with regard to both the constitutional and substantive aspects of the subject. In addition, the module will enable students to develop a critical understanding of areas of EU law and to retrieve and analyse information about EU law from a range of sources. THIS MODULE IS ONLY OPEN TO LAW STUDENTS RETURNING FROM A YEAR ABROAD.

LAW-6005A

20

Option A Study (80 - 100 credits)

Students will select 80 - 100 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BRITISH HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module offers students the opportunity to explore the "hows" and the "whats" of human rights protection in the UK. In the first couple of weeks, we consider the modalities of the HRA and will touch upon the general jurisprudence of the ECHR. For the major part of the module, we will look at a range of substantive rights and consider how - by what means and to what extent - they are protected in domestic law under the HRA. Areas that we will cover, given the topical and dynamic nature of the course, cannot be predicted but in past years classes have covered: protest, media privacy, police powers,counter-terrorism, hate speech, prisoners' rights and religious freedom.

LAWZ6022A

20

COMPANY LAW

An introduction to the legal regulation and control of companies and those persons involved with them, principally directors and shareholders. Consideration is given, among others, to the nature, types and functions of companies, the consequences of incorporation, the company's organs and agents, the rights and obligations of shareholders, the structure and management of the board of directors and its relationship with the shareholders. The course aims to give a modern treatment of company law, concentrating on those aspects which are of practical importance and relevance not only to those who wish to pursue a career as commercial or company lawyers, but also to those who have no such aspirations, as a knowledge of the company and how it works is relevant to many aspects of legal practice.

LAW-6006A

20

COMPARATIVE LAW

Lectures on the methods, aims and uses of Comparative Law and the main legal traditions of the world today.

LAW-6008A

20

COMPETITION LAW

This module is designed to allow a good understanding of the substantive and procedural rules of competition law as well as the core economic concepts of competition. It focuses on the main principles of competition law and investigates the means by which competition laws tackle such problems as cartels, abuses of monopolies and mergers. Broader issues, such as remedies and enforcement strategies will also be reviewed. The module will help to place the UK competition regime within its European and international contexts.

LAW-6010A

20

CRIME AND SENTENCING

'Crime and Sentencing' examines the nature and extent of the problem of crime in England and Wales and sentencing law. First, the module looks at sources of knowledge about crime, comparing depictions of crime and criminals in the media with knowledge derived from criminal statistics (including recorded crime statistics and the British Crime Survey). Second, we look at the main theories of sentencing and punishment: retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation and restoration. Third, we explore the sources of sentencing law and sentencing decisions: statute, case-law, ministerial statements and informal sources. Fourth, we turn to the recent history of sentencing law in England and Wales, evaluating the coherence of the overall sentencing structure. Fifth, the module examines the impact of moves towards structured sentencing, focusing on the impact of sentencing guidelines and the Sentencing Council on promoting consistency in sentencing. Sixth, attention turns to the use of imprisonment asking, "What are prisons for and are they used appropriately?" The module examines the treatment of offenders with mental health problems and those who are deemed dangerous, as well as the use of mandatory minimum sentences (sometimes called "three strikes and you're out" laws). We also look at the efficacy of alternatives to imprisonment, such as community orders. Seventh, the focus shifts to victims of crime: what role can and do victims have in sentencing proceedings? Should they have any input at all? Restorative justice will be examined as an innovative yet controversial means of responding to crime that places victims at the heart of responses to crime.

LAWZ6023A

20

DISCRIMINATION LAW

This module examines the philosophical and conceptual basis of equality and anti-discrimination law, the substantive law of the UK concerning discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, age and genetic inheritance, the impact of EU law on the development of UK anti-discrimination law, the enforcement of anti-discrimination legislation and future directions in discrimination law.

LAW-6011A

20

DISSERTATION

An opportunity to offer a dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words. Students undertake a study in an area of law of particular interest to them under the guidance of a member of faculty who acts as supervisor. The period of study extends over the duration of two semesters, which must normally be consecutive autumn and spring semesters. STUDENTS MAY ONLY UNDERTAKE THE DISSERTATION OPTION WITH THE CONSENT OF THE MODULE ORGANISER.

LAW-6002Y

20

FAMILY LAW: ADULT RELATIONSHIPS

Family and Relationship Law endeavours to impart an understanding and knowledge of the law relating to and key issues of adult relationships including cohabitation, marriage, family breakdown, domestic violence, the effect of the Human Rights Act 1998 on this aspects of the law, the property aspects of marital breakdown, pre-nuptial contracts, and child support. It encourages research into and analysis of the family and adult relationship related legal and policy source materials, including electronic databases, and conclusions drawn from that process. Family law relating to adult relationships in England and Wales in 2012 is set within an historical, social, statutory and international context and generally the law and policy issues relating to adult family relationships and the effects of breakdown and separation of partners are debated and analysed in some depth.

LAW-6013A

20

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

Intellectual Property (IP) law can affect, the music you listen to, the brands you buy, the films you watch, the technology you use, the books you read, the shape of the bottle you drink from, the websites you view... In short, IP law applies to nearly everything in your daily life. Primarily, it deals with the protection and encouragement of innovation in technology, business, the arts, and the creative industries. Intellectual property is an exciting and up to the minute field of law which is constantly evolving. Students will be introduced to, and encouraged to think about, the practical importance of intellectual property rights and their economic and philosophical justifications. There will also be a technological dimension to the module, whereby students will be introduced to the impact technology has had on the development and enforcement of IP rights. Students will learn the basics of intellectual property law over a broad spectrum, including how to apply the law to representative factual situations. The course is designed to give a rounded overview of the three main areas of Intellectual Property; copyright, patents and trade marks.

LAW-6019B

20

INTERNATIONAL AND EU ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

"What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on? "(Henry David Thoreau, a letter to H.G.O. Blake, May 20, 1860). Our planet is being plundered, degraded and polluted at an unprecedented rate. This pattern of human activity compromises not only the right of future generations to a healthy environment, but also their ability to fulfil their most basic needs. The biggest environmental challenges of our time, such as climate change, trans-boundary pollution and the loss of biodiversity, require a common action by the international community as a whole. International Environmental Law represents the set of legal rules and principles that guide the international community in its collective effort to meet these challenges. This proposed module aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the context, foundations and the complexities of international environmental law, and its application through European Union (EU) law. It will review the historical background and the developments that shaped the evolution of this field of law. It will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the unique legal principles and regulatory approaches that guide environmental law-making, as well as with some knowledge of specific subject-areas, such as climate change law, biodiversity law, and water law. This module will be taught through the use of a "dual-themed" approach; each part will be covered by two lectures; the first seminar will present the international regulatory framework (i.e. 'international environmental law'), while the following seminar will include a more concrete discussion on the manner in which international law was adopted into, and refined through, the EU framework. Such a teaching methodology will provide the students with a wider understanding of the topic; notably the students will grasp the relevance of international law to our everyday life, the challenge of balancing environmental goals with other policy objectives, and the manner in which general international law principles can be, and have been, concretised via EU law.

LAW-6014A

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module will introduce students to the regional (European, Inter-American and African) and international (the OHCHR, UN Human Rights Council, treaty-based bodies, Universal Periodic Review, and Special Procedures) mechanisms of human rights protection. Lectures will focus on the conceptual and institutional framework for human rights protection, and will also seek to lay a foundation for more narrowly focused seminar discussions. The latter will consider in depth the content and scope of selected substantive rights - such as the right to life, freedom from torture, and freedom of expression and assembly - drawing upon relevant international, regional and domestic human rights jurisprudence. Seminars will also allow for discussion of the implementation and enforcement of human rights norms, and for critical reflection on the use of human rights language (reflecting on the adequacy of rights-based solutions to real-world problems).

LAW-6020B

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW AND REFUGEE LAW

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is the law governing armed conflict, whereas Refugee Law provides important protection for the victims of armed conflict. During this module students will consider key issues in both IHL and refugee law, such as the difference between combatants and civilians, legitimate targets and illegal weapons and the scope of protection offered to refugees. During seminars students will apply these principles and assess the legality of current international events. This module will be a prerequisite for students wishing to take part in the UEA Law school and British red Cross Humanitarian Law Project.

LAW-6007A

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW

This module is intended to introduce students to the English law and practice of international trade. Although there have been considerable attempts to harmonise the law relating to international trade at an international level, English law remains of very considerable importance and is often chosen as the applicable law to govern international transactions. This module looks at the English law relating to international sales, international payments and international carriage of goods by sea. As well as these core contracts in an international trade transaction, the module will also examine international dispute resolution and the problems of governing law, jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, and the growing use of international commercial arbitration as an alternative to international litigation. It also briefly introduces students to why and how the laws in these areas have become increasingly harmonised.

LAW-6017B

20

INTERNET LAW

Internet law is a cross-cutting area of law for today's multinational and innovative environment, particularly relevant in industries like electronic commerce, information technology, and the media. Topics covered in this module include data protection and privacy, cybercrime, telecoms, contracts, domain names, the control of content and the resolution of disputes. Students will explore the application of law across traditional categories and are encouraged to reflect on the role of a national legal system in an interconnected world. Teaching will include some online elements as well as lectures and seminars, and the module is assessed by 100% coursework.

LAW-6001A

20

JURISPRUDENCE

Students undertake directed reading on main currents of legal philosophy. This unit does not have formal lectures.

LAW-6018B

20

LAW AND MEDICINE

The module provides an in-depth examination of a range of medico-legal issues and explores the interface between the law and medical ethics. The module will investigate various areas of law and analyse the potential effect of legal rules on the provision of contemporary medicine. It will further address how the law impacts upon medical professionals in terms of their legal, professional and ethical accountability and consider important questions pertaining to patient rights.

LAW-6016B

20

LAW OF CRIMINAL EVIDENCE

The Law of Criminal Evidence examines the basic concepts (evidence, relevance, credibility, probative value, weight) and rules of proof that apply in English criminal trials, that is, the burden and standard of proof, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, the opinion evidence rules, the course of the trial (including witness competence), the treatment of evidence of bad character and discretionary and non-discretionary exclusion of evidence. The justification for rules is considered alongside the rules themselves. THE MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-6015B

20

MEDIA LAW

The aims of this module are: To introduce students to the structure of the media industries in the UK, the justification for, and different models of regulation. To consider the main social, technological and regulatory influences shaping its development. To consider the regulation of the media markets. To consider the issues relating to the management of reputation from a private law perspective, including defamation and the protection of privacy. To consider legal issues pertaining to journalism (e.g. , contempt, courts, privilege).

LAW-6009A

20

Option B Study (0 - 20 credits)

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND, C. 500-1066

This module surveys the history of the English from their arrival in Britain in the fifth century until the end of the eleventh century and the conquest of England by the Normans. We shall cover topics such as the conversion of the English in the seventh century; the domination of England by Mercia in the eighth century; the Viking invasions and the reign of Alfred the Great; the emergence of Wessex as the dominant force in Britain in the tenth century; the conquest of England by the Danes in the eleventh century; and the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

HIS-5005A

20

ANIMAL WELFARE LAW

The module will consider the law relating to animal protection and animal welfare in England and Wales, including the effect on domestic law of EU law and international law. In particular, it will consider, first, the original development of animal protection law, including the social and political context in which legislation was originally enacted. The module will then move on to consider in detail the move from individual, narrow, situation-specific legislation to the general protection offered by the Protection of Animals Act 1911, the first general animal protection legislation in the UK. After considering the significant development of animal protection legislation in the UK, the module will consider the field of animal welfare science, giving students a foundation in the basic welfare concepts on which the modern animal welfare law is based. After explaining the necessary concepts of animal welfare science, the module will move on to consider the development of law in the UK, which led to the Animal Welfare Act 2006, taking the law from its principal focus on prevention of cruelty towards an additional concern for a promotion of good welfare. The module will then consider the law relating to the protection/welfare of animals in specific situations, such as: - The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, as amended (including currently proposed amendments); - Scientific testing (including consideration of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and the associated regulatory regime); - Wild animals (including the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and the Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996); - Farm animals (including the Welfare of Farmed Animals Regulations 2007, as amended, and the EU Welfare of Animals (Transport) England Order 2006 and associated EU legislation); - Hunting (including the political and legal debates surrounding the Hunting Act 2004).

LAW-5019B

20

CONSPIRACY AND CRISIS IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND

Assassination. Foreign invasion. Revolt and rebellion. Political and religious plots loomed large and posed a constant threat in Early Modern England. Conspiracy was not simply an imagined threat nor did it exist in theory; it was a social and political reality that elicited fear, shaped policies and gave rise to self-fulfilling prophecies. Did the greatest threat of subversion come from popular uprisings, foreign invasion or from the heart of the British government? From Mary, Queen of Scots and the Gunpowder Plot to the hidden agenda of Charles I, this module will survey a series of popular, elite and royalist conspiracies. Moving behind official narratives, it will draw on a host of resources to investigate alternative explanations for crisis over power, authority and legitimacy during this period. Each conspiracy will provide and point of entry into broader changes in early modern society as the crown and commons reimagined and realigned political, religious and social boundaries.

HIS-5027B

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

Individual Employment Law (Employment Law 1) is a single (Spring) semester 20-credit optional module. It examines individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

EU CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

This module examines European Union constitutional law and the functioning of the EU at supranational level. It will start with an analysis of the EU institutions and their interaction, the legislative process and the role of fundamental rights in EU law. It will then consider direct actions before the Court of Justice, in particular actions for annulment and actions against recalcitrant Member States. Finally, a topical issue of EU constitutional law will be addressed.

LAWZ5018B

20

Early Medieval Europe: Warriors, Saints, and Rulers

This course explores the experiences and fortunes of the peoples of the western peninsula of Eurasia between the rule of the Emperor Constantine I in the 330s and the call to crusade in the 1090s. At the beginning of the period the lands centred on the Mediterranean and much of its hinterland were situated within the Roman empire. Yet, within three hundred years, this empire had disintegrated and been replaced by a number of successor states, ruled by competing dynasties. These states included Visigothic Hispania, Vandal Africa, and Merovingian Francia. Another#in fact, the longest lived of all the successor states#was the eastern empire centred on Constantinople, long known to historians as 'the Byzantine empire'. By the close of the seventh century, many of these states had themselves been conquered by Arabic and African warriors committed to the new religion of Islam and been incorporated in the Caliphate centred on the city of Damascus#an empire which easily rivalled the might, spread, and power of Rome before its own collapse and fission in circa 1000. What Islamic rulers could do, so too could Christian ones. In 800 the son of a Frankish usurper, Charlemagne, was crowned emperor of the West. The actions and ambitions of this emperor were as formative and as formidable in the history of ninth and tenth century Europe as those of Napoleon in the eighteenth and nineteenth. The heirs and successors of Charlemagne#whether Frankish, Ottonian, or Scandinavian#were long compelled to negotiate his legacy and memory. By the eleventh century even the Roman pontiffs, now advancing a new programme of reform and renewal, were looking to situate themselves in relation to his Salian successors. The summons to liberate Jerusalem and rescue the Greek empire in the east, carefully tailored to the aspirations of the new elites of Francia and Catalonia, was perhaps the most explosive strategy advanced by these Roman pontiffs. This course is thus broad in chronological scope, covering more than eight hundred years, and extensive in geographical range, taking us from the Atlantic to the Euphrates, from the Atlas mountains to the North Sea. In the course of this journey we will meet many warriors, saints, and rulers, both female and male.

HIS-5042A

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law examines child law in England and Wales, focussing particularly on issues relating to parenthood, parental responsibility, children's welfare, children's rights, parental disputes over children, the regulation of international child abduction, public law issues surrounding child protection (including the accountability of local authorities in regard to the care and protection of children) and lastly the changing nature of adoption, and the reform of adoption law.

LAW-5012B

20

FROM AGINCOURT TO BOSWORTH: ENGLAND IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES

Through a close examination of the lives and reigns of four very different monarchs this unit investigates the workings of kingship and high politics in one of the most turbulent periods of English History (1415-1485). New interpretations of the Wars of the Roses, as well as original source material, will be studied.

HIS-5009B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

This module builds on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and allows students to explore new topics. The module with be neither specifically consumer- nor commercial-based and will therefore be an ideal compliment to both consumer- and commercial-oriented options within the LL.B. The module will be focused upon doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. The attempt to balance theoretical analysis and practical application will be key to this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

France from the Enlightenment to the Belle Epoque

This module will introduce you to an eventful period of history during which France exercised a preponderant role over European affairs and culture. The module will provide you with the essential background knowledge of political events, revolutions and wars but it will also encourage you to explore deeper social and cultural trends. In the first weeks we will reconsider 'Old regime' France, drawing attention to its dynamism and cultural richness before turning to the crises that discredited Bourbon absolutism. In subsequent weeks we will focus on the Revolutionary-Napoleonic epoch: our endeavour here will be to explain why the Revolution was revolutionary in theory, violent in practice and dictatorial in consequence. We will then reflect on the Restoration. Using extracts from Hugo's Les Miserables as our starting point, we will look at how rapid industrialization generated social tensions that successive ministries tried to diffuse through repression and reform. Next, we will look at the France of the Second Republic and Second Empire; our focus here will be Napoleon III's modernization initiatives and dramatic remodelling of Paris. Finally, we will approach the history of the Third Republic between 1870 and 1914 from three angles: its success in making the populace feel French; science, art and culture; and its nationalistic foreign-policy, which contributed toward undermining the general European peace. The seminars for this module will provide us with an opportunity to analyse and discuss in depth an eclectic range of primary sources, including textual documents (in English translation) ranging from constitutions to period fictional writings, maps, advertisements, artwork, extant material and architectural evidence, and music.

HIS-5059A

20

GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

HERITAGE AND PUBLIC HISTORY

Public history is history in the public sphere, whether in museums and galleries, heritage sites and historic houses, radio and television broadcasting, film, popular history books, or public policy within government. The central challenge and task of public history is making history relevant and accessible to its audience of people outside academia, whilst adhering to an academically credible historical method. This module explores the theory and practice of public history in the heritage sector. The module considers questions such as, how is the past used? What is authenticity? Who 'owns' historic sites? The module also offers the opportunity for undergraduates to work on a heritage project with a local heritage partner - the nature of this project varies each year depending on the availability of such partnership opportunities. PLEASE NOTE: The availability of places with partners this year means that the module will be limited to twelve undergraduate places. All students on the module will be required to engage in preparatory reading and writing over the course of the summer break.

HIS-5026A

20

HISTORY OF MODERN ITALY

Since the unification of the states of the Italian peninsula, the history of modern Italy has been the subject of intense historical debate. Modern Italy has often been cast as a 'weak' state and 'fragile' nation, riven by particularism and by competing secular and religious ideologies, 'economically backward', less successful than its national neighbours, and 'the least of the Great Powers'. More recent historiography has sought to challenge or modify these perceptions in a number of ways, and this course examines modern Italian history from unification to present day, in the light of these ongoing historiographical debates. a) Italian nationalism, the process of Italian unification and the attempts to create national unity after 1870; b) the relationship between socio-economic change and political development in Liberal Italy; c)the impact of the First World War on Italian society and politics; e)the nature of the Fascist regime and its impact on Italian society; f)the radicalisation of the regime, its racial policies and the quest for Empire; g)Italy's role in World War II, the reasons for the collapse of the Fascist regime, and the emergence of civil war. h) Italian history since 1945

HIS-5060B

20

Human Rights: The history of an Idea

Reading key historical, philosophical, political, legal and literary texts, this module track will track the emergence of human rights as a cultural idea from their conception in the eighteenth century, through the development of political rights and humanitarianism in the nineteenth century, through to the Nuremberg trials and the United Nations of Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), into the post World War Two period and up to the present day.We will trace how the idea of human rights developed at key junctures, and untangle their relationship to political and historical change.

HIS-5043A

20

IMPERIAL RUSSIAN AND SOVIET HISTORY, 1861-1945

This module examines some of the main themes in Russian history between the Emancipation of the Serfs and the outbreak of the Second World War. We will look at the nature of industrialisation and the peasant economy, the autocracy and its fall in 1917, the revolutionary movement and the nationalities question. We will then examine how the Revolution of 1917 changed the state and the ways in which the Communists attempted to change society before 1929. We conclude by examining the country during the era of the five year plans and the impact of the Stalinist system on the Soviet Union before the outbreak of world war.

HIS-5019A

20

INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR MANAGEMENT

The module addresses the changing role of information technology and management information systems in organisations today. In particular, it examines the role of IT in contemporary organisations and its role as an essential enabler of competitive advantage. This module aims to provide an understanding of the use of information by modern organisations and an understanding of concepts such as systems development, change management, Big Data and electronic commerce.

NBS-5003Y

20

LATER MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module examines the political, cultural and social history of later medieval Europe (circa 1100-1400). It has a particular focus on the Empire and Italy, but we will also look at France and Constantinople. We will encounter some of the chief characters of the period, such as Emperors Frederick Barbarossa and Frederick II, 'the Wonder of the World', and Pope Innocent III. Students will be introduced to some of the most important events and concepts to shake medieval Europe, such as the intellectual Renaissance of the twelfth century, the Crusades, the rise of Heresy and the Inquisition, the Empire's long struggle in Italy, and the Papal Schism.

HIS-5006B

20

LATIN FOR HISTORIANS

This module provides an introduction to the linguistic skills in medieval Latin which enable students to read administrative documents such as charters, accounts, court rolls, etc. It is particularly suited for those who intend proceeding to postgraduate study in aspects of the past, such as medieval history, which require a reading knowledge of Latin. This course is not intended for students who have already studied Latin to A level or equivalent.

HIS-5004B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

This module introduces students to the fundamental concepts, theories, techniques and challenges involved in managing the organisation's integrated marketing communications mix and examines its individual elements. The module thereby considers issues that arise in planning, implementing and controlling marketing communications strategies across different media channels, including print and broadcast advertising, PR, sponsorships, product placements, sales promotions, retail marketing as well as direct and digital marketing. Students will not only evaluate current promotional strategies for existing brands, but also have to develop, design and present a new marketing communication campaign of their own together with a suitable TV or print ad.

NBS-5020Y

20

MEDICINE AND SOCIETY BEFORE THE 17TH CENTURY

This module examines the theory and practice of medicine at all levels of English society during the medieval and early modern periods, and assesses the impact of medical ideas upon religious, literary and political thought. Topics include: the emergence of a healing profession and its attempts to secure a monopoly of practice; the role of women as both patients and practitioners; theories about the spread of disease and necessary measures for public health; medicine and the Church;and attitudes to mortality. Edited versions of original documents are used.

HIS-5061B

20

MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990

This module introduces students to German history in the twentieth century which was characterised by various radical regime changes and territorial alterations. Topics include German world policy and nationalism in the late imperial period; imperialism and expansionism during the First World War; the challenges of modernity in the Weimar Republic; the rise of Hitler and the formation of the Nazi empire in Europe; the post-war division of Germany and the legacy of the Third Reich; the nature of the GDR dictatorship and the problem of West German terrorism; as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification. Special attention will be given to questions of nationalism and national identity, issues of history and memory, and Germany's role in Europe and the world. On completion of this unit, students will have developed a solid understanding of one of the most dramatic periods of German history when the country oscillated between the two extremes of war and repression, on the one hand, and the return to peace and democracy, on the other.

HIS-5018A

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN: THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

This module deals with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the start of the Cold War.

HIS-5017B

20

NEW WORLDS: THE EUROPEAN COLONIAL EXPANSION FROM COLUMBUS TO ABOLITIONISM

This module looks at the European colonial enterprise in America and Asia. Starting from the explorations in the Mediterranean we will then look at the expansion of European powers across the Atlantic and the Indian oceans: Columbus and the discovery of America, the first colonies of New England, the creation of trading posts in India and East Asia, and the missionary campaigns in China and Japan. Drawing on selected extracts from travel writings and ethnographic descriptions of previously unknown places and people, we will focus on the protagonists of these explorations - conquerors, adventurers, merchants and settlers - and their interaction with and exploitation of non-European people and cultures, and we will finally conclude by considering the debates which developed around these themes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

HIS-5044B

20

NORMAN AND PLANTAGENET ENGLAND, 1066-1307

This module follows the history of England from the Norman Conquest of 1066 down to the death of Edward I in 1307. We will encounter some of the most important figures in English history during this period, including William the Conqueror, Empress Matilda, Henry II, Thomas Becket, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Richard I, and Edward I, amongst many others; and will examine many of the key events, such as the Conquest, the long Civil War of King Stephen's reign, the murder of Thomas Becket, Magna Carta, and the invasions of Wales and Scotland. The aim of this module is to look at the political, ecclesiastical, social and intellectual history of England in this period and to place English history in the wider context of Europe in the Middle Ages.

HIS-5007B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module will introduce students to the history of propaganda. It will ask students to consider what constitutes propaganda, and to understand the techniques of propaganda, as well as its purposes and effectiveness. It will consider the issue across the twentieth century and will do so by looking at the issue of propaganda in dictatorial regimes, such as Nazi Germany (and fascism more widely), as well as the communist dictatorships. It will also look at the role of propaganda in the Western democracies, looking especially at the issue of the British Empire and the Cold War. It will also look at the role of propaganda in radical politics and protest movements, such as the environmental movement. In doing so it will provide students with an understanding of important historical and ethical debates.

HIS-5050B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. Particular focus is placed on human rights, refugee law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

QUEENS, COURTESANS AND COMMONERS: WOMEN AND GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the issue of gender in European history, between 1500 and 1750. Using a variety of written and visual sources, and including a comparative element, it focuses on the following themes: definitions of femininity and masculinity; life-cycles; family, kinship, and marriage; social exclusion, charity and the welfare state; law, crime, and order; witchcraft and magic; honour, sex, and sexual identities; work; learning and the arts; material culture; the impact of European expansions.

HIS-5056B

20

RACE AND RACISM IN THE USA

This seminar will explore the origins and continued role in American culture of the idea of race. Where did the concept of race come from? And to what uses has it been put by various groups within America's pluralistic society? Restricted to students on programmes in American History or Literature, or who have previously done modules on race. Not available to first year students.

AMAH5046B

20

REFORMATION TO REVOLUTION

This module examines three centuries of European history connecting two unprecedented revolutionary epochs: the Reformation of the sixteenth century and the American and French revolutions at the end of the early modern era. We will look at key themes and movements in these centuries, including the politics of the Reformation; the Mediterranean work of the Ottomans and Habsburg Spain; the Dutch Golden Age; the great political and religious struggles of the seventeenth century, including wars in the British Isles, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Baltic; the Russia of the Romanov czars and Peter the Great; the growth of centralised states and absolutism in France, Prussia and Austria; the Enlightenment; the rise of the Atlantic economies; and the challenge to the Old Regime from revolutionary politics.

HIS-5025A

20

RURAL ENGLAND 1660 TO 1900

This module will encourage you to consider broad questions in relation to life in rural England and, specifically, as it related to individuals in England between 1660-1900. Topics to be covered will include changes in land use and technology; landowners: affluence and decline; rural crime; housing - types and conditions; family life; childhood; education; poverty and health care.

HIS-5058A

20

THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1857-1956

This module surveys the history of the British Empire from the mid-nineteenth century to the Suez Crisis, seeking to explain the Empire's growth and the early stages of its contraction. It examines the nature and impact of British colonial rule, at the political, economic and social/cultural levels, addressing the development of the 'settler' colonies/Dominions, the special significance of India and the implications of the 'New Imperialism'. Problems to be considered include theories of 'development' and 'collaboration', the growth of resistance and nationalism, and Britain's responses to these, and the impacts of the two World Wars and the Cold War on Britain's Imperial system.

HIS-5013B

20

THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This module analyses the emergence, development and end of the Cold War. In doing so it explores the historical circumstances behind the conflict, relations between the United States of America, the Soviet Union, and other states, as well as the impact of nuclear weapons. The Cold War has been revisited by historians from various angles, and in a variety of ways, in recent years and this module is structured to enable engagement with these new histories. In this way, it takes account of developments that have traditionally been viewed as central to the history of the post-war era, while also drawing upon the expertise within the School of History to explore lesser known case studies and alternative spheres where the conflict was played out. This will include coverage of a range of states in Europe (Hungary, France, Spain#) and beyond (Cuba, Grenada, Cambodia#), as well as paying attention to broader themes such as the role of propaganda, sport and youth. At the same time it will consider overarching bodies in the form of the United Nations, the Non-Aligned Movement and the emerging European project. The module concludes by asking why the Cold War ended so abruptly, what role civil resistance played in this, and why the process was peaceful in some cases and violent in others. Here, the Soviet Union, Poland and Yugoslavia will be the focus of attention

HIS-5024B

20

THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR: WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS

This module explores female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. It will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes. It will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5055A

20

THE ENGLISH CIVIL WARS

This module looks at the causes, course and significance at what, in terms of relative population loss was probably the single most devastating conflict in English history; the civil wars of 1642-6, 1648 and 1651. In those years, families, villages and towns were divided by political allegiances and military mobilisation. Hundreds of thousands died, not just from warfare, but also from the spread of infectious disease, siege and the disruption of food supplies. In the rest of the British Isles, suffering was even more profound. The execution of the King in 1649, intended to bring an end to the wars, divided the country ever more deeply. By the late 1640s, radical social groups had emerged who questioned the very basis of authority in Early Modern Society, and made arguments for democracy and for the redistribution of land and power. Karl Marx thought that English revolution marked the beginnings of capitalism. Was he right? Focussing on ordinary men and women as well as upon important generals, politicians and monarchs, this module examines the following issues: the causes of the civil war; the reign of Charles I; the start of the warfare in Ireland and Scotland; the outbreak of the English Civil war; the course of the war; popular allegiances - why did ordinary people fight?; the Levellers, Diggers and Ranters; the crisis of 1647-9; the trial and execution of Charles I; gender, women and revolution; the experience of warfare; print and popular political gossip; the failure of the English Republic and the Restoration of Charles II. Particular use will be made of the primary source extracts and web resources.

HIS-5028B

20

THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1066 TO 1600: BUILT AND SEMI-NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS

This module will examine the development of the English countryside from late Saxon times into the eighteenth century. Topics covered will include woods and wood-pastures, enclosure, walls and hedges, the archaeology of churches and vernacular houses. There will be a substantial practical component to the module, involving the analysis of buildings, hedges and woods and other semi-natural environments.

HIS-5003B

20

THE FIRST BRITISH EMPIRE

Between the sixteenth and the early nineteenth centuries, the English crossed the oceans and claimed territory on every continent other than Antarctica. This module surveys the creation and growth of British Empire, examining its origins and its impact on an array of peoples. In the context of studying how the empire spread and functioned, we will consider the varied experiences of Africans, Native Americans, Aboriginal Australians, Protestant refugees from the continent of Europe, the peoples of India, the Irish, and British settlers across the globe. The complex, intimate, and often violent interactions of these groups led to ideological battles pitting loyalism against republicanism, for example, and imperial "civilization" against an array of indigenous cultural revivals. At first glance these struggles may seem to place the British against the subject peoples of their empire, but on closer examination it becomes apparent that they fractured nearly every population within the imperial domains. The creative energy of the British Empire stemmed in large part from collaborations between British groups and individuals and segments of their purported imperial subjects in building, reforming, or in some cases seeking to destroy the structures of imperialism

HIS-5045A

20

THE HISTORY OF NORWICH

This module will focus on the development of towns and cities in England from the Norman Conquest until the present day. We will use Norwich as our main case study, but will also draw on other comparative examples around England, such as London, York, Exeter or Leeds, to place Norwich within its wider context. This module will combine social, political and economic history with a detailed consideration of the built environment of the city; key buildings, open spaces and street patterns. There will be regular field trips into Norwich to explore historic buildings, collections and landscapes.

HIS-5040A

20

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST

This module provides a historical background to the Middle East and its politics. It is concerned with politics within the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. The module encourages students to think critically about the links between some key concepts in the comparative politics of non-Western countries, including historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/neo-colonialism, the role of culture and identity and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

HIS-5048B

20

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

This module will examine the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Saxon period. We will examine the field archaeology of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, discuss the landscapes of Roman Britain, and assess the nature of the Roman/Saxon transition. We will then investigate the development of territorial organisation, field systems and settlement patterns during the Saxon and early medieval periods. The module provides an introduction to the theory and methods of landscape archaeology, as well as giving a broad overview of the development of society, economy and landscape in the period up to c.1100.

HIS-5002A

20

THE RISE AND FALL OF BRITISH POWER

This module examines Britain's expansion and decline as a great power, from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the 1950s. It considers the foundations of British power, the emergence of rivals, Britain's relationship with the European powers and the USA, and the impact of two World Wars and Cold War. It investigates the reasons for Britain's changing fortunes, as it moved from guarding the balance of power to losing its empire.

HIS-5011A

20

THE US SUPREME COURT, 1900 - TODAY: THE RIGHTS REVOLUTION

The 20th Century saw a major expansion in the role of the Supreme Court in American politics and society. Changing understandings of individual rights and liberties spurred a constitutional revolution in areas of civil rights and individual freedoms. Legal and social changes occurred alongside changing interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights to fundamentally alter the way many Americans related to each other and to the government. Following World War Two the Court became increasingly active in areas of public policy, deciding cases involving freedom of speech, religion and the press, campaign finance, gun control and the right to bear arms, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, same-sex marriage, abortion, and the death penalty, among many others. This module introduces students to the role and operation of the Court as well as to the historic events it has been involved with since the early 20th Century. From repeatedly striking down New Deal legislation in the 1930s to halting the recount of votes in Florida in the 2000 election, from holding the state had no responsibility for the protection of individuals in the first two decades of the 20th Century to expanding understandings of "equal protection of the laws" in the second half of the century, the module will encourage students to consider the role of law in shaping and influencing American history and politics, as well as asking how and why the Court ruled in particular ways. Through a combination of Court opinions and academic studies, students will be asked to consider key issues in 20th and 21st Century US history and the role of the law and Constitution in shaping them. Students are challenged to consider how understandings of key legal "rights" have changed over time and what this tells us about the Court, the Constitution, and about American society more broadly. Students considering taking this module are encouraged to also consider "The US Supreme Court, 1789-1900: (Re)making the Nation" which introduces students to the role and activities of the Court in the 19th Century and, as such, provides a useful background for this module.

AMAH5034B

20

TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND

This module seeks to identify patterns of continuity and change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with a view to defining the early modern period in practice. Through an examination of both political and constitutional history from the top down, and social and cultural history from the bottom up, it seeks to understand the period dynamically, in terms of new and often troubled relationships which were formed between governors and governed. Topics include: Tudor monarchy, the Protestant Reformation, the social order, popular religion and literacy, riot and rebellion, the Stuart state, the civil wars, crime and the law, women and gender.

HIS-5010A

20

TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN, 1914 TO THE PRESENT

This module examines the themes of conflict and consensus in Britain from the Great War to the present day, both through the study of political life and also by assessing the impact of economic, social and cultural change. There are opportunities to re-evaluate issues such as the impact of war on society, "landmark" General Elections such as those of 1945 and 1979, the nature and durability of consensus politics in the 1950s, or Britain's role in the contemporary world.

HIS-5057B

20

VICTORIAN BRITAIN

This module will examine the leading themes in British history during Victoria's reign (1837-1901). It will include political, social, economic, religious, urban, gender and intellectual topics.

HIS-5012A

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Year Abroad

Students spend their third year of study at a US Law School. The Law School has links with prestigious and well-established US Law Schools: South Texas College of Law in Houston, Cumberland School of Law at Samford University Alabama.

Accommodation in the US is arranged by the host Schools. Students must pay the cost of this. As a rough guide the cost of living for a student living on campus in Louisville this year was $7,000 for the whole year.

*Please note that the universities to which UEA is able to send students may vary from year to year.

For Home/EU students opting for a Year Abroad the tuition fee is currently £1350.  The Year Abroad tuition fee will be subject to an annual increase. International Students are required to pay 25% of their annual tuition fee to UEA during their year Abroad and will be calculated based on the current tuition fee for that year.

 

 

Entry Requirements

  • Qualification: LLB
  • A Level: AAA
  • International Baccalaureate: 34
  • Scottish Highers: AAAAB one Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAA (acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications)
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAAAA
  • Access Course: Humanitities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 45 credits at level 3 in a related subject
  • BTEC: DDD. Acceptable BTEC subjects Applied Science, Applied Law and Business.
  • European Baccalaureate: 85%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of applicants will not be interviewed for this course, however some applicants are requested to attend an interview prior to being offered a place. Applicants who are invited for interview will include those that have taken Access and OU qualifications.

These interviews are normally quite informal and cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course, personal interests and extra-curricular activities. Applicants will be required to write a short essay as part of the interview process.

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English Language GCSEs at grade C or above.

Assessment

Key factors used to assess an application include:

  • Past and future achievement in examinations
  • Academic interest in the subject
  • Personal interests and extra-curricular activities
  • The reference

All applications are considered on their own individual merits.

  • Qualification: LLB
  • A Level: AAA
  • International Baccalaureate: 34
  • Scottish Highers: AAAAB one Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAA (acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications)
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAAAA
  • Access Course: Humanitities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC: DDD. Acceptable BTEC subjects Applied Science, Applied Law and Business.
  • European Baccalaureate: 85%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of applicants will not be interviewed for this course, however some applicants are requested to attend an interview prior to being offered a place. Applicants who are invited for interview will include those that have taken Access and OU qualifications.

These interviews are normally quite informal and cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course, personal interests and extra-curricular activities. Applicants will be required to write a short essay as part of the interview process.

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English Language GCSEs at grade C or above.

Assessment

Key factors used to assess an application include:

  • Past and future achievement in examinations
  • Academic interest in the subject
  • Personal interests and extra-curricular activities
  • The reference

All applications are considered on their own individual merits.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

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International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International webpages.