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UCAS Course Code

M123

Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Bachelor of Laws

School of Study

Law

Course Organiser

Ms. Gillian Daly


“The year I spent in the USA was probably the best year I ever had in education. It has often been a talking point in job interviews and no doubt helped me get where I am today: an associate solicitor in the Dispute Resolution Department of the City of London Office of Baker & McKenzie, one of the world’s largest law firms.”

Richard Pike, Law graduate

The LLB Law with American Law degree recognises the importance of the US in modern legal and commercial life. It presents an outstanding opportunity for students in two ways. First, students have the opportunity to study the US legal system and its foundations, the importance of the constitution and its role in modern US society and the role of lawyers in the US. Second, students spend a year studying alongside US law students at a leading law school in the United States. At the end of the four year degree not only will students obtain an English qualifying law degree they will also have a very good understanding of the US and its legal system.

Course Structure

The LLB Law with American Law degree offers a unique opportunity to study law with a transatlantic dimension. This is a unique programme offered by a UK Law School. You will cover all the compulsory English law modules whilst also acquiring an understanding of the US and its legal system.

Years 1 and 2:

  • A distinctive feature of this programme is that we offer specific training in American law during your first two years at the University of East Anglia. You will take compulsory English law subjects alongside American law modules specifically tailored to the course.
  • The subjects you will cover include the US legal system and its foundations, the importance of the constitution and its role in modern US society and the role of lawyers in the US.

Year 3:

  • The year abroad is spent at a leading US Law School. At present you may attend South Texas College of Law in Houston, Texas or the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, Alabama. While you are required to pass the year abroad, the marks do not contribute to your final degree classification.

Year 4:

  • The final year is spent at the University of East Anglia. You will take the remaining compulsory English law module alongside optional modules offered by the Law School and the University.

Assessment

Assessment on the LLB Law with American Law is by a mixture of examinations and coursework. Some optional modules are assessed entirely by coursework while others include seen, pre-release or open book exams. In addition, students are encouraged to submit non-assessed coursework regularly throughout the year, providing an opportunity for written feedback.


Choosing UEA means joining some of the most satisfied students in the country. The Law School has an enviable reputation for excellence, and was ranked second for teaching out of all English Law departments in the 2013 National Student Survey. We are also proud to have many years’ experience of running Year Abroad programmes.

We offer a unique, socially responsible community of excellent research and teaching. This not only prepares you for a career in law and many other professions, but also provides engagement with the wider community through a vast range of pro-bono work undertaken by our undergraduates as part of our Law Clinic.

As a student at the Law School you will:

  • Gain valuable experience through pro-bono work as part of our Law Clinic
  • Benefit from exceptionally high quality teaching,
  • Be part of a student body that has a 93 per cent satisfaction rate, according to the 2013 National Student Survey,
  • Be supported to build your future career with a strong focus on employability throughout your degree including internships and mentoring opportunities.

Employability

We produce highly employable students due to the programmes and opportunities we offer. The School enjoys excellent links with our alumni and our courses place a strong emphasis on employability, with a focus on mentoring, internships and transferable skills.

  • We maintain and develop excellent relationships with the wider legal community and beyond.
  • Employment features as a fundamental part of the curriculum with an active focus on Law in Practice (which develops career management skills).
  • The Legal Method, Skills and Reasoning module help develop useful transferable skills.
  • The School has one of the largest internship programmes of any law school in the UK with 40 places kept solely for UEA law students and a number of scholarships and prizes from law firms.
  • The Mentor Scheme matches second year students with established barristers and solicitors.

Student Experience

The School has a strong community engagement ethos, with a fundamental commitment to community service and to helping those who need the expertise and enthusiasm the School can offer. We have one of the largest pro bono operations of all law schools in the UK, with over half of our students engaging with the wider community.

2014 sees the Law School return to its 16th century home, Earlham Hall. Near the banks of the River Yare, the hall is an amazing building, reopening after extensive restoration and refurbishment.

UEA has a vibrant campus and an engaged student body. The University has been ranked in the top 3 for Student Experience by the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey 2014 – and for very good reason. The campus offers a whole host of activities and societies, making your student years rich and full of new experiences.

Year Abroad

If you choose to study LLB Law with American Law or Law with European Systems, you will spend your third year studying abroad. We have links with some prestigious and well-established Law Schools in the US and Europe.

Teaching Excellence and Facilities

Ranked second for Law teaching out of all English mainstream universities (2013 National Student Survey), you will benefit from innovative and stimulating teaching across all areas of the curriculum. In both the 2015 Guardian University Guide and 2013 National Student Survey, 96 per cent of our students were satisfied with the teaching they received. This is supported by academics in the Law School having been awarded the University’s prestigious Excellence in Teaching prize a number of times. 

Research-led teaching is offered across all years of the degree, drawing on internationally excellent research in areas such as Media, Internet and Intellectual Property Law, Commercial Law and Competition Law.

UniStats Information

Year

Compulsory Study (120 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

This module involves an introductory study of: the nature of constitutions and of the UK's specifically, together with sources of the latter; the fundamental principles of the UK constitution (Parliamentary Sovereignty, the rule of law and the separation of powers); its key institutions (both Houses of Parliament, Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Civil Service) - and the relationship between them; challenges to the unitary state (from devolution and the EU); the framework for protecting human rights in the UK by means of the Human Rights Act; and the principles of judicial review. It will expose students to some basic critical perspectives and ideas.

LAW-4003A

20

CONTRACT LAW

This module considers the nature of contractual obligations, the legal principles which govern the formation, content and validity of contracts and the remedies available for breach of contractual obligations. It provides an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines of the English law of contract.

LAW-4006B

20

ENGLISH LEGAL PROCESS

This module examines the actors, institutions and processes that make up the English Legal System. In so doing, it provides students with an understanding of how criminal and civil cases proceed through the legal system. Topics studied include police powers, the decision to prosecute, juries, the judiciary, civil procedure and alternative dispute resolution.

LAW-4004A

20

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LAW

This module will introduce students to the study of US Law and prepare them for the year abroad at a US Law School. Students will study the history and origins of US Law, the federal system and the court structure. They will examine the approach to legal education in the US and gain experience in the Socratic Method of teaching. They will also study the US legal profession alongside issues of civil and criminal procedure, including the role of lawyers working on capital punishment cases. THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED ON M123.

LAW-4007B

20

LAW IN PRACTICE

This module addresses four important aspects of the 'Law in Practice' . . First, students will study key issues affecting contemporary legal practice, such as access to justice, the opening of the legal professions to competition from other providers, diversity in the legal professions , litigation costs/conditional fee agreements and professional ethics. Second, students will be exposed to perspectives on law that 'cut across' other law modules, such as thematic and contextual approaches to law (e.g. law and economics, socio-legal approaches). Third students will receive tuition in key skills (most of which are highly transferable) such as effective oral and written communication, negotiation, team-working, interpreting data and advocacy - together with opportunities to practice and develop these skills. Finally we will look, with the assistance of many external speakers, and career options and career management for law graduates. THIS MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW LLB STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-4001Y

20

LEGAL METHOD, SKILLS AND REASONING

This module introduces students to legal method (determining the meaning and application of statutes and law-making through cases), legal research, legal writing and legal reasoning about law and fact in a common law legal system.

LAW-4002A

20

Compulsory Study (100 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

LAND LAW

This module aims to give an introduction to the types of interest in and rights over land, how they are created and conveyed and how they bind third parties. Topics covered will include the nature of land ownership, land registration, co-ownership and specific interests in land.

LAW-5008A

20

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW

This module provides an introduction to the core principles of English criminal law and provides students with the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. Students will examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case-studies. Topics will include: homicide; causation; non-fatal offences against the person; property offences; defences; inchoate liability; complicity.

LAW-4005B

20

THE LAW OF TORT

Students will be taught general principles of civil liability for damage done by one person to another, including the law of Negligence (particularly in relation to personal injury), liability for statements, occupier's liability, nuisance, intentional torts and damages.

LAW-5016B

20

THE LAW OF TRUSTS

This Autumn module is concerned with the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. It considers the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trusts

LAW-5007A

20

US CONSTITUTIONAL METHOD

This will prepare the students in the fundamentals of American Law and the American Legal System before their year abroad in the USA. Topics covered include Constitutional Law, the judicial system, civil procedure, and aspects of property law, tort and contract law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-5010A

20

Option A Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

Individual Employment Law (Employment Law 1) is a single (Spring) semester 20-credit optional module. It examines individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law examines child law in England and Wales, focussing particularly on issues relating to parenthood, parental responsibility, children's welfare, children's rights, parental disputes over children, the regulation of international child abduction, public law issues surrounding child protection (including the accountability of local authorities in regard to the care and protection of children) and lastly the changing nature of adoption, and the reform of adoption law.

LAW-5012B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

This module builds on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and allows students to explore new topics. The module with be neither specifically consumer- nor commercial-based and will therefore be an ideal compliment to both consumer- and commercial-oriented options within the LL.B. The module will be focused upon doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. The attempt to balance theoretical analysis and practical application will be key to this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. Particular focus is placed on human rights, refugee law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

Compulsory Study (120 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at approved American Law Schools and pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-5003Y

120

Compulsory Study (20 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

EU LAW

This module will provide students with the fundamentals of EU law, with regard to both the constitutional and substantive aspects of the subject. In addition, the module will enable students to develop a critical understanding of areas of EU law and to retrieve and analyse information about EU law from a range of sources. THIS MODULE IS ONLY OPEN TO LAW STUDENTS RETURNING FROM A YEAR ABROAD.

LAW-6005A

20

Option A Study (60 credits)

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED EMPLOYMENT LAW

Advanced Employment Law is a single (Spring) semester 20-credt optional module, which complements Employment Law 1 (Individual Employment Law). It examines some of the more complex and controversial aspects of UK employment law concerning the protection of human rights and collective rights in the workplace, and the legal regulation of industrial relations. The topics to be studied include privacy and freedom of speech at work, the law regulating trade unions, collective bargaining and industrial disputes, and the rights of workers and their representatives to be involved in the running of the enterprise. These issues are examined from both a conceptual and a practical perspective. By taking this module, students will also gain an understanding of the sources and role of international labour standards, and of the domestic and international institutions and mechanisms that protect human rights and collective rights at work, including the ILO, the Council of Europe, the Certification Officer and the Central Arbitration Committee.

LAW-6021B

20

ADVANCED LAND LAW

This module examines in detail a number of important property interest in land. It covers the essential nature of and governing legal principles for these interests. In addition, it highlights current development of these concepts as well as their practical implications on modern society and topical issues.

LAW-5021B

20

BRITISH HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module offers students the opportunity to explore the "hows" and the "whats" of human rights protection in the UK. In the first couple of weeks, we consider the modalities of the HRA and will touch upon the general jurisprudence of the ECHR. For the major part of the module, we will look at a range of substantive rights and consider how - by what means and to what extent - they are protected in domestic law under the HRA. Areas that we will cover, given the topical and dynamic nature of the course, cannot be predicted but in past years classes have covered: protest, media privacy, police powers,counter-terrorism, hate speech, prisoners' rights and religious freedom.

LAWZ6022A

20

COMPANY LAW

An introduction to the legal regulation and control of companies and those persons involved with them, principally directors and shareholders. Consideration is given, among others, to the nature, types and functions of companies, the consequences of incorporation, the company's organs and agents, the rights and obligations of shareholders, the structure and management of the board of directors and its relationship with the shareholders. The course aims to give a modern treatment of company law, concentrating on those aspects which are of practical importance and relevance not only to those who wish to pursue a career as commercial or company lawyers, but also to those who have no such aspirations, as a knowledge of the company and how it works is relevant to many aspects of legal practice.

LAW-6006A

20

COMPARATIVE LAW

Lectures on the methods, aims and uses of Comparative Law and the main legal traditions of the world today. Presentations by students in the Spring Semester on specific coursework topics.

LAW-6008A

20

COMPETITION LAW

This module is designed to allow a good understanding of both the core economic concepts of competition, and the substantive and procedural rules of competition law. It focuses on the main principles of competition law and investigates the means by which competition laws tackle such problems as cartels, abuses of monopolies and mergers. Broader issues, such as remedies and enforcement strategies will also be reviewed. The module will help to place the UK competition regime within its European and international contexts.

LAW-6010A

20

CRIME AND SENTENCING

'Crime and Sentencing' examines the nature and extent of the problem of crime in England and Wales and sentencing law. First, the module looks at sources of knowledge about crime, comparing depictions of crime and criminals in the media with knowledge derived from criminal statistics (including recorded crime statistics and the British Crime Survey). Second, we look at the main theories of sentencing and punishment: retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation and restoration. Third, we explore the sources of sentencing law and sentencing decisions: statute, case-law, ministerial statements and informal sources. Fourth, we turn to the recent history of sentencing law in England and Wales, evaluating the coherence of the overall sentencing structure. Fifth, the module examines the impact of moves towards structured sentencing, focusing on the impact of sentencing guidelines and the Sentencing Council on promoting consistency in sentencing. Sixth, attention turns to the use of imprisonment asking, "What are prisons for and are they used appropriately?" The module examines the treatment of offenders with mental health problems and those who are deemed dangerous, as well as the use of mandatory minimum sentences (sometimes called "three strikes and you're out" laws). We also look at the efficacy of alternatives to imprisonment, such as community orders. Seventh, the focus shifts to victims of crime: what role can and do victims have in sentencing proceedings? Should they have any input at all? Restorative justice will be examined as an innovative yet controversial means of responding to crime that places victims at the heart of responses to crime.

LAWZ6025B

20

DISCRIMINATION LAW

This module examines the philosophical and conceptual basis of equality and anti-discrimination law, the substantive law of the UK concerning discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, age and genetic inheritance, the impact of EU law on the development of UK anti-discrimination law, the enforcement of anti-discrimination legislation and future directions in discrimination law.

LAW-6011A

20

DISSERTATION

An opportunity to offer a dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words. Students undertake a study in an area of law of particular interest to them under the guidance of a member of faculty who acts as supervisor. The period of study extends over the duration of two semesters, which must normally be consecutive autumn and spring semesters. STUDENTS MAY ONLY UNDERTAKE THE DISSERTATION OPTION WITH THE CONSENT OF THE MODULE ORGANISER.

LAW-6002Y

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

Individual Employment Law (Employment Law 1) is a single (Spring) semester 20-credit optional module. It examines individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

EU CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

This module examines European Union constitutional law and the functioning of the EU at supranational level. It will start with an analysis of the EU institutions and their interaction, the legislative process and the role of fundamental rights in EU law. It will then consider direct actions before the Court of Justice, in particular actions for annulment and actions against recalcitrant Member States. Finally, a topical issue of EU constitutional law will be addressed.

LAWZ5018B

20

FAMILY LAW: ADULT RELATIONSHIPS

Family and Relationship Law endeavours to impart an understanding and knowledge of the law relating to and key issues of adult relationships including cohabitation, marriage, family breakdown, domestic violence, the effect of the Human Rights Act 1998 on this aspects of the law, the property aspects of marital breakdown, pre-nuptial contracts, and child support. It encourages research into and analysis of the family and adult relationship related legal and policy source materials, including electronic databases, and conclusions drawn from that process. Family law relating to adult relationships in England and Wales in 2012 is set within an historical, social, statutory and international context and generally the law and policy issues relating to adult family relationships and the effects of breakdown and separation of partners are debated and analysed in some depth.

LAW-6013A

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law examines child law in England and Wales, focussing particularly on issues relating to parenthood, parental responsibility, children's welfare, children's rights, parental disputes over children, the regulation of international child abduction, public law issues surrounding child protection (including the accountability of local authorities in regard to the care and protection of children) and lastly the changing nature of adoption, and the reform of adoption law.

LAW-5012B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

This module builds on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and allows students to explore new topics. The module with be neither specifically consumer- nor commercial-based and will therefore be an ideal compliment to both consumer- and commercial-oriented options within the LL.B. The module will be focused upon doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. The attempt to balance theoretical analysis and practical application will be key to this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

Intellectual Property (IP) law can affect, the music you listen to, the brands you buy, the films you watch, the technology you use, the books you read, the shape of the bottle you drink from, the websites you view... In short, IP law applies to nearly everything in your daily life. Primarily, it deals with the protection and encouragement of innovation in technology, business, the arts, and the creative industries. Intellectual property is an exciting and up to the minute field of law which is constantly evolving. Students will be introduced to, and encouraged to think about, the practical importance of intellectual property rights and their economic and philosophical justifications. There will also be a technological dimension to the module, whereby students will be introduced to the impact technology has had on the development and enforcement of IP rights. Students will learn the basics of intellectual property law over a broad spectrum, including how to apply the law to representative factual situations. The course is designed to give a rounded overview of the three main areas of Intellectual Property; copyright, patents and trade marks.

LAW-6019B

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This course will introduce students to the concept of human rights, the mechanisms of the European Convention on Human Rights and the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. It will examine the philosophy of human rights and place the European Convention in international context before considering specific rights. The human rights under consideration will include the right to life, the prohibition of torture and the right to a fair trial.

LAW-6020B

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW AND REFUGEE LAW

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is the law governing armed conflict, whereas Refugee Law provides important protection for the victims of armed conflict. During this module students will consider key issues in both IHL and refugee law, such as the difference between combatants and civilians, legitimate targets and illegal weapons and the scope of protection offered to refugees. During seminars students will apply these principles and assess the legality of current international events. This module will be a prerequisite for students wishing to take part in the UEA Law school and British red Cross Humanitarian Law Project.

LAW-6007A

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW

This module is intended to introduce students to the English law and practice of international trade. Although there have been considerable attempts to harmonise the law relating to international trade at an international level, English law remains of very considerable importance and is often chosen as the applicable law to govern international transactions. This module looks at the English law relating to international sales, international payments and international carriage of goods by sea. As well as these core contracts in an international trade transaction, the module will also examine international dispute resolution and the problems of governing law, jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, and the growing use of international commercial arbitration as an alternative to international litigation. It also briefly introduces students to why and how the laws in these areas have become increasingly harmonised.

LAW-6017B

20

INTERNET LAW

Internet law is a cross-cutting area of law for today's multinational and innovative environment, particularly relevant in industries like electronic commerce, information technology, and the media. Topics covered in this module include data protection and privacy, cybercrime, telecoms, contracts, domain names, the control of content and the resolution of disputes. Students will explore the application of law across traditional categories and are encouraged to reflect on the role of a national legal system in an interconnected world. Teaching will include some online elements as well as lectures and seminars, and the module is assessed through continuous assessment (50%) and an essay (50%).

LAW-6001A

20

JURISPRUDENCE

Students undertake directed reading on main currents of legal philosophy. This unit does not have formal lectures.

LAW-6018B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

LAW AND MEDICINE

The module provides an in-depth examination of a range of medico-legal issues and explores the interface between the law and medical ethics. The module will investigate various areas of law and analyse the potential effect of legal rules on the provision of contemporary medicine. It will further address how the law impacts upon medical professionals in terms of their legal, professional and ethical accountability and consider important questions pertaining to patient rights.

LAW-6016B

20

LAW OF CRIMINAL EVIDENCE

The Law of Criminal Evidence examines the basic concepts (evidence, relevance, credibility, probative value, weight) and rules of proof that apply in English criminal trials, that is, the burden and standard of proof, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, the opinion evidence rules, the course of the trial (including witness competence), the treatment of evidence of bad character and discretionary and non-discretionary exclusion of evidence. The justification for rules is considered alongside the rules themselves. THE MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-6015B

20

MEDIA LAW

The aims of this module are: To introduce students to the structure of the media industries in the UK, the justification for, and different models of regulation. To consider the main social, technological and regulatory influences shaping its development. To consider the regulation of the media markets. To consider the issues relating to the management of reputation from a private law perspective, including defamation and the protection of privacy. To consider legal issues pertaining to journalism (e.g. , contempt, courts, privilege).

LAW-6009A

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. Particular focus is placed on human rights, refugee law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

THE LAW OF RESTITUTION

The law of restitution, or that of unjust enrichment, is concerned with the circumstances in which a defendant's gain can be returned or given up to the claimant. The syllabus is divided into two parts. The first we will refer to as the law of autonomous unjust enrichment and the second as restitution for wrongs.

LAWZ6026A

20

Option B Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students may select level 5 or 6 modules from the Law School only.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED EMPLOYMENT LAW

Advanced Employment Law is a single (Spring) semester 20-credt optional module, which complements Employment Law 1 (Individual Employment Law). It examines some of the more complex and controversial aspects of UK employment law concerning the protection of human rights and collective rights in the workplace, and the legal regulation of industrial relations. The topics to be studied include privacy and freedom of speech at work, the law regulating trade unions, collective bargaining and industrial disputes, and the rights of workers and their representatives to be involved in the running of the enterprise. These issues are examined from both a conceptual and a practical perspective. By taking this module, students will also gain an understanding of the sources and role of international labour standards, and of the domestic and international institutions and mechanisms that protect human rights and collective rights at work, including the ILO, the Council of Europe, the Certification Officer and the Central Arbitration Committee.

LAW-3P16

20

ADVANCED EMPLOYMENT LAW

Advanced Employment Law is a single (Spring) semester 20-credt optional module, which complements Employment Law 1 (Individual Employment Law). It examines some of the more complex and controversial aspects of UK employment law concerning the protection of human rights and collective rights in the workplace, and the legal regulation of industrial relations. The topics to be studied include privacy and freedom of speech at work, the law regulating trade unions, collective bargaining and industrial disputes, and the rights of workers and their representatives to be involved in the running of the enterprise. These issues are examined from both a conceptual and a practical perspective. By taking this module, students will also gain an understanding of the sources and role of international labour standards, and of the domestic and international institutions and mechanisms that protect human rights and collective rights at work, including the ILO, the Council of Europe, the Certification Officer and the Central Arbitration Committee.

LAW-6021B

20

ADVANCED LAND LAW

This module examines in detail a number of important property interest in land. It covers the essential nature of and governing legal principles for these interests. In addition, it highlights current development of these concepts as well as their practical implications on modern society and topical issues.

LAW-5021B

20

BRITISH HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module offers students the opportunity to explore the "hows" and the "whats" of human rights protection in the UK. In the first couple of weeks, we consider the modalities of the HRA and will touch upon the general jurisprudence of the ECHR. For the major part of the module, we will look at a range of substantive rights and consider how - by what means and to what extent - they are protected in domestic law under the HRA. Areas that we will cover, given the topical and dynamic nature of the course, cannot be predicted but in past years classes have covered: protest, media privacy, police powers,counter-terrorism, hate speech, prisoners' rights and religious freedom.

LAW-3Z01

20

BRITISH HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module offers students the opportunity to explore the "hows" and the "whats" of human rights protection in the UK. In the first couple of weeks, we consider the modalities of the HRA and will touch upon the general jurisprudence of the ECHR. For the major part of the module, we will look at a range of substantive rights and consider how - by what means and to what extent - they are protected in domestic law under the HRA. Areas that we will cover, given the topical and dynamic nature of the course, cannot be predicted but in past years classes have covered: protest, media privacy, police powers,counter-terrorism, hate speech, prisoners' rights and religious freedom.

LAWZ6022A

20

CARRIAGE OF GOODS BY SEA AND MARINE INSURANCE

This Module provides a comprehensive introduction to the law and business of the carriage of goods by sea and marine insurance and is key to the International Trade Law masters . masters. It examines carriage documents and their interaction, the general principles of carriage of goods by sea, carriage contracts in the form of charter parties and those evidenced by bills of lading. The module also explores international attempts at harmonisation in the area of international carriage and examines the operation of international carriage regimes (conventions) such as The Hague, Hague-Visby Rules, the Hamburg Rules and the Rotterdam Rules. The module also look at certain key issues in the law of marine insurance such as the formation of the contract of insurance, the insurable interest, the duty of utmost good faith, warranties, subrogation, contribution and the assignment of interests in an insured policy.

LAW-M640

20

COLLECTIVE LABOUR LAW

This module examines the legal issues that arise out of the relationship between employers, trade unions, employee representatives and employees. It includes a study of the legal status of trade unions and employers' associations, freedom of association in the workplace, the rights of trade union officials and members to time off work for union duties/activities, internal trade union law (including enforcement of union rule books and the rules governing union elections, membership, ballots and funds), the law on collective bargaining and trade union recognition, the legal status of collective agreements, information and consultation of employees, the legal requirements governing the organisation of industrial action, and the consequences of unlawful industrial action. While the main focus of the module is on UK law, the impact of EU law and the European Convention on Human Rights on UK Collective Labour Law is also considered.

LAW-M670

20

COMMERCIALISATION OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

This module is aimed at students who may have an interest in either Intellectual Property (IP) Law and/or Competition Law, as well as students more focussed on Commercial Law. Students will be expected to have taken either or both Globalisation of IP (M641) or International Competition Law (M648) in the Autumn semester . If not, students will only be permitted to take the module with the consent of the module organiser. The relationship between intellectual property and competition law and policy is not only a very interesting and complex area of law, but also one of major importance to the commercial sector. Although both regimes protect innovation, their approaches and underlying principles are fundamentally different and need to be reconciled. Without a sound understanding of the interface between them, the rights holder runs the risk of infringing competition law by way of exploiting intellectual property rights. The module therefore focuses on the commercially most relevant intellectual property rights (patents, trademarks and copyrights). It provides the student with a sound understanding of the different intellectual property rights, the possible mechanisms of their commercialisation and the relevant restraints posed by competition law. The module critically assesses the most recent case law and decisional practice of the European Commission in the technology and pharmaceutical sectors (including the judgments in Microsoft and AstraZeneca, and the investigations against Samsung, Google and Apple) and discusses its impact on commercial practice.

LAW-M684

20

COMPANY LAW

An introduction to the legal regulation and control of companies and those persons involved with them, principally directors and shareholders. Consideration is given, among others, to the nature, types and functions of companies, the consequences of incorporation, the company's organs and agents, the rights and obligations of shareholders, the structure and management of the board of directors and its relationship with the shareholders. The course aims to give a modern treatment of company law, concentrating on those aspects which are of practical importance and relevance not only to those who wish to pursue a career as commercial or company lawyers, but also to those who have no such aspirations, as a knowledge of the company and how it works is relevant to many aspects of legal practice.

LAW-3K09

20

COMPANY LAW

An introduction to the legal regulation and control of companies and those persons involved with them, principally directors and shareholders. Consideration is given, among others, to the nature, types and functions of companies, the consequences of incorporation, the company's organs and agents, the rights and obligations of shareholders, the structure and management of the board of directors and its relationship with the shareholders. The course aims to give a modern treatment of company law, concentrating on those aspects which are of practical importance and relevance not only to those who wish to pursue a career as commercial or company lawyers, but also to those who have no such aspirations, as a knowledge of the company and how it works is relevant to many aspects of legal practice.

LAW-6006A

20

COMPARATIVE COMPANY LAW

Globalisation, democratisation of information, Europeisation and global competition have been partially responsible for a lot of fundamental changes in Company law and in the way Company law is intended around the world. This module will provide students with a sound understanding of these changes and of comparative Company law in general. This module provides an understanding of the basic concepts, principles, rules and procedures of modern company law in a globalised and international context. It is structured so as to enable students to see their own system of company law in a new and more meaningful light, and to be able to form new views about its future development alongside with the future of an international Company Law. It is designed to develop awareness of some of the aspects of company law, including 'minimum capital' and the legal standing of shareholders, directors and creditors around the world, and shall give an overview of the ways in which the various countries are developing their own Company Law within their boundaries, and how that influences the development of company law outside their boundaries. The module aims to do so by a review of the harmonisation programme in Europe, an international comparative study, and an illustration of empirical findings that show new ways in which corporate vehicles can be developed to meet particular policy objectives.

LAW-M678

20

COMPARATIVE CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

This module examines the principal forms of corporate governance, control and regulation of the firm across countries. In particular, it introduces the key features of corporate governance and considers the legal relationship between directors, managers, and shareholders, including the contribution shareholder activism can make to improving corporate governance. The module also discusses the market for corporate control and the growing empirical research on comparative corporate governance. The overall purpose is to provide a theoretical and practical grasp of corporate governance, which can be useful for academic as all well as professional work in this field.

LAW-M615

20

COMPARATIVE INTERNATIONAL SALES LAW

This module is key to the International Trade Law LLM and takes a critical and comparative look at the fundamental legal arrangements for the international sale of goods and the two competing international legal regimes, being the UN Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) and the English law on sale of goods (including the Sale of Goods Act 1979), all against the backdrop of the drive towards international legal harmonisation. Today, international sales contracts are frequently governed by the CISG which is in force in more than 70 States from all parts of the world, among them both major industrial nations and developing states. It has been widely applied in international commercial transactions in the past thirty years with more than 3000 decisions by state courts and arbitral tribunals having been reported so far. It therefore seems fair to say that the CISG has in fact been one of the success stories in the field of the international unification of private law. Nevertheless, the United Kingdom, one of the oldest -and biggest- global trading nations, has not, yet, ratified the CISG. Also, in spite of the widespread adoption of the CISG, it remains the case that many international traders choose English law to govern their international sales contracts. We will examine select substantive provisions of these two "competing" legal regimes with a view to determine their essential differences and similarities. This examination may shed light on questions such as, why parties would choose English Sales Law rather than the CISG, and the implications of the "competition" between the two regimes for efforts aimed at the international harmonisation of law. Throughout the module, attention will be drawn to problems arising in international sales practice in order to develop an understanding of the commercial context in which the law of international sales operates.

LAW-M683

20

COMPARATIVE LAW

Lectures on the methods, aims and uses of Comparative Law and the main legal traditions of the world today. Presentations by students in the Spring Semester on specific coursework topics.

LAW-3K13

20

COMPARATIVE LAW

Lectures on the methods, aims and uses of Comparative Law and the main legal traditions of the world today. Presentations by students in the Spring Semester on specific coursework topics.

LAW-6008A

20

COMPETITION LAW

This module is designed to allow a good understanding of both the core economic concepts of competition, and the substantive and procedural rules of competition law. It focuses on the main principles of competition law and investigates the means by which competition laws tackle such problems as cartels, abuses of monopolies and mergers. Broader issues, such as remedies and enforcement strategies will also be reviewed. The module will help to place the UK competition regime within its European and international contexts.

LAW-3K17

20

COMPETITION LAW

This module is designed to allow a good understanding of both the core economic concepts of competition, and the substantive and procedural rules of competition law. It focuses on the main principles of competition law and investigates the means by which competition laws tackle such problems as cartels, abuses of monopolies and mergers. Broader issues, such as remedies and enforcement strategies will also be reviewed. The module will help to place the UK competition regime within its European and international contexts.

LAW-6010A

20

COMPETITION LAW IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

This module examines the challenges of competition law enforcement in the international context. Key themes include: (1) Jurisdictional issues: the extraterritorial application of national competition laws, bilateral co-operation, harmonisation and soft-multilateralism, international law and the WTO; (2) Comparative insights: the manifestation of competition policy issues across a number of important national jurisdictions; (3) Advanced case studies: looking in detail at competition cases where a number of jurisdictions have been involved and where competition policy has intersected with other national and international policy agendas (in particular, trade and development policy).

LAW-M604

20

CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

This module involves an introductory study of: the nature of constitutions and of the UK's specifically, together with sources of the latter; the fundamental principles of the UK constitution (Parliamentary Sovereignty, the rule of law and the separation of powers); its key institutions (both Houses of Parliament, Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Civil Service) - and the relationship between them; challenges to the unitary state (from devolution and the EU); the framework for protecting human rights in the UK by means of the Human Rights Act; and the principles of judicial review. It will expose students to some basic critical perspectives and ideas.

LAW-4003A

20

CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

In this module students will be asked to engage in critical assessment and analysis of and reflection on the major principles, themes and rules that underlie the British Constitution. Topics to be studied include: the nature of constitutions and of the UK's specifically, together with sources of the latter; the fundamental principles of the UK constitution (Parliamentary Sovereignty, the rule of law and the separation of powers); its key institutions (both Houses of Parliament, Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Civil Service) - and the relationship between them; challenges to the unitary state (from devolution and the EU); the framework for protecting human rights in the UK by means of the Human Rights Act; and the principles of judicial review. For those on M121, students will be asked to engage in some comparative study

LAW-5009A

20

CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW - GRADUATE DIPLOMA

In this module students will be asked to engage in critical assessment and analysis of and reflection on the major principles, themes and rules that underlie the British Constitution. Topics to be studied include: the nature of constitutions and of the UK's specifically, together with sources of the latter; the fundamental principles of the UK constitution (Parliamentary Sovereignty, the rule of law and the separation of powers); its key institutions (both Houses of Parliament, Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Civil Service) - and the relationship between them; challenges to the unitary state (from devolution and the EU); the framework for protecting human rights in the UK by means of the Human Rights Act; and the principles of judicial review. For students of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies course only.

LAW-5022A

20

CONTRACT LAW

This module considers the nature of contractual obligations, the legal principles which govern the formation, content and validity of contracts and the remedies available for breach of contractual obligations. It provides an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines of the English law of contract.

LAW-4006B

20

CONTRACT LAW - GRADUATE DIPLOMA

This module considers the nature of contractual obligations, the legal principles which govern the formation, content and validity of contracts and the remedies available for breach of contractual obligations. It provides an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines of the English law of contract. For students of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies course only.

LAW-5024B

20

CRIME AND SENTENCING

Crime and Sentencing addresses key issues in contemporary penal theory and sentencing law. Students will examine theories of punishment before turning to some of the most controversial issues in the modern legal system. For whom should prisons be used and why? To what extent are sentencers free to impose sentences that they consider are appropriate and to what extent must they follow guidelines? How ought we deal with offenders who have drug or mental health problems? How best can victims be accommodated in sentencing procedures? The module explores these topics and evaluates the relevant law in its social and political contexts. THIS MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-3Z05

20

CRIME AND SENTENCING

'Crime and Sentencing' examines the nature and extent of the problem of crime in England and Wales and sentencing law. First, the module looks at sources of knowledge about crime, comparing depictions of crime and criminals in the media with knowledge derived from criminal statistics (including recorded crime statistics and the British Crime Survey). Second, we look at the main theories of sentencing and punishment: retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation and restoration. Third, we explore the sources of sentencing law and sentencing decisions: statute, case-law, ministerial statements and informal sources. Fourth, we turn to the recent history of sentencing law in England and Wales, evaluating the coherence of the overall sentencing structure. Fifth, the module examines the impact of moves towards structured sentencing, focusing on the impact of sentencing guidelines and the Sentencing Council on promoting consistency in sentencing. Sixth, attention turns to the use of imprisonment asking, "What are prisons for and are they used appropriately?" The module examines the treatment of offenders with mental health problems and those who are deemed dangerous, as well as the use of mandatory minimum sentences (sometimes called "three strikes and you're out" laws). We also look at the efficacy of alternatives to imprisonment, such as community orders. Seventh, the focus shifts to victims of crime: what role can and do victims have in sentencing proceedings? Should they have any input at all? Restorative justice will be examined as an innovative yet controversial means of responding to crime that places victims at the heart of responses to crime.

LAWZ6025B

20

CURRENT ISSUES IN EMPLOYMENT LAW

This module allows students to study in depth some of the major issues of topical importance in employment law, from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. This area of Law is constantly evolving, with employees' lawyers in particular looking for new ways to further their clients' interests, in relation to both substantive rights under the contract (e.g. in relation to implied terms), and remedies available to breach by the employer, during employment and on termination. In addition, there is a constant flow of proposals for employment law reform. The content of the module necessarily changes from year to year to reflect recent and forthcoming developments in the legislation, case law, academic literature and in practice.

LAW-M630

20

CURRENT ISSUES IN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

This module will provide students with an in-depth look at a number of current issues in intellectual property and information technology law. The relevant issues will change each year, but issues will be drawn from a wide variety of topics. Students will have an opportunity to consider how intellectual property law is challenged by these current issues and to analyse its responses and proposed responses. Students will be expected to have taken either Globalisation of Intellectual Property Law or Internet Law and Governance in the Autumn Semester, or have demonstrated knowledge in either area. For students not taking the ITIP LLM admission to the module will be at the discretion of the module organiser, and previous knowledge may be required.

LAW-M622

20

DEVELOPMENT SKILLS YEAR 1

These sessions are designed to help students achieve the best possible result from their academic studies. We look at developing skills such as correct referencing, planning coursework and general time management. The Skills Development team also act as first port of call for any problems relating to any academic issues.

LAW-1A3Y

0

DEVELOPMENT SKILLS YEAR 2

These sessions are designed to help students achieve the best possible result from their academic studies. We look at developing skills such as correct referencing, planning coursework and general time management. The Skills Development team also act as first port of call for any problems relating to any academic issues.

LAW-2I3Y

0

DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT LAW

This module examines the economic and social causes of discrimination in employment, the meaning of the concepts of "equality" and "discrimination", and the substantive UK and EU Law concerning discrimination in relation to the "protected characteristics" (sex, sexual orientation, gender reassignment, racial or ethnic origin, disability, genetic inheritance, religion or belief, and age). Particular emphasis is placed on the impact of EU Law on the development of UK anti-discrimination law, on the difficulties of applying and enforcing anti-discrimination laws, and on future directions in discrimination law including possible new protected characteristics such as appearance, genetic inheritance and socio-economic status. This module carries 40 M-level credits.

LAW-M18Y

40

DISCRIMINATION LAW

This module examines the philosophical and conceptual basis of equality and anti-discrimination law, the substantive law of the UK concerning discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, age and genetic inheritance, the impact of EU law on the development of UK anti-discrimination law, the enforcement of anti-discrimination legislation and future directions in discrimination law.

LAW-3K19

20

DISCRIMINATION LAW

This module examines the philosophical and conceptual basis of equality and anti-discrimination law, the substantive law of the UK concerning discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, age and genetic inheritance, the impact of EU law on the development of UK anti-discrimination law, the enforcement of anti-discrimination legislation and future directions in discrimination law.

LAW-6011A

20

DISSERTATION

An opportunity to offer a dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words. Students undertake a study in an area of law of particular interest to them under the guidance of a member of faculty who acts as supervisor. The period of study extends over the duration of two semesters, which must normally be consecutive autumn and spring semesters. STUDENTS MAY ONLY UNDERTAKE THE DISSERTATION OPTION WITH THE CONSENT OF THE MODULE ORGANISER.

LAW-3D1Y

20

DISSERTATION

This module is intended to give each student the opportunity to develop a research proposal and write a dissertation on a research question formulated by the student using the subject matter of the degree for which the student is enrolled. The purpose of the dissertation is for the student to demonstrate his or her ability to carry through an independent piece of work on a subject of his or her choice.

LAW-M14X

40

DISSERTATION

An opportunity to offer a dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words. Students undertake a study in an area of law of particular interest to them under the guidance of a member of faculty who acts as supervisor. The period of study extends over the duration of two semesters, which must normally be consecutive autumn and spring semesters. STUDENTS MAY ONLY UNDERTAKE THE DISSERTATION OPTION WITH THE CONSENT OF THE MODULE ORGANISER.

LAW-6002Y

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

Individual Employment Law (Employment Law 1) is a single (Spring) semester 20-credit optional module. It examines individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

ENGLISH LEGAL PROCESS

This module examines the actors, institutions and processes that make up the English Legal System. In so doing, it provides students with an understanding of how criminal and civil cases proceed through the legal system. Topics studied include police powers, the decision to prosecute, juries, the judiciary, civil procedure and alternative dispute resolution.

LAW-4004A

20

EU CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

This module examines European Union constitutional law and the functioning of the EU at supranational level. It will start with an analysis of the EU institutions and their interaction, the legislative process and the role of fundamental rights in EU law. It will then consider direct actions before the Court of Justice, in particular actions for annulment and actions against recalcitrant Member States. Finally, a topical issue of EU constitutional law will be addressed.

LAWZ5018B

20

EU LAW

This module will provide students with the fundamentals of EU law, with regard to both the constitutional and substantive aspects of the subject. In addition, the module will enable students to develop a critical understanding of areas of EU law and to retrieve and analyse information about EU law from a range of sources. THIS MODULE IS ONLY OPEN TO LAW STUDENTS RETURNING FROM A YEAR ABROAD.

LAW-3K07

20

EU LAW

This module will provide students with the fundamentals of EU law, with regard to both the constitutional and substantive aspects of the subject. In addition, the module will enable students to develop a critical understanding of areas of EU law and to retrieve and analyse information about EU law from a range of sources. THIS MODULE IS ONLY OPEN TO LAW STUDENTS RETURNING FROM A YEAR ABROAD.

LAW-6005A

20

EU LAW

This module provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of EU law which impact on the daily lives of those living within the European Union. It focuses on essential aspects of the internal market, the free movement of goods and persons, and enforcement of rights conferred by EU law before the national courts. In addition, the module teaches students how to retrieve and work with information about EU law from a range of sources and to undertake critical analysis.

LAW-5006A

20

EU LAW - GRADUATE DIPLOMA

This module provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of EU law which impact on the daily lives of those living within the European Union. It focuses on essential aspects of the internal market, the free movement of goods and persons, and enforcement of rights conferred by EU law before the national courts. In addition, the module teaches students how to retrieve and work with information about EU law from a range of sources and to undertake critical analysis. For students of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies course only.

LAW-5027A

20

FAMILY LAW: ADULT RELATIONSHIPS

Family and Relationship Law endeavours to impart an understanding and knowledge of the law relating to and key issues of adult relationships including cohabitation, marriage, family breakdown, domestic violence, the effect of the Human Rights Act 1998 on this aspects of the law, the property aspects of marital breakdown, pre-nuptial contracts, and child support. It encourages research into and analysis of the family and adult relationship related legal and policy source materials, including electronic databases, and conclusions drawn from that process. Family law relating to adult relationships in England and Wales in 2012 is set within an historical, social, statutory and international context and generally the law and policy issues relating to adult family relationships and the effects of breakdown and separation of partners are debated and analysed in some depth.

LAW-3K23

20

FAMILY LAW: ADULT RELATIONSHIPS

Family and Relationship Law endeavours to impart an understanding and knowledge of the law relating to and key issues of adult relationships including cohabitation, marriage, family breakdown, domestic violence, the effect of the Human Rights Act 1998 on this aspects of the law, the property aspects of marital breakdown, pre-nuptial contracts, and child support. It encourages research into and analysis of the family and adult relationship related legal and policy source materials, including electronic databases, and conclusions drawn from that process. Family law relating to adult relationships in England and Wales in 2012 is set within an historical, social, statutory and international context and generally the law and policy issues relating to adult family relationships and the effects of breakdown and separation of partners are debated and analysed in some depth.

LAW-6013A

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law examines child law in England and Wales, focussing particularly on issues relating to parenthood, parental responsibility, children's welfare, children's rights, parental disputes over children, the regulation of international child abduction, public law issues surrounding child protection (including the accountability of local authorities in regard to the care and protection of children) and lastly the changing nature of adoption, and the reform of adoption law.

LAW-5012B

20

FOUNDATIONS OF EMPLOYMENT LAW

This module aims to give students a basic knowledge of the history, sources and institutions of employment law and a good working knowledge of all the main employment law subject areas. Students will be able to consider the nature of the employment relationship and the economic, social and political factors influencing the development of UK employment law. The module carries 40 M-level credits.

LAW-M17Y

40

FOUNDATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL LAW

This 40 credit year-long module forms the grounding of (and is compusory on) the International Commercial and Business Law and International Trade Law courses, and aims to introduce students to the essential foundational elements of international commercial law, not studied at undergraduate level. It aims to give students an understanding of what drives the law governing international commerce, the reasons for harmonisation of the law in the area, the institutions involved in the harmonisation process and the scope of that process. We examine the various ways in which harmonised instruments are created and the major problems and policy issues which have to be confronted. In doing so, we explore several areas of international commercial practice in which attempts have been made to harmonise or codify the law, and consider how successful these efforts have been, and ways in which the harmonisation process can be improved.

LAW-MA1Y

40

FRENCH LAW OF OBLIGATIONS

The first half of the module examines the essential elements of French contract law. This part of the course will be assessed by a course test. The second half will consider French tortuous liability. During the module students will learn to read cases, write problem questions and case commentaries. This module is taught in FRENCH. PRE-REQUISITE - LAW-4008Y.

LAW-5004Y

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

This module builds on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and allows students to explore new topics. The module with be neither specifically consumer- nor commercial-based and will therefore be an ideal compliment to both consumer- and commercial-oriented options within the LL.B. The module will be focused upon doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. The attempt to balance theoretical analysis and practical application will be key to this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

GLOBAL MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS LAW

This module explores the challenge posed by the 'information society' and increasingly globalised and integrated media industries to the rule of law and to national legal systems. Many have predicted that the Internet will make borders less relevant, yet many states continue to regulate both established media (print, broadcast) as well as new media. International organisations identify freedom of expression as a key component of democracy, but also express concern about cultural diversity, hate speech, and access to the media and the Internet. Meanwhile, a number of areas of commerce and society are moving online, leading to challenging questions regarding jurisdiction and liability. Topics covered will include media regulation, electronic commerce, human rights, global governance of the Internet, and disputes between states as to the extent to which national laws apply to transnational messages and transactions. Students will also be introduced to the innovative research taking place in the media@uea centre and encouraged to discuss the legal systems of their own nations. THIS MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-5001S

20

GLOBALISATION OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

This module will provide an introduction to intellectual property and the phenomenon of globalisation. It will concentrate on the international legal regime under the WTO TRIPs agreement, and specifically on how copyright law is governed by international conventions. The geographical focus will be Global. This module is compulsory for all students taking the LLM in Information Technology and Intellectual Property and is open to all LAW PGT students and to interested students from other schools, subject to the module leader's discretion. It does not assume any previous knowledge of intellectual property law.

LAW-M641

20

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

Intellectual Property (IP) law can affect, the music you listen to, the brands you buy, the films you watch, the technology you use, the books you read, the shape of the bottle you drink from, the websites you view... In short, IP law applies to nearly everything in your daily life. Primarily, it deals with the protection and encouragement of innovation in technology, business, the arts, and the creative industries. Intellectual property is an exciting and up to the minute field of law which is constantly evolving. Students will be introduced to, and encouraged to think about, the practical importance of intellectual property rights and their economic and philosophical justifications. There will also be a technological dimension to the module, whereby students will be introduced to the impact technology has had on the development and enforcement of IP rights. Students will learn the basics of intellectual property law over a broad spectrum, including how to apply the law to representative factual situations. The course is designed to give a rounded overview of the three main areas of Intellectual Property; copyright, patents and trade marks.

LAW-3P12

20

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

Intellectual Property (IP) law can affect, the music you listen to, the brands you buy, the films you watch, the technology you use, the books you read, the shape of the bottle you drink from, the websites you view... In short, IP law applies to nearly everything in your daily life. Primarily, it deals with the protection and encouragement of innovation in technology, business, the arts, and the creative industries. Intellectual property is an exciting and up to the minute field of law which is constantly evolving. Students will be introduced to, and encouraged to think about, the practical importance of intellectual property rights and their economic and philosophical justifications. There will also be a technological dimension to the module, whereby students will be introduced to the impact technology has had on the development and enforcement of IP rights. Students will learn the basics of intellectual property law over a broad spectrum, including how to apply the law to representative factual situations. The course is designed to give a rounded overview of the three main areas of Intellectual Property; copyright, patents and trade marks.

LAW-6019B

20

INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE SECURED TRANSACTIONS

The module will look at domestic English law on security and secured transactions and selected overseas jurisdictions, and introduce students to international harmonisation measures, such as the Cape Town Convention on Security Interests in Mobile Equipment and the UNCITRAL Legislative Guide to Secured Transactions It will start by examining what forms of credit there are, what a security interest is, concepts of attachment and perfection of security, and explore what problems might crop up in cross-border security transactions. It will then examine the English law of fixed and floating charges, chattel mortgages and possessory security, exploring in what circumstances a pledge of documents might be used in an international trade transactions The second part of the course will introduce the Cape Town Convention and the reasons why that was required, as well as the UNCITRAL Legislative Guide The third part of the course compares English law and the transaction filing scheme it epitomises with the UCC Article 9 and commonwealth Personal Property Securities Acts, for example the New Zealand Personal Property Securities Act 1999, and the Federal Australian Personal Property Security Act 2009 and the notice filing scheme that they reflect before rounding up by examining current law reform proposals in England put forward by the Law Commission and now picked up by the Secured Transactions Law Reform Project

LAW-M682

20

INTERNATIONAL BANKING: LAW AND PRACTICE

This module starts with a review of the types of business undertaken by an international bank, the risks inherent in those businesses and the ways in which regulators seek to regulate the conduct of those businesses; with an emphasis on credit risk and prudential regulation. It includes sessions on credit agreements (including syndicated credits) and the Loan Market Association documents, guarantees and other forms of credit support, basic insolvency principles, and taking security.

LAW-M591

20

INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION

International arbitration has become the established method of determining disputes between international commercial businesses, with new arbitral centres emerging and the law and practice of international commercial arbitration evolving rapidly. This module examines the legal theory and practice of international commercial arbitration. The module's thrust is on understanding the nature and operation of the arbitral process in the context of international commercial relationships, as a means of resolving disputes that arise in international commercial transactions. In addition to providing an overview of the arbitral process, the module also focuses on key problems and issues that arise in arbitral practice, such as the interaction and application of the various relevant laws, and the application and interpretation of the most important international legal instruments relevant to international commercial arbitration such as the New York Convention and the UNCITRAL Model Law.

LAW-M610

20

INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL LITIGATION

This module will provide an introduction to the issues which arise in the litigation of commercial disputes on an international basis. It will cover the treatment of jurisdiction and applicable law in commercial disputes by reference mainly to UK and European legal sources, and introduce some of the principal features of the common law legal systems (UK and USA), as they apply to commercial cases. The module it open to all LAW PGT students. It is particularly relevant to students taking the ICBL or International Trade LLMs.

LAW-M649

20

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION LAW

This module is designed to allow an understanding of both the core economic concepts of competition, and the substantive law and procedure of competition law, in particular of the European Union, but also of other jurisdictions as relevant. The principal piece of legislation in the EU is the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and in particular its provisions on competition, namely Articles 101 and 102. These will form the basis of the seminars, along with the Council Regulation 1/2003 on the implementation of Article 101 and Article 102 (Modernisation Regulation), and the Council Regulation 139/2004 on the control of concentration between undertakings (Merger Regulation). Seminars will be built around the legal provisions and case law on the subject matter. Classes will investigate the means by which competition laws tackle such problems as cartels and anti-competitive agreements among undertakings, monopolies and the abuse of dominant positions, vertical restraints, merger control and state aid. Broader issues - such as remedies and enforcement strategies and wider questions of policy and regulatory design - will also be reviewed.

LAW-M647

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This course will introduce students to the concept of human rights, the mechanisms of the European Convention on Human Rights and the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. It will examine the philosophy of human rights and place the European Convention in international context before considering specific rights. The human rights under consideration will include the right to life, the prohibition of torture and the right to a fair trial.

LAW-3P14

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This course will introduce students to the concept of human rights, the mechanisms of the European Convention on Human Rights and the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. It will examine the philosophy of human rights and place the European Convention in international context before considering specific rights. The human rights under consideration will include the right to life, the prohibition of torture and the right to a fair trial.

LAW-6020B

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW AND REFUGEE LAW

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is the law governing armed conflict, whereas Refugee Law provides important protection for the victims of armed conflict. During this module students will consider key issues in both IHL and refugee law, such as the difference between combatants and civilians, legitimate targets and illegal weapons and the scope of protection offered to refugees. During seminars students will apply these principles and assess the legality of current international events. This module will be a prerequisite for students wishing to take part in the UEA Law school and British red Cross Humanitarian Law Project.

LAW-3K11

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW AND REFUGEE LAW

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is the law governing armed conflict, whereas Refugee Law provides important protection for the victims of armed conflict. During this module students will consider key issues in both IHL and refugee law, such as the difference between combatants and civilians, legitimate targets and illegal weapons and the scope of protection offered to refugees. During seminars students will apply these principles and assess the legality of current international events. This module will be a prerequisite for students wishing to take part in the UEA Law school and British red Cross Humanitarian Law Project.

LAW-6007A

20

INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT LAW

Foreign direct investment refers to an investment made in a foreign jurisdiction to achieve a long term economic benefit. Almost 3000 treaties worldwide regulate foreign direct investment, and it is the interpretation of these treaties by arbitral tribunals, together with customary international law, which forms the basis of international investment law. This module examines the nature of international investment law and investor-State dispute resolution procedures, and looks at recent developments in the area. The module considers the policies underlying international investment law and how these impact upon the operation of international investment law in practice.

LAW-M662

20

INTERNATIONAL OIL AND GAS LAW

This module examines the participants in international oil and gas transactions and the legal and contractual rules which govern exploration and production. It deals with the rights associated with the ownership and development of hydrocarbon reserves, and the types of agreements that can be entered into (such as concessions, production sharing, participation and service contracts). The module also explores the issues of risk, control and investment; and examines the impact of law and policy on the manner in which oil and gas development projects are negotiated and implemented.

LAW-M673

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW

This module is intended to introduce students to the English law and practice of international trade. Although there have been considerable attempts to harmonise the law relating to international trade at an international level, English law remains of very considerable importance and is often chosen as the applicable law to govern international transactions. This module looks at the English law relating to international sales, international payments and international carriage of goods by sea. As well as these core contracts in an international trade transaction, the module will also examine international dispute resolution and the problems of governing law, jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, and the growing use of international commercial arbitration as an alternative to international litigation. It also briefly introduces students to why and how the laws in these areas have become increasingly harmonised.

LAW-3P08

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW

This module is intended to introduce students to the English law and practice of international trade. Although there have been considerable attempts to harmonise the law relating to international trade at an international level, English law remains of very considerable importance and is often chosen as the applicable law to govern international transactions. This module looks at the English law relating to international sales, international payments and international carriage of goods by sea. As well as these core contracts in an international trade transaction, the module will also examine international dispute resolution and the problems of governing law, jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, and the growing use of international commercial arbitration as an alternative to international litigation. It also briefly introduces students to why and how the laws in these areas have become increasingly harmonised.

LAW-6017B

20

INTERNATIONAL and EUROPEAN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

This unit is concerned with the operation of international and EC law in the field of the environment. The emergence of concepts such as sustainability and the precuationary principle will be considered, together with the role and relevance of legal principles and processes in the search for solutions to environmental problems. Specific themes will include climate change, trade and the environment, and the environment and human rights.

LAW-M528

20

INTERNET LAW

Internet law is a cross-cutting area of law for today's multinational and innovative environment, particularly relevant in industries like electronic commerce, information technology, and the media. Topics covered in this module include data protection and privacy, cybercrime, telecoms, contracts, domain names, the control of content and the resolution of disputes. Students will explore the application of law across traditional categories and are encouraged to reflect on the role of a national legal system in an interconnected world. Teaching will include some online elements as well as lectures and seminars, and the module is assessed by 100% summative assignment.

LAW-3B05

20

INTERNET LAW

Internet law is a cross-cutting area of law for today's multinational and innovative environment, particularly relevant in industries like electronic commerce, information technology, and the media. Topics covered in this module include data protection and privacy, cybercrime, telecoms, contracts, domain names, the control of content and the resolution of disputes. Students will explore the application of law across traditional categories and are encouraged to reflect on the role of a national legal system in an interconnected world. Teaching will include some online elements as well as lectures and seminars, and the module is assessed through continuous assessment (50%) and an essay (50%).

LAW-6001A

20

INTERNET LAW AND GOVERNANCE

Legal issues relating to Internet use are increasingly important. Students are introduced to the key principles of Internet law, including competing views on its status and its relationship with other legal principles. The question of the relationship between law and technology is also considered. Case studies of alternative forms of governance are explored, including international co-operation and stakeholder-driven processes, in the context of issues such as domain names, social networking and the regulation of Internet service providers. Current issues in Internet law are included on the syllabus each year, as is a primer on relevant aspects of Internet technology and history.

LAW-M643

20

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LAW

This module will introduce students to the study of US Law and prepare them for the year abroad at a US Law School. Students will study the history and origins of US Law, the federal system and the court structure. They will examine the approach to legal education in the US and gain experience in the Socratic Method of teaching. They will also study the US legal profession alongside issues of civil and criminal procedure, including the role of lawyers working on capital punishment cases. THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED ON M123.

LAW-4007B

20

ISSUES IN FREE SPEECH

The extent to which we are all able to express views - whether agreeable or abhorrent - to obtain and receive information and to participate in "communicative activities" alone or with others is the focus of this module. Although legal in outlook and origins, it will be taught drawing on a variety of socio-political perspectives. It is not a module that is avowedly doctrinal or rule-based; there will be limited exploration and analysis of cases and rules, certainly not in any detail. Instead, we will consider the topic of free speech - what it is, why it is valued, what constraints there are on its exercise, the tensions that underpin it and its relationship with other rights and social interests - from a normative perspective. Indicative topics over the ten-week module course include: # Free speech theory and First Amendment jurisprudence # International human rights norms # Hate speech # Protesting and dissent # Regulation of artistic and cultural expression # Words that shock and offend # Privacy and media intrusions # Free speech and religious freedom # Inciting and encouraging terrorism # Political communication and broadcasting # State secrets # Free speech, fair trials and open justice # New forms of speech and social media # Newsgathering and journalists' sources

LAW-M686

20

JURISPRUDENCE

Students undertake directed reading on main currents of legal philosophy. This unit does not have formal lectures.

LAW-3P10

20

JURISPRUDENCE

Students undertake directed reading on main currents of legal philosophy. This unit does not have formal lectures.

LAW-6018B

20

LAND LAW

This module introduces students to basic concepts and principles in land law, including the scope of land, framework of land registration, the concept of ownership and co-ownership in land, and the implications of subsidiary interests in land. THIS MODULE IS INTENDED FOR STUDENTS RETURNING FROM A YEAR ABROAD. THIS MODULE IS NOT FOR GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LEGAL STUDIES STUDENTS.

LAW-3K03

20

LAND LAW

This module aims to give an introduction to the types of interest in and rights over land, how they are created and conveyed and how they bind third parties. Topics covered will include the nature of land ownership, land registration, co-ownership and specific interests in land.

LAW-5008A

20

LAND LAW

This module introduces students to basic concepts and principles in land law, including the scope of land, framework of land registration, the concept of ownership and co-ownership in land, and the implications of subsidiary interests in land. THIS MODULE IS INTENDED FOR STUDENTS RETURNING FROM A YEAR ABROAD. THIS MODULE IS NOT FOR GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LEGAL STUDIES STUDENTS.

LAW-6003A

20

LAND LAW - GRADUATE DIPLOMA

This module provides an introduction to the types of interest in and right over land, how they are created and transferred, and the extent to which they bind third parties. Syllabus: 1.Introduction to property and land 2.Unregistered title to land 3.Land registration 4.Co-ownership of land 5.Leases (optional) 6.Easements (optional) 7.Covenants (optional) 8.Mortgages (optional) 9.Adverse Possession (optional) Students must choose two optional topics from the last five listed. For students of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies course only.

LAW-5028A

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

LAW AND MEDICINE

The module provides an in-depth examination of a range of medico-legal issues and explores the interface between the law and medical ethics. The module will investigate various areas of law and analyse the potential effect of legal rules on the provision of contemporary medicine. It will further address how the law impacts upon medical professionals in terms of their legal, professional and ethical accountability and consider important questions pertaining to patient rights.

LAW-3P06

20

LAW AND MEDICINE

The module provides an in-depth examination of a range of medico-legal issues and explores the interface between the law and medical ethics. The module will investigate various areas of law and analyse the potential effect of legal rules on the provision of contemporary medicine. It will further address how the law impacts upon medical professionals in terms of their legal, professional and ethical accountability and consider important questions pertaining to patient rights.

LAW-6016B

20

LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL PAYMENTS

This module examines the law and practice relating to the different payment methods and mechanisms that may be adopted by commercial parties to discharge the payment obligations of international buyers of goods and services. The different payment mechanisms are analysed and compared, their fundamental characteristics identified and their advantages and disadvantages considered. These include direct payment by means of electronic funds transfer and bills of exchange systems, but the main focus of the module is on the most common terms of payment in international trade utilising the intervention of banks, that is to say, documentary collections and payment under documentary credits. We undertake a detailed examination of the most recent version of the Uniform Customs and Practice for Documentary Credits (UCP 600).This Module is assessed by a pre-released COURSE TEST which usually takes place in the week before Spring semester.

LAW-M671

20

LAW IN PRACTICE

This module addresses four important aspects of the 'Law in Practice' . . First, students will study key issues affecting contemporary legal practice, such as access to justice, the opening of the legal professions to competition from other providers, diversity in the legal professions , litigation costs/conditional fee agreements and professional ethics. Second, students will be exposed to perspectives on law that 'cut across' other law modules, such as thematic and contextual approaches to law (e.g. law and economics, socio-legal approaches). Third students will receive tuition in key skills (most of which are highly transferable) such as effective oral and written communication, negotiation, team-working, interpreting data and advocacy - together with opportunities to practice and develop these skills. Finally we will look, with the assistance of many external speakers, and career options and career management for law graduates.

LAW-5005Y

20

LAW IN PRACTICE

This module addresses four important aspects of the 'Law in Practice' . . First, students will study key issues affecting contemporary legal practice, such as access to justice, the opening of the legal professions to competition from other providers, diversity in the legal professions , litigation costs/conditional fee agreements and professional ethics. Second, students will be exposed to perspectives on law that 'cut across' other law modules, such as thematic and contextual approaches to law (e.g. law and economics, socio-legal approaches). Third students will receive tuition in key skills (most of which are highly transferable) such as effective oral and written communication, negotiation, team-working, interpreting data and advocacy - together with opportunities to practice and develop these skills. Finally we will look, with the assistance of many external speakers, and career options and career management for law graduates. THIS MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW LLB STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-4001Y

20

LAW OF CRIMINAL EVIDENCE

The Law of Criminal Evidence examines the basic concepts (evidence, relevance, credibility, probative value, weight) and rules of proof that apply in English criminal trials, that is, the burden and standard of proof, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, the opinion evidence rules, the course of the trial (including witness competence), the treatment of evidence of bad character and discretionary and non-discretionary exclusion of evidence. The justification for rules is considered alongside the rules themselves. THE MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-3P04

20

LAW OF CRIMINAL EVIDENCE

The Law of Criminal Evidence examines the basic concepts (evidence, relevance, credibility, probative value, weight) and rules of proof that apply in English criminal trials, that is, the burden and standard of proof, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, the opinion evidence rules, the course of the trial (including witness competence), the treatment of evidence of bad character and discretionary and non-discretionary exclusion of evidence. The justification for rules is considered alongside the rules themselves. THE MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-6015B

20

LAW OF THE WTO

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) is central to international trade law. This module will cover the legal rules and institutions of the WTO and the implementation of WTO obligations by members. It will pay particular attention to the institutions and governance of the WTO, its dispute settlement system, the principle of non-discrimination in international trade, and the ability of the WTO to cope with issues such as development, regionalism, and environmental protection.

LAW-M668

20

LAW OF TORT - GRADUATE DIPLOMA

Students will be taught general principles of civil liability for damage done by one person to another, including intentional torts, the law of Negligence (particularly in relation to personal injury), liability for statements, occupier's liability, protection of privacy and defamation, nuisance and remedies. For students of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies course only.

LAW-5025B

20

LAW OF TRUSTS

This Autumn module is concerned with the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. It considers the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trusts THIS MODULE IS INTENDED FOR STUDENTS RETURNING FROM A YEAR ABROAD.

LAW-3K05

20

LAW OF TRUSTS

This Autumn module is concerned with the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. It considers the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trusts THIS MODULE IS INTENDED FOR STUDENTS RETURNING FROM A YEAR ABROAD.

LAW-6004A

20

LAW OF TRUSTS - GRADUATE DIPLOMA

This Autumn module is concerned with the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. It considers the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trust

LAW-5030A

20

LEGAL METHOD, SKILLS AND REASONING

This module introduces students to legal method (determining the meaning and application of statutes and law-making through cases), legal research, legal writing and legal reasoning about law and fact in a common law legal system.

LAW-4002A

20

MEDIA LAW

The aims of this module are: To introduce students to the structure of the media industries in the UK, the justification for, and different models of regulation. To consider the main social, technological and regulatory influences shaping its development. To consider the regulation of the media markets. To consider the issues relating to the management of reputation from a private law perspective, including defamation and the protection of privacy. To consider legal issues pertaining to journalism (e.g. , contempt, courts, privilege).

LAW-3K15

20

MEDIA LAW

The aims of this module are: To introduce students to the structure of the media industries in the UK, the justification for, and different models of regulation. To consider the main social, technological and regulatory influences shaping its development. To consider the regulation of the media markets. To consider the issues relating to the management of reputation from a private law perspective, including defamation and the protection of privacy. To consider legal issues pertaining to journalism (e.g. , contempt, courts, privilege).

LAW-6009A

20

MEDIA MARKETS AND REGULATION

This module compares the approach to regulation of communication markets in the EC to other jurisdictions, in particular the US. It also considers the application of competition law to media markets, including protecting the interests of media plurality. Content regulation being a matter principally of national law is considered from a comparative perspective.

LAW-M667

20

MISCARRIAGES OF JUSTICE

This module will give students the chance to consider how the criminal justice system deals with errors. Using Packer's model as a conceptual framework students will critically analyse current and previous arrangements. Defining and quantifying miscarriages of justice (and considering what level of error is "acceptable") will be undertaken. Inter-disciplinary (drawing on psychological research) and comparative issues will be considered. The roles of the media, Court of Appeal and Criminal Cases Review Commission and Innocence projects will be examined. Students will be encouraged to challenge existing arrangements and consider critically proposals for change. A case study will be used.

LAW-6027B

20

MISCARRIAGES OF JUSTICE

This module will give students the chance to consider how the criminal justice system deals with errors. Using Packer's model as a conceptual framework students will critically analyse current and previous arrangements. Defining and quantifying miscarriages of justice (and considering what level of error is "acceptable") will be undertaken. Inter-disciplinary (drawing on psychological research) and comparative issues will be considered. The roles of the media, Court of Appeal and Criminal Cases Review Commission and Innocence projects will be examined. Students will be encouraged to challenge existing arrangements and consider critically proposals for change. A case study will be used.

LAW-3P20

20

MRES DISSERTATION

Dissertation - the code will vary according to which pathway you are taking. The final dissertation should not exceed 15,000 words (excluding abstract and bibliography. All Dissertations are double-marked. You will be provided with a dissertation outline by your pathway school.

LAW-M18X

60

POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EMPLOYMENT LAW

This module is aimed principally at solicitors in practice and personnel managers/HR professionals (who will often already hold the CIPD qualification). It covers the whole of modern employment law from first principles, being taught in 11 fortnightly seminars and a 10,000 word dissertation, written under personal supervision. In addition there are two whole-day seminars on methods of resolving employment disputes. The aim is to teach both the major principles and the detailed applications, so that the candidate will be able to handle employment related problems with confidence.

LAW-M70X

60

POSTGRADUATE LEGAL SKILLS AND RESEARCH

This Module will be compulsory for all taught Law Masters Programmes and will be taught in the first two weeks of the first semester with combined assessment by way of attendance, course test and submission of a short coursework in the first semester. The aim of this module is to assist students in developing a number of core legal study skills needed during the LLM year (and thereafter). The Module will commence with a standard Induction Day followed by seminars on subjects such as Using electronic research resources, Plagiarism and how to avoid it and proper citation of Sources, The Role of Conflicts of Law and Comparative Law in international commercial law, Identifying and understanding sources of law: Reading and analysing legislation, cases and legal articles, Academic legal skills: Writing a coursework, assignment or project and Answering Problem Questions and giving presentations.

LAW-M593

20

PRACTICAL EMPLOYMENT LAW

This module aims to give students the opportunity to acquire certain key skills of an employment law practitioner, including the drafting and varying of employment contracts, handling redundancies and business transfers, solving employment problems (e.g absence management issues) and the preparation and defence of employment tribunal claims. The module is assessed by means of two practical exercises, and some sessions are led by practising employment lawyers/employment relations experts. The module carries 40 M-level credits.

LAW-M19Y

40

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW

This module provides an introduction to the core principles of English criminal law and provides students with the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. Students will examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case-studies. Topics will include: homicide; causation; non-fatal offences against the person; property offences; defences; inchoate liability; complicity.

LAW-3P02

20

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW

This module provides an introduction to the core principles of English criminal law and provides students with the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. Students will examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case-studies. Topics will include: homicide; causation; non-fatal offences against the person; property offences; defences; inchoate liability; complicity.

LAW-6014B

20

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW

This module provides an introduction to the core principles of English criminal law and provides students with the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. Students will examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case-studies. Topics will include: homicide; causation; non-fatal offences against the person; property offences; defences; inchoate liability; complicity.

LAW-4005B

20

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW - GRADUATE DIPLOMA

This module provides an introduction to the core principles of English criminal law and provides students with the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. Students will examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case-studies. Topics will include: homicide; causation; non-fatal offences against the person; property offences; defences; inchoate liability; complicity. For students of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies course only. For students of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies course only.

LAW-5023B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. Particular focus is placed on human rights, refugee law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

PUBLIC PROTEST LAW

State authorities have an obligation to protect and facilitate peaceful protest - from temporary encampments to far-right rallies, from Pride parades to funeral pickets and wedding protests, and from 'Critical Mass' bicycle rides to prayer vigils in public places. This course will examine the ways in which law commonly seeks to regulate protest - what kinds of protest (including forms of direct action) are (or ought to be) protected? What kind of regulation is (or might legitimately be) permitted? How should the authorities respond to spontaneous and/or unorganized gatherings, simultaneous meetings and counter-protests, protests on private property?

LAW-M688

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR LAW

By the time they have completed the module, students should be able to: #Identify relevant research questions within a given area, and to formulate and operationalise (or, in the case of more 'exploratory' research designs, to identify) hypotheses for investigation #Evaluate different research designs and identify which of these are relevant to their chosen research questions and hypotheses #Identify which sources of data will be of assistance in the investigation of a particular research topic, and which techniques of data-gathering and analysis are appropriate #Write up a research project, and to organise skilfully and present the results of their research, to consider whether hypotheses are confirmed or falsified by the evidence and to consider, in either case, the reasons for the findings

LAW-M16Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT - GRADUATE DIPLOMA

LAW-5029B

20

TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT

This module will enable students: #To identify what amounts to a termination of employment and what legal mechanisms exist to maintain continuity of employment #To distinguish between contractual and statutory rules on termination #To enable students to identify situations where an employment relationship can or must be lawfully terminated #To understand the dual element of procedural and substantive unfairness in Unfair Dismissal #To be aware of remedies and enforcement in relation to both Wrongful and Unfair Dismissal claims

LAW-M675

20

THE EUROPEAN UNION AND THE WORLD: TRADE, DEVELOPMENT, REGIONALISM.

This module tries to assess the ever evolving area of the relations of the European Union with the Rest of the World. It does so by focusing on three distinct but interrelated issues: trade, development and regionalism. The module is designed for lawyers and students of other disciplines (political scientists, international relations theorists etc.) interested in studying the EU external relations. The module takes its cue from and focuses on the following real-life questions: How does the European Union take part in trade negotiations? How does the EU participate in WTO? What are EU's relations with the developing and least developed countries? Does the EU export its model of regional integration to other areas such as South America, Asia, Africa? What are EU's relations with its neighbouring countries in Northern Africa, East Europe and Middle East? What kind of tools does the EU possess in order to achieve policy aims such as conflict resolution/peace and protection of environment?

LAW-M680

20

THE LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROJECT FINANCE

This module will commence with identifying the aims and objectives and key legal characteristics of international project finance transactions. We will then look at why project finance is chosen over other forms of financing, examine the contractual nexus of a deal and focus on the different types of risks involved in a project finance transaction for example, legal, sovereign, political, construction and market risk and how these risks are mitigated. We will consider the different parties (for example commercial banks, development finance institutions, governments, export credit agencies, insurance providers, equity investors, hedging providers) to a transaction and their differing commercial interests. We will also examine the environmental, social and human rights implications of large scale project finance deals.

LAW-M608

20

THE LAW OF ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

The law of electronic commerce is concerned both with the application of existing legal concepts (such as contract formation, taxation, liability and consumer protection) to electronic business and transactions, but also with the development of new legal instruments (at national level, within the EU and internationally) and electronic money to deal with the e-commerce sector. Students explore a range of statutory and judicial approaches, including online dispute resolution (ODR), and also consider the legal and commercial challenges of 'doing business online'. The module involves some practical, problem-based activities, but also more general questions of international harmonisation.

LAW-M654

20

THE LAW OF RESTITUTION

The law of restitution, or that of unjust enrichment, is concerned with the circumstances in which a defendant's gain can be returned or given up to the claimant. The syllabus is divided into two parts. The first we will refer to as the law of autonomous unjust enrichment and the second as restitution for wrongs.

LAWZ6026A

20

THE LAW OF RESTITUTION

The law of restitution, or that of unjust enrichment, is concerned with the circumstances in which a defendant's gain can be returned or given up to the claimant. The syllabus is divided into two parts. The first we will refer to as the law of autonomous unjust enrichment and the second as restitution for wrongs.

LAW-3Z08

20

THE LAW OF TORT

Students will be taught general principles of civil liability for damage done by one person to another, including the law of Negligence (particularly in relation to personal injury), liability for statements, occupier's liability, nuisance, intentional torts and damages.

LAW-5016B

20

THE LAW OF TRUSTS

This Autumn module is concerned with the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. It considers the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trusts

LAW-5007A

20

THE PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT OF PRIVACY AND REPUTATION

In the intrusive, multi-faceted world that exists today, with 24/7 media and an ever-expanding internet, the potential for damage to reputation and interference with privacy has never been greater. This module focuses on the various ways in which the law protects rights to reputation and privacy and examines ways in which the law can be used to manage reputations in this complex world. The module will focus on the law of defamation, the laws relating to the protection of privacy interests, and the developing interplay between law and technology. While the approach taken by English law will form a significant part of the module's content, comparative study will also be made of the laws of America and other common law jurisdictions as well as the laws of the European Union and some specific European countries.

LAW-M598

20

US CONSTITUTIONAL METHOD

This will prepare the students in the fundamentals of American Law and the American Legal System before their year abroad in the USA. Topics covered include Constitutional Law, the judicial system, civil procedure, and aspects of property law, tort and contract law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-5010A

20

WORK-LIFE BALANCE

One of the most difficult and controversial issues in employment law is the extent to which the law can and should be used to enable employees to achieve a measure of control over when, where and how they work, and thereby to achieve a satisfactory balance between their work and their personal lives. This module examines the various interests at stake and the business case for policies that promote work-life balance, and includes an examination of the current law and practice (in the UK and further afield) on matters such as maternity, paternity, adoption and parental leave and pay, career breaks, flexible working (for parents, carers and others) and working time.

LAW-M613

20

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at an approved European university and there pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M120.

LAW-2B4Y

120

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at an approved French university and there pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M121.

LAW-2B6Y

120

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at approved American Law Schools and pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-2B7Y

120

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at an approved European university and there pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M120.

LAW-5001Y

120

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at an approved French university and there pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M121.

LAW-5002Y

120

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at approved American Law Schools and pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-5003Y

120

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Year Abroad

Students spend their third year of study at a US Law School. The Law School has links with prestigious and well-established US Law Schools: South Texas College of Law in Houston, Cumberland School of Law at Samford University Alabama.

Accommodation in the US is arranged by the host Schools. Students must pay the cost of this. As a rough guide the cost of living for a student living on campus in Louisville this year was $7,000 for the whole year.

*Please note that the universities to which UEA is able to send students may vary from year to year.

For Home/EU students opting for a Year Abroad the tuition fee is currently £1350.  The Year Abroad tuition fee will be subject to an annual increase. International Students are required to pay 25% of their annual tuition fee to UEA during their year Abroad and will be calculated based on the current tuition fee for that year.

 

 

Entry Requirements

  • Qualification: LLB
  • A Level: AAA
  • International Baccalaureate: 34
  • Scottish Highers: with One Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAA (acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications)
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAAAA
  • Access Course: Pass with Distinction in 45 credits at level 3 in a related subject
  • BTEC: DDD in a related subject
  • European Baccalaureate: 85%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of applicants will not be interviewed for this course, however some applicants are requested to attend an interview prior to being offered a place. Applicants who are invited for interview will include those that have taken Access, OU or BTEC qualifications.

These interviews are normally quite informal and cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course, personal interests and extra-curricular activities. Applicants will be required to write a short essay as part of the interview process.

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English Language GCSEs at grade C or above.

Assessment

Key factors used to assess an application include:

  • Past and future achievement in examinations
  • Academic interest in the subject
  • Personal interests and extra-curricular activities
  • The reference

All applications are considered on their own individual merits.

  • Qualification: LLB
  • A Level: AAA
  • International Baccalaureate: 34
  • Scottish Highers: with One Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAA (acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications)
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAAAA
  • Access Course: Pass with Distinction in 45 credits at level 3 in a related subject
  • BTEC: DDD in a related subject
  • European Baccalaureate: 85%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of applicants will not be interviewed for this course, however some applicants are requested to attend an interview prior to being offered a place. Applicants who are invited for interview will include those that have taken Access, OU or BTEC qualifications.

These interviews are normally quite informal and cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course, personal interests and extra-curricular activities. Applicants will be required to write a short essay as part of the interview process.

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English Language GCSEs at grade C or above.

Assessment

Key factors used to assess an application include:

  • Past and future achievement in examinations
  • Academic interest in the subject
  • Personal interests and extra-curricular activities
  • The reference

All applications are considered on their own individual merits.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees

We are committed to ensuring that Tuition Fees do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds.  Full time UK/EU students starting an undergraduate degree course in 2014 will be charged a tuition fee of £9,000.  The level of fee may be subject to yearly increases.  Full time International students starting an undergraduate degree course in 2014 will be charged a tuition fee of £12,900.  The level of fee may be subject to yearly increases.


University Fees and Financial Support: International Students
 

50th Anniversary Scholarships

We recently celebrated our 50th anniversary and to mark this we want to give our international undergraduate students an exciting opportunity.  Once you have an offer from UEA for September 2014, you can apply for our anniversary scholarship.

We will award 20 undergraduate students with scholarships covering 50% of the first year’s tuition fee. To find out if your are eligible and for details of how to apply please click here - www.uea.ac.uk/study/international/fees-and-funding/international-undergraduate-scholarships

 


Fees During the Year Abroad

For Home/EU students opting for a Year Abroad the tuition fee is currently £1350.  The Year Abroad tuition fee will be subject to an annual increase. International Students are required to pay 25% of their annual tuition fee to UEA during their year Abroad and will be calculated based on the current tuition fee for that year.

Students who are entitled to a student loan will be able to obtain such a loan during their year abroad. In addition, students who receive a local education authority grant who inform the local authority that they are spending a year in the US as part of their degree programme should receive their grant as normal.


How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

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International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International webpages.