LLB Law with American Law


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Laws



UCAS Course Code
M123
A-Level typical
AAA See All Requirements
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The LLB (Hons) Law with American Law degree offers you a unique opportunity to study law with a transatlantic dimension. You will cover all the compulsory English law modules whilst also acquiring an understanding of the US legal system.

As part of the degree programme, you will spend a year studying alongside US law students at a leading law school in the United States. At the end of your four year degree you will obtain an English qualifying law degree and also have a very good understanding of the US and its legal system, making this course an attractive prospect for those intending to enter the legal profession.

Overview

The LLB Law with American Law degree offers the unique opportunity to study both English and American law and to spend a year abroad at a leading US law school. This four year LLB incorporates the compulsory English law modules required to obtain a qualifying law degree while providing a broader educational and cultural experience.

Although the US legal system originates from the English common law, it has developed in markedly different ways.  Its study provides a comparative element to your legal education, as well an insight into the politics, history and culture of the United States.

In your second year at UEA, alongside your English law modules, you will study the US legal system and US Constitutional Law.  You will spend your third year at one of our partner law schools in Alabama, Florida or Texas. Taking classes with American students, you will develop a deeper understanding of your chosen areas of US law. 

Course Structure

Years 1 and 2:

  • In the first year, you will follow the same programme as the three year LLB, taking English law foundational subjects, together with modules which incorporate training in the skills required for practice as a lawyer, such as legal writing, legal research and legal reasoning. You will also be required to take the skills development programme run by the School and will have the opportunity to participate in extra-curricular activities, such as mooting, negotiation and pro bono work.
  • In the second year, alongside your English law subjects and the skills development programme, you will take American law modules designed to prepare you for the year abroad.  You will study the US legal system, including its history and origins, as well as topical issues of civil and criminal justice, such as capital punishment.  You will also learn about US Constitutional Law through studying decisions of the US Supreme Court.

 

Year 3:

  • You will spend the year abroad at a US law school, selecting classes from the broad range offered on the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree programme.  
  • While you are required to pass the year abroad, the marks do not contribute to your final degree classification.
  • Currently students attend either Cumberland Law School at Samford University (Birmingham, Alabama), South Texas College of Law (Houston, Texas) or Stetson University College of Law (Tampa, Florida). 

Read more about the year abroad.

 

Year 4:

  • You will spend the final year at UEA, where you will take the remaining compulsory English law module alongside optional modules offered by the Law School.
  • You may, with the approval of the Law School, also choose from a limited number of modules offered by other Schools in the University. Subjects selected in the past have included language, literature, management, politics and history options.
  • Students who perform well academically in their second year can opt to write a dissertation in place of a taught module. Students who select the dissertation option undertake an extended piece of research and writing under the direction of a member of faculty.
  • Modules taken in both the second and fourth years contribute to the final degree classification.

Assessment

 

Assessment on the LLB Law with American Law is by a mixture of examinations and coursework. Some optional modules are assessed entirely by coursework while others include seen, pre-release or open book exams. In addition, students are encouraged to submit non-assessed coursework regularly throughout the year, providing an opportunity for written feedback.  In order to progress to the year abroad, students must pass all modules and achieve an average mark of 55% in both the first and second years of the degree.  

 

Where Next?

 

Take the professional stage of qualification to practice as a barrister or solicitor, or use your transferable skills in business, banking, accountancy, the civil or diplomatic service, the charitable sector, teaching or academia.

 

Many of our graduates have gone on to build careers in leading firms in London and internationally such as:

 

  • Linklaters
  • Freshfields
  • Herbert Smith
  • Baker & McKenzie
  • Eversheds

Others work as in-house counsel in limited companies, public authorities and the Government Legal Service. We also have a significant number of graduates who are barristers including several Queen's Counsel.

Study Abroad

You will spend the third year of study at one of our partner US Law Schools. Currently students attend either Cumberland Law School at Samford University (Birmingham, Alabama), South Texas College of Law (Houston, Texas) or Stetson University College of Law (Tampa, Florida). 

You will study alongside American students, selecting classes from the broad range offered on the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree programme. Classes taken by recent students include: Criminal Procedure, Constitutional Law, Environmental law, Bioethics and the Law, Aviation Law, Race and American Law, Entertainment Law, and Scientific Evidence. Past students have also developed their skills by selecting classes such as Appellate Advocacy and Legal Writing and by participating in Law Clinics.

As well as educational opportunities, students are well placed to broaden their cultural experiences by travelling locally and throughout the US.  Students commonly visit southern cities such as Nashville, Memphis, New Orleans and Miami.  Past students have also travelled further afield, for example, to San Francisco and New York, as well as to the neighbouring countries of Canada and Mexico.

One of the benefits of the year abroad is that you will not pay tuition fees to the host institution.  You pay a percentage of your standard tuition fee to UEA for the year abroad.  Home/EU students currently pay £1350, which is 15% of their standard tuition fee.  International Students pay 25% of their annual tuition fee. 

*The Year Abroad tuition fee is subject to annual review.

*Please note that the universities to which UEA is able to send students may vary from year to year. Classes offered at the host institutions are also subject to change.

Hear from our students

Read about UEA students’ experiences on the UEA Study Abroad office blog ‘On the Road

 

"I applied for the Law with American Law course as I had always wanted to live in America and I had an interest in learning more about the politics and history of the US. I undertook my study abroad year at the Cumberland School of Law in Alabama. Cumberland is a small Law School situated on campus at Samford University. The Law School is like a small community and everyone there; faculty, staff and students were so welcoming and helpful to us. As well as the academic experience studying at Law School in the US, I also gained practical experience by volunteering at the Domestic Relations Court in Birmingham and by shadowing an attorney and a judge, whom I became good friends with during my time in Alabama. During the year, I also travelled around the States, visiting places along the East and West coasts and everywhere in between! Some of the highlights included San Francisco, New York and Washington, where I sat on the floor of the House of Representatives in Congress, and getting suited up for race day at the Kentucky Derby. The Law with American Law programme is very beneficial, not only for the academic side in that you have a knowledge of the law and legal systems of the US as well as the UK, but also for the social aspect - You grow more as a person and you become more independent. The year abroad and your experiences give you so much more to talk about in interviews and sets you apart from other candidates. Your year abroad really is a once in a lifetime experience and from my year in Alabama I have memories that will last a life time and I have made friends for life. I would highly encourage you to take that opportunity".

Rob Ireland, 2015

 

 

 

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

This module involves an introductory study of: the nature of constitutions and of the UK's specifically, together with sources of the latter; the fundamental principles of the UK constitution (Parliamentary Sovereignty, the rule of law and the separation of powers); its key institutions (both Houses of Parliament, Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Civil Service) - and the relationship between them; challenges to the unitary state (from devolution and the EU); the framework for protecting human rights in the UK by means of the Human Rights Act; and the principles of judicial review. It will expose students to some basic critical perspectives and ideas.

LAW-4003A

20

CONTRACT LAW

This module considers the nature of contractual obligations, the legal principles which govern the formation, content and validity of contracts and the remedies available for breach of contractual obligations. It provides an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines of the English law of contract.

LAW-4006B

20

ENGLISH LEGAL PROCESS

This module examines the actors, institutions and processes that make up the English Legal System. In so doing, it provides students with an understanding of how criminal and civil cases proceed through the legal system. Topics studied include police powers, the decision to prosecute, juries, the judiciary, civil procedure and alternative dispute resolution.

LAW-4004A

20

LAW IN PRACTICE

This module addresses four important aspects of the 'Law in Practice'. First, students will study key issues affecting contemporary legal practice, such as access to justice, the opening of the legal professions to competition from other providers, diversity in the legal professions , litigation costs/conditional fee agreements and professional ethics. Second, students will be exposed to perspectives on law that 'cut across' other law modules, such as thematic and contextual approaches to law (e.g. law and economics, socio-legal approaches). Third students will receive tuition in key skills (most of which are highly transferable) such as effective oral and written communication, negotiation, team-working, interpreting data and advocacy - together with opportunities to practice and develop these skills. Finally we will look, with the assistance of many external speakers, and career options and career management for law graduates. THIS MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW LLB STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-4001Y

20

LEGAL METHOD, SKILLS AND REASONING

This module introduces students to legal method (determining the meaning and application of statutes and law-making through cases), legal research, legal writing and legal reasoning about law and fact in a common law legal system.

LAW-4002A

20

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW

This module provides an introduction to the core principles of English criminal law and provides students with the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. Students will examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case-studies. Topics will include: homicide; causation; non-fatal offences against the person; property offences; defences; inchoate liability; complicity. THIS MODULE IS ONLY OPEN TO LAW STUDENTS.

LAW-4005B

20

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LAW

This module will introduce students to the study of US Law and prepare them for the year abroad at a US Law School. Students will study the history and origins of US Law, the federal system and the court structure. They will examine the approach to legal education in the US and gain experience in the Socratic Method of teaching. They will also study the US legal profession alongside issues of civil and criminal procedure, including the role of lawyers working on capital punishment cases. THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED ON M123.

LAW-5011A

20

LAND LAW

This module aims to give an introduction to the types of interest in and rights over land, how they are created and conveyed and how they bind third parties. Topics covered will include the nature of land ownership, land registration, co-ownership and specific interests in land.

LAW-5008A

20

THE LAW OF TORT

Students will be taught general principles of civil liability for damage done by one person to another, including the law of negligence (particularly in relation to personal injury), liability for statements, occupier's liability, nuisance, intentional torts and damages.

LAW-5016B

20

THE LAW OF TRUSTS

This Autumn module is concerned with the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. It considers the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trusts

LAW-5007A

20

US CONSTITUTIONAL METHOD

This module offers an in depth analysis of select topics of US Constitutional law focusing on the method of resolving new issues arising long after the Constitution and its amendments were drafted, employed by the US Supreme Court. Topics include Checks and Balances, Judicial Review, Equal Protection, Privacy, Global Jurisdiction and Global reach of US Constitutional law. Teaching is in the form of weekly seminars, using the Socratic method. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-5010B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANIMAL WELFARE LAW

The module will consider the law relating to animal protection and animal welfare in England and Wales, including the effect on domestic law of EU law and international law. In particular, it will consider, first, the original development of animal protection law, including the social and political context in which legislation was originally enacted. The module will then move on to consider in detail the move from individual, narrow, situation-specific legislation to the general protection offered by the Protection of Animals Act 1911, the first general animal protection legislation in the UK. After considering the significant development of animal protection legislation in the UK, the module will consider the field of animal welfare science, giving students a foundation in the basic welfare concepts on which the modern animal welfare law is based. After explaining the necessary concepts of animal welfare science, the module will move on to consider the development of law in the UK, which led to the Animal Welfare Act 2006, taking the law from its principal focus on prevention of cruelty towards an additional concern for a promotion of good welfare. The module will then consider the law relating to the protection/welfare of animals in specific situations, such as: - The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, as amended (including currently proposed amendments); - Scientific testing (including consideration of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and the associated regulatory regime); - Wild animals (including the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and the Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996); - Farm animals (including the Welfare of Farmed Animals Regulations 2007, as amended, and the EU Welfare of Animals (Transport) England Order 2006 and associated EU legislation); - Hunting (including the political and legal debates surrounding the Hunting Act 2004).

LAW-5019B

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

Individual Employment Law (Employment Law 1) is a single (Spring) semester 20-credit optional module. It examines individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

EU CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

This module examines European Union constitutional law and the functioning of the EU at supranational level. It will start with an analysis of the EU institutions and their interaction, the legislative process and the role of fundamental rights in EU law. It will then consider direct actions before the Court of Justice, in particular actions for annulment and actions against recalcitrant Member States. Finally, a topical issue of EU constitutional law will be addressed.

LAWZ5018B

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law is a socio-legal study of the moral and legal laws connecting parents, children and the state. We consider who is a parent; what rights and responsibilities parents have; to what extent children have been able to assert human rights; the welfare principle (the basis on which decisions about children are made); law and policy arguments surrounding post-separation parenting and contact; child protection and local authority duties towards children; when we take a child into care and why we tolerate some harm to children; and adoption. The module reflects both the practical application of child law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? - and the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society? How could we think differently about it, and change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills, as well as transferable skills. International/exchange students are very welcome. Anyone who has not studied law before should contact the module organiser for advice prior to enrolment.

LAW-5012B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

This module builds on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and allows students to explore new topics. The module with be neither specifically consumer- nor commercial-based and will therefore be an ideal compliment to both consumer- and commercial-oriented options within the LL.B. The module will be focused upon doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. The attempt to balance theoretical analysis and practical application will be key to this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. Particular focus is placed on human rights, refugee law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

YEAR ABROAD

Students will spend the third year of their studies at approved American Law Schools and pursue such fields of study previously agreed by the Head of the School of Law. RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON COURSE M123.

LAW-5003Y

120

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

EU LAW

This module will provide students with the fundamentals of EU law, with regard to both the constitutional and substantive aspects of the subject. In addition, the module will enable students to develop a critical understanding of areas of EU law and to retrieve and analyse information about EU law from a range of sources. THIS MODULE IS FOR LAW STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-6005A

20

Students will select 80 - 100 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

COMPANY LAW

An introduction to the legal regulation and control of companies and those persons involved with them, principally directors and shareholders. Consideration is given, among others, to the nature, types and functions of companies, the consequences of incorporation, the company's organs and agents, the rights and obligations of shareholders, the structure and management of the board of directors and its relationship with the shareholders. The course aims to give a modern treatment of company law, concentrating on those aspects which are of practical importance and relevance not only to those who wish to pursue a career as commercial or company lawyers, but also to those who have no such aspirations, as a knowledge of the company and how it works is relevant to many aspects of legal practice.

LAW-6006A

20

COMPARATIVE LAW

Lectures on the methods, aims and uses of Comparative Law and the main legal traditions of the world today.

LAW-6008A

20

COMPETITION LAW

This module is designed to allow a good understanding of the substantive and procedural rules of competition law as well as the core economic concepts of competition. It focuses on the main principles of competition law and investigates the means by which competition laws tackle such problems as cartels, abuses of monopolies and mergers. Broader issues, such as remedies and enforcement strategies will also be reviewed. The module will help to place the UK competition regime within its European and international contexts.

LAW-6010A

20

CRIME AND SENTENCING

'Crime and Sentencing' examines the nature and extent of the problem of crime in England and Wales and sentencing law. First, the module looks at sources of knowledge about crime, comparing depictions of crime and criminals in the media with knowledge derived from criminal statistics (including recorded crime statistics and the British Crime Survey). Second, we look at the main theories of sentencing and punishment: retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation and restoration. Third, we explore the sources of sentencing law and sentencing decisions: statute, case-law, ministerial statements and informal sources. Fourth, we turn to the recent history of sentencing law in England and Wales, evaluating the coherence of the overall sentencing structure. Fifth, the module examines the impact of moves towards structured sentencing, focusing on the impact of sentencing guidelines and the Sentencing Council on promoting consistency in sentencing. Sixth, attention turns to the use of imprisonment asking, "What are prisons for and are they used appropriately?" The module examines the treatment of offenders with mental health problems and those who are deemed dangerous, as well as the use of mandatory minimum sentences (sometimes called "three strikes and you're out" laws). We also look at the efficacy of alternatives to imprisonment, such as community orders. Seventh, the focus shifts to victims of crime: what role can and do victims have in sentencing proceedings? Should they have any input at all? Restorative justice will be examined as an innovative yet controversial means of responding to crime that places victims at the heart of responses to crime. THIS MODULE IS FOR LAW STUDENTS ONLY.

LAWZ6023B

20

DISCRIMINATION LAW

This module examines the philosophical and conceptual basis of equality and anti-discrimination law, the substantive law of the UK concerning discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, age and genetic inheritance, the impact of EU law on the development of UK anti-discrimination law, the enforcement of anti-discrimination legislation and future directions in discrimination law.

LAW-6011A

20

DISSERTATION

An opportunity to offer a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words. Students undertake a study in an area of law of particular interest to them under the guidance of a member of faculty who acts as supervisor. The period of study extends over the duration of two semesters, which must normally be consecutive autumn and spring semesters. STUDENTS MAY ONLY UNDERTAKE THE DISSERTATION OPTION WITH THE CONSENT OF THE MODULE ORGANISER.

LAW-6002Y

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 2

This module in advanced employment law complements Employment Law 1 (individual employment law). It examines some of the more complex and controversial aspects of UK employment law concerning the protection of human rights and collective rights in the workplace, and the legal regulation of industrial relations. The topics to be studied include privacy and freedom of speech at work, the law regulating trade unions, collective bargaining and industrial disputes, and the rights of workers and their representatives to be involved in the running of the enterprise. These issues are examined from both a conceptual and a practical perspective. By taking this module, students will also gain an understanding of the sources and role of international labour standards, and of the domestic and international institutions and mechanisms that protect human rights and collective rights at work, including the ILO, the Council of Europe, the Certification Officer and the Central Arbitration Committee.

LAW-6021B

20

FAMILY LAW: ADULT RELATIONSHIPS

Adult Relationships Law is a socio-legal study of marriage (the rules around marrying, same-sex and transsexual persons' marriages, why people marry, whether and why marriage has a privileged status in society, what if we abolished marriage); divorce (the grounds of divorce, how the process works, whether the process should be reformed, fault v no-fault divorce); financial settlements on divorce (what settlement can be expected, should prenups be enforceable); cohabitation without marriage (remedies on breakdown of the relationship, should cohabitants have divorce-style rights, financial support where there are children); and domestic violence (what is domestic violence; criminal and civil remedies; forced marriage). The module reflects both the practical application of family law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? - and the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society? How could we think differently about it, and change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills as well as transferable skills. International/exchange students are very welcome. Anyone who has not studied law before should contact the module organiser for advice prior to enrolment.

LAW-6013A

20

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

Intellectual Property (IP) law can affect, the music you listen to, the brands you buy, the films you watch, the technology you use, the books you read, the shape of the bottle you drink from, the websites you view... In short, IP law applies to nearly everything in your daily life. Primarily, it deals with the protection and encouragement of innovation in technology, business, the arts, and the creative industries. Intellectual property is an exciting and up to the minute field of law which is constantly evolving. Students will be introduced to, and encouraged to think about, the practical importance of intellectual property rights and their economic and philosophical justifications. There will also be a technological dimension to the module, whereby students will be introduced to the impact technology has had on the development and enforcement of IP rights. Students will learn the basics of intellectual property law over a broad spectrum, including how to apply the law to representative factual situations. The course is designed to give a rounded overview of the three main areas of Intellectual Property; copyright, patents and trade marks.

LAW-6019B

20

INTERNATIONAL AND EU ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

"What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on? "(Henry David Thoreau, a letter to H.G.O. Blake, May 20, 1860). Our planet is being plundered, degraded and polluted at an unprecedented rate. This pattern of human activity compromises not only the right of future generations to a healthy environment, but also their ability to fulfil their most basic needs. The biggest environmental challenges of our time, such as climate change, trans-boundary pollution and the loss of biodiversity, require a common action by the international community as a whole. International Environmental Law represents the set of legal rules and principles that guide the international community in its collective effort to meet these challenges. This proposed module aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the context, foundations and the complexities of international environmental law, and its application through European Union (EU) law. It will review the historical background and the developments that shaped the evolution of this field of law. It will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the unique legal principles and regulatory approaches that guide environmental law-making, as well as with some knowledge of specific subject-areas, such as climate change law, biodiversity law, and water law. This module will be taught through the use of a "dual-themed" approach; each part will be covered by two lectures; the first seminar will present the international regulatory framework (i.e. 'international environmental law'), while the following seminar will include a more concrete discussion on the manner in which international law was adopted into, and refined through, the EU framework. Such a teaching methodology will provide the students with a wider understanding of the topic; notably the students will grasp the relevance of international law to our everyday life, the challenge of balancing environmental goals with other policy objectives, and the manner in which general international law principles can be, and have been, concretised via EU law.

LAW-6014A

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module will introduce students to the regional (European, Inter-American and African) and international (the OHCHR, UN Human Rights Council, treaty-based bodies, Universal Periodic Review, and Special Procedures) mechanisms of human rights protection. Lectures will focus on the conceptual and institutional framework for human rights protection, and will also seek to lay a foundation for more narrowly focused seminar discussions. The latter will consider in depth the content and scope of selected substantive rights - such as the right to life, freedom from torture, and freedom of expression and assembly - drawing upon relevant international, regional and domestic human rights jurisprudence. Seminars will also allow for discussion of the implementation and enforcement of human rights norms, and for critical reflection on the use of human rights language (reflecting on the adequacy of rights-based solutions to real-world problems).

LAW-6020B

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW AND REFUGEE LAW

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is the law governing armed conflict, whereas Refugee Law provides important protection for the victims of armed conflict. During this module students will consider key issues in both IHL and refugee law, such as the difference between combatants and civilians, legitimate targets and illegal weapons and the scope of protection offered to refugees. During seminars students will apply these principles and assess the legality of current international events. This module will be a prerequisite for students wishing to take part in the UEA Law School and British Red Cross Humanitarian Law Project.

LAW-6007A

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW

This module is intended to introduce students to the English law and practice of international trade. Although there have been considerable attempts to harmonise the law relating to international trade at an international level, English law remains of very considerable importance and is often chosen as the applicable law to govern international transactions. This module looks at the English law relating to international sales, international payments and international carriage of goods by sea. As well as these core contracts in an international trade transaction, the module will also examine international dispute resolution and the problems of governing law, jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, and the growing use of international commercial arbitration as an alternative to international litigation. It also briefly introduces students to why and how the laws in these areas have become increasingly harmonised.

LAW-6017B

20

INTERNET LAW

Internet law is a cross-cutting area of law for today's multinational and innovative environment, particularly relevant in industries like electronic commerce, information technology, and the media. Topics covered in this module include data protection and privacy, cybercrime, telecoms, contracts, domain names, the control of content and the resolution of disputes. Students will explore the application of law across traditional categories and are encouraged to reflect on the role of a national legal system in an interconnected world. Teaching will include some online elements as well as lectures and seminars, and the module is assessed by 100% coursework.

LAW-6001A

20

JURISPRUDENCE

Students undertake directed reading on main currents of legal philosophy. This unit does not have formal lectures.

LAW-6018B

20

LAW AND MEDICINE

The module provides an in-depth examination of a range of medico-legal issues and explores the interface between the law and medical ethics. The module will investigate various areas of law and analyse the potential effect of legal rules on the provision of contemporary medicine. It will further address how the law impacts upon medical professionals in terms of their legal, professional and ethical accountability and consider important questions pertaining to patient rights.

LAW-6016B

20

MEDIA LAW

The aims of this module are: To introduce students to the structure of the media industries in the UK, the justification for, and different models of regulation. To consider the main social, technological and regulatory influences shaping its development. To consider the regulation of the media markets. To consider the issues relating to the management of reputation from a private law perspective, including defamation and the protection of privacy. To consider legal issues pertaining to journalism (e.g. , contempt, courts, privilege).

LAW-6009A

20

MISCARRIAGES OF JUSTICE

This module will give students the chance to consider how the criminal justice system tries to achieve the objectives of convicting the guilty and avoid convicting the innocent. Using Packer's model as a conceptual framework, students will critically analyse current and previous arrangements for preventing and correcting miscarriages of justice. Defining and quantifying miscarriages of justice (and considering what level of error is "acceptable") will be undertaken. Inter-disciplinary (drawing on psychological research) issues and the role of forensic science will be considered. The roles of the Court of Appeal and Criminal Cases Review Commission in correcting errors will be examined in detail. Compensation arrangements for victims of miscarriage of justice will be subjected to detailed critical analysis. Students will be encouraged to challenge existing arrangements and consider critically proposals for change. A number of case studies will be used during the module. The module will make extensive use of podcasts to disseminate supplementary information.

LAW-6027B

20

THE CRIMINAL PROCESS

The Criminal Process examines key issues in contemporary English criminal justice. The module will explore principles and concepts that underpin the criminal justice system. We will look at a series of case-studies that illustrate tensions and conflicts between those principles including: the 'right to silence' in police interviews and at trial; the treatment of rape complainants in the criminal process, including how such complainants are treated at court and the questions about their 'sexual history' that they can be asked at trial; key issues in evidence law, such as the admissibility of evidence of previous convictions at trial; the admissibility of 'unfairly' obtained evidence; and the jury system (we will examine whether trial by jury is the most effective way of organising trials). THE MODULE IS AVAILABLE FOR LAW STUDENTS ONLY.

LAW-6015A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANIMAL WELFARE LAW

The module will consider the law relating to animal protection and animal welfare in England and Wales, including the effect on domestic law of EU law and international law. In particular, it will consider, first, the original development of animal protection law, including the social and political context in which legislation was originally enacted. The module will then move on to consider in detail the move from individual, narrow, situation-specific legislation to the general protection offered by the Protection of Animals Act 1911, the first general animal protection legislation in the UK. After considering the significant development of animal protection legislation in the UK, the module will consider the field of animal welfare science, giving students a foundation in the basic welfare concepts on which the modern animal welfare law is based. After explaining the necessary concepts of animal welfare science, the module will move on to consider the development of law in the UK, which led to the Animal Welfare Act 2006, taking the law from its principal focus on prevention of cruelty towards an additional concern for a promotion of good welfare. The module will then consider the law relating to the protection/welfare of animals in specific situations, such as: - The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, as amended (including currently proposed amendments); - Scientific testing (including consideration of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and the associated regulatory regime); - Wild animals (including the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and the Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996); - Farm animals (including the Welfare of Farmed Animals Regulations 2007, as amended, and the EU Welfare of Animals (Transport) England Order 2006 and associated EU legislation); - Hunting (including the political and legal debates surrounding the Hunting Act 2004).

LAW-5019B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. It aims the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BRITAIN AND EUROPE

The UK's relationship with its continental European neighbours has historically been fraught with tension and difficulty. This module investigates and attempts to explain Britain's ambivalent attitude towards European integration and considers competing visions of Britain's post-war destiny. It tracks, through examination of internal debates in the two main political parties, the UK's changing European policy from aloofness in the 1950s through the two half-hearted applications for membership in the 1960s to accession in 1973 and the development of its reputation as an 'awkward partner'. It also examines the impact of EU membership on British politics and the British political system, assesses the success of Britain's efforts to shape the EU agenda, and critically evaluates the arguments for and against British membership, including those concerning British exceptionalism. This module is recommended for those students who intend to progress to the European Studies with Brussels Internship' module in Year 3

PPLI5058B

20

Black Freedom Struggle: The Civil Rights Movement

This is the second of two modules examining the black freedom struggle in the United States. This module examines the struggle from 1865 to Black Lives Matter. Students will study the political activism of African American figures such as Sojourner Truth, Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, Mary McLeod Bethune and Angela Davis. Students will gain a detailed understanding of the race, gender and class dimensions of the 'long' civil rights movement, paying specific attention to the activism of black women organisers. Finally, the module will encourage students to think through the diverse and changing nature of the civil rights movement as black activists responded to specific political situations both within the United States and abroad.

AMAH5050B

20

Black Freedom Struggles: Slavery, 1619-1865

This is the first of two modules examining the black freedom struggle in the United States. The module will follow a chronological sequence, allowing us to trace the course of racial slavery in North America, reflecting on the roots of racism that flourished during the antebellum years and beyond. Through engaging with the developing historiography of slavery in the United States students will gain a deeper understanding of contemporary (then and now) debates concerning race and racial identity as well as American slavery per se. We will be interrogating various sources found in the Morgan Reader alongside representations of slavery in novels, cinema, and oral histories.

AMAH5043A

20

DEMOCRACY

This module considers how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece and looks at the critiques of democracy advanced by its opponents. The ideas and values underpinning democracy will be examined. The first part of the module focuses on texts by the major democratic thinkers including Locke, Rousseau and Mill. The second part concentrates on contemporary theories of democracy and examines the problems which democracy currently faces and evaluates the solutions proposed, including "electronic democracy" and "cosmopolitan democracy".

PPLX5051B

20

DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE

This module is a 20 credit version of PPLX6097B: Distributive Justice. THIS 20 CREDIT VERSION IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO VISITING, EXCHANGE AND NON HUM STUDENTS.

PPLX6098B

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

Individual Employment Law (Employment Law 1) is a single (Spring) semester 20-credit optional module. It examines individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

EU CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

This module examines European Union constitutional law and the functioning of the EU at supranational level. It will start with an analysis of the EU institutions and their interaction, the legislative process and the role of fundamental rights in EU law. It will then consider direct actions before the Court of Justice, in particular actions for annulment and actions against recalcitrant Member States. Finally, a topical issue of EU constitutional law will be addressed.

LAWZ5018B

20

EU'S FUTURE AS AN INTERNATIONAL ACTOR

The module focuses on European political and economic co-operation and projections for the future. Issues include: the EU's attempts at foreign policy in international conflicts such as Iraq, former Yugoslavia, Georgia, co-operation with other International organisations, as an economic superpower vis-a-vis the United States, China and Japan, as aid-donor to the Developing World and a pioneering force behind environmental policy and energy policy - as a hesitant superpower in security and defence (Islamic State, Africa, Asia, etc.). It is advisable - but not compulsory - to know a few basics as to the make-up and workings of the EU before embarking on this module.

PPLI5046B

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law is a socio-legal study of the moral and legal laws connecting parents, children and the state. We consider who is a parent; what rights and responsibilities parents have; to what extent children have been able to assert human rights; the welfare principle (the basis on which decisions about children are made); law and policy arguments surrounding post-separation parenting and contact; child protection and local authority duties towards children; when we take a child into care and why we tolerate some harm to children; and adoption. The module reflects both the practical application of child law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? - and the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society? How could we think differently about it, and change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills, as well as transferable skills. International/exchange students are very welcome. Anyone who has not studied law before should contact the module organiser for advice prior to enrolment.

LAW-5012B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

This module builds on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and allows students to explore new topics. The module with be neither specifically consumer- nor commercial-based and will therefore be an ideal compliment to both consumer- and commercial-oriented options within the LL.B. The module will be focused upon doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. The attempt to balance theoretical analysis and practical application will be key to this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

GENDER AND THE MEDIA

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research methods, this module examines the role of media in constructing - and challenging - contemporary gender relations and understandings of a range of femininities and masculinities. The module explores both theoretical and methodological issues and covers theoretical approaches from feminist media studies, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory. It explores a range of media and visual cultures including television, magazines, sports media, music, digital media culture, etc.

AMAM5031A

20

Human Rights: The history of an Idea

Reading key historical, philosophical, political, legal and literary texts, this module track will track the emergence of human rights as a cultural idea from their conception in the eighteenth century, through the development of political rights and humanitarianism in the nineteenth century, through to the Nuremberg trials and the United Nations of Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), into the post World War Two period and up to the present day.We will trace how the idea of human rights developed at key junctures, and untangle their relationship to political and historical change.

HIS-5043A

20

IN AND OUT: THE POLITICS OF MIGRATION

This module will address the politics of migration and citizenship. It will provide students with a background to political thought on citizenship, membership and belonging. It will then examine migration at the international, state and individual levels. The international level will focus on historical movements of people (such as from Europe and Asia towards the Americas) and contemporary flows of refugees and guest workers. The state level will look comparatively at immigration and emigration policies and critically assess the logic behind them. Attention will be given to different countries in various regions for comprehensive comparative evaluation. Different types of migration will be considered, including economic (such as non-immigrant and immigrant work visas), family (such as spousal and family reunification visas) and humanitarian (refugees, asylum seekers, and special humanitarian protections). The politics of these migration categories will be foregrounded, including governmental tactics of management, how they comply or fail to comply with international human rights norms, and the foreign policy implications of humanitarian visas. Finally the individual level will consider narrative accounts of migration in order to understand policy and practice from a bottom-up and experiential perspective. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate and analyse the politics of migration as manifest in the various policies and practices.

PPLI5060B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE

Few areas of international politics which remain unregulated by international organisations or international norms. This module examines the historical development of international organizations and regimes, including the UN, NATO, European Union, and international financial institutions. It also assesses their design and evolution, and the extent to which their operation reflects underlying power and interest. It critically evaluates the main theories to explain cooperation between states, the role played in security, trade, finance, gender and environmental policy, and asks whether the structure of international organisation amounts to global governance.

PPLI5057A

20

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS SINCE 1945

This module provides a brief historical and theoretical review of the cold war. It then goes on to look at some of the key issues of the post-cold war world. How far have international relations changed since the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989? What are the prospects for peace, stability and prosperity now that the ideological and military struggle between the USSR and the USA is over? Has international terrorism replaced communism as the main threat to the West?

PPLI5045A

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

This module will give students an essential grounding in International Relations theory, encompassing both the foundational theories of realism and liberalism, and contemporary debates about hegemony, neo-imperialism and post-positivism. The module is structured around the positivist/post-positivist divide and starts with classical realism and neo-realism, and liberalism and neo-liberalism. It then explores the English School and constructivism before turning to more critical theories like post-colonialism, feminism and gender studies, and postmodernism.

PPLI5059A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

This module explores issues within, and perspectives on, international security. In the first part of the module, we explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system. The module examines the ways in which violent conflict and the use of force are managed in world politics. It surveys a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. Additionally, the responses of the international community to violent conflict including terrorism will be explored, looking broadly at the contested notion of the "Just War". Drawing upon historical and contemporary examples of war and violent conflict, it assesses the contributions of different actors and processes to the achievement of regional and world peace and security. The module's second part turns to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These will include constructivist, feminist, and sociological perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful, is it to think of issues such as pandemics, environmental degradation, poverty, and undocumented migration as security issues? What is gained and what is lost by so doing?

PPLI5056B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

LANGUAGE AND GENDER (LEVEL 6)

This module explores a variety of matters relating to language and its relationship to questions of gender and sexuality. Do men and women use language differently? Are the genders represented differentially in language and what might this show about socio-cultural ideologies and power structures? Is linguistic behaviour used to create and construct gender and sexual identities? Consideration will include such issues as stereotypical ideas of gendered language, sexist language, how same-sex conversations differ from mixed-sex conversations, how children are linguistically socialised into their gender categories, whether men are from Mars and women from Venus, and so on. Discussion and reading will be informed by a wide variety of ideas from fields such as anthropology, psychology, biology, sociology, and politics (especially feminism).

PPLL6035A

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This political analysis for development module focuses on core principles in politics and their application to development analysis, covering topics that include power and resistance, states and nations, citizenship and justice, violence and non-violence, democratisation and electoral systems and the role of the media. The various topics will be taught with intensive reference to theory but also integrated with empirical material, both historical and contemporary in nature. It is taught through a combination of lectures, facilitated reading groups, video sessions and student-led seminars.

DEV-5008B

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 1/I

A course for students with a French A-Level, Intermediate French, or any other equivalent qualification. If you have studied French abroad and are unsure what your level is, please get in touch with the module organiser as early as possible. This module is designed to develop students' existing reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on receptive skills (listening/reading) to start with. It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on receptive skills as well as textual grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the teacher's discretion.

PPLF4016A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN LANGUAGE 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A, or equivalent to B1 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/I

A course in Spanish for students with Spanish A-Level, Intermediate Spanish, or any other equivalent qualification. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. Key components include exploring issues for the development of intercultural competence and learning to articulate the employability skills developed as part of the module. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Orals are arranged separately. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLH4025A

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module introduces students to the history and theory of propaganda, and its role in society. We consider what constitutes and defines propaganda. Focusing on the 20th century, we examine propaganda in a range of political settings, both totalitarian and democratic, in the local context of the relationships of power and communications. We consider how theories of propaganda emerged after the First World War, and how propaganda is shaped by governance structures, journalists and media institutions, and by technology. We look at extreme propaganda in Bosnia and Rwanda, and at legal recourses against incitement. And we examine current techniques, including internet platforms, used by Russia and Islamic extremists.

HIS-5050B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. Particular focus is placed on human rights, refugee law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST

This module provides a historical background to the Middle East and its politics. It is concerned with politics within the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. The module encourages students to think critically about the links between some key concepts in the comparative politics of non-Western countries, including historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/neo-colonialism, the role of culture and identity and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

HIS-5048B

20

THE POLITICS OF ELECTIONS AND ELECTORAL MALPRACTICE

This is a 20 credit version of PPLX6090B

PPLX6091B

20

THE US SUPREME COURT, 1900-TODAY: The Rights Revolution

The 20th Century saw a major expansion in the role of the Supreme Court in American politics and society. Changing understandings of individual rights and liberties spurred a constitutional revolution in areas of civil rights and individual freedoms. Legal and social changes occurred alongside changing interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights to fundamentally alter the way many Americans related to each other and to the government. Following World War Two the Court became increasingly active in areas of public policy, deciding cases involving freedom of speech, religion and the press, campaign finance, gun control and the right to bear arms, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, same-sex marriage, abortion, and the death penalty, among many others. This module introduces students to the role and operation of the Court as well as to the historic events it has been involved with since the early 20th Century. From repeatedly striking down New Deal legislation in the 1930s to halting the recount of votes in Florida in the 2000 election, from holding the state had no responsibility for the protection of individuals in the first two decades of the 20th Century to expanding understandings of "equal protection of the laws" in the second half of the century, the module will encourage students to consider the role of law in shaping and influencing American history and politics, as well as asking how and why the Court ruled in particular ways. Through a combination of Court opinions and academic studies, students will be asked to consider key issues in 20th and 21st Century US history and the role of the law and Constitution in shaping them. Students are challenged to consider how understandings of key legal "rights" have changed over time and what this tells us about the Court, the Constitution, and about American society more broadly.

AMAH6041B

20

TOPICS IN BRITISH POLITICS

Some people are arguing that British politics is in crisis - tumbling electoral turnouts, decline of political parties, cynicism about the political class, high levels of apathy etc. We examine and make sense of this problem (if it is a problem), by examining in depth three or four topics. Recently these have included: changing patterns of electoral behaviour and campaigning; the issue of electoral reform; the evolving role of political parties in the face of social and technological change.

PPLX5048A

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of WHC is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; strategies and challenges of peace-building; and the strengths and weaknesses of institutional design as a conflict management tool, including territorial solutions to violent conflicts and the establishment of power-sharing arrangements.

DEV-6003A

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Not Guilty

    When should talking to competitors land you in prison? Hear from UEA cartels expert…

    Read it Not Guilty
  • UEA Law Clinic

    UEA Law Clinic brings together an unrivalled range of pro bono opportunities for our students.

    Read it UEA Law Clinic

Entry Requirements

  • A Level AAA
  • International Baccalaureate 34 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers AAA
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AAAAAA
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDD. Acceptable BTEC subjects Applied Science, Applied Law and Business.
  • European Baccalaureate 85%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications


GCSE Offer


Assessment


  • A Level AAA
  • International Baccalaureate 34
  • Scottish Highers AAAAB one Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers AAA (acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications)
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AAAAAA
  • Access Course Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDD. Acceptable BTEC subjects Applied Science, Applied Law and Business.
  • European Baccalaureate 85%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of applicants will not be interviewed for this course, however some applicants are requested to attend an interview prior to being offered a place. Applicants who are invited for interview will include those that have taken Access and OU qualifications.

These interviews are normally quite informal and cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course, personal interests and extra-curricular activities. Applicants will be required to write a short essay as part of the interview process.

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English Language GCSEs at grade C or above.

Assessment

Key factors used to assess an application include:

  • Past and future achievement in examinations
  • Academic interest in the subject
  • Personal interests and extra-curricular activities
  • The reference

All applications are considered on their own individual merits.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

______________________________________________________________________

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Professional regulators in the legal sector are currently conducting an extensive consultation about legal education and training.This includes a review about the routes and qualifications to become a solicitor or barrister. Some of the considerations include changing or ending existing routes, or opening new ones. The current routes of a qualifying law degree or the GDL, and the BPTC to become a barrister will remain in place until summer 2017. The current route of a qualifying law degree or GDL or LPC will remain in place until summer 2018.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board will make announcements after their consultations and reviews in due course. These decisions will then inform the different routes to qualification as a solicitor or barrister.

Undergraduate Admissions Office

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

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International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International webpages.

    Next Steps

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    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

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