Back to Course List

UCAS Course Code

QT37

Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Bachelor of Arts

Course Organiser

Dr. Thomas Karshan


BA English and American LiteratureThe writers of Britain and America are of course deeply connected: often they employ the same language, address the same readers, share the same cultural reference points. But at the same time, the two traditions differ sharply in their typical values and tones of voice. This programme allows you to experience these continuities and distinctions. Students on this programme have access to the courses that make up the degrees in English Literature and American and English Literature. The combination also means that you encounter the teaching of two different Schools: the interdisciplinary work of the School of American Studies, and the more literary focus of the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing.

Your degree course will be planned in conjunction with your adviser, but we give an outline here.  The basic unit of teaching, the module, lasts for one semester and carries twenty credits in Years 1 and 2, thirty credits in Year 3.  The academic year contains two semesters; in each semester you will normally take three units, making a total of six units a year (two and four respectively in the final Year).  Over the three years of your course you will normally accumulate 360 credits: that is, eighteen modules.  Free choice modules are available – either to extend your degree subjects, or to venture outside them.  As we believe in encouraging interdisciplinarity, you will be required to take three units (sixty credits) outside English and American Literature.  Within our own Faculty of Arts and Humanities, this could involve taking units in American Studies, Creative Writing, Drama, History or Film, for example.  Alternatively, you may opt for units offered by the Faculty of Science or the Faculty of Social Sciences subject to entry requirements.

Course Structure:

Year 1

The first year requires you to take introductory courses in both traditions, though a slight emphasis is placed on the less familiar American literature and on its social and historical background. Courses such as Imagining America, and Literature in History provide you with the context within which future studies will unfold.  You will have a list of optional modules to choose from, encouraging you to broaden your awareness of related subjects such as film, drama, philosophy, linguistics or history.

Year 2 and Year 3

The precise mixture of English and American modules in the second and third years is up to you, and you will discuss your choices with your faculty adviser to make sure that you end up with a balanced programme. You are required to take a number of modules outside the immediate English and American Literature programme. There is a wide range of modules to choose from in the Faculty of Humanities, including free-choice courses in drama, film and creative writing as well as offerings in other literatures and in history.

You can also (and subject to entry requirements) use your free choices to take modules offered by other faculties.

Modules of study are taught in a number of different forms – often lectures and smaller seminar groups – designed to encourage student participation. In every module your work is assessed; forms of assessment also vary, including essays, project work, presentation, examination or a combination of any of these methods. You may also write a dissertation during your final year.

This programme does not include a year in the USA.

Teaching and Assessment:

Key skills, issues and ideas are introduced in lectures given by all members of faculty, including literary critics, literary historians, and writers.  More specialist study is undertaken in small group seminars. These are chosen from a range offered within the School and across the University. You will also spend time studying and researching in the library or carrying out practical work or projects. In most subject areas, you are assessed at the end of each year on the basis of coursework and, in some cases, project and examination results. In your final year, you will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice and with the advice of tutors. There is no final examination. Your final degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and three.


Why Choose UsChoosing to study Literature, Drama and Creative Writing at UEA means joining some of the most satisfied students in the UK.

Out of all mainstream UK universities, we have been ranked overall joint first for student satisfaction for Drama, and joint fourth for English Studies in the 2013 National Student Survey.

Here are some of the reasons why:

  • Our world-famous Creative Writing department attracts successful and aspiring writers from around the world
  • The School is home to the British Centre for Literary Translation
  • You can take part in our active and engaged student body
  • Discover endless opportunities to attend and get involved in our rich schedule of events, readings and performances

A broad range of courses

Our School brings together writers, scholars, performers, teachers and students in an exploration of the powers and possibilities of literature. Our aim is to make creative writing and critical reading confront one another in ways that sharpen and enliven both.

Our School has a world-famous reputation for Creative Writing, and is also home to highly rated scholars with a focus on literature, translation and drama. With a strong focus on interdisciplinary learning, we work closely with other Schools at UEA.

#1 for student experience

In 2013 UEA was ranked number one in the UK for Student Experience by the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey – as well as ranking joint second for overall satisfaction in the 2013 National Student Survey.

Student life at UEA is enhanced through an active Student Union, a myriad clubs and societies to join and a lively and engaged student body.

Literary festivals and events

Writers from across the globe travel to UEA to take part in our long-running literary festival organised by the Arthur Miller Centre and the Centre for Creative and Performing Arts.

The teaching staff and students also put on a number of events throughout the year, including readings, performances and plays.

The University’s significant contribution to creative writing was recognised with the recent prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education.

Teaching and research excellence

In the National Student Survey 2013, we achieved excellent teaching rankings and scores - joint first for Drama and second for Imaginative Writing, scoring 99 and 97 per cent respectively.

As one of our students, you will benefit from our interdisciplinary approach, and have the scope to tailor your own degree as your interests develop throughout your time at UEA.

Our academic staff are writers, as well as teachers, and are at the forefront of research in their field. Many contribute articles to leading newspapers, appear on television and radio arts programmes, publish original research and write novels, short stories, poems and plays.

If you choose to study with us, you can expect to be inspired by leading figures in the literary world such as Kathryn Hughes, writer of the biographies of Mrs Beeton and George Eliot, Giles Foden, whose novel The Last King of Scotland was made into an Oscar winning Hollywood movie, and novelist Rachel Hore, a regular in the bestseller list.

UniStats Information

Year

Compulsory Study (80 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

IMAGINING AMERICA: LITERATURE I

Imagining America: Literature I is a level one module designed to introduce the major writers and themes of literature in the United States. For this module there will be a weekly lecture and a two-hour seminar. Lecture Slot: Monday, 1200-12.50. Further information on the timing of the seminar can be found in the published timetable.

AMSF4003A

20

IMAGINING AMERICA: LITERATURE II

Imagining America: Literature II is a level one module designed to expand upon an introduction to the major writers and themes of literature from the United States. For this module there will be a weekly lecture and seminar. Further information on the timing of the seminar can be found in the published timetable.

AMSF4001B

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY 1

This is the main introductory module to the study of literature. It aims to help new students to read historically, by offering a range of models of the relationship between literature and history, explored through the study of selected historical and literary moments. The module is taught by a weekly lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4008A

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY II

This module follows on from Literature in History I, taking in more recent history, and including discussion of how writers of the present make use of the past. The module is taught by lectures, with an accompanying seminar. Attendance at both lectures and seminars is compulsory.

LDCL4012B

20

Option A Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANALYSING FILM AND TELEVISION

The module is designed to provide students with core study skills and techniques and methods of textual analysis. The module will cover the analysis of a range of formal features and frameworks such as narrative, mise-en-scene, camera work, editing and sound used in the analysis of film and television. The study skills covered will include use of the library and internet for research, as well as note taking, essay planning and the conventions of academic writing. In the process the module will cover issues such as referencing and plagiarism. It will be taught by lecture, seminar and screening.

FTMF4002A

20

CLASSIC READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This introductory module for first year students is designed to invite you into philosophical enquiry by way of a detailed study of some of the most famous books by the founding fathers of Western Philosophy. The set texts typically include a classic work by Plato, from the birth of philosophy in Classical Greece, and a classic work by Descartes, the father of modern philosophy. One or two texts by Aristotle or later Greek and Mediaeval thinkers may also be included. The texts are studied in modern English. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required, and this module is suitable for students from other disciplines who are taking no other philosophy modules It is taught annually.

PHI-4001A

20

CONTAINING MULTITUDES: AMERICAN HISTORY I

This module offers a survey of American history from the colonial period through the nineteenth century, taking such key events as, eg, the conquest of the continent, the development of American democracy and the traumatic years of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Students in American Studies four-year programmes also take the complementary module Containing Multitudes: American History II, which is taught in the Spring Semester. Students attend a weekly seminar and an associated lecture series.

AMSF4004A

20

INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES

This module will introduce students to the development of cultural studies in this country and the work undertaken in the field. While it is a core module for those in Literature and History, it is suited to all those interested in interdisciplinary study and the history of academic disciplines, and it will introduce students to a range of approaches in study. It is taught through seminars.

LDCL4010A

20

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY MODERN STUDIES

This module introduces key themes in early modern history: witchcraft, gender, rebellion, religious conflict, the reformation, warfare, state formation and other key aspects of the period 1500-1750.

HIS-4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

This module is designed to provide an introduction to medieval history both for first year historians and students from other schools. It surveys the history of medieval Europe, including England, from c.1000 to c1300, and also examines some archaeology, literature, art, and architecture from the period. The module also aims to introduce students to a range of primary sources, including some of the physical remains to be found in East Anglia.

HIS-4001A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN HISTORY

This module provides a wide-ranging introduction to the political, social and economic transformation of Britain and Europe from the late eighteenth century to the First World War. Among the themes it considers are industrialisation and its impact; revolution and reform; nationalism and imperialism; gender and society; great power relations; the impact of war and the collapse of the old Europe in 1917-18.

HIS-4003A

20

READING CULTURES I: AMERICAN ICONS

This module provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary research methods and writing skills that are essential for students undertaking a degree programme in the School of American Studies. Students will be encouraged to look at reading American culture across disciplines and media, and to develop their own strategies for learning, from note taking and planning, through locating and engaging with critical opinions, to producing and evaluating academic writing. This module is intended as an introduction to interdisciplinary scholarship and its transferable skills.

AMSF4006A

20

READING TEXTS: TUTORIAL CLASS

This module provides the opportunity to work closely on selected texts within the contexts of a small group. It aims to develop and explore modes of textual analysis. By the end of the module the students will have highly developed reading skills, a sense of the implications of interpreting texts and the individual research skills essential for a university degree. Not available to Visiting Students.

LDCL4009A

20

READING TRANSLATIONS: TUTORIAL CLASS

This module provides the opportunity to work closely with texts in translation, looking at how we read and analyse them and how we consider their relationship to the originals. We aim to develop the skills necessary for working with foreign texts in English translation. A thorough reading knowledge of another language besides English is essential.

LDCL4013A

20

Option B Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CONTAINING MULTITUDES: AMERICAN HISTORY II

This module continues where Containing Multitudes I leaves off and tracks the historical narrative through from the end of the nineteenth century into the twentieth century, covering industrialisation and America's emergence as a world power, the Progressive era, the New Deal, the Cold War and its legacy, and the impact of the dramatic changes of the 1960s. Students attend a weekly seminar and an associated lecture series.

AMSF4002B

20

READING CULTURES II: IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES

The module develops and expands the research methods, writing skills, and oral skills acquired in Reading Cultures I: American Icons. By continuing the exploration of contemporary American culture and introducing cultural and critical theory as a means to engage with current ideas and ideologies circulating around American cultural icons, the module will encourage exploration of America's changing position in the world. The module is intended to further facilitate skills in reading, writing, analysis, synthesis, independent thinking, and confidence as self-supporting learners in order to provide a strong foundation for work at levels 2 and 3.

AMSF4007B

20

READING TEXTS II

This module seeks to build on and develop the work of the Autumn semester, in particular that of Reading Texts and Reading Translations. The focus will fall again on small-group discussion and on the reading of a small number of texts - one creative, and one critical - chosen by the tutor from a set list. With this close attention to reading at its core, the module will also look at a number of the terms and ideas central to the study of literature and to the practice of interpretation. Not available to Visiting Students.

LDCL4011B

20

WRITING TEXTS

This module explores the culture and anthropology of writing, and addresses issues such as the differences between writing and speaking, between literary and non-literary texts, and the writer's relationship with readers. In weekly lectures and seminar groups, we will look at the writing process itself - drafting, revising, editing, translating - and will explore how and why texts come into being, and how they work to position the reader or to generate readerly interaction. The module is taught by a lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4014B

20

Option A Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

19TH CENTURY AMERICAN WRITING

This module aims to build on and develop your knowledge of the range of American literature in the nineteenth century. We will consider the rise of a distinctly American literary tradition in modes like realism, the gothic, romanticism, naturalism and the detective story, looking to make new connections both among writers and between literature and such larger issues as slavery, economics and feminism.

AMSL5012A

20

20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

This module provides a broadly chronological view of American poetry from the start of the twentieth century to the present day. It wonders about what the consequences might be if we consider seriously Emerson's claim (made in 1844), that America might be seen as a poem. Through detailed examination each week of groups of three related poets, the module aims both to question what constitutes an American poetics, and to examine how this conception has changed over the course of the twentieth century. As well as tracing a trajectory in American poetry from modernist to postmodernist modes, one of its primary concerns is also to start exploring how ideas of what an American poetry might be are inflected differently in 'mainstream' and in more avant-garde (or 'experimental') poetries. Indeed, by explicitly thinking about these differences the module will pay particular attention to the ways in which ideas of nationhood, of political dissent and protest, of poetic 'groupings' and canon-formation, are instrumental in determining what we choose to see as America's representative poetry. By the end of the module students should have a wide knowledge of a range of different twentieth-century American poetries, as well as a strong sense of how the political, cultural and literary 'tastes' of America across the century have delivered it the sorts of poetry it deserves.

AMSL5011B

20

AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

This module surveys the prose of some of the twentieth century's most important American women writers, writers who (or whose 'other' works) tend to disappear from reading lists that include books by women only out of duty. Along the way we will seek to interrogate the terms with which we begin: American, women and prose. Assuming that biology does not define literature, we will instead seek to understand the social pressures on these women writers, and their responses to them, in an effort to maintain the specificity, diversity and range of these women's literary pursuits.

AMSL5013A

20

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION

The purpose of this module is to expose students to a range of prose works by important contemporary American writers. In particular, we will be concerned with some of the key concepts associated with contemporary American fiction, including the definition of the contemporary: postmodernism; metafiction; historiography; postcolonialism; and memory.

AMSL5015B

20

THE HOLOCAUST IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

This module aims to explore representations of the Holocaust in American literature. Students will explore how the Holocaust is represented by American Jewish and non-Jewish authors. Students will consider whether, and how, the Holocaust is 'Americanised' by American writers; they will consider some of the ethical and philosophical debates concerning representation of the Holocaust in art; they will examine how American Jewish writers engage with the Holocaust to negotiate questions of Jewish identity; and they will consider the problematic uses and definitions of the term 'holocaust' in American culture.

AMSL5016B

20

Option B Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Through a combination of lectures and seminars, this module will explore the theory and practice of literary criticism from the origins of the study of English literature as an academic discipline to the present. In order to do this, we examine not only the work of literary critics and theorists, but also engage with developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary study.

LDCL5031A

20

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING

This module reads fiction, poetry, nonfictional prose, and drama of the eighteenth century, as a means with which to identify the dominant concerns of the epoch (class; gender; the politics of party; increasing secularisation), and to explore some of its debates (aristocracy versus middle class; prose versus poetry; classical or ancient versus modern or contemporary; religious versus secular). We read popular novelists, such as Eliza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Samuel Richardson, Laurence Sterne, and Henry Fielding; popular dramatists (Fielding especially); verse both well-known and more obscure (Pope, Gay, Smart); and excerpts from other contemporary sources (didactic, philosophical, political, religious). By the end of the module you will have acquired a knowledge of and sensitivity to the literary genres of the eighteenth century (novel, poetry, prose, drama); a knowledge of the political and cultural landscape; and a knowledge of the conditions of writing (print culture, the beginnings of literary criticism, the professionalization of literature).

LDCL5041A

20

EUROPEAN LITERATURE: ENCOUNTERS WITH 'OTHERNESS'

This module explores critical, aesthetic and thematic issues in a selection of texts originally published in languages other than English, with the aim of investigating some key features and major preoccupations of twentieth century 'European' literature. The focus will be firstly on aspects of the individual as 'other' , and secondly on the ways in which such conditions find expression in new, 'other' forms of writing. General issues to be explored include the nature of narrative, the role of the reader, styles of writing, difficulty, intertextuality, and the implications or 'otherness' of reading in translation. Writers to be studied may include Kafka, Rilke, Sartre, De Beauvoir, Camus, Queneau, Robbe-Grillet, Sarraute, Calvino and Sebald. Assessment is by means of an individually chosen project, supported by individual and group tutorials. The module may be of particular interest to people who have taken LDCE2Z15 modernism.

LDCL5033B

20

MEDIEVAL WRITING

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the study of medieval English literature. In a series of lectures and seminars students will work through a small but representative selection of medieval texts, including lyrics, romance, and fable, in order to develop a working knowledge of the language - Middle English - and appreciation of different forms and genres found in medieval writing. Medieval texts and contexts will be used as a means of familiarising students with medieval language, and form the basis for further modules in medieval writing that may be taken within the School.

LDCL5043A

20

MODERNISM

The purpose of this module is to study the literature of the early decades of the twentieth century - roughly 1900-1930 - in particular the work of those authors who attempted to break with received norms of literary style and content. The module is organised as a series of thematic and formal explorations that include attention to at least some of the following: the dissolution of character and gravitation towards psychological states such as fantasy and desire, with the emergence of the unconscious; narrative and temporal disruption, obtrusion of language and other sources of modernist difficulty, the afterlife of religion, as in interest in the unseen and supernatural; the significance of the city, the mass media, and other modern cultural forms; gender and the politics of modernism. The sequence of guiding lectures focuses discussion on a set of specific texts and themes, with their contexts, and these are taken up for consideration in the accompanying seminars. 'Modernism' is thus constructed gradually over the semester as a mosaic of closely related issues, each one reflecting on the others. As well as providing an overview of defining textual features, in prose and poetry, the module is concerned also with the critical reading of modernism in the light of contemporaneous criticism and theory as well as current analyses.

LDCL5045A

20

NINETEENTH-CENTURY WRITING

This module aims to equip you with a knowledge of writing from across the nineteenth century, in a variety of modes (fiction, poetry, science, journalism, cultural criticism, nonsense). We will examine authors including George Eliot, Tennyson, Darwin, Arnold, Gaskell, and the Brownings, among others. You will thus develop an awareness of how different kinds of writing in the period draw on, influence, and contest with each other. Likewise, you will acquire a sense for the cultural, political and socio-economic contexts of nineteenth-century writing, and some of the material contexts in which that writing took place (serial publication, popular readership, censorship, public controversy).

LDCL5047B

20

ROMANTICISM 1780-1840

Romantic Literature is often thought of as poetry, primarily work by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and Bryon. But the signs and forms of Romantic sensibility can also be found in a much broader constituency of writing practice: the novel, letter writing, the essay, political and aesthetic theory, and writing of all kinds taken as social critique. This module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars.

LDCL5034B

20

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING: RENAISSANCE AND REVOLUTION

This module explores 17th-Century writing in diverse forms, familiar and unfamiliar: the masque, poetry, prose fiction, political prose and the antecedents of what we now call 'journalism'. We will consider the place of these works in society and in their intellectual and cultural contexts, and examine the traffic between literary writing and broader (popular?) print culture.

LDCL5042A

20

SHAKESPEARE

The aim of this lecture-seminar module is to help you become a better reader of Shakespearean drama. He was writing between about 1590 and about 1610; obviously his plays speak to us over a great cultural distance, and we can find fresh ways of reading them by exploring the theatrical, generic and historical frameworks in which they were written and staged. The lectures, then, will introduce a range of contexts, and the seminars will seek to turn them to account in the reading of the dramatic texts themselves.

LDCL5040B

20

Option C Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

ANY HUM MODULE AT LEVEL 5 (PRE-REQUISITES PERMITTING).

Name Code Credits

Option A Study (30 credits)

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

This module aims to introduce students to the fascinatingly wide and diverse area of American autobiography. It takes a broadly chronological structure in order to introduce key narratives and writers in the history of American autobiography, and will also enable students to engage with important theoretical debates influencing how we might understand autobiography - debates which can perhaps best be described as attempting to determine what is at stake in writing, reading and defining the autobiographical 'I'. Questions to be explored will include: What do we mean by autobiography? Why is it so difficult to define autobiography? What is 'American' about autobiography?

AMSL6007A

30

AMERICAN GOTHIC

American fiction began in the period of the European Gothic novel, which thus marked the American tradition from the first. In this seminar module we will establish the meaning of gothic conventions and consider their persisting effects in American fiction.

AMSL6024B

30

CALIFORNIA DREAMING: NOVELS OF THE GOLDEN STATE

This module looks at the ways in which California has represented itself, or been represented, in fiction. Beginning with the 'first' published Californian novel of 1854, The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta, the Celebrated California Bandit, we will trace the development of the Californian novel into the early twenty-first century. One particular interest is the ways in which Californian novels engage with, dissect, and critique notions of California as a 'dream' or ideal/idyll; and we will explore how novelists address crucial, and often contentious, historical moments in Californian history. Topics include settlement and 'removal'; migration and immigration; corporate interests and 'big business'; Los Angleles as the City of Dreams; and 'global' California. Writers will include some or all of the following: Mary Austin, T C Boyle, Joan Didion, Chester Himes, Frank Norris, Kem Nunn; John Rollin Ridge, Upton Sinclair, John Steinbeck, Helena Maria Viramontes, Nathaniel West, and Karen Tei Yamashita.

AMSL6044A

30

IMAGINING THE PACIFIC

This module considers the ways in which American literature has engaged with the opening up of Pacific space from the early nineteenth century to the present. From Melville's adventures on whaling vessels throughout the Pacific, to Pearl Harbour and anxieties about Japanese presence in and beyond the borders of the United States, to writing by contemporary Asian-American authors whose work evinces influences from China, Korea and India, the texts on this course chart the ways in which the Pacific Ocean and its peoples have contributed to, created, and contested American national narratives. The module will develop students' insights into issues of U.S. national history and cultural geography, and deepen their engagement with current theories of nationalism and transnationalism either in preparation for, or as a frame for reflection on, their studies abroad.

AMSL6022A

30

TALES OF THE JAZZ AGE

This module examines American prose of the 1920s in the context of the Jazz Age. American literature of the 20s is often conflated with modernism, or the expatriate experience, or the Harlem Renaissance; this module will consider 1920s writing in the context of the market and the rise of professional authorship, anxieties about imitation and the middlebrow and conformism, and the pressures of commercial success on fiction. It will draw on reception studies and the influence of publication formats (mass-market magazines, serial publication, the burgeoning market for film adaptations). Texts will be drawn from a mix of "high" and "low." After considering the pressures of commercialism on the publication of The Waste Land, texts could include the short stories of Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise, The Sun Also Rises, The Great Gatsby, Babbitt, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Winesburg, Ohio, Glimpses of the Moon, and Manhattan Transfer. Students will also be expected to research journalism of the day, such as The New Yorker and the New York Times, which have accessible online archives.

AMSL6020A

30

THE LITERARY 1960s

When thinking of the sixties, literature, in general, is not what immediately springs to mind - pushed, as it is, to the background of music and the counterculture. Yet the decade brought about many profound changes in the paradigms of literature. Amongst such changes was the proliferation of metafiction as a narrative response to both the 'exhaustion' of literature in the light of the period's dramatic events, and to the new literary and philosophical developments in critical theory (poststructuralism). There was also the emergence of two 'new' genres: new journalism, and the non-fiction novel. This module is an examination of literary responses to the many changes and challenges brought about in this decade. It will discuss whether literature simply recoiled into solipsistic abstraction or whether it was a motivating force in the general struggle to conceptualize a 'new' or countercultural American consciousness.

AMSL6015A

30

THE POETICS OF PLACE: POST 1945 AMERICAN POETRY AND ENVIRONMENT

The American poet Charles Olson famously declared: 'I take SPACE to be the central fact to man born in America, from Folsom cave to now. I spell it large because it comes large here. Large, and without mercy.' This module explores how a range of linguistically innovative American poets, from 1945 to the present, have engaged this question of space and environment in their writings. There will be a particular focus on how scientific literature, natural history writing, field guides, and eco-criticism have contributed to poets' theories of poetry and poetics as well as an emphasis on the role environmental notions of place and space play in forming and critiquing ideas of American identity.

AMSL6016B

30

Option B Study (30 credits)

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CHARLES DICKENS: BEYOND REALITY

Charles Dickens has been described, and cherished, as one fo the great chroniclers of the panorama of mid-Victorian society. At the same time, much modern criticism has rightly emphasised what a strange and innovative writer he is, less a documentary social realist than an early practitioner of what might now be called 'magical realism',. This module will examine works from across Dickens's writing career, in a variety of different modes - fiction, journalism, drama, and public speaking - reading them not only in the context of Dickens's times, but also in the context of how other writers in those times dealt with comparable questions. As a result, students will be able to develop their larger interests in the relationships between social reality and its literary representations.

LDCL6089B

30

CHAUCER

This module explores Chaucer's major writings in their historical, cultural and literary contexts. The module will introduce Chaucer's writing in a range of genres and will examine his works' representation and exploration of society, identity, chivalry, politics, religion and gender, and will also consider the medieval reception of Chaucer's writing. Previous experience of medieval literature will be useful but is not required.

LDCL6053A

30

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

This module offers students the chance to learn about children's literature and its development. It starts with the history of children's literature, looking at its use as a pedagogical tool, moving through Aesop's fables, fairy tales, Mother Goose, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and examining other authors such as A.A. Milne, Dr. Seuss, Roald Dahl, Sherman Alexie and Nancy Garden, amongst others. The course looks at issues of genre and content as well as historical context. Theoretical readings on children's literature are also closely engaged with. By studying the development of children's literature, this module also analyses the development of the concept of childhood in Western society.

LDCL6038A

30

CULTURES OF SUBURBIA

The history of twentieth-century literature is often told from the perspective of the metropolitan avant-garde. Modernist writers and intellectuals by turns celebrated or abominated the modern metropolis, but they tended to agree that the urban and the modern were inextricably linked. They were also often united by a hatred of suburbia, which they associated with the rise of a pooterish middle class and in turn with an irredeemably philistine, socially conservative middlebrow culture. Wyndham Lewis famously blasted 'the purgatory of Putney'. Yet in certain respects the twentieth century was the suburban century, as the cities continued their horizontal expansion and the separation of 'life' and 'work' that is the suburban response to industrialism became widespread. The growth of suburbia from the late nineteenth century to the present day has provoked a fascinating variety of cultural responses, including, but not limited to, hostile denunciations. Writers, artists and filmmakers found much opportunity for comedy in suburban habits, values and aspirations. They considered the emergence of the suburban housewife and the implications for this for women and for feminism. They debated the architecture and planning of the suburbs, notably through engagements with the Garden City and Garden Suburb movements. They speculated about the political implications of the growth of a literature, home-owning suburban middle class. They depicted the effects of mass immigration on suburbia and the development of suburban multiculture. They pointed to the uncanny and even the surreal aspects of suburban life. This module explores the literature and cultural geography of the English suburbs, and in so doing it suggests an alternative history of modernity, told not from the centre but from the periphery. Writers covered might include: George and Weedon Grossmith, Arthur Machen, William Morris, C.F.G Masterman, Ebenezer Howard, H. G. Wells, G.K. Chesterton, John Galsworth, Dorothy Richardson, George Orwell, Stevie Smith, John Betjeman, Elizabeth Bowen, Doris Lessing, Hanif Kureshi, J. G Ballard, Jonathan Meades and Julian Barnes.

LDCL6095A

30

DRAMA AND LITERATURE: THE QUESTION OF GENRE

LDCL6017B

30

EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA

This module focuses on the medieval and early sixteenth century period, exploring conceptions and deployments of drama. Comparative work of different forms of drama, the drama and other artistic media, and the drama and social attitudes will be encouraged. You will explore whether drama successfully produces civic unity; how audiences are addressed and constructed; the theatricality of how the Biblical past is imagined, the significance of staging, place, and gesture; the social and political functions of drama, the representation of women; and protests against the drama from various quarters. Our period ends just as the suburban professional theatre was establishing itself in London in a form that was fundamentally influenced by these much earlier dramatic activities. We shall explore how spectacle and ceremony enabled pre-Reformation communities to celebrate their existence and assert an often contested or otherwise problematic sense of their cultural identity.

LDCL6065A

30

FIN DE SIECLE: FANTASIES OF DECADENCE AND DEGENERATION

Max Nordau's 1892 Degeneration, attacking fin de siecle decadence, draws together fears of cultural decline and corrupting artistic practice through pseudo-Darwinian thinking about devolution. Yet Nordau's urgent and apocalyptic claims about 'diseased' art draw an ambivalent response from contemporary writers, such as those associated with the aestheticism and decadence of The Yellow Book. It is within the fantastic, however, that Nordau is most directly confronted and social norms most explicitly deformed by art. Wilde's swift move from pedestal to pederast may remove a key figure, but texts such as The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Novel of the White Powder; Dracula; Wells' science fiction dystopias and, more recently, Moore and Campbell's From Hell, rehearse, react to, or reflect upon such concerns. These writings share a central tension: are the effects of decadence and degeneration offering pessimistic prophesy or optimistic alternatives? This module would complement nineteenth-century options and offer a perspective on the Modernist module. For students also taking the Gothic it would be related, although usefully focusing on the closing years of the nineteenth century with a different emphasis.

LDCL6028B

30

HENRY JAMES: QUESTIONS OF ART, LIFE AND THEORY

In this module students engage with the range of Henry James's writing and also the reproduction of his life and work in contemporary culture. This module aims not simply to add to understanding of James but also to explore the issues that his work raises in relation to the art and history of fiction, philosophy and cultural reproduction. It is suitable not only for literature students who want to study this writer who spans realism and modernism, and short stories, literary criticism and fiction, but also for creative writing students and literature and philosophy students. The final assignment will have a creative writing option that comprises a piece of creative writing with a critical reflection. It can be taken by students who have studied modules in nineteenth-century writing or modernism.

LDCL6075B

30

IMAGINING THE PAST IN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE

This module will examine topics in Renaissance literature. These topics may include but are not limited to: Elizabethan and Jacobean drama; the development of the sonnet; courtliness; humanism. Further information on this module will be announced in due course. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6100B

30

LATIN AMERICAN NARRATIVES

While the term 'narrative' in Spanish is often used to denote fiction it is not restrictive to the genre. The aim of this module is to explore the core of storytelling that underpins Latin American literature and which surfaces in various forms of writing from the 'microrelato' to the short story, the prose poem as well as the 'rewriting' exercise/critical appraisal, such as Alejandra Pizarnik's the Bloody Countess. A further aspect of this module is to attempt to disentangle the web of literary influences woven into some of these Latin American narratives as well as to trace the itinerary of these influential threads as they travelled from the South of the American continent to other literatures. As the editors of Issue 113 of Granta have stated "who would hve imagined fifteen years ago that writings of the outcast Chilean Roberto Bolano who washed ashore in Barcelona via Mexico, would exercise so wide an influence on writers in Spain, Latin America and across the world:" And yet, Bolano's literary output is unthinkable without Borges, just as the Colombian Juan gabriel Vasquez' Secret History of Costaguana is inconceivable without Conrad's Nostromo. Readings will include works by Borges, Cortazar, Bolano, Juan Gabriel Vasquez, Clarice Lispector, Alejandra Pizarnik, amongst others. The module would elaborate upon the level one Writing Texts module and would complement World Literature: Reading Globally.

LDCL6093A

30

LITERATURE AND DECONSTRUCTION

In an interview with Derek Attridge, Jacques Derrida describes literature as 'this strange institution which allows one to say everything'. This module explores the writings of Derrida and related thinkers alongside a range of literary texts, including works by Keats, Shakespeare and Joyce. Through a combination of lectures and seminars, we will think about the strangenesses of literature, look at the ways in which it is an 'institution' and consider the kinds of freedom - of speech, writing and thinking - it permits. Our aim throughout will be to establish the possibilities for literary criticism opened up by deconstruction. The module is open to everyone, but may be of particular interest to those who studied critical theory in the second year.

LDCL6048A

30

LITERATURE AND HUMAN RIGHTS

Reading key philosophical, political, legal and literary texts, this module will track the emergence of human rights as a cultural idea from their conception in the eighteenth century, through to the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and beyond in the period after World War Two. The module will address the following questions: What type of human being was presupposed by the declarations of rights? How did the novel help form perceptions about rights and human sympathy? In what ways did the UDHR re-imagine concepts of human rights after the Holocaust? How were these changes reflected in new forms of post-war writing, such as post-colonial and late modernist writing? How can we think about the relation between rights and literature today? This module will suit students who have enjoyed the challenges of philosophy and literary theory. It should also appeal to those who are interested in thinking seriously about the relationship between literature and its 'real world' applications and significance.

LDCL6031B

30

LITERATURE AND OPERA

Sixteenth-century Italian literati created opera as the rebirth of Greek Tragedy. From its basic form as word-plus-music to its repeated reforms that have put now text, now music, now drama first,opera and literature have constantly complemented and competed with each other. This module explores the relationship between opera and various kinds of literature, including drama, prose, and poetry. We will ask "How can an orchestra narrate?" "How is an opera libretto like a movie script?" "Why do certain literary texts invite musical adaptation more than others?" and "What is the 'best' literary analogy for opera: drama, poetry, or the novel?" Students will also compare various operas with their literary sources in order to better understand how different media represent race, gender, and nationality. Composers will include Brittten, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Rossini, and Weill. Authors will include Shakespeare, Wilde, Brecht, James, Scott, Joyce and Aeschylus.

LDCL6101B

30

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module explores the relations between literature and philosophy and differing understandings of the self, love and ethics through close reading of philosophical and literary texts. It is organised chronologically and moves from the classical writing of Plato to modern literature. The module designed for final year students who are studying Literature and Philosophy. It is also open only to students in Literature who have taken modules in Philosophy in years one and two; or by special concession at the discretion of the module organiser to other students who have substantial experience in both Honours level Literature and Honours level Philosophy.

LDCL6025A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (AUT)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period from 1789 to the present day (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6018A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (SPR)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period from 1789 to the present day (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6019B

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: PRE-1789 (AUT)

This module is an advanced-level unit, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period up to 1830 (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6061A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: PRE-1789 (SPR)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period up to 1830 (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6062B

30

LITERATURE, 1640-1740

This module will examine topics in the literature of the period 1640-1740. These topics may include but are not limited to: the poetry of the English civil war; print culture; the emergence and development of the novel; epic. Further information on this module will be announced in due course.

LDCL6083A

30

LYRIC

The module will incorporate a historical survey of Western lyric, looking at its inception in the poetry of Pindar and Sappho, and the Aristotelian division of poetic arts in lyric, dramatic and epic. It will cover lyrics from Provencal troubadour poets through the Italian and English renaissance to Romantic lyric. Finally, it will cover the fate of lyric in the present day, from 'conceptual writing' and 'post-humanism' which offer a thoroughgoing rejection of lyric, to the embrace of lyric in contemporary young poets. The module will start by considering the question: 'What is lyric'? The purpose is not to establish a transhistorical concept of lyric as genre or mode, but rather to see how different thinkers at different times have approached it. This is a particularly timely question for literary criticism and poetics. We will isolate certain tropes, ethics, and focal points that are taken to be characteristic of lyric, whilst at the same time probing the historicity of lyric as a concept, especially regarding the ideology of the lyric 'I' that is associated with romanticism. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6087A

30

MADNESS, MEDICINE, SCIENCE AND WOMEN'S WRITING IN THE REGENCY

This module will study late 18th-century and early 19th-century writings in the context of scientific and medical innovation. We consider whether it may be appropriate to view the work of novelists such as Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen and Mary Shelley as a response to, and even a protest against these newly (or, more correctly, nearly) professionalised, male-dominated worlds. These women writers often concern themselves with the 'consumers' as well as the providers of the services offered by these professions; this module considers why that might be and how this kind of contextualisation might impact upon our readings of their work.

LDCL6042A

30

MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN LITERATURE

This module will examine topics in the literature of the medieval and early modern periods. These topics may include but are not limited to: the genre of reomance; religious devotion; quest narrative; dream poetry; myth and mythography. Further information on this module will be announced in due course. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6104B

30

MEDIEVAL ARTHURIAN TRADITIONS

From Welsh folklore to Monty Python, the tales of Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table have excited and intrigued generations. Why? To answer this question we explore the development of the legend from its twelfth-century Celtic roots through to a number of twentieth-century film adaptations. How the legend has been translated across form, genres, cultures and ages will be studied, including examples from Middle English Arthurian Texts, translations of the Welsh Mabinogion, of Monmouth's Latin chronicle and French romance texts. This module will enable students familiar with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to enhance their awareness of the wider Arthurian traditions within which this text belongs, but is also suitable for students who are encountering medieval literature for the first time.

LDCL6066B

30

MEDIEVAL MONSTROSITIES

Giants, dragons and half-human hybrids are just some of the fantastical creatures that populate Middle English literature. Too readily dismissed by modern readers as mere whimsy, or else the product of credulous minds, instead this module takes monsters seriously as revealing facets of a sophisticaled myth-making society. We will consider monsters in a range of genres including Arthurian Romance, saints' legends, travel writing and visual imagery, as well as their reception by medieval and modern readers and critics. We will also explore 'human monsters' (women, pagans, Jews) rendered 'other' due to their perceived divergence from societal and religious norms. Previous experience of Middle English literature will be an advantage but is not required. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6081B

30

NERVOUS NARRATIVES

'We all say it's nerves, and none of us knows what it means', says a character in Wilkie Collins' 1860 novel, The Woman in White. Our aim is to think about how a discourse of the 'nerves' - the 'nervous temperament' and nervous illness - can be both so pervasive culturally and so slippery in its meaning. This interdisciplinary module takes you from the late 17th century, when the concept of 'neurologie' first emerged, to the 21st century, linking literary, medical and philosophical writing to explore the representation of the 'nerves'. The historical range of the module is not meant to imply a transhistorical understanding of nervous illness or temperament, but rather will enable us to analyse the historically specific nature of the nervous body and what it is made to mean, culturally, within different contexts. In this way, we will be working with issues as diverse as religious 'enthusiasm', hysteria and hypochondria, sensibility, sensation, fear of modernity, manliness and effeminacy, shell-shock, PTSD and the concepts of the healthy or fragile body of the nation. Spanning time and genre, the literary texts studied will take us from the earliest, Jonathan Swift's satire, A Tale of a Tub (1704) up to the contemporary: Siri Hustvedt's novel, What I Loved (2003) and her analytical memoir, The Shaking Woman, Or, A History of My Nerves (2010).

LDCL6046A

30

POETRY AFTER MODERNISM

This module will survey a wide range of post-war British poetry actively engaged with the Modernist tradition of Eliot, Pound and others. Reading critical texts alongside poems, it will introduce students to lesser-known writers, such as the Welsh poet Lynette Roberts and the Scottish poet W.S. Graham, as well as considering well-known English poets such as Philip Larkin and Ted Hughes from a Modernist perspective. Recognising the influence of contemporary American verse on experimental poets such as J.H. Prynne and Paul Muldoon will also be an important theme. A chronological syllabus will take students from 1945 up to the present day, and there will be a chance to write creatively as well as critically as part of the assessment. Students wishing to take this module must have taken LDCE2Z15 Modernism.

LDCL6078B

30

POETRY IN DARK TIMES: HOLDERLIN, RILKE, CELAN

Writing in (and against) the Romantic, Modernist and post-Holocaust eras respectively, these three poets test language (in this case German) to the very limits of its expressive possibilities, and thus present an equivalent challenge to some of the most gifted poet-translators of our day. This seminar module offers an opportunity, by means of close reading, to explore in detail selected works, to consider the position of the poet and the lyric voice in times of crisis and transition, and to locate them within the wider Western poetic tradition. All texts studied are readily available in a range of English translations.

LDCL6023A

30

QUEER LITERATURE AND THEORY

This module offers students the chance to learn about LGBTQ literature and its development in English-speaking countries, as well as approaches to queer theory. This means analysing sexuality and gender and the representation of such identities in literature. Authors studied may include Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, Alison Bechdel, Gore Vidal, and Sarah Waters, as well as children's books and young adult novels by Alex Sanchez, Nancy Garden, Ellen Wittlinger, and Marcus Ewert. Authors of theoretical texts looked at may include Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Leo Bersani, and Teresa de Lauretis. Understanding how LGBTQ characters are featured in literature also helps us to see how queer people are understood in a given society in general. This course also aims to look at a variety of genres in order to see how these different text types work and how they approach similar material in different ways.

LDCL6033B

30

REGENCY WOMEN WRITERS

This module situates the work of various women writers of the Regency period in literary and historical contexts. The main texts under discussion are by Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Hays, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, and Maria Edgeworth. The unit considers themes which - although not exclusive to women's writing at this time - occur strikingly frequently in the work of Regency women. These themes include sanity, madness and ideas about the mind, and literary devices such as the love-mad woman. Health, ill-health and the development of medicine are central to these fictions and the course, and we also discuss the figure of the doctor, the quack and the 'psychiatrist' in these texts. We look at writings by Regency women travellers whose destinations ranged from Italy to Bath, Sweden and Revolutionary France.

LDCL6044B

30

ROMANTIC ORIENTALISM, 1780-1830

The fascination with the "East" and the "Exotic" (the "Oriental Renaissance") was an important element of the British Romantic period. This module will explore the material history of British involvement in the 'East' in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; how that 'East' was constructed and represented for a western metropolitan audience; and explore the cultural productions of that involvement in poetry, fictional, prose and visual art. Texts discussed will include writing by well-known Romantic writers, such as S. T. Coleridge, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley and Thomas de Quincey, as well as those by William Beckford, Sir William Jones, Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan). It will explore the influence of Arabian Nights on Gothic and Romantic period writing. Areas discussed will include India, Persia, the Levant, and China. The module will discuss such writings in the light of contemporary postcolonial theories of Orientalism including criticism by Edward Said, Gayatori Spivak, Abdul JanMohammed and others. This module will concentrate in particular on the representation of the Indian people, places and cultures of the Indian sub continent.

LDCL6091A

30

SATIRE

'Satire is problematic, open ended, essayistic, ambiguous in relation to history, uncertain in its political effects, resistant to final closure, more inclined to ask questions than provide answers, ambivalent about the pleasures it offers' (Dustin Griffin).The aim of this module is to investigate the problematic territory of satire. Using examples from modern and contemporary fiction and journalism alongside early modern and classical satire, we will formulate a critical and conceptual map, which will in turn allow us to discuss some of the problems of satire (those of genre, of gender, of politics, of morality, of history), and to explore some of the paradoxes of its strategies and functions (freedom versus limits; subversion versus conformity; transformation versus stasis).Writers under discussion will include Juvenal, Horace, Swift and Pope; John Dryden, Eliza Haywood, Delarivier Manley, Evelyn Waugh, Stella Gibbons, and Jonathan Coe. This module offers the opportunity for one or more of the assessments to be a creative writing piece. This module counts towards the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6085B

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love.

LDCL6056B

30

THE CONDITION OF ENGLAND NOVEL 1818-2000

This module will examine the classic nineteenth-century 'Condition of 'England' novel alongside mid-to-late twentieth-century representations of England (and myths of national identity). Attention will be given to post-colonial writing as a significant part of the question: What is it to be English (or British)?

LDCL6072A

30

THE CONTESTED PAST: LITERATURE AND THE POLITICS OF MEMORY

How do we negotiate the darker aspects of our past, particularly when individuals' experiences clash with official history? This module explores the public and private practices of remembering and forgetting in the aftermath of civil war, totalitarianism, colonialism or otherwise repressive rule. In particular, we will examine the writer's role as collaborator , witness, archivist or dissident: how does the writer facIlitate access to, and debate about, contentious, painful or obfuscated history? Our approach to the politics of commemoration is interdisciplinary and draws on ideas from philosophy, historiography, memory and cultural studies as well as heritage and museum studies. The primary material encompasses a range of fictional, non-fictional and visual material from a wide range of genres; most of it postwar and relatively recent. Since this is a global issue you will enounter writers from formerly colonised nations in Africa, from Central and Eastern Europe, South America, and the Near and Asia.

LDCL6097A

30

THE GOTHIC

This module seeks to cover some 'canonical' texts of the Gothic Novel (1764-1820) in Walpole, Radcliffe, Mary Shelley, and to consider some later developments of the gothic mode in later 19th and 20th centuries: Poe, Le Fanu, Stevenson, MR James, Elizabeth Bowen, David Storey and Angela Carter. The course also seeks to introduce students to some of the theoretical and historical arguments around the contested nature of the term 'gothic', the Uncanny, the subversiveness or otherwise of this kind of writing, and its relation to the novel genre.

LDCL6024A

30

THE LITERATURE OF WORLD WAR ONE

The module will examine representations of World War One. As a Level 3 module, the focus will be inter-disciplinary. Literary materials will be contextualised using historical and other sources. Use will also be made of memoirs, letters, diaries, and photographs. Students will be encouraged to conduct research using the internet and other facilities.

LDCL6073B

30

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS: NONSENSE AND MODERN WRITING

It's widely recognised that modernist literature is characterised by a revolution of the word. Less widely recognised, and little explored, is the relationship between modernist linguistic experimentalism and literary nonsense, as practised by Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, and others. This course will begin with these well-known nonsense writers and explore their roots in seventeenth and eighteenth-century nonsense, before going on to examine some of the adventures in language of major modernist and postmodernist writers. Modernist and postmodernist authors studied are likely to include the Joyce of Finnegans Wake, early Auden, Wallace Stevens, Nabokov, and John Ashbery. This is not a course on children's literature, but on some very challenging modern literature, mostly poetry. It should appeal to those who take a childish pleasure in wordplay and fantasy. You will need to enjoy uncertainty and have good close-reading skills. To do this module you must have studied either Modernism or Critical Theory, unless you obtain a waiver from the lecturer.

LDCL6015A

30

TRAUMATURGIES: READING AND WRITING TRAUMA ACROSS CONTEXTS

Trauma haunts the writing of the twentieth century. Slavery, war, patriarchy, terrorism, genocide, colonialism, modernity, technology and post-modernity: these legacies demand to be written and read, and engender a writing singular to their traumas. Yet the writing of these wounds, and the critical work that reads it, raises fundamental questions about whether trauma can ever be represented or understood. Spreading beyond their contexts, these questions effect their own traumas, cracking open our assumptions about what it is possible to read, to write, and indeed to think. Working roughly from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, this module reads a selection of theoretical, literary and critical texts that aim to write and read trauma across cultural, historical, personal and public contexts.

LDCL6050A

30

ULYSSES

This module will provide students with the opportunity to read one of the most famous, yet notoriously unread, novels of the twentieth century. The module has a number of aims. First, it will give students the time and opportunity to try to read and understand James Joyce's Ulysses. Secondly, the module will introduce students to some of the formal innovations typical of modernist writing through the close analysis of techniques such as interior monologue and mythic analogy. Thirdly, it will allow students to read a wide range of responses to Ulysses, both among Joyce's contemporaries, and in the history of twentieth century criticism. Fourthly, the module will situate the text historically, with a particular focus on the way that the text's obscenity affected its reception and circulation in the 1920s and 1930s.

LDCL6076B

30

VIRGIL'S CLASSIC EPIC

This module will explore the centrality of Virgil's Aeneid to Medieval and Renaissance culture. It will examine developing attitudes to the Classical literary legacy and accommodation and reinvention of Virgil's epic poem within new religious, political and literary contexts. The course will begin with exploration of Virgil's poem on its own terms before turning to re-workings of the 'Aeneid' by Augustine, Dante, Chaucer, Douglas and Marlowe, the Renaissance invention of a 13th Book to 'complete' Virgil's poem, and the recasting of classical epic within the very different conventions of medieval and Renaissance romance. Previous experience of classical or medieval literature is not required.

LDCL6054B

30

WORDS AND MUSIC

'Writing about music is like dancing about architecture'; or so the saying goes. On the contrary, words and music are intimately related, not only in those forms in which they meet head on - opera and song, most obviously - but also more fundamentally. It is in words that we make sense of what we hear, and via words that we pass on that sense, both of specific musical experiences and of music per se. And it is in words that we convey our sense of the sheer seductiveness of music, together with our ongoing frustration at its seeming elusiveness. Literary texts in particular offer evidence of a rich variety of responses to music, ranging from the deferential and star struck to the sceptical and resolutely tone deaf. This module will offer an opportunity to explore specific aspects of the relationship of words and music. To begin, the myth of Orpheus, perhaps the most influential story of the power of music, a story to which literature and music, both apart and together, have returned many times. To follow, we'll look at three specific areas of musico-literary interaction: song, the most potent alliance of words and music, an alliance which has given rise to a rich critical literature; specific literary texts in which music forms the object of attention (Beckett, Proust and Kafka, for example); and selected critical-theoretical texts that have sought to understand aspects of the relationship of words and music. Students will be encouraged to develop their own interests, especially as regards particular examples of, for example, poetry and song. Creative responses to the material will be encouraged and creative writing submissions allowed.

LDCL6106A

30

WRITING LIFE: BIOGRAPHY AND CREATIVE NON-FICTION

How do writers attempt to capture 'life' in all its various forms? What, if any, are the different requirements in writing the life of a famous (or not so famous) person and that of a city or landscape? What about the 'life' of travel or food and how do you approach writing about the natural world? These are just some of the questions that this module sets out to address. We will be reading a wide variety of texts, from the 'traditional' biography to some of the more experimental examples of creative non-fiction. From Samuel Johnson to essays in The New Yorker, all human (and non-human) life will be there! Students may choose between writing their own piece of Biography or creative Non-Fiction as their final project or submitting a critical essay.

LDCL6026B

30

Option C Study (60 credits)

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

This module aims to introduce students to the fascinatingly wide and diverse area of American autobiography. It takes a broadly chronological structure in order to introduce key narratives and writers in the history of American autobiography, and will also enable students to engage with important theoretical debates influencing how we might understand autobiography - debates which can perhaps best be described as attempting to determine what is at stake in writing, reading and defining the autobiographical 'I'. Questions to be explored will include: What do we mean by autobiography? Why is it so difficult to define autobiography? What is 'American' about autobiography?

AMSL6007A

30

AMERICAN GOTHIC

American fiction began in the period of the European Gothic novel, which thus marked the American tradition from the first. In this seminar module we will establish the meaning of gothic conventions and consider their persisting effects in American fiction.

AMSL6024B

30

AMERICAN PARADISE: LAND AND CULTURE IN THE USA

This module is about land. It is about the dream of the American wilderness, of bountiful nature in a land of plenty, and about earth turned to profit. It is about plants and botany - and the way in which the American people have responded to the natural environment around them. For scientists, explorers, artists and writers, that could mean a sense of wonder. In rural America, though, it often meant, more prosaically, viewing the land as a resource, to be exploited, by cultivation or mineral extraction and mining, perhaps. In the industrial city, it often meant creating protected enclaves - gardens, parks, national parks - which might offer a retreat from urban smokestacks. In the post-industrial age, it has very often meant returning to derelict land to plant crops or parks where factories once stood, to grow food and, possibly more importantly, to regrow communities. Above all, this module is about the many different ways in which Americans have defined their own sense of their nation and their own identities through reference to the natural world.

AMSS6046B

30

CALIFORNIA DREAMING: NOVELS OF THE GOLDEN STATE

This module looks at the ways in which California has represented itself, or been represented, in fiction. Beginning with the 'first' published Californian novel of 1854, The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta, the Celebrated California Bandit, we will trace the development of the Californian novel into the early twenty-first century. One particular interest is the ways in which Californian novels engage with, dissect, and critique notions of California as a 'dream' or ideal/idyll; and we will explore how novelists address crucial, and often contentious, historical moments in Californian history. Topics include settlement and 'removal'; migration and immigration; corporate interests and 'big business'; Los Angleles as the City of Dreams; and 'global' California. Writers will include some or all of the following: Mary Austin, T C Boyle, Joan Didion, Chester Himes, Frank Norris, Kem Nunn; John Rollin Ridge, Upton Sinclair, John Steinbeck, Helena Maria Viramontes, Nathaniel West, and Karen Tei Yamashita.

AMSL6044A

30

CHARLES DICKENS: BEYOND REALITY

Charles Dickens has been described, and cherished, as one fo the great chroniclers of the panorama of mid-Victorian society. At the same time, much modern criticism has rightly emphasised what a strange and innovative writer he is, less a documentary social realist than an early practitioner of what might now be called 'magical realism',. This module will examine works from across Dickens's writing career, in a variety of different modes - fiction, journalism, drama, and public speaking - reading them not only in the context of Dickens's times, but also in the context of how other writers in those times dealt with comparable questions. As a result, students will be able to develop their larger interests in the relationships between social reality and its literary representations.

LDCL6089B

30

CHAUCER

This module explores Chaucer's major writings in their historical, cultural and literary contexts. The module will introduce Chaucer's writing in a range of genres and will examine his works' representation and exploration of society, identity, chivalry, politics, religion and gender, and will also consider the medieval reception of Chaucer's writing. Previous experience of medieval literature will be useful but is not required.

LDCL6053A

30

CULTURES OF SUBURBIA

The history of twentieth-century literature is often told from the perspective of the metropolitan avant-garde. Modernist writers and intellectuals by turns celebrated or abominated the modern metropolis, but they tended to agree that the urban and the modern were inextricably linked. They were also often united by a hatred of suburbia, which they associated with the rise of a pooterish middle class and in turn with an irredeemably philistine, socially conservative middlebrow culture. Wyndham Lewis famously blasted 'the purgatory of Putney'. Yet in certain respects the twentieth century was the suburban century, as the cities continued their horizontal expansion and the separation of 'life' and 'work' that is the suburban response to industrialism became widespread. The growth of suburbia from the late nineteenth century to the present day has provoked a fascinating variety of cultural responses, including, but not limited to, hostile denunciations. Writers, artists and filmmakers found much opportunity for comedy in suburban habits, values and aspirations. They considered the emergence of the suburban housewife and the implications for this for women and for feminism. They debated the architecture and planning of the suburbs, notably through engagements with the Garden City and Garden Suburb movements. They speculated about the political implications of the growth of a literature, home-owning suburban middle class. They depicted the effects of mass immigration on suburbia and the development of suburban multiculture. They pointed to the uncanny and even the surreal aspects of suburban life. This module explores the literature and cultural geography of the English suburbs, and in so doing it suggests an alternative history of modernity, told not from the centre but from the periphery. Writers covered might include: George and Weedon Grossmith, Arthur Machen, William Morris, C.F.G Masterman, Ebenezer Howard, H. G. Wells, G.K. Chesterton, John Galsworth, Dorothy Richardson, George Orwell, Stevie Smith, John Betjeman, Elizabeth Bowen, Doris Lessing, Hanif Kureshi, J. G Ballard, Jonathan Meades and Julian Barnes.

LDCL6095A

30

DRAMA AND LITERATURE: THE QUESTION OF GENRE

LDCL6017B

30

FIN DE SIECLE: FANTASIES OF DECADENCE AND DEGENERATION

Max Nordau's 1892 Degeneration, attacking fin de siecle decadence, draws together fears of cultural decline and corrupting artistic practice through pseudo-Darwinian thinking about devolution. Yet Nordau's urgent and apocalyptic claims about 'diseased' art draw an ambivalent response from contemporary writers, such as those associated with the aestheticism and decadence of The Yellow Book. It is within the fantastic, however, that Nordau is most directly confronted and social norms most explicitly deformed by art. Wilde's swift move from pedestal to pederast may remove a key figure, but texts such as The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Novel of the White Powder; Dracula; Wells' science fiction dystopias and, more recently, Moore and Campbell's From Hell, rehearse, react to, or reflect upon such concerns. These writings share a central tension: are the effects of decadence and degeneration offering pessimistic prophesy or optimistic alternatives? This module would complement nineteenth-century options and offer a perspective on the Modernist module. For students also taking the Gothic it would be related, although usefully focusing on the closing years of the nineteenth century with a different emphasis.

LDCL6028B

30

IMAGINING THE PACIFIC

This module considers the ways in which American literature has represented the opening up of Pacific space from the early nineteenth century to the present. From Melville's adventures on whaling vessels throughout the Pacific, to Pearl Harbour and anxieties about Japanese presence in and beyond the borders of the United States, to writing by contemporary Asian-American and Pacific authors, the texts on this course chart the ways in which the Pacific Ocean and its peoples have contributed to, created, and contested American national narratives. The module will develop students' insights into issues of U.S. national history and cultural geography, and deepen their engagement with current theories of nationalism and transnationalism as a frame for reflection on their studies abroad. At its heart a course in American literature, students will encounter an array of different genres of writing, including novels, travel narratives, poetry, short stories, and memoirs.

AMSL6042B

30

IMAGINING THE PACIFIC

This module considers the ways in which American literature has engaged with the opening up of Pacific space from the early nineteenth century to the present. From Melville's adventures on whaling vessels throughout the Pacific, to Pearl Harbour and anxieties about Japanese presence in and beyond the borders of the United States, to writing by contemporary Asian-American authors whose work evinces influences from China, Korea and India, the texts on this course chart the ways in which the Pacific Ocean and its peoples have contributed to, created, and contested American national narratives. The module will develop students' insights into issues of U.S. national history and cultural geography, and deepen their engagement with current theories of nationalism and transnationalism either in preparation for, or as a frame for reflection on, their studies abroad.

AMSL6022A

30

IMAGINING THE PAST IN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE

This module will examine topics in Renaissance literature. These topics may include but are not limited to: Elizabethan and Jacobean drama; the development of the sonnet; courtliness; humanism. Further information on this module will be announced in due course. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6100B

30

LATIN AMERICAN NARRATIVES

While the term 'narrative' in Spanish is often used to denote fiction it is not restrictive to the genre. The aim of this module is to explore the core of storytelling that underpins Latin American literature and which surfaces in various forms of writing from the 'microrelato' to the short story, the prose poem as well as the 'rewriting' exercise/critical appraisal, such as Alejandra Pizarnik's the Bloody Countess. A further aspect of this module is to attempt to disentangle the web of literary influences woven into some of these Latin American narratives as well as to trace the itinerary of these influential threads as they travelled from the South of the American continent to other literatures. As the editors of Issue 113 of Granta have stated "who would hve imagined fifteen years ago that writings of the outcast Chilean Roberto Bolano who washed ashore in Barcelona via Mexico, would exercise so wide an influence on writers in Spain, Latin America and across the world:" And yet, Bolano's literary output is unthinkable without Borges, just as the Colombian Juan gabriel Vasquez' Secret History of Costaguana is inconceivable without Conrad's Nostromo. Readings will include works by Borges, Cortazar, Bolano, Juan Gabriel Vasquez, Clarice Lispector, Alejandra Pizarnik, amongst others. The module would elaborate upon the level one Writing Texts module and would complement World Literature: Reading Globally.

LDCL6093A

30

LITERATURE AND DECONSTRUCTION

In an interview with Derek Attridge, Jacques Derrida describes literature as 'this strange institution which allows one to say everything'. This module explores the writings of Derrida and related thinkers alongside a range of literary texts, including works by Keats, Shakespeare and Joyce. Through a combination of lectures and seminars, we will think about the strangenesses of literature, look at the ways in which it is an 'institution' and consider the kinds of freedom - of speech, writing and thinking - it permits. Our aim throughout will be to establish the possibilities for literary criticism opened up by deconstruction. The module is open to everyone, but may be of particular interest to those who studied critical theory in the second year.

LDCL6048A

30

LITERATURE AND OPERA

Sixteenth-century Italian literati created opera as the rebirth of Greek Tragedy. From its basic form as word-plus-music to its repeated reforms that have put now text, now music, now drama first,opera and literature have constantly complemented and competed with each other. This module explores the relationship between opera and various kinds of literature, including drama, prose, and poetry. We will ask "How can an orchestra narrate?" "How is an opera libretto like a movie script?" "Why do certain literary texts invite musical adaptation more than others?" and "What is the 'best' literary analogy for opera: drama, poetry, or the novel?" Students will also compare various operas with their literary sources in order to better understand how different media represent race, gender, and nationality. Composers will include Brittten, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Rossini, and Weill. Authors will include Shakespeare, Wilde, Brecht, James, Scott, Joyce and Aeschylus.

LDCL6101B

30

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module explores the relations between literature and philosophy and differing understandings of the self, love and ethics through close reading of philosophical and literary texts. It is organised chronologically and moves from the classical writing of Plato to modern literature. The module designed for final year students who are studying Literature and Philosophy. It is also open only to students in Literature who have taken modules in Philosophy in years one and two; or by special concession at the discretion of the module organiser to other students who have substantial experience in both Honours level Literature and Honours level Philosophy.

LDCL6025A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (AUT)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period from 1789 to the present day (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6018A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (SPR)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period from 1789 to the present day (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6019B

30

LYRIC

The module will incorporate a historical survey of Western lyric, looking at its inception in the poetry of Pindar and Sappho, and the Aristotelian division of poetic arts in lyric, dramatic and epic. It will cover lyrics from Provencal troubadour poets through the Italian and English renaissance to Romantic lyric. Finally, it will cover the fate of lyric in the present day, from 'conceptual writing' and 'post-humanism' which offer a thoroughgoing rejection of lyric, to the embrace of lyric in contemporary young poets. The module will start by considering the question: 'What is lyric'? The purpose is not to establish a transhistorical concept of lyric as genre or mode, but rather to see how different thinkers at different times have approached it. This is a particularly timely question for literary criticism and poetics. We will isolate certain tropes, ethics, and focal points that are taken to be characteristic of lyric, whilst at the same time probing the historicity of lyric as a concept, especially regarding the ideology of the lyric 'I' that is associated with romanticism. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6087A

30

MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN LITERATURE

This module will examine topics in the literature of the medieval and early modern periods. These topics may include but are not limited to: the genre of reomance; religious devotion; quest narrative; dream poetry; myth and mythography. Further information on this module will be announced in due course. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6104B

30

NATIVE AMERICAN WRITING AND FILM

This module considers Native American writing and film as sites of cultural and political resistance, analysing the ways in which a diverse range of Native authors, screenwriters and directors within the United States respond to contemporary tribal socio-economic and political conditions. Taking popular ideas of 'the Indian', this module considers the ways in which stereotypes and audience expectations are subverted and challenged. Topics include race and racism, indigeneity, identity, culture, gender, genre, land and notions of 'home', community, dialogue, postcolonial theory in its application to those who remain colonised, and political issues such as human rights and environmental racism.

AMSS6027B

30

NERVOUS NARRATIVES

'We all say it's nerves, and none of us knows what it means', says a character in Wilkie Collins' 1860 novel, The Woman in White. Our aim is to think about how a discourse of the 'nerves' - the 'nervous temperament' and nervous illness - can be both so pervasive culturally and so slippery in its meaning. This interdisciplinary module takes you from the late 17th century, when the concept of 'neurologie' first emerged, to the 21st century, linking literary, medical and philosophical writing to explore the representation of the 'nerves'. The historical range of the module is not meant to imply a transhistorical understanding of nervous illness or temperament, but rather will enable us to analyse the historically specific nature of the nervous body and what it is made to mean, culturally, within different contexts. In this way, we will be working with issues as diverse as religious 'enthusiasm', hysteria and hypochondria, sensibility, sensation, fear of modernity, manliness and effeminacy, shell-shock, PTSD and the concepts of the healthy or fragile body of the nation. Spanning time and genre, the literary texts studied will take us from the earliest, Jonathan Swift's satire, A Tale of a Tub (1704) up to the contemporary: Siri Hustvedt's novel, What I Loved (2003) and her analytical memoir, The Shaking Woman, Or, A History of My Nerves (2010).

LDCL6046A

30

POETRY IN DARK TIMES: HOLDERLIN, RILKE, CELAN

Writing in (and against) the Romantic, Modernist and post-Holocaust eras respectively, these three poets test language (in this case German) to the very limits of its expressive possibilities, and thus present an equivalent challenge to some of the most gifted poet-translators of our day. This seminar module offers an opportunity, by means of close reading, to explore in detail selected works, to consider the position of the poet and the lyric voice in times of crisis and transition, and to locate them within the wider Western poetic tradition. All texts studied are readily available in a range of English translations.

LDCL6023A

30

QUEER LITERATURE AND THEORY

This module offers students the chance to learn about LGBTQ literature and its development in English-speaking countries, as well as approaches to queer theory. This means analysing sexuality and gender and the representation of such identities in literature. Authors studied may include Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, Alison Bechdel, Gore Vidal, and Sarah Waters, as well as children's books and young adult novels by Alex Sanchez, Nancy Garden, Ellen Wittlinger, and Marcus Ewert. Authors of theoretical texts looked at may include Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Leo Bersani, and Teresa de Lauretis. Understanding how LGBTQ characters are featured in literature also helps us to see how queer people are understood in a given society in general. This course also aims to look at a variety of genres in order to see how these different text types work and how they approach similar material in different ways.

LDCL6033B

30

ROMANTIC ORIENTALISM, 1780-1830

The fascination with the "East" and the "Exotic" (the "Oriental Renaissance") was an important element of the British Romantic period. This module will explore the material history of British involvement in the 'East' in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; how that 'East' was constructed and represented for a western metropolitan audience; and explore the cultural productions of that involvement in poetry, fictional, prose and visual art. Texts discussed will include writing by well-known Romantic writers, such as S. T. Coleridge, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley and Thomas de Quincey, as well as those by William Beckford, Sir William Jones, Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan). It will explore the influence of Arabian Nights on Gothic and Romantic period writing. Areas discussed will include India, Persia, the Levant, and China. The module will discuss such writings in the light of contemporary postcolonial theories of Orientalism including criticism by Edward Said, Gayatori Spivak, Abdul JanMohammed and others. This module will concentrate in particular on the representation of the Indian people, places and cultures of the Indian sub continent.

LDCL6091A

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love.

LDCL6056B

30

TALES OF THE JAZZ AGE

This module examines American prose of the 1920s in the context of the Jazz Age. American literature of the 20s is often conflated with modernism, or the expatriate experience, or the Harlem Renaissance; this module will consider 1920s writing in the context of the market and the rise of professional authorship, anxieties about imitation and the middlebrow and conformism, and the pressures of commercial success on fiction. It will draw on reception studies and the influence of publication formats (mass-market magazines, serial publication, the burgeoning market for film adaptations). Texts will be drawn from a mix of "high" and "low." After considering the pressures of commercialism on the publication of The Waste Land, texts could include the short stories of Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise, The Sun Also Rises, The Great Gatsby, Babbitt, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Winesburg, Ohio, Glimpses of the Moon, and Manhattan Transfer. Students will also be expected to research journalism of the day, such as The New Yorker and the New York Times, which have accessible online archives.

AMSL6020A

30

THE CONTESTED PAST: LITERATURE AND THE POLITICS OF MEMORY

How do we negotiate the darker aspects of our past, particularly when individuals' experiences clash with official history? This module explores the public and private practices of remembering and forgetting in the aftermath of civil war, totalitarianism, colonialism or otherwise repressive rule. In particular, we will examine the writer's role as collaborator , witness, archivist or dissident: how does the writer facIlitate access to, and debate about, contentious, painful or obfuscated history? Our approach to the politics of commemoration is interdisciplinary and draws on ideas from philosophy, historiography, memory and cultural studies as well as heritage and museum studies. The primary material encompasses a range of fictional, non-fictional and visual material from a wide range of genres; most of it postwar and relatively recent. Since this is a global issue you will enounter writers from formerly colonised nations in Africa, from Central and Eastern Europe, South America, and the Near and Asia.

LDCL6097A

30

THE GOTHIC

This module seeks to cover some 'canonical' texts of the Gothic Novel (1764-1820) in Walpole, Radcliffe, Mary Shelley, and to consider some later developments of the gothic mode in later 19th and 20th centuries: Poe, Le Fanu, Stevenson, MR James, Elizabeth Bowen, David Storey and Angela Carter. The course also seeks to introduce students to some of the theoretical and historical arguments around the contested nature of the term 'gothic', the Uncanny, the subversiveness or otherwise of this kind of writing, and its relation to the novel genre.

LDCL6024A

30

THE LITERARY 1960s

When thinking of the sixties, literature, in general, is not what immediately springs to mind - pushed, as it is, to the background of music and the counterculture. Yet the decade brought about many profound changes in the paradigms of literature. Amongst such changes was the proliferation of metafiction as a narrative response to both the 'exhaustion' of literature in the light of the period's dramatic events, and to the new literary and philosophical developments in critical theory (poststructuralism). There was also the emergence of two 'new' genres: new journalism, and the non-fiction novel. This module is an examination of literary responses to the many changes and challenges brought about in this decade. It will discuss whether literature simply recoiled into solipsistic abstraction or whether it was a motivating force in the general struggle to conceptualize a 'new' or countercultural American consciousness.

AMSL6040B

30

THE POETICS OF PLACE: POST 1945 AMERICAN POETRY AND ENVIRONMENT

The American poet Charles Olson famously declared: 'I take SPACE to be the central fact to man born in America, from Folsom cave to now. I spell it large because it comes large here. Large, and without mercy.' This module explores how a range of linguistically innovative American poets, from 1945 to the present, have engaged this question of space and environment in their writings. There will be a particular focus on how scientific literature, natural history writing, field guides, and eco-criticism have contributed to poets' theories of poetry and poetics as well as an emphasis on the role environmental notions of place and space play in forming and critiquing ideas of American identity.

AMSL6016B

30

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS: NONSENSE AND MODERN WRITING

It's widely recognised that modernist literature is characterised by a revolution of the word. Less widely recognised, and little explored, is the relationship between modernist linguistic experimentalism and literary nonsense, as practised by Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, and others. This course will begin with these well-known nonsense writers and explore their roots in seventeenth and eighteenth-century nonsense, before going on to examine some of the adventures in language of major modernist and postmodernist writers. Modernist and postmodernist authors studied are likely to include the Joyce of Finnegans Wake, early Auden, Wallace Stevens, Nabokov, and John Ashbery. This is not a course on children's literature, but on some very challenging modern literature, mostly poetry. It should appeal to those who take a childish pleasure in wordplay and fantasy. You will need to enjoy uncertainty and have good close-reading skills. To do this module you must have studied either Modernism or Critical Theory, unless you obtain a waiver from the lecturer.

LDCL6015A

30

TRAUMATURGIES: READING AND WRITING TRAUMA ACROSS CONTEXTS

Trauma haunts the writing of the twentieth century. Slavery, war, patriarchy, terrorism, genocide, colonialism, modernity, technology and post-modernity: these legacies demand to be written and read, and engender a writing singular to their traumas. Yet the writing of these wounds, and the critical work that reads it, raises fundamental questions about whether trauma can ever be represented or understood. Spreading beyond their contexts, these questions effect their own traumas, cracking open our assumptions about what it is possible to read, to write, and indeed to think. Working roughly from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, this module reads a selection of theoretical, literary and critical texts that aim to write and read trauma across cultural, historical, personal and public contexts.

LDCL6050A

30

VIRGIL'S CLASSIC EPIC

This module will explore the centrality of Virgil's Aeneid to Medieval and Renaissance culture. It will examine developing attitudes to the Classical literary legacy and accommodation and reinvention of Virgil's epic poem within new religious, political and literary contexts. The course will begin with exploration of Virgil's poem on its own terms before turning to re-workings of the 'Aeneid' by Augustine, Dante, Chaucer, Douglas and Marlowe, the Renaissance invention of a 13th Book to 'complete' Virgil's poem, and the recasting of classical epic within the very different conventions of medieval and Renaissance romance. Previous experience of classical or medieval literature is not required.

LDCL6054B

30

WORDS AND MUSIC

'Writing about music is like dancing about architecture'; or so the saying goes. On the contrary, words and music are intimately related, not only in those forms in which they meet head on - opera and song, most obviously - but also more fundamentally. It is in words that we make sense of what we hear, and via words that we pass on that sense, both of specific musical experiences and of music per se. And it is in words that we convey our sense of the sheer seductiveness of music, together with our ongoing frustration at its seeming elusiveness. Literary texts in particular offer evidence of a rich variety of responses to music, ranging from the deferential and star struck to the sceptical and resolutely tone deaf. This module will offer an opportunity to explore specific aspects of the relationship of words and music. To begin, the myth of Orpheus, perhaps the most influential story of the power of music, a story to which literature and music, both apart and together, have returned many times. To follow, we'll look at three specific areas of musico-literary interaction: song, the most potent alliance of words and music, an alliance which has given rise to a rich critical literature; specific literary texts in which music forms the object of attention (Beckett, Proust and Kafka, for example); and selected critical-theoretical texts that have sought to understand aspects of the relationship of words and music. Students will be encouraged to develop their own interests, especially as regards particular examples of, for example, poetry and song. Creative responses to the material will be encouraged and creative writing submissions allowed.

LDCL6106A

30

WRITING LIFE: BIOGRAPHY AND CREATIVE NON-FICTION

How do writers attempt to capture 'life' in all its various forms? What, if any, are the different requirements in writing the life of a famous (or not so famous) person and that of a city or landscape? What about the 'life' of travel or food and how do you approach writing about the natural world? These are just some of the questions that this module sets out to address. We will be reading a wide variety of texts, from the 'traditional' biography to some of the more experimental examples of creative non-fiction. From Samuel Johnson to essays in The New Yorker, all human (and non-human) life will be there! Students may choose between writing their own piece of Biography or creative Non-Fiction as their final project or submitting a critical essay.

LDCL6026B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Year Abroad

You may choose to study at another European university for one or both semesters of the second year.  Please see our Study Abroad pages for further information.

Entry Requirements

  • Qualification: BA (Hons)
  • A Level: AAB including English Literature (or the combined English Language & Literature A-level)
  • International Baccalaureate: 33 points overall with score of 5 in HL English
  • Scottish Highers: At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAB including English
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAABB including English
  • Access Course: Please contact the university for further information.
  • BTEC: Please contact the university for further information.
  • European Baccalaureate: 80% overall, including 70% in English Literature

Entry Requirement

The combined English Language and Literature A-level is acceptable instead of English Literature. A second Arts or Humanities subject at A-Level is encouraged, alongside English Literature. Students studying the IB programme should normally offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at Higher Level, alongside English. 

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • TOEFL: Internet-based score of 88 overall (minimum 19 in the Listening and Writing components; 20 in the Reading component; and 21 in the Speaking component)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.
 

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However some students will be invited to attend an interview. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English at Grade C or above at GCSE Level.

  • Qualification: BA (Hons)
  • A Level: ABB including English Literature (or the combined English Language & Literature A-level)
  • International Baccalaureate: 32 points overall with score of 5 in HL English
  • Scottish Highers: At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: ABB including English Literature
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AABBBB
  • Access Course: Please contact the university for further information.
  • BTEC: Please contact the university for further information.
  • European Baccalaureate: 77% overall, including 75% in English Literature

Entry Requirement

The combined English Language and Literature A-level is acceptable instead of English Literature. A second Arts or Humanities subject at A-Level is encouraged, alongside English Literature. Students studying the IB programme should normally offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at Higher Level. 

2014

Typical A-level offer: ABB including English Literature (or English Language & Literature)

Typical International Baccalaureate offer: 32 including 5 in HL English

All equivalent qualifications considered, please contact the university for further information

Students should also have 5 GCSEs including English (grade C) and Mathematics (grade C).

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • TOEFL: Internet-based score of 88 overall (minimum 19 in the Listening and Writing components; 20 in the Reading component; and 21 in the Speaking component)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.
 

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However some students will be invited to attend an interview. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English at Grade C or above at GCSE Level.

Fees and Funding

University Fees and Financial Support: UK/EU Students

We are committed to ensuring that Tuition Fees do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds.  Full time UK/EU students starting an undergraduate degree course in 2014 will be charged a tuition fee of £9,000.  The level of fee may be subject to yearly increases.

International Students:

Full time International students starting an undergraduate degree course in 2014 will be charged a tuition fee of £12,900.  The level of fee may be subject to yearly increases.

50th Anniversary Scholarships

We recently celebrated our 50th anniversary and to mark this we want to give our international undergraduate students an exciting opportunity.  Once you have an offer from UEA for September 2014, you can apply for our anniversary scholarship.

We will award 20 undergraduate students with scholarships covering 50% of the first year’s tuition fee. To find out if your are eligible and for details of how to apply please click here - www.uea.ac.uk/study/international/fees-and-funding/international-undergraduate-scholarships


Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Literature, Drama and Creative Writing)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.