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UCAS Course Code

QT37

Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Bachelor of Arts

Course Organiser

Dr. Thomas Karshan


BA English and American LiteratureThe writers of Britain and America are of course deeply connected: often they employ the same language, address the same readers, share the same cultural reference points. But at the same time, the two traditions differ sharply in their typical values and tones of voice. This programme allows you to experience these continuities and distinctions. Students on this programme have access to the courses that make up the degrees in English Literature and American and English Literature. The combination also means that you encounter the teaching of two different departments: the interdisciplinary work of American Studies, and the more literary focus of the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing.

Your degree course will be planned in conjunction with your adviser, but we give an outline here.  The basic unit of teaching, the module, lasts for one semester and carries twenty credits in Years 1 and 2, thirty credits in Year 3.  The academic year contains two semesters; in each semester you will normally take three units, making a total of six units a year (two and four respectively in the final Year).  Over the three years of your course you will normally accumulate 360 credits: that is, eighteen modules.  Free choice modules are available – either to extend your degree subjects, or to venture outside them.  As we believe in encouraging interdisciplinarity, you will be required to take three units (sixty credits) outside English and American Literature.  Within our own Faculty of Arts and Humanities, this could involve taking units in American Studies, Creative Writing, Drama, History or Film, for example.  Alternatively, you may opt for units offered by the Faculty of Science or the Faculty of Social Sciences subject to entry requirements.

Course Structure:

Year 1

The first year requires you to take introductory courses in both traditions, though a slight emphasis is placed on the less familiar American literature and on its social and historical background. Courses such as Imagining America, and Literature in History provide you with the context within which future studies will unfold.  You will have a list of optional modules to choose from, encouraging you to broaden your awareness of related subjects such as film, drama, philosophy, linguistics or history.

Year 2 and Year 3

The precise mixture of English and American modules in the second and third years is up to you, and you will discuss your choices with your faculty adviser to make sure that you end up with a balanced programme. You are required to take a number of modules outside the immediate English and American Literature programme. There is a wide range of modules to choose from in the Faculty of Humanities, including free-choice courses in drama, film and creative writing as well as offerings in other literatures and in history.

You can also (and subject to entry requirements) use your free choices to take modules offered by other faculties.

Modules of study are taught in a number of different forms – often lectures and smaller seminar groups – designed to encourage student participation. In every module your work is assessed; forms of assessment also vary, including essays, project work, presentation, examination or a combination of any of these methods. You may also write a dissertation during your final year.

This programme does not include a year in the USA.

Teaching and Assessment:

Key skills, issues and ideas are introduced in lectures given by all members of faculty, including literary critics, literary historians, and writers.  More specialist study is undertaken in small group seminars. These are chosen from a range offered within the School and across the University. You will also spend time studying and researching in the library or carrying out practical work or projects. In most subject areas, you are assessed at the end of each year on the basis of coursework and, in some cases, project and examination results. In your final year, you will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice and with the advice of tutors. There is no final examination. Your final degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and three.


UniStats Information

Why Choose UsChoosing to study within the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing at UEA means joining some of the most satisfied students in the UK.

In the 2014 National Student Survey, we received an overall satisfaction score of 95% in both English Studies and Drama, and 93% for Imaginative Writing. We were are also in the top 10 for English and Creative Writing in the 2015 Guardian University Guide. 

Here are some of the reasons why:

  • Our world-famous Creative Writing department attracts successful and aspiring writers from around the world
  • The School is home to the British Centre for Literary Translation
  • You can take part in our active and engaged student body
  • Discover endless opportunities to attend and get involved in our rich schedule of events, readings and performances

A broad range of courses

The School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing brings together writers, scholars, performers, teachers and students in an exploration of the powers and possibilities of literature. Our aim is to make creative writing and critical reading confront one another in ways that sharpen and enliven both.

We have a world-famous reputation for Creative Writing, and are also home to highly rated scholars with a focus on literature, translation and drama. With a strong focus on interdisciplinary learning, we work closely with other departments at UEA.

Known for student experience

In 2014 UEA was ranked in the top 3 in the UK for Student Experience by the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey  – as well as ranking joint third for overall satisfaction in the 2014 National Student Survey.

Student life at UEA is enhanced through an active Student Union, a myriad clubs and societies to join and a lively and engaged student body.

Literary festivals and events

Writers from across the globe travel to UEA to take part in our long-running literary festival organised by the Arthur Miller Centre and the Centre for Creative and Performing Arts.

The teaching staff and students also put on a number of events throughout the year, including readings, performances and plays.

The University’s significant contribution to creative writing was recognised with the recent prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education.

Teaching and research excellence

In the National Student Survey 2014, we achieved excellent teaching scores - 94% for Drama, 96% for English Studies and 91% for Imaginative Writing. 

As one of our students, you will benefit from our interdisciplinary approach, and have the scope to tailor your own degree as your interests develop throughout your time at UEA.

Our academic staff are writers, as well as teachers, and are at the forefront of research in their field. Many contribute articles to leading newspapers, appear on television and radio arts programmes, publish original research and write novels, short stories, poems and plays.

If you choose to study with us, you can expect to be inspired by leading figures in the literary world such as Kathryn Hughes, writer of the biographies of Mrs Beeton and George Eliot, Giles Foden, whose novel The Last King of Scotland was made into an Oscar winning Hollywood movie, and novelist Rachel Hore, a regular in the bestseller list.

Year

Compulsory Study (80 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

IMAGINING AMERICA: LITERATURE I

Imagining America: Literature I is a level one module designed to introduce the major writers and themes of literature in the United States. For this module there will be a weekly lecture and a two-hour seminar. Lecture Slot: Monday, 1200-12.50. Further information on the timing of the seminar can be found in the published timetable.

AMAL4033A

20

IMAGINING AMERICA: LITERATURE II

Imagining America: Literature II is a level one module designed to expand upon an introduction to the major writers and themes of literature from the United States. For this module there will be a weekly lecture and seminar. Further information on the timing of the seminar can be found in the published timetable.

AMAL4031B

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY 1

This is the main introductory module to the study of literature. It aims to help new students to read historically, by offering a range of models of the relationship between literature and history, explored through the study of selected historical and literary moments. The module is taught by a weekly lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4008A

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY II

Literature in History II shifts our attention to writing from the 19th century to the present. Although we are still interested in historical context, our focus turns to the history of an idea about literature. Literary realism, or the idea that the novel can, and should, reflect real life, will be our central concern: after establishing what literary realism is and why it was such an important idea in the 19th century, we will examine how writers might agree with, or react against literary realism at different times, and finish by exploring the possibility of literary realism now. The module will allow you a full semester to grapple with a key aesthetic debate about the novel, engage with it through literary and critical texts, and help you to think about the implications of the question of what a novel can - or ought - to do. The module will be taught by weekly lecture and seminar, both of which are compulsory.

LDCL4019B

20

Option A Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

READING CULTURES I: AMERICAN ICONS

This module provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary research methods and writing skills that are essential for students undertaking a degree programme in the School of American Studies. Students will be encouraged to look at reading American culture across disciplines and media, and to develop their own strategies for learning, from note taking and planning, through locating and engaging with critical opinions, to producing and evaluating academic writing. This module is intended as an introduction to interdisciplinary scholarship and its transferable skills.

AMAS4036A

20

READING TEXTS: TUTORIAL CLASS

This module provides the opportunity to work closely on selected texts within the contexts of a small group. It aims to develop and explore modes of textual analysis. By the end of the module the students will have highly developed reading skills, a sense of the implications of interpreting texts and the individual research skills essential for a university degree. Not available to Visiting Students.

LDCL4009A

20

Option B Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

READING CULTURES II: IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES

The module develops and expands the research methods, writing skills, and oral skills acquired in Reading Cultures I: American Icons. By continuing the exploration of contemporary American culture and introducing cultural and critical theory as a means to engage with current ideas and ideologies circulating around American cultural icons, the module will encourage exploration of America's changing position in the world. The module is intended to further facilitate skills in reading, writing, analysis, synthesis, independent thinking, and confidence as self-supporting learners in order to provide a strong foundation for work at levels 2 and 3.

AMAS4037B

20

READING TEXTS II

This module seeks to build on and develop the work of the Autumn semester, in particular that of Reading Texts and Reading Translations. The focus will fall again on small-group discussion and on the reading of a small number of texts - one creative, and one critical - chosen by the tutor from a set list. With this close attention to reading at its core, the module will also look at a number of the terms and ideas central to the study of literature and to the practice of interpretation. Not available to Visiting Students.

LDCL4011B

20

WRITING TEXTS

This module explores the culture and anthropology of writing, and addresses issues such as the differences between writing and speaking, between literary and non-literary texts, and the writer's relationship with readers. In weekly lectures and seminar groups, we will look at the writing process itself - drafting, revising, editing, translating - and will explore how and why texts come into being, and how they work to position the reader or to generate readerly interaction. The module is taught by a lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4020B

20

Option A Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

19TH CENTURY AMERICAN WRITING

This module aims to build on and develop your knowledge of the range of American literature in the nineteenth century. We will consider the rise of a distinctly American literary tradition in modes like realism, the gothic, romanticism, naturalism and the detective story, looking to make new connections both among writers and between literature and such larger issues as slavery, economics and feminism.

AMAL5012A

20

20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

This module provides a broadly chronological view of American poetry from the start of the twentieth century to the present day. It wonders about what the consequences might be if we consider seriously Emerson's claim (made in 1844), that America might be seen as a poem. Through detailed examination each week of groups of three related poets, the module aims both to question what constitutes an American poetics, and to examine how this conception has changed over the course of the twentieth century. As well as tracing a trajectory in American poetry from modernist to postmodernist modes, one of its primary concerns is also to start exploring how ideas of what an American poetry might be are inflected differently in 'mainstream' and in more avant-garde (or 'experimental') poetries. Indeed, by explicitly thinking about these differences the module will pay particular attention to the ways in which ideas of nationhood, of political dissent and protest, of poetic 'groupings' and canon-formation, are instrumental in determining what we choose to see as America's representative poetry. By the end of the module students should have a wide knowledge of a range of different twentieth-century American poetries, as well as a strong sense of how the political, cultural and literary 'tastes' of America across the century have delivered it the sorts of poetry it deserves.

AMAL5011B

20

AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

This module surveys the prose of some of the twentieth century's most important American women writers, writers who (or whose 'other' works) tend to disappear from reading lists that include books by women only out of duty. Along the way we will seek to interrogate the terms with which we begin: American, women and prose. Assuming that biology does not define literature, we will instead seek to understand the social pressures on these women writers, and their responses to them, in an effort to maintain the specificity, diversity and range of these women's literary pursuits.

AMAL5013A

20

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION

The purpose of this module is to expose students to a range of prose works by important contemporary American writers. In particular, we will be concerned with some of the key concepts associated with contemporary American fiction, including the definition of the contemporary: postmodernism; metafiction; historiography; postcolonialism; and memory.

AMAL5015B

20

SOUTHERN LITERATURE

"Tell us about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all."- William Faulkner. The development of Southern writing in the twentieth century is one of the most compelling stories in the history of American literature. In this module we will examine the ways in which a wide variety of writers-including some of the most important voices of the twentieth century- tried to tell about the South. We will explore what, if anything, gives Southern literature a distinct voice, and consider the nature of its regional identity in the wake of the so-called Americanization of Dixie. We will, of course, consider the issue of race and racism in the South, and its concomitant effect on Southern writing, black and white. And whilst debating the changes that Southern literature has undergone, we will also explore the significant changes which have affected the South itself, and its role in the life of the nation.

AMAL5037B

20

THE BEATS AND THE LIMITS OF WRITING

This module covers the writers known as 'The Beats' in terms of their antecedents, the literary and cultural traditions in which they worked, and the social and critical debates that raged during their heyday. Students will be asked to read widely, to compare and contrast different writers' styles, and to make informed judgements about the writers' relationships to the times in which they wrote. The module aims to foster an understanding of the Beat literary phenomenon in literary, political and social contexts. It will also examine the debts Beat writers owed to 'American Renaissance' writers including Emerson and Whitman, to wider ideas of the 'avant-garde' in the Twentieth Century generally, and to European Romantic traditions. It will investigate how a Beat poetics developed as a response to Cold War 'consensus culture', and sought to establish a countercultural (though distinctly American) 'tradition'.

AMAL5076A

20

THE HOLOCAUST IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

This module aims to explore representations of the Holocaust in American literature. Students will explore how the Holocaust is represented by American Jewish and non-Jewish authors. Students will consider whether, and how, the Holocaust is 'Americanised' by American writers; they will consider some of the ethical and philosophical debates concerning representation of the Holocaust in art; they will examine how American Jewish writers engage with the Holocaust to negotiate questions of Jewish identity; and they will consider the problematic uses and definitions of the term 'holocaust' in American culture.

AMAL5016B

20

Option B Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Through a combination of lectures and seminars, this module will explore the theory and practice of literary criticism from the origins of the study of English literature as an academic discipline to the present. In order to do this, we examine not only the work of literary critics and theorists, but also engage with developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary study.

LDCL5031A

20

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING

This module reads fiction, poetry, nonfictional prose, and drama of the eighteenth century, as a means with which to identify the dominant concerns of the epoch (class; gender; the politics of party; increasing secularisation), and to explore some of its debates (aristocracy versus middle class; prose versus poetry; classical or ancient versus modern or contemporary; religious versus secular). We read popular novelists, such as Eliza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Samuel Richardson, Laurence Sterne, and Henry Fielding; popular dramatists (Fielding especially); verse both well-known and more obscure (Pope, Gay, Smart); and excerpts from other contemporary sources (didactic, philosophical, political, religious). By the end of the module you will have acquired a knowledge of and sensitivity to the literary genres of the eighteenth century (novel, poetry, prose, drama); a knowledge of the political and cultural landscape; and a knowledge of the conditions of writing (print culture, the beginnings of literary criticism, the professionalization of literature).

LDCL5041A

20

EUROPEAN LITERATURE

This module examines examples of twentieth-century European writing (all read in translation). Rather than (merely) place writers in their national contexts, we will deal with topics, issues and formal experiments that complicate, sometimes transcend, national boundaries. In fact we will interrogate what 'European' might mean in relation to literature - where are the borders? Are continental Europeans fundamentally 'other'? And if so, how does this otherness manifest itself aesthetically, thematically, tonally and formally? We'll look at how writers from different countries frequently challenge the conventions of genre and the conventions of reading and interpreting. Among a range of important innovations (or continuities), we may explore varieties of 'European' modernism, New Objectivity, the absurd, the nouveau roman, noir, or magical realism. We will also ask how European writers have responded to the challenges, upheavals and catastrophes of the twentieth century and how they deal with the ethnic, religious and cultural diversity within Europe. The module includes a weekly lecture. Assessment is by means of an individually chosen project (3500 words) which is supported by individual and group tutorials, a dedicated guidance session and a formative proposal.

LDCL5033B

20

MEDIEVAL WRITING

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the study of medieval English literature. In a series of lectures and seminars students will work through a small but representative selection of medieval texts, including lyrics, romance, and fable, in order to develop a working knowledge of the language - Middle English - and appreciation of different forms and genres found in medieval writing. Medieval texts and contexts will be used as a means of familiarising students with medieval language, and form the basis for further modules in medieval writing that may be taken within the School.

LDCL5043A

20

MODERNISM

The purpose of this module is to study the literature of the early decades of the twentieth century - roughly 1900-1930 - in particular the work of those authors who attempted to break with received norms of literary style and content. The module is organised as a series of thematic and formal explorations that include attention to at least some of the following: the dissolution of character and gravitation towards psychological states such as fantasy and desire, with the emergence of the unconscious; narrative and temporal disruption, obtrusion of language and other sources of modernist difficulty, the afterlife of religion, as in interest in the unseen and supernatural; the significance of the city, the mass media, and other modern cultural forms; gender and the politics of modernism. The sequence of guiding lectures focuses discussion on a set of specific texts and themes, with their contexts, and these are taken up for consideration in the accompanying seminars. 'Modernism' is thus constructed gradually over the semester as a mosaic of closely related issues, each one reflecting on the others. As well as providing an overview of defining textual features, in prose and poetry, the module is concerned also with the critical reading of modernism in the light of contemporaneous criticism and theory as well as current analyses.

LDCL5045A

20

ROMANTICISM 1780-1840

Romantic Literature is often thought of as poetry, primarily work by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and Bryon. But the signs and forms of Romantic sensibility can also be found in a much broader constituency of writing practice: the novel, letter writing, the essay, political and aesthetic theory, and writing of all kinds taken as social critique. This module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars.

LDCL5034B

20

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING: RENAISSANCE AND REVOLUTION

This module aims to introduce you to the poetry, drama and prose of one of Britain's most exciting periods of cultural, political and intellectual transformation: the seventeenth century. That century saw radical change of many kinds, most obviously the execution of the monarch after the civil wars, but also in attitudes to religion, history, women's place within society, and the relationship between the territories that make up 'Britain'. And the century saw vigorous and impassioned defences of old orthodoxies too. Through a sustained series of close-readings of texts each week, the module invites you to reflect on the complicated ways social and historical transformations brought about transformations in literary forms. Attention will be paid to the social and material contexts in which literature circulated. Authors we will study include famous names, like John Milton, Ben Jonson, and Andrew Marvell, and a host of lesser-known figures too, including Lucy Hutchinson, Amelia Lanyer, Edmund Waller, and Henry Vaughan. By the end, we hope you will have not only a good grasp of the varieties of seventeenth-century writing (including non-literary texts), but also the ways in which literature and history might inform and challenge one another.

LDCL5042A

20

SHAKESPEARE

The aim of this lecture-seminar module is to help you become a better reader of Shakespearean drama. He was writing between about 1590 and about 1610; obviously his plays speak to us over a great cultural distance, and we can find fresh ways of reading them by exploring the theatrical, generic and historical frameworks in which they were written and staged. The lectures, then, will introduce a range of contexts, and the seminars will seek to turn them to account in the reading of the dramatic texts themselves.

LDCL5040B

20

VICTORIAN WRITING

This module aims to equip you with a knowledge of writing from across the nineteenth century, in a variety of modes (fiction, poetry, science, journalism, cultural criticism, nonsense). We will examine authors including George Eliot, Tennyson, Dickens, Darwin, Arnold, Charlotte Bronte, and the Brownings, among others. You will thus develop an awareness of how different kinds of writing in the period draw on, influence, and contest with each other. Likewise, you will acquire a sense for the cultural, political and socio-economic contexts of nineteenth-century writing, and some of the material contexts in which that writing took place (serial publication, popular readership, periodical writing, public controversy).

LDCL5047B

20

Option C Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

ANY LDC MODULE AT LEVEL 5 (PRE-REQUISITES PERMITTING). ANY AMS MODULE AT LEVEL 5 (PRE-REQUISITES PERMITTING).

Name Code Credits

19TH CENTURY AMERICAN WRITING

This module aims to build on and develop your knowledge of the range of American literature in the nineteenth century. We will consider the rise of a distinctly American literary tradition in modes like realism, the gothic, romanticism, naturalism and the detective story, looking to make new connections both among writers and between literature and such larger issues as slavery, economics and feminism.

AMAL5012A

20

20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

This module provides a broadly chronological view of American poetry from the start of the twentieth century to the present day. It wonders about what the consequences might be if we consider seriously Emerson's claim (made in 1844), that America might be seen as a poem. Through detailed examination each week of groups of three related poets, the module aims both to question what constitutes an American poetics, and to examine how this conception has changed over the course of the twentieth century. As well as tracing a trajectory in American poetry from modernist to postmodernist modes, one of its primary concerns is also to start exploring how ideas of what an American poetry might be are inflected differently in 'mainstream' and in more avant-garde (or 'experimental') poetries. Indeed, by explicitly thinking about these differences the module will pay particular attention to the ways in which ideas of nationhood, of political dissent and protest, of poetic 'groupings' and canon-formation, are instrumental in determining what we choose to see as America's representative poetry. By the end of the module students should have a wide knowledge of a range of different twentieth-century American poetries, as well as a strong sense of how the political, cultural and literary 'tastes' of America across the century have delivered it the sorts of poetry it deserves.

AMAL5011B

20

ADAPTATION: SHAKESPEARE ON STAGE AND SCREEN

This module explores the rich dramatic and cinematic traditions of Shakespearean adaptation. It considers a range of adaptations, from the seventeenth-century versions of Macbeth, King Lear and Henry V to more recent film versions of Shakespeare's plays, examining the light that adaptive transformations may cast on both the original plays and on the different social and cultural circumstances of the new productions. The module focuses in particular upon cinematic adaptations of Richard III, Henry V, The Tempest, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth and King Lear, though will also discuss many other examples from stage and screen. In seminars linked to weekly screening this module offers an introduction to the theory and practice of adaptation as well as an outline view of how to read Shakespeare on film.

LDCD5021A

20

ADOLESCENCE IN AMERICAN CULTURE POST-1950

This module will suggest that there is a preoccupation with adolescence in postwar and contemporary American culture, and will explore why this is the case. It will do so by introducing students to representations of adolescence in various disciplines, focusing particularly on literature, film, psychoanalysis and cultural studies. Questions to be explored will include: What is 'American' about adolescence? How do representations of adolescence vary according to factors such as gender, race and region? Is there a particular discipline or artistic form which is especially suited to depictions of adolescence?

AMAS5025A

20

AMERICA AND VIETNAM

This module examines the involvement of the United States in Vietnam, from the Second World War to the Paris Peace Accords of 1973. Focusing on the main period of US entanglement, 1963-1973, it uses documents, historical studies, film, and literary texts to illuminate the American experience in Vietnam and its domestic repercussions.

AMAH5041A

20

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

This course offers a critical introduction to understanding America's role in the world. It provides historical and political analyses of U.S. foreign relations, looking at the themes and traditions that have shaped America's increasing influence in global affairs during the twentieth century up to the present day. From the war of 1898 to the conflicts of the early twenty-first century, it examines how and why the U.S. relationship to the world has changed. Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? In discussing foreign relations, the course analyses political and diplomatic elites, but also, the role of foreign actors and private organisations, from religious groups to citizen organisations to NGOs, in defining America in the world.

AMAH5051A

20

AMERICAN MASCULINITIES

This interdisciplinary module will examine how national identity and white masculinity are entwined in a conflicting discourse of hegemonic and challenging narratives in the US. It will focus on a specific construction of white masculinity as it has become embedded and legitimized as the normative national identity against which all others are subordinated. The module will examine gender discourses that radically challenge this accepted link between masculinity, whiteness and national identity.

AMAS5018B

20

AMERICAN MUSIC

The first book published in the New World was a hymn book. Music, sacred and profane, has been at the centre of American lives ever since. Accordingly, this module will explore the history of American music - but it will also examine the way that its development tells a larger story. Focusing largely on the vernacular musical traditions we will encounter a wide range of musical styles and musicians, each of which has something vital to tell us about the shaping of America. After all, as Plato knew, "When the mode of the music changes, the walls of the city shake."

AMAS5023A

20

AMERICAN PARIS BETWEEN THE WARS

This module introduces some of the styles, ideas and ideologies of trans-Atlantic modernism as elements in the creation of a myth. It centres on the American expatriate colony in Paris and, from this, works to contextualise and re-imagine some of the century's most notorious literary and artistic moments. Initial studies of the little magazines, manifestos, publishers, painters and photographers provide a sense of the driving political and aesthetic energies of the period, while the module's middle weeks uses this context to re-read a group of expatriate novels. The final three weeks of the course shifts the emphasis to considerations of memory, memoir and the construction of myth.

AMAL5014A

20

AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

This module surveys the prose of some of the twentieth century's most important American women writers, writers who (or whose 'other' works) tend to disappear from reading lists that include books by women only out of duty. Along the way we will seek to interrogate the terms with which we begin: American, women and prose. Assuming that biology does not define literature, we will instead seek to understand the social pressures on these women writers, and their responses to them, in an effort to maintain the specificity, diversity and range of these women's literary pursuits.

AMAL5013A

20

AUDIO DRAMA: THE THEATRE OF THE MIND

Because sound is invisible, audio drama is sometimes thought of as more imaginative than visual drama. Audio theatre takes place in the mind rather than on stage. Through practice and theory this module explores audio drama and the invisible world of sound. We will do voice work, create sound effects, analyse music, and collaborate on an audio drama to be podcast over the Internet. Our practice will be sharpened by questioning how the aesthetics of sound compares to sight, how changes in sound technology influence culture, and how sound represents race, gender, and nationality. We will listen to a wide range of radio genres, including comedy, drama, music, and news, from "classic" shows like 'The Goon Show' and 'War of the Worlds' to the more recent 'Planet B' and 'Another Case of Milton Jones'. To create our final audio drama project, students will gain experience using audio recording and editing software.

LDCD5052A

20

AUSTEN AND THE BRONTES: READING THE ROMANCE

This module will consider three texts by Austen and the Brontes. A wide variety of literary and historical contexts will be discussed: feminisms, colonialism, impact of war, the social status of the woman writer, representations of governesses, madness and mad women, rakes, foreigners and strangers, minds and bodies, heroes and heroines. We investigate the ways that the lives of the authors of these novels have been told and read as romances. Opportunities will be available to work on film versions. Work on any text by these authors is welcomed in class and in coursework.

LDCL5035B

20

BORDERLANDS OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

Identified as the site "where the Third World grates against the First and bleeds", the US-Mexico border quite literally embodies the tense economic, historical and socio-political relationship between America and Mexico. This module provides an interdisciplinary reading of the Borderlands of the American Southwest, analysing a diverse range of literary texts, films and documentaries, art and performance art, and political essays that present conflicting images and experiences of 'America' from both the United States and Mexico. The border will be analysed not just as the point that divides 'civilisation' from 'savagery', but as an ongoing and established point of social and economic conflict, where traditional frontier ideology interacts with the ramifications of 'immigration', and with 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Topics for discussion will include lawlessness and law enforcement, violence and horror, illegal aliens and border crossing, myths and frontiers, NAFTA and economics, and the potentials and pitfalls of a borderland hybridity.

AMAS5043B

20

COMEDY AND THE ABSURD IN DRAMA

How and why does comedy work as idea and theatrical practice? This module explores comedy across time and place, going back to both classical comedy (Aristophanes) and the roots of commedia dell'arte, and continuing through Moliere and Wycherley in the seventeenth-century, Goldoni in the eighteenth, Oscar Wilde and Alfred Jarry in the 1890s, and into the twentieth century with Beckett, Ionesco, Stoppard, Orton and Fo. The module ends with Richard Bean's 2011 adaptation of Goldoni in One Man, Two Guvnors. We'll study the theory, practice and politics of comedy in drama, encompassing comedy as social critique, comedy of ideas, theatre of the absurd, farce as confrontation, carnival and the grotesque, comic bodies, clowning, metatheatre and theatricality. There may be opportunities to view some of the plays on film and to participate in some practical workshops. The main mode is seminar discussion. Assessment is by means of a group seminar participation, a scene analysis and a longer written project. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment but this module is open to all.

LDCL5055B

20

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION

The purpose of this module is to expose students to a range of prose works by important contemporary American writers. In particular, we will be concerned with some of the key concepts associated with contemporary American fiction, including the definition of the contemporary: postmodernism; metafiction; historiography; postcolonialism; and memory.

AMAL5015B

20

CONTEMPORARY BRITISH THEATRE (SUMMER SCHOOL)

This module offers insights into contemporary British theatre practice, with particular emphasis on seeing, discussing and writing about current examples of classical and contemporary drama in London and the East Anglia region. RESERVED FOR INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY.

LDCD5052S

20

CONTEMPORARY WRITING

This module aims to take an open snapshot of different modes of writing in the recent British scene, not a post-war history of the novel. Together with the question of exactly what it means to be contemporary, we shall concentrate on a small number of thematic and/or formal features, looking in particular at more adventurous examples of recent literature.

LDCL5049B

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (AUT)

Supervised placements and internships in one or other of the performance orientated creative industries in Britain or elsewhere. As with LDCD5019A, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5014A

40

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (SPR)

Supervised placements and internships in one or other of the performance orientated creative industries in Britain or elsewhere. As with LDCD5020B, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5015B

40

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (AUT)

Either an extended piece of research and writing on a drama-related topic selected by the individual with the approval of the module organiser, or an approved and supervised solo performance piece. As with LDCD5014A, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5019A

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (SPR)

Either an extended piece of research and writing on a drama-related topic selected by the individual with the approval of the module organiser, or an approved and supervised solo performance piece. As with LDCD5015B, this module is available to students on the three Drama programmes (W400, WQ43 and WW84) in LDC and elsewhere, on prior approval of a viable proposal by the Drama faculty.

LDCD5020B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 2 Creative Writing modules. The teaching uses structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of prose fiction and poetry. In the first half of the seminar students will write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. In the second half the focus will shift to the work of established authors, using sample texts as a stimulus to students' own writing.

LDCC5005A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (SPR)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 2 Creative Writing modules. The teaching uses structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of prose fiction and poetry. In the first half of the seminar students will write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. In the second half the focus will shift to the work of established authors, using sample texts as a stimulus to students' own writing.

LDCC5004B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (AUT)

This module enables students to test the range of their abilities as writers of poetry. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as voice, persona, sound, imagery, metaphor, structure and form. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aims: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing poetry and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LCCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5003A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (SPR)

This module enables students to test the range of their abilities as writers of poetry. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as voice, persona, sound, imagery, metaphor, structure and form. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aims: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing poetry and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LDC STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LCCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5007B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (AUT)

This module enables students to test their abilities and potential as writers of prose fiction. It is not intended for beginners, or those with no experience of a formal creative writing environment. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as character, genre voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. Aim: The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LIT STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LDCC5001A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5001A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (SPR)

This module enables students to test their abilities and potential as writers of prose fiction. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts to consider such issues as character, genre, voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of students' own work. The aim of this module is to develop students' expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction and to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's work. THIS MODULE IS EXCLUSIVE TO CREATIVE WRITING MINORS, VISITING STUDENTS FROM EQUIVALENT COURSES AND LIT STUDENTS WITH SOME PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE OF CREATIVE WRITING. ALL OTHER STUDENTS SHOULD ENROL ON LDCC5005A/LDCC5004B: CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION.

LDCC5006B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (AUT)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE SPRING MODULE (LDCC2W24) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/television.

LDCC5002A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (SPR)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE AUTUMN MODULE (LDCC2W05) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/TV.

LDCC5008B

20

CREATIVE WRITING:AN INTRODUCTION (SUMMER SCHOOL)

This module is for students with little previous experience of creative writing. We will be doing a set number of in-class exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation. On occasion we will study the work of established authors. Very often students will be asked to 'write about what they know', drawing on notebooks, memory, family stories, sensory impressions.... In both prose and poetry we will concentrate initially on generating material. In prose we will go on to look at character, dialogue, point-of-view, 'showing' vs 'telling', plotting, etc.. In poetry, we will begin to explore the possibilities of pattern and form, sound, voice, imagery, 'making strange', etc.. Students should equip themselves with a notebook for everyday use and a file or folder in which to keep handouts and all written work. Students will be required to complete exercises in class and for homework and should be prepared to read their work aloud.

LDCC5002S

20

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Through a combination of lectures and seminars, this module will explore the theory and practice of literary criticism from the origins of the study of English literature as an academic discipline to the present. In order to do this, we examine not only the work of literary critics and theorists, but also engage with developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary study.

LDCL5031A

20

CULTURAL THEORY AND ANALYSIS

This transdisciplinary module introduces a range of critical approaches to ideas of culture and encourages their assessment and application. As well as literature, we will be examining visual culture (art, film, advertising) and the practice of everyday life. Organised broadly historically and focussing on the twentieth century, we will consider different approaches to 'culture', including key debates around concepts of 'high' and 'low', popular and mass culture, culture and power, culture 'industries', gender and culture, modernism and postmodernism. Theorists to be studied may include Raymond Williams, F.R. Leavis, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Roland Barthes, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Dick Hebdige, Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler and Fredric Jameson. The main mode will be seminar discussion.

LDCL5032A

20

DEVISED PERFORMANCE

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON W400, WQ43 AND WW84 ONLY. In this course, we will explore the concept of devised performance, in all of its various manifestations, and examine methods to develop devised theatre in the rehearsal room. Exploring the use of non-dramatic texts, thematic structures, storytelling, found text and abstract imagery, this class allows students to study and put into practice the devising techniques of companies such as the Wooster Group, Elevator Repair Service, Complicite, Kneehigh and SITI Company. You will learn about theories of narrative and dramatic structure, and experiment with a range of techniques used to generate material for performance outside of the traditional genre of the "playwright's theatre".

LDCD5053A

20

DOING IT YOURSELF: PUNK AND AMERICA

Although the exact provenance of 'punk' remains a contested issue, since its emergence in the mid-1970s this transnational musical and cultural phenomenon has become very much a part of the American grain. Indeed, punk's capacity to adopt, appropriate, assimilate, and re-invent a vast and eclectic range of cultural styles, forms, and ideas, as well as its 'do-it-yourself,' places it in a longstanding American intellectual tradition of self-reliance and innovation. In this interdisciplinary module, we will attempt to define punk, and consider what it means to be punk, by examining its influence in music, film, poetry, and fiction. The unit will also explore the socio-political implications of punk in terms of gender, sexuality, and community, and question the possibility of punk in an increasingly globalised and commoditised world.

AMAS5042B

20

DRAMA OUTREACH PROJECT

Reserved for students on courses: W400U1, WQ43U1, WW84U1. Group practical theatre work which entails public performance to target audiences in the community or on campus.

LDCD5018B

20

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING

This module reads fiction, poetry, nonfictional prose, and drama of the eighteenth century, as a means with which to identify the dominant concerns of the epoch (class; gender; the politics of party; increasing secularisation), and to explore some of its debates (aristocracy versus middle class; prose versus poetry; classical or ancient versus modern or contemporary; religious versus secular). We read popular novelists, such as Eliza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Samuel Richardson, Laurence Sterne, and Henry Fielding; popular dramatists (Fielding especially); verse both well-known and more obscure (Pope, Gay, Smart); and excerpts from other contemporary sources (didactic, philosophical, political, religious). By the end of the module you will have acquired a knowledge of and sensitivity to the literary genres of the eighteenth century (novel, poetry, prose, drama); a knowledge of the political and cultural landscape; and a knowledge of the conditions of writing (print culture, the beginnings of literary criticism, the professionalization of literature).

LDCL5041A

20

ERASMUS EXCHANGE: AUTUMN SEMESTER

LDC students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme for the Autumn semester must enrol for this module. Students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme to Dublin will need in addition to enrol for module LDCL5025B. Further details of the ERASMUS scheme are available from the Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5024A

60

ERASMUS EXCHANGE: SPRING SEMESTER

LDC students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme for the Spring semester must enrol for this module. Students going abroad under the ERASMUS exchange scheme to Dublin will need in addition to enrol for module LDCL5024A. Further details on the ERASMUS scheme are available from the Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5025B

60

EUROPEAN LITERATURE

This module examines examples of twentieth-century European writing (all read in translation). Rather than (merely) place writers in their national contexts, we will deal with topics, issues and formal experiments that complicate, sometimes transcend, national boundaries. In fact we will interrogate what 'European' might mean in relation to literature - where are the borders? Are continental Europeans fundamentally 'other'? And if so, how does this otherness manifest itself aesthetically, thematically, tonally and formally? We'll look at how writers from different countries frequently challenge the conventions of genre and the conventions of reading and interpreting. Among a range of important innovations (or continuities), we may explore varieties of 'European' modernism, New Objectivity, the absurd, the nouveau roman, noir, or magical realism. We will also ask how European writers have responded to the challenges, upheavals and catastrophes of the twentieth century and how they deal with the ethnic, religious and cultural diversity within Europe. The module includes a weekly lecture. Assessment is by means of an individually chosen project (3500 words) which is supported by individual and group tutorials, a dedicated guidance session and a formative proposal.

LDCL5033B

20

FILMS THAT MADE US AMERICAN: THE 1980S THROUGH THE MOVIES

The module will examine America in the1980s. It will look at youth culture, post-Vietnam revisionism and the 'remasculinization of America', yuppie culture, and the impact of both AIDS and drug addiction. Core factors of study in this module are the effects of both New Right morality upon the American socio-cultural landscape, and Ronald Reagan as postmodern president administrating to a 'celluloid America' of his own fantastic imagining. Overall, the module will offer the chance to analyse the tensions and contradictions of the decade as they were played out in both the content and structure of contemporary American film.

AMAS5019A

20

FROM PUSHKIN TO CHEKHOV: NINETEENTH-CENTURY RUSSIAN FICTION

This module offers students the opportunity to study some of the great works of nineteenth-century Russian fiction by authors such as Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. Russian writers were convinced that their country's literature had been too dependent on European models and they set out consciously to create a distinctly 'Russian' tradition. What did this involve and why subsequently were the works of the authors like Dostoevsky and Chekhov received so rapturously when they became available in English translations at the beginning of the twentieth century? We will also examine this writing in its social, historical and political context, which raises questions regarding the significance of gender, censorship and empire.

LDCL5048A

20

FROM TRAGIC TO EPIC PERFORMANCE

Through readings of classical and neo-classical generic criticism, as well as through an investigation of performance and staging demands, the module examines classical, post-classical and early modern forms of tragedy, and contrasts them with the complex emergent forms of tragicomedy and (later) epic, which, in different ways, re-model or resist the central experience of tragic reception. The course will look at plays selected from different genres, countries and periods, e.g. classical Greek (Sophocles) and Roman (Seneca) French Neoclassical (Racine), Spanish golden age (Lope de Vega Calderon), English Jacobean (Middleton and Rowley, Ford), Japanese Kabuki, post-revolutionary German (from Schiller to Brecht). By positing strategies for reading and performing such plays, it will thus develop a deeper knowledge of stage history and of complex theatrical styles. It will also engage with critical discourse, especially in aesthetics and genre criticism (Zeami, Aristotle, Castelvetro, Dryden, Lessing, Brecht).

LDCD5022A

20

I AM

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS REGISTERED FOR COURSES Q300, Q3W8, QV31, QT37, W400, WQ43, WW84 ONLY. The purpose of this Module is to explore notions of personal identity and investigate how a heightened self-knowledge can benefit our relationship to and impact upon the world. In LDC, the question of human subjectivity is approached daily in the texts, novels, plays and poetry that constitute its curriculum. Using the rubric of Graduate Identity Theory, a programme of workshops will investigate how the study of these materials shapes our own self-image; our approach to life, and ultimately, our identity. Beginning with an introduction to Freud's theory of consciousness, we will be building a portfolio of material that considers the concept of identity from the ego to the online avatar. In activities such as creating blogs, tweeting and participating in other social media sites, we will experiment with the manipulation of identity and assess the impact of our online personas. The workshops and the production of an 'I Am (LDC)' portfolio are designed so that individuals can raise to consciousness their own unique attributes and make confident claims, through academic pursuit, about who they are and what they can do. The techniques of rhetoric, positive psychology and neuro-linguistic programme (NLP) will also be discussed as tools for esteem building and identity formation. Overall, the workshops will be designed to afford the opportunities to develop, practise and rehearse those identity claims so that upon graduation, identity can be affirmed by the new social and economic world that the individual will enter.

LDCL5054A

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5056A

20

LITERATURE AND VISUAL CULTURE: AT THE FIN DE SIECLE

This interdisciplinary module investigates the interweaving of literature, painting and photography in Europe in the latter part of the nineteenth century, with a particular focus on France. It looks at the characteristic thematic preoccupations, styles and perceptual psychologies which drive Naturalism, Impressionism, Symbolism, Aestheticism and Decadence as modernist modes. We will be examining developments in the handling of narrative and poetry as well as experiments in theatre against the background of photography's emulation of painting, and painting's struggle to free itself from the academic. Writers to be studied include Baudelaire, Zola, Moore, Maupassant, Wilde, Yeats, Maeterlinck and Mirbeau alongside a selection of poets, painters and photographers of the period. Assessment is by means of a written image analysis and a longer individually designed project, both of which are supported by individual tutorials.

LDCL5046A

20

LITERATURE STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD (SPRING)

A semester spent at a university abroad with the approval of the School. Students interested in European universities should see the Erasmus exchange modules, LDCL5024A and LDCL5025B. In all instances you must consult with Study Abroad Office.

LDCL5026B

60

LOOKING AT PICTURES: PHOTOGRAPHY AND VISUAL CULTURE IN THE USA

Photographic portraits, family albums, anthropological illustrations, lynching postcards, advertisements, food packaging and fashion photos are just some of the pictures that will be "read" and analysed in this module. Students will explore how visual texts can contribute to an understanding of nationhood, class, race, sexuality and identity in the USA. Opening sessions will focus on ways of "reading" visual texts. [No previous experience of working with images is necessary]. Most of the semester will be devoted to analysing how photographic images both reflect and contribute to constructions of American culture.

AMAS5024B

20

MEDIEVAL WRITING

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the study of medieval English literature. In a series of lectures and seminars students will work through a small but representative selection of medieval texts, including lyrics, romance, and fable, in order to develop a working knowledge of the language - Middle English - and appreciation of different forms and genres found in medieval writing. Medieval texts and contexts will be used as a means of familiarising students with medieval language, and form the basis for further modules in medieval writing that may be taken within the School.

LDCL5043A

20

METHOD AND MEISNER

Students will be given the opportunity to explore what it is to direct and act truthfully for the camera with the intention of drawing out the most exciting and edgy filmic performances. This will be done through two methods. One, a weekly Meisner scene class in which actors and directors will learn the craft of film performance and two, a weekly hands on film making class in which they will be given the skills to go off and film the scenes themselves in their cinematic form using digital cameras. The students will be taken through the technicalities of camera use, story boarding and the use of different shots to create the sense of the scene. Through the practical, hands on process of making short films, students will gain a general understanding of the process and techniques of film making and through the Meisner and Method techniques, start to build a creative tool kit that is appropriate to working for the screen. The module is for LEVEL 2 DRAMA students only: W400, WQ43, WW84.

LDCD5054B

20

MODERNISM

The purpose of this module is to study the literature of the early decades of the twentieth century - roughly 1900-1930 - in particular the work of those authors who attempted to break with received norms of literary style and content. The module is organised as a series of thematic and formal explorations that include attention to at least some of the following: the dissolution of character and gravitation towards psychological states such as fantasy and desire, with the emergence of the unconscious; narrative and temporal disruption, obtrusion of language and other sources of modernist difficulty, the afterlife of religion, as in interest in the unseen and supernatural; the significance of the city, the mass media, and other modern cultural forms; gender and the politics of modernism. The sequence of guiding lectures focuses discussion on a set of specific texts and themes, with their contexts, and these are taken up for consideration in the accompanying seminars. 'Modernism' is thus constructed gradually over the semester as a mosaic of closely related issues, each one reflecting on the others. As well as providing an overview of defining textual features, in prose and poetry, the module is concerned also with the critical reading of modernism in the light of contemporaneous criticism and theory as well as current analyses.

LDCL5045A

20

NATIVE AMERICANS

This seminar will study Native Americans within the broad context of American history, although the cultures of individual tribes will also be examined. Brief attention will be paid to pre-colonial times, but the main emphasis will be on the period after the white man's arrival.

AMAH5035B

20

NEW YORK CITY: HISTORY AND CULTURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

AMAS5041B

20

PERFORMANCE SKILLS: THE ACTOR AND THE TEXT

This module is reserved for Drama majors (W400), Drama/Literature Joints (WQ43), Scriptwriting and Performance (WW84), and Theatre Directing Masters students. Drama Minors wishing to apply must first seek approval for inclusion from Mr T. Gash. The main methods of study are through: (1) individual performance of poems and speeches, (2) scene classes, (3) character study of roles in classic plays.

LDCD5016A

20

POLITICAL THEATRE

This module examines the use of theatre and performance - by the State, by oppositional groups, by political activists and by theatre and performance practitioners - to solidify or challenge structures of power. The course looks at specific examples of how theatre and public spectacles have been used in the twentieth century to control or contest the political stage. Examining American, South America, African, Russian, and Eastern European performance in the twentieth century, this class will document and explore through specific performances, videos, dramatic texts and theoretical essays, how performance in theory and practice can be used to explore issues to race, ethnicity, gender, political upheaval and social change within a society.

LDCD5011B

20

PUBLISHING (AUT)

The module will be conceptual as well as practical including discussions and exercises around the design, editing and publishing of a text and what constitutes an editorial policy. In the seminars students will be taught how to set up, run and market their own publications (a magazine/book/fanzine) as well as to justify their editorial, marketing and business strategies. This course will be assessed by a portfolio and a piece of coursework. Three sessions of training on Indesign publishing software will be provided as part of the course. This module will suit students who wish to engage with publishing on a creative and intellectual level as well as learning useful employability skills.

LDCL5028A

20

PUBLISHING (SPR)

The module will be conceptual as well as practical including discussions and exercises around the design, editing and publishing of a text and what constitutes an editorial policy. In the seminars students will be taught how to set up, run and market their own publications (a magazine/book/fanzine) as well as to justify their editorial, marketing and business strategies. This course will be assessed by a portfolio and a piece of coursework. Three sessions of training on Indesign publishing software will be provided as part of the course. This module will suit students who wish to engage with publishing on a creative and intellectual level as well as learning useful employability skills.

LDCL5029B

20

RACE AND RACISM IN THE USA

This seminar will explore the origins and continued role in American culture of the idea of race. Where did the concept of race come from? And to what uses has it been put by various groups within America's pluralistic society? Restricted to students on programmes in American History or Literature, or who have previously done modules on race. Not available to first year students.

AMAH5046B

20

READING AND WRITING CONTEMPORARY POETRY

This module will focus on poetry written from the post-war context up to the present day. The poets studied will be drawn principally from an Anglo-American tradition and may include such writers as Frank O'Hara, John Berryman, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, Sharon Olds, James Tate, Yusef Komunyakaa, Carol Ann Duffy, Carolyn Forche among others. Using the reading and study of post-war poetry, students will be able to write creatively and/or critically for assessment. The module would build upon Creative Writing modules and also complement level two modules such as Modernism, and Poetry and Painting, as well as level three modules such as Lyric, Words and Music, Poetry After Modernism, and poetry dissertations. This module is open to Literature and English Literature with Creative Writing Students.

LDCL5057B

20

READING SHAKESPEARE'S ENGLAND

This is a module which invites students to reach back into the past and read Shakespeare's plays in their original historical and performance context. By doing so students will develop an ability to read and analyse the rich language of the plays as well as gaining a more detailed appreciation of how they relate to the turbulent and dynamic period in history in which they were first written and performed. Students will have the opportunity to watch performances of at least two plays, at the reconstructed Globe in London and in Stratford-Upon-Avon, and our visits to medieval castles, Tudor country mansions and other sites of interest will animate the physical settings of the stories Shakespeare tells.

LDCL5001S

20

ROMANTICISM 1780-1840

Romantic Literature is often thought of as poetry, primarily work by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and Bryon. But the signs and forms of Romantic sensibility can also be found in a much broader constituency of writing practice: the novel, letter writing, the essay, political and aesthetic theory, and writing of all kinds taken as social critique. This module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars.

LDCL5034B

20

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING: RENAISSANCE AND REVOLUTION

This module aims to introduce you to the poetry, drama and prose of one of Britain's most exciting periods of cultural, political and intellectual transformation: the seventeenth century. That century saw radical change of many kinds, most obviously the execution of the monarch after the civil wars, but also in attitudes to religion, history, women's place within society, and the relationship between the territories that make up 'Britain'. And the century saw vigorous and impassioned defences of old orthodoxies too. Through a sustained series of close-readings of texts each week, the module invites you to reflect on the complicated ways social and historical transformations brought about transformations in literary forms. Attention will be paid to the social and material contexts in which literature circulated. Authors we will study include famous names, like John Milton, Ben Jonson, and Andrew Marvell, and a host of lesser-known figures too, including Lucy Hutchinson, Amelia Lanyer, Edmund Waller, and Henry Vaughan. By the end, we hope you will have not only a good grasp of the varieties of seventeenth-century writing (including non-literary texts), but also the ways in which literature and history might inform and challenge one another.

LDCL5042A

20

SHAKESPEARE

The aim of this lecture-seminar module is to help you become a better reader of Shakespearean drama. He was writing between about 1590 and about 1610; obviously his plays speak to us over a great cultural distance, and we can find fresh ways of reading them by exploring the theatrical, generic and historical frameworks in which they were written and staged. The lectures, then, will introduce a range of contexts, and the seminars will seek to turn them to account in the reading of the dramatic texts themselves.

LDCL5040B

20

SOUTHERN LITERATURE

"Tell us about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all."- William Faulkner. The development of Southern writing in the twentieth century is one of the most compelling stories in the history of American literature. In this module we will examine the ways in which a wide variety of writers-including some of the most important voices of the twentieth century- tried to tell about the South. We will explore what, if anything, gives Southern literature a distinct voice, and consider the nature of its regional identity in the wake of the so-called Americanization of Dixie. We will, of course, consider the issue of race and racism in the South, and its concomitant effect on Southern writing, black and white. And whilst debating the changes that Southern literature has undergone, we will also explore the significant changes which have affected the South itself, and its role in the life of the nation.

AMAL5037B

20

THE AMERICAN FAMILY

The idea of the "family" has been integral to American's conceptions of themselves as a nation and as individuals. This module will explore the centrality of the family to the American nations and the ideas and ideal that surround its model form: "mother", "husband", "wife", "child". One of its primary objectives will be to demonstrate that the ideal of the family, born in the wake of the revolutionary era and the rise of the middle-classes in the antebellum North, has never been the majority experience for Americans, either in the nineteenth century or in the contemporary period. Case studies will be explored reflecting on different family forms in the United States from a historical perspective and are likely to include the familial experiences of African Americans, Native Americans, Gay and Lesbian Couples, single parenthood, and marital breakdown. The module will make use of a variety of primary materials including historical sources, legislation, novels, folklore and song.

AMAS5040A

20

THE BEATS AND THE LIMITS OF WRITING

This module covers the writers known as 'The Beats' in terms of their antecedents, the literary and cultural traditions in which they worked, and the social and critical debates that raged during their heyday. Students will be asked to read widely, to compare and contrast different writers' styles, and to make informed judgements about the writers' relationships to the times in which they wrote. The module aims to foster an understanding of the Beat literary phenomenon in literary, political and social contexts. It will also examine the debts Beat writers owed to 'American Renaissance' writers including Emerson and Whitman, to wider ideas of the 'avant-garde' in the Twentieth Century generally, and to European Romantic traditions. It will investigate how a Beat poetics developed as a response to Cold War 'consensus culture', and sought to establish a countercultural (though distinctly American) 'tradition'.

AMAL5076A

20

THE COLD WAR

This module explores the way in which American society and culture was shaped during the years of the Cold War, the tense standoff between the two "superpowers" between the end of World War II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. The work includes consideration of the key events, issues, and concepts in the history of the Cold War, from the division of Europe and the Marshall Plan, the emergence of the Truman Doctrine, the impact of the Chinese Revolution, through the Cuban missile crisis, the period of detente in the 1970s and the chilling of US-Soviet relations during the "second Cold War" of the early 1980s. Particular attention is given to the impact of those events in the USA, upon the ways in which Cold War anxieties were represented - and, also, the ways in which anxieties about American society became meshed in the Cold War. Discussion will range across issues from the bomb and the space race to the family, gender, and race. Throughout, particular use will be made of visual sources and film.

AMAH5048B

20

THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE

Centred in New York City, the Harlem Renaissance was a period of intense cultural production and political activity amongst African Americans in the early twentieth century. This movement is often credited with ushering in the era of the 'New Negro' - a generation of defiant and empowered black Americans who claimed the right to "speak for themselves" in the face of race discrimination. Through an intensive interdisciplinary examination of African American fiction, poetry, political writing, music, painting and theatre, this module will assess the significance of the Harlem Renaissance both in the United States and overseas. Students will be asked to explore these issues by examining, among other works, the novels of Claude McKay, Nella Larsen and Zora Neale Hurston, poetry by Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen as well as the blues lyrics of Billie Holiday and Ma Rainey.

AMAS5039B

20

THE HOLOCAUST IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

This module aims to explore representations of the Holocaust in American literature. Students will explore how the Holocaust is represented by American Jewish and non-Jewish authors. Students will consider whether, and how, the Holocaust is 'Americanised' by American writers; they will consider some of the ethical and philosophical debates concerning representation of the Holocaust in art; they will examine how American Jewish writers engage with the Holocaust to negotiate questions of Jewish identity; and they will consider the problematic uses and definitions of the term 'holocaust' in American culture.

AMAL5016B

20

THE SHORT STORY (AUT)

What is a short story? What do short story writers have to say? What about short story critics and theorists? Is the short story a narrative in miniature? Or is there more to a short story than simply being 'short'? And why are critics so concerned with whether the short story is alive or dead? These are the kind of questions this module will investigate by asking you to think as a short story reader, theorist, critic and writer. Reading will be drawn from short story writers - and writing about the short story - roughly spanning the 19th century to the present, and from a range of cultural contexts. Our interest will not be to establish a history of the short story, but instead to explore the range of thematic preoccupations, changing definitions, and critical debates surrounding the form. Students will have the opportunity to respond to these questions in critical and/or creative forms of assessment. Writers studied might include Edgar Allan Poe, Katherine Mansfield, Julio Cortazar, Anton Chekov, Ali Smith and Ryunosuke Aqutagawa.

LDCL5058A

20

THE SHORT STORY (SPR)

What is a short story? What do short story writers have to say? What about short story critics and theorists? Is the short story a narrative in miniature? Or is there more to a short story than simply being 'short'? And why are critics so concerned with whether the short story is alive or dead? These are the kind of questions this module will investigate by asking you to think as a short story reader, theorist, critic and writer. Reading will be drawn from short story writers - and writing about the short story - roughly spanning the 19th century to the present, and from a range of cultural contexts. Our interest will not be to establish a history of the short story, but instead to explore the range of thematic preoccupations, changing definitions, and critical debates surrounding the form. Students will have the opportunity to respond to these questions in critical and/or creative forms of assessment. Writers studied might include Edgar Allan Poe, Katherine Mansfield, Julio Cortazar, Anton Chekov, Ali Smith and Ryunosuke Aqutagawa.

LDCL5060B

20

THE US SUPREME COURT, 1900 - TODAY: THE RIGHTS REVOLUTION

The 20th Century saw a major expansion in the role of the Supreme Court in American politics and society. Changing understandings of individual rights and liberties spurred a constitutional revolution in areas of civil rights and individual freedoms. Legal and social changes occurred alongside changing interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights to fundamentally alter the way many Americans related to each other and to the government. Following World War Two the Court became increasingly active in areas of public policy, deciding cases involving freedom of speech, religion and the press, campaign finance, gun control and the right to bear arms, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, same-sex marriage, abortion, and the death penalty, among many others. This module introduces students to the role and operation of the Court as well as to the historic events it has been involved with since the early 20th Century. From repeatedly striking down New Deal legislation in the 1930s to halting the recount of votes in Florida in the 2000 election, from holding the state had no responsibility for the protection of individuals in the first two decades of the 20th Century to expanding understandings of "equal protection of the laws" in the second half of the century, the module will encourage students to consider the role of law in shaping and influencing American history and politics, as well as asking how and why the Court ruled in particular ways. Through a combination of Court opinions and academic studies, students will be asked to consider key issues in 20th and 21st Century US history and the role of the law and Constitution in shaping them. Students are challenged to consider how understandings of key legal "rights" have changed over time and what this tells us about the Court, the Constitution, and about American society more broadly. Students considering taking this module are encouraged to also consider "The US Supreme Court, 1789-1900: (Re)making the Nation" which introduces students to the role and activities of the Court in the 19th Century and, as such, provides a useful background for this module.

AMAH5034B

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing, participation in workshops, and one-to-one feedback sessions with your tutor provides formative assessment and allows you to learn to write journalism before your achievements are assessed. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - practices.

LDCC5009A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing, participation in workshops, and one-to one feedback sessions with your tutor provides formative assessment and allows you to learn to write journalism before your achievements are assessed. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - practices.

LDCC5010B

20

THEATRES OF REVOLT: NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPEAN DRAMA

Beginning with Ibsen and Strindberg, this module examines the development of modern forms of drama during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, addressing modern concerns - self and society, gender, sexuality, social and class conflicts, creation and destruction, the unconscious - and deploying experimental types of theatre by Chekhov, Maeterlinck, Wilde, Hauptmann, Buchner and Wedekind, as well as the two seminal Scandinavians. We will be looking at versions of Naturalism, Symbolism and Expressionism as modernist modes in drama and suggesting ways in which these shape and anticipate later developments. Assessment is by means of one scene analysis and one longer essay. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment.

LDCL5030A

20

THREE WOMEN WRITERS

The writings of Edith Wharton, Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf intersect with discourses of 'new women' and gender as well as feminism, and social and cultural history. This second level seminar develops historicist and generic understanding as well as exploring women's identity through these authors' writings, which move between realism and modernism. Special attention to just one writer is possible in the final essay. Particular attention will be given to some of Virginia Woolf's lesser known writing.

LDCL5050B

20

VICTORIAN WRITING

This module aims to equip you with a knowledge of writing from across the nineteenth century, in a variety of modes (fiction, poetry, science, journalism, cultural criticism, nonsense). We will examine authors including George Eliot, Tennyson, Dickens, Darwin, Arnold, Charlotte Bronte, and the Brownings, among others. You will thus develop an awareness of how different kinds of writing in the period draw on, influence, and contest with each other. Likewise, you will acquire a sense for the cultural, political and socio-economic contexts of nineteenth-century writing, and some of the material contexts in which that writing took place (serial publication, popular readership, periodical writing, public controversy).

LDCL5047B

20

WORDS AND IMAGES

The module aims to explore the relationship between words and images in contemporary literature. As well as developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss how these two media can be combined, the module will survey shifts in the generic conventions of such literature over the last few decades so that students will develop an awareness of the various narrative techniques that such texts employ and be able to discuss these aspects in an informed and critical manner. The theoretical approach will consider narrative, ekphrasis, and critical work in the area by Scott McCloud, Perry Nodelman and Ivan Brunetti, amongst others. The module will analyse established texts by writers and artists such as Art Spiegelman, Alan Moore and Joe Sacco as well as more recent texts. Students will be assessed through critical and/or creative engagement. The module will build upon the level one Writing Texts module and will complement Words and Music and Children's Literature at level three.

LDCL5053B

20

Option A Study (30 credits)

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

This module aims to introduce students to the fascinatingly wide and diverse area of American autobiography. It takes a broadly chronological structure in order to introduce key narratives and writers in the history of American autobiography, and will also enable students to engage with important theoretical debates influencing how we might understand autobiography - debates which can perhaps best be described as attempting to determine what is at stake in writing, reading and defining the autobiographical 'I'. Questions to be explored will include: What do we mean by autobiography? Why is it so difficult to define autobiography? What is 'American' about autobiography?

AMAL6007A

30

AMERICAN GOTHIC

American fiction began in the period of the European Gothic novel, which thus marked the American tradition from the first. In this seminar module we will establish the meaning of gothic conventions and consider their persisting effects in American fiction.

AMAL6024B

30

CALIFORNIA DREAMING: NOVELS OF THE GOLDEN STATE

This module looks at the ways in which California has represented itself, or been represented, in fiction. Beginning with the 'first' published Californian novel of 1854, The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta, the Celebrated California Bandit, we will trace the development of the Californian novel into the early twenty-first century. One particular interest is the ways in which Californian novels engage with, dissect, and critique notions of California as a 'dream' or ideal/idyll; and we will explore how novelists address crucial, and often contentious, historical moments in Californian history. Topics include settlement and 'removal'; migration and immigration; corporate interests and 'big business'; Los Angleles as the City of Dreams; and 'global' California. Writers will include some or all of the following: Mary Austin, T C Boyle, Joan Didion, Chester Himes, Frank Norris, Kem Nunn; John Rollin Ridge, Upton Sinclair, John Steinbeck, Helena Maria Viramontes, Nathaniel West, and Karen Tei Yamashita.

AMAL6044A

30

IMAGINING THE PACIFIC

This module considers the ways in which American literature has represented the opening up of Pacific space from the early nineteenth century to the present. From Melville's adventures on whaling vessels throughout the Pacific, to Pearl Harbour and anxieties about Japanese presence in and beyond the borders of the United States, to writing by contemporary Asian-American and Pacific authors, the texts on this course chart the ways in which the Pacific Ocean and its peoples have contributed to, created, and contested American national narratives. The module will develop students' insights into issues of U.S. national history and cultural geography, and deepen their engagement with current theories of nationalism and transnationalism as a frame for reflection on their studies abroad. At its heart a course in American literature, students will encounter an array of different genres of writing, including novels, travel narratives, poetry, short stories, and memoirs.

AMAL6042B

30

SIN, SENTIMENT AND SENSATION: NINETEENTH CENTURY BESTSELLERS

This module offers the opportunity to become familiar with books that would once have been known and loved by millionsof readers - books that helped to define the very notion of what a "bestseller" was and might be. Packed with sin, sentiment and sensation, the texts on this module, by both British and American writers, defined the popular literary scene across the length of the nineteenth century on both sides of the Atlantic. We will analyse their massive appeal to nineteenth century readers in America and Britain, explore their contemporary recption, consider their multimedia adaptions and the place of publishing technology in their success, examine their role in moral panics and popular crazes, and think about why so many of these extraordinarily successful books are now forgotten, popularly and critically. What can the most read books of the nineteenth century tell us about the politics of popular literature, then and now?

AMAL6046B

30

TALES OF THE JAZZ AGE

This module examines American prose of the 1920s in the context of the Jazz Age. American literature of the 20s is often conflated with modernism, or the expatriate experience, or the Harlem Renaissance; this module will consider 1920s writing in the context of the market and the rise of professional authorship, anxieties about imitation and the middlebrow and conformism, and the pressures of commercial success on fiction. It will draw on reception studies and the influence of publication formats (mass-market magazines, serial publication, the burgeoning market for film adaptations). Texts will be drawn from a mix of "high" and "low." After considering the pressures of commercialism on the publication of The Waste Land, texts could include the short stories of Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise, The Sun Also Rises, The Great Gatsby, Babbitt, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Winesburg, Ohio, Glimpses of the Moon, and Manhattan Transfer. Students will also be expected to research journalism of the day, such as The New Yorker and the New York Times, which have accessible online archives.

AMAL6020A

30

THE LITERARY 1960s

When thinking of the sixties, literature, in general, is not what immediately springs to mind - pushed, as it is, to the background of music and the counterculture. Yet the decade brought about many profound changes in the paradigms of literature. Amongst such changes was the proliferation of metafiction as a narrative response to both the 'exhaustion' of literature in the light of the period's dramatic events, and to the new literary and philosophical developments in critical theory (poststructuralism). There was also the emergence of two 'new' genres: new journalism, and the non-fiction novel. This module is an examination of literary responses to the many changes and challenges brought about in this decade. It will discuss whether literature simply recoiled into solipsistic abstraction or whether it was a motivating force in the general struggle to conceptualize a 'new' or countercultural American consciousness.

AMAL6015A

30

Option B Study (30 credits)

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

18TH CENTURY VOYAGE LITERATURE

The eighteenth-century reading public eagerly devoured narratives of voyages around the world. In this course we will survey the diverse ranGe of voyage litearature this century produced. We will read accounts of actual and fictional Voyages, as well as narratives that fall somewhere between the real and the imaginary. Key questions for us will be how voyagers' identities and ideas are reshaped through th experience of the sea and its islands, how our texts both articulate and question the ideologies underpinning Britain's maritime empire, and how voyage literature connects to other literary genres, including the novel, romance, history, utopia and anecdote. Texts include Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, James Cook's Endeavour Journal, Daniel Defoe's The Storm, Olaudah Equiano's The Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano, Janet Schaw's Journal of a Lady of Quality and Tobias Smollett's Roderick Random. THIS COURSE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6108B

30

CHARLES DICKENS: BEYOND REALITY

Charles Dickens has been described, and cherished, as one fo the great chroniclers of the panorama of mid-Victorian society. At the same time, much modern criticism has rightly emphasised what a strange and innovative writer he is, less a documentary social realist than an early practitioner of what might now be called 'magical realism',. This module will examine works from across Dickens's writing career, in a variety of different modes - fiction, journalism, drama, and public speaking - reading them not only in the context of Dickens's times, but also in the context of how other writers in those times dealt with comparable questions. As a result, students will be able to develop their larger interests in the relationships between social reality and its literary representations.

LDCL6089B

30

CHAUCER

This module explores Chaucer's major writings in their historical, cultural and literary contexts. The module will introduce Chaucer's writing in a range of genres and will examine his works' representation and exploration of society, identity, chivalry, politics, religion and gender, and will also consider the medieval reception of Chaucer's writing. Previous experience of medieval literature will be useful but is not required.

LDCL6053A

30

CULTURES OF SUBURBIA

The history of twentieth-century literature is often told from the perspective of the metropolitan avant-garde. Modernist writers and intellectuals by turns celebrated or abominated the modern metropolis, but they tended to agree that the urban and the modern were inextricably linked. They were also often united by a hatred of suburbia, which they associated with the rise of a pooterish middle class and in turn with an irredeemably philistine, socially conservative middlebrow culture. Wyndham Lewis famously blasted 'the purgatory of Putney'. Yet in certain respects the twentieth century was the suburban century, as the cities continued their horizontal expansion and the separation of 'life' and 'work' that is the suburban response to industrialism became widespread. The growth of suburbia from the late nineteenth century to the present day has provoked a fascinating variety of cultural responses, including, but not limited to, hostile denunciations. Writers, artists and filmmakers found much opportunity for comedy in suburban habits, values and aspirations. They considered the emergence of the suburban housewife and the implications for this for women and for feminism. They debated the architecture and planning of the suburbs, notably through engagements with the Garden City and Garden Suburb movements. They speculated about the political implications of the growth of a literature, home-owning suburban middle class. They depicted the effects of mass immigration on suburbia and the development of suburban multiculture. They pointed to the uncanny and even the surreal aspects of suburban life. This module explores the literature and cultural geography of the English suburbs, and in so doing it suggests an alternative history of modernity, told not from the centre but from the periphery. Writers covered might include: George and Weedon Grossmith, Arthur Machen, William Morris, C.F.G Masterman, Ebenezer Howard, H. G. Wells, G.K. Chesterton, John Galsworth, Dorothy Richardson, George Orwell, Stevie Smith, John Betjeman, Elizabeth Bowen, Doris Lessing, Hanif Kureshi, J. G Ballard, Jonathan Meades and Julian Barnes.

LDCL6095A

30

DRAMA AND LITERATURE: THE QUESTION OF GENRE

This seminar will explore the boundaries between drama and other genres (kinds, art-forms, media) in an attempt to investigate a number of interrelated theoretical questions. We shall explore these issues via various types of activity - practical criticism, critiques of literary theory, performance analysis, personal theatrical adaptations. The set texts are works of literature which do not quite fit generically - particularly plays that seem to be in some sense 'epic', or novels in some sense 'theatrical', ranging from Shakespeare in the 17th century through to Gay and Fielding in the 18th and Dostoyevsky and Chekhov in the 19th.

LDCL6017B

30

FIN DE SIECLE: FANTASIES OF DECADENCE AND DEGENERATION

Max Nordau's 1892 Degeneration, attacking fin de siecle decadence, draws together fears of cultural decline and corrupting artistic practice through pseudo-Darwinian thinking about devolution. Yet Nordau's urgent and apocalyptic claims about 'diseased' art draw an ambivalent response from contemporary writers, such as those associated with the aestheticism and decadence of The Yellow Book. It is within the fantastic, however, that Nordau is most directly confronted and social norms most explicitly deformed by art. Wilde's swift move from pedestal to pederast may remove a key figure, but texts such as The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Novel of the White Powder; Dracula; Wells' science fiction dystopias and, more recently, Moore and Campbell's From Hell, rehearse, react to, or reflect upon such concerns. These writings share a central tension: are the effects of decadence and degeneration offering pessimistic prophesy or optimistic alternatives? This module would complement nineteenth-century options and offer a perspective on the Modernist module. For students also taking the Gothic it would be related, although usefully focusing on the closing years of the nineteenth century with a different emphasis.

LDCL6028B

30

HENRY JAMES: QUESTIONS OF ART, LIFE AND THEORY

In this module students engage with the range of Henry James's writing and also the reproduction of his life and work in contemporary culture. This module aims not simply to add to understanding of James but also to explore the issues that his work raises in relation to the art and history of fiction, philosophy and cultural reproduction. It is suitable not only for literature students who want to study this writer who spans realism and modernism, and short stories, literary criticism and fiction, but also for creative writing students and literature and philosophy students. The final assignment will have a creative writing option that comprises a piece of creative writing with a critical reflection. It can be taken by students who have studied modules in nineteenth-century writing or modernism.

LDCL6075B

30

IMAGINING THE PAST IN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE

In the English Renaissance (roughly the period 1500-1650), the way writers thought about their country's past was changing radically. The emergence of modern nationalism, the radical religious changes brought about by the Reformation, and new understandings of our relationship to the English language and to the British landscape, all fundamentally reshaped writers' relationship to the past. How did Renaissance writers imagine their ancestors? How did they negotiate their complicated relationship with the age that came before them, the period we tend to call the 'middle ages'? How did they situate themselves among Britain's often wild and remote landscape? How did war and colonialism demand radical transformations of history? What was the creative potential of the English language's messy, hybrid history? And -perhaps most importantly - how did all these pressures shape the poetry and drama of the period? This module will ask these large questions of the English Renaissance's most important writers, including Edmund Spenser, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, and you will be introduced to some of their greatest works. These works will be read alongside some texts (icluding non-literary texts), which are less well-known today, but were considerd important in their own age. The module will proceed through a series of close-readings of pieces of poetry, prose and drama, allowing large questions to emerge from short passages of text during the seminars. There will be short written exercises regularly during the module to help you prepare for the final Project, and there will the the opportunity for one-on-one-tutorials too. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6100B

30

LATIN AMERICAN NARRATIVES

While the term 'narrative' in Spanish is often used to denote fiction it is not restrictive to the genre. The aim of this module is to explore the core of storytelling that underpins Latin American literature and which surfaces in various forms of writing from the 'microrelato' to the short story, the prose poem as well as the 'rewriting' exercise/critical appraisal, such as Alejandra Pizarnik's the Bloody Countess. A further aspect of this module is to attempt to disentangle the web of literary influences woven into some of these Latin American narratives as well as to trace the itinerary of these influential threads as they travelled from the South of the American continent to other literatures. As the editors of Issue 113 of Granta have stated "who would hve imagined fifteen years ago that writings of the outcast Chilean Roberto Bolano who washed ashore in Barcelona via Mexico, would exercise so wide an influence on writers in Spain, Latin America and across the world:" And yet, Bolano's literary output is unthinkable without Borges, just as the Colombian Juan gabriel Vasquez' Secret History of Costaguana is inconceivable without Conrad's Nostromo. Readings will include works by Borges, Cortazar, Bolano, Juan Gabriel Vasquez, Clarice Lispector, Alejandra Pizarnik, amongst others. The module would elaborate upon the level one Writing Texts module and would complement World Literature: Reading Globally.

LDCL6093A

30

LITERATURE AND DECONSTRUCTION

In an interview with Derek Attridge, Jacques Derrida describes literature as 'this strange institution which allows one to say everything'. This module explores the writings of Derrida and related thinkers alongside a range of literary texts, including works by Keats, Shakespeare and Joyce. Through a combination of lectures and seminars, we will think about the strangenesses of literature, look at the ways in which it is an 'institution' and consider the kinds of freedom - of speech, writing and thinking - it permits. Our aim throughout will be to establish the possibilities for literary criticism opened up by deconstruction. The module is open to everyone, but may be of particular interest to those who studied critical theory in the second year.

LDCL6048A

30

LITERATURE AND HUMAN RIGHTS

Reading key philosophical, political, legal and literary texts, this module will track the emergence of human rights as a cultural idea from their conception in the eighteenth century, through to the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and beyond in the period after World War Two. The module will address the following questions: What type of human being was presupposed by the declarations of rights? How did the novel help form perceptions about rights and human sympathy? In what ways did the UDHR re-imagine concepts of human rights after the Holocaust? How were these changes reflected in new forms of post-war writing, such as post-colonial and late modernist writing? How can we think about the relation between rights and literature today? This module will suit students who have enjoyed the challenges of philosophy and literary theory. It should also appeal to those who are interested in thinking seriously about the relationship between literature and its 'real world' applications and significance.

LDCL6031B

30

LITERATURE AND OPERA

Sixteenth-century Italian literati created opera as the rebirth of Greek Tragedy. From its basic form as word-plus-music to its repeated reforms that have put now text, now music, now drama first,opera and literature have constantly complemented and competed with each other. This module explores the relationship between opera and various kinds of literature, including drama, prose, and poetry. We will ask "How can an orchestra narrate?" "How is an opera libretto like a movie script?" "Why do certain literary texts invite musical adaptation more than others?" and "What is the 'best' literary analogy for opera: drama, poetry, or the novel?" Students will also compare various operas with their literary sources in order to better understand how different media represent race, gender, and nationality. Composers will include Brittten, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Rossini, and Weill. Authors will include Shakespeare, Wilde, Brecht, James, Scott, Joyce and Aeschylus.

LDCL6101B

30

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module explores the relations between literature and philosophy and differing understandings of the self, love and ethics through close reading of philosophical and literary texts. It is organised chronologically and moves from the classical writing of Plato to modern literature. The module designed for final year students who are studying Literature and Philosophy. It is also open only to students in Literature who have taken modules in Philosophy in years one and two; or by special concession at the discretion of the module organiser to other students who have substantial experience in both Honours level Literature and Honours level Philosophy.

LDCL6025A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (AUT)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period from 1789 to the present day (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6018A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (SPR)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period from 1789 to the present day (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6019B

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: PRE-1789 (AUT)

This module is an advanced-level unit, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period up to 1830 (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6061A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: PRE-1789 (SPR)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period up to 1830 (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6062B

30

LYRIC

The module will incorporate a historical survey of Western lyric, looking at its inception in the poetry of Pindar and Sappho, and the Aristotelian division of poetic arts in lyric, dramatic and epic. It will cover lyrics from Provencal troubadour poets through the Italian and English renaissance to Romantic lyric. Finally, it will cover the fate of lyric in the present day, from 'conceptual writing' and 'post-humanism' which offer a thoroughgoing rejection of lyric, to the embrace of lyric in contemporary young poets. The module will start by considering the question: 'What is lyric'? The purpose is not to establish a transhistorical concept of lyric as genre or mode, but rather to see how different thinkers at different times have approached it. This is a particularly timely question for literary criticism and poetics. We will isolate certain tropes, ethics, and focal points that are taken to be characteristic of lyric, whilst at the same time probing the historicity of lyric as a concept, especially regarding the ideology of the lyric 'I' that is associated with romanticism. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6087A

30

MADNESS AND MEDICINE: WOMEN'S WRITING IN THE REGENCY

This module will study late 18th-century and early 19th-century writings in the context of scientific and medical innovation. We consider whether it may be appropriate to view the work of novelists such as Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen and Mary Shelley as a response to, and even a protest against these newly (or, more correctly, nearly) professionalised, male-dominated worlds. These women writers often concern themselves with the 'consumers' as well as the providers of the services offered by these professions; this module considers why that might be and how this kind of contextualisation might impact upon our readings of their work.

LDCL6042A

30

MEDIEVAL ARTHURIAN TRADITIONS

From Welsh folklore to Monty Python, the tales of Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table have excited and intrigued generations. Why? To answer this question we explore the development of the legend from its twelfth-century Celtic roots through to a number of twentieth-century film adaptations. How the legend has been translated across form, genres, cultures and ages will be studied, including examples from Middle English Arthurian Texts, translations of the Welsh Mabinogion, of Monmouth's Latin chronicle and French romance texts. This module will enable students familiar with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to enhance their awareness of the wider Arthurian traditions within which this text belongs, but is also suitable for students who are encountering medieval literature for the first time.

LDCL6066B

30

MEDIEVAL GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Gender and sexual identities are neither given nor fixed, but rather learned and insistently fluid. It is the aim of this module to tease out their complexity and challenge assumptions. The medieval is constantly imagined as a key moment in the history of sexuality, though it is rare for critics to gree on quite why this should be so and provokes lively and contentious debate. Examining a range of medieval poems, narratives, drama and images, students will explore the historical construction of the body, virginities, heterosexuality, homosexuality, the polymorphous erotics of female mysticism, the medieval understanding of cross-dressing, and the intersectionof sexuality with race, gender, and religion. By the end of the module, students will have improved their knowledge of medieval writing and culture and will have considered the writing and performance of gender in historical context.

LDCL6120A

30

MEDIEVAL MONSTROSITIES

Giants, dragons and half-human hybrids are just some of the fantastical creatures that populate Middle English literature. Too readily dismissed by modern readers as mere whimsy, or else the product of credulous minds, instead this module takes monsters seriously as revealing facets of a sophisticated myth-making society. We will consider monsters in a range of genres including romance, saints' legends, travel writing and visual imagery, as well as their reception by medieval and modern readers and critics. We will interrogate the various discourses of monstrosity and consider what makes a monster, including: the horroh and allure of the monstrous body; monstrous appetites; sexuality and sexual deviance; geography and racial alterity. We will also explore the literary and cultural construction of 'human monsters' (women, pagans, Jews) rendered 'other' due to their perceived divergence from societal and religious norms. Throughout the module you will be able to apply your developing understanding of teh discourse of monstrosity in a range of practical contexts including field trips and engagement opportunities. Previous experience of Middle English literature will be an advantage but is not required. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6081B

30

NERVOUS NARRATIVES

'We all say it's nerves, and none of us knows what it means', says a character in Wilkie Collins' 1860 novel, The Woman in White. Our aim is to think about how a discourse of the 'nerves' - the 'nervous temperament' and nervous illness - can be both so pervasive culturally and so slippery in its meaning. This interdisciplinary module takes you from the late 17th century, when the concept of 'neurologie' first emerged, to the 21st century, linking literary, medical and philosophical writing to explore the representation of the 'nerves'. The historical range of the module is not meant to imply a transhistorical understanding of nervous illness or temperament, but rather will enable us to analyse the historically specific nature of the nervous body and what it is made to mean, culturally, within different contexts. In this way, we will be working with issues as diverse as religious 'enthusiasm', hysteria and hypochondria, sensibility, sensation, fear of modernity, manliness and effeminacy, shell-shock, PTSD and the concepts of the healthy or fragile body of the nation. Spanning time and genre, the literary texts studied will take us from the earliest, Jonathan Swift's satire, A Tale of a Tub (1704) up to the contemporary: Siri Hustvedt's novel, What I Loved (2003) and her analytical memoir, The Shaking Woman, Or, A History of My Nerves (2010).

LDCL6046A

30

NEW WORLDS: SCIENCE FICTION AND BEYOND

It has been suggested that science fiction was the authentic literature of the twentieth century, yet it has also been seen as a genre cut off from the literary mainstream, its provenance, tropes and generic limits contested. Are there distinctions betwen science fiction, speculative fiction and even sci-fi? This module aims to explore science fiction as a mode by investigating varous definitions of science fiction and asking: what possibilities does it offer to writers? How does it mediate the relationship between literature and science (and technology): And how have writers gone beyond the conventional limits of the genre (and we will also consider other media)? The module will look at thematic clusters of texts, often pushing the boundaries of the conventional sci-fi canon and encouraging students to think across different literary periods about the antecedents of science fiction. We will consider such themes as interplanetary travel, time travel, ecological catastrope, speculative fiction, experiments with scale, and steam punk and writers studied might include H.G. Wells, John Wyndham, Ursula K. Le Guin, J.G. Ballard, Margaret Atwood and China Mieville.

LDCL6116B

30

POETRY IN DARK TIMES?

This module will engage with the poetry of three major poets (Holderlin, Rilke, Celan) who, writing in (and against) the Romantic, Modernist and post-Holocaust eras respectively, test language (in this case German) to the very limits of its expressive possibilities, and thus present an equivalent challenge to some of the most gifted post-translators of our day. The focus will be on Rilke's Duino Elegies, one of the great works of 20th century Modernism, whose composition spans the period of the First World War. This seminar module offers an opportunity, by means of close reading, to explore these major works in detail, to consider the position of the poet and the lyric voice in times of crisis and transition, and to locate them within the wider Western poetic tradition. All texts studied are readily available in a range of English translations.

LDCL6023A

30

ROMANTIC ORIENTALISM, 1780-1830

The fascination with the "East" and the "Exotic" (the "Oriental Renaissance") was an important element of the British Romantic period. This module will explore the material history of British involvement in the 'East' in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; how that 'East' was constructed and represented for a western metropolitan audience; and explore the cultural productions of that involvement in poetry, fictional, prose and visual art. Texts discussed will include writing by well-known Romantic writers, such as S. T. Coleridge, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley and Thomas de Quincey, as well as those by William Beckford, Sir William Jones, Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan). It will explore the influence of Arabian Nights on Gothic and Romantic period writing. Areas discussed will include India, Persia, the Levant, and China. The module will discuss such writings in the light of contemporary postcolonial theories of Orientalism including criticism by Edward Said, Gayatori Spivak, Abdul JanMohammed and others. This module will concentrate in particular on the representation of the Indian people, places and cultures of the Indian sub continent.

LDCL6091A

30

SATIRE

'Satire is problematic, open ended, essayistic, ambiguous in relation to history, uncertain in its political effects, resistant to final closure, more inclined to ask questions than provide answers, ambivalent about the pleasures it offers' (Dustin Griffin).The aim of this module is to investigate the problematic territory of satire. Using examples from modern and contemporary fiction and journalism alongside early modern and classical satire, we will formulate a critical and conceptual map, which will in turn allow us to discuss some of the problems of satire (those of genre, of gender, of politics, of morality, of history), and to explore some of the paradoxes of its strategies and functions (freedom versus limits; subversion versus conformity; transformation versus stasis).Writers under discussion will include Juvenal, Horace, Swift and Pope; John Dryden, Eliza Haywood, Delarivier Manley, Evelyn Waugh, and Jonathan Coe.This module offers the opportunity for one or more of the assessments to e a creative writing piece. This module counts towards the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6085B

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love.

LDCL6056B

30

STOP, LOOK, LISTEN

This is a module abut attention and description, and about how the two together might constitute a way of life. Our reference point will be the journal of the English poet R.F. Langley, an extraordinary volume of set-piece encounters with the natural world, with artworks and with everyday objects and spaces. We'll read Langley's descriptions alongside the words or images or objects to which he attends. We'll trace the aesthetic and philosophical influences that form what we'll consider as a poetics of attention, including Ruskin, Adrian Stokes and Merleau-Ponty. And we'll look at other examples of writing which seek closely to transcribe and account for acts of attention, whether involving nature (Hopkins, Richard Jefferies, Edward Thomas) or art (T.J.Clark, Mieke Bal). Attending to attention will require us to consider variously questions of perception, of ekphrasis (the rhetorical figure closest to the writing in question here) and of environmental literature. We'll have a chance also to visit a small number of appropriate places - a Norwich church, one or two local galleries - and see or ourselves how attentive we're willing to be. The module is intended for both literature and creative writing students, expecially those with an interest in visual art, aesthetics and nature writing. It will involve regular writing exercises and will offer considerable scope for creative-critical experiment.

LDCL6112A

30

T.S. ELIOT AND TWENTIETH CENTURY POETRY

The poetry of T.S. Eliot has a unique place in modern verse as a body of writing that combines mass popular appeal with intense intellectual challenge. The first half of this module will take students chronologically through the various stages of Eliot's Collected Poems, from the nineteenth-century influences that combined to prudcue 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' (1915) to the wartime contexts of his final major poem, Four Quartets (1944). It will also offer an introduction to Eliot's literary criticism as well as criticism written about him. The first coursework essay will take the form of an editorial commentary on a chosen poem or passage, giving students an opportunity to follow up allusions and interpretations through wider reading. The second half of the module will look more broadly at Eliot's influence as a poet, critic, and editor. Beginning with his own views of the need to reinvent poetry's cultural significance for the twentieth century, we will consider the importance of Eliot's example to later poets in Britain (W.H. Auden, W.S. Graham, Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, J.H. Prynne) as well as around the world, such as John Ashbery (American), Kamau Brathwaite (West Indies), Seamus Heaney (Ireland), Tomas Transtromer (Sweden) and Gwen Harwood (Australia). The final project will be 3,000-word essay on any Eliot-related topic of the student's choosing, and may take the form of a creative-critical poetry portfolio and self-commentary in response to the reading for the course.

LDCL6122B

30

THE ART OF EMOTION: LITERATURE, WRITING AND FEELING

According to Roland Barthes, emotion is 'a disturbance, a bordering on collapse: something perverse, under respectable appearances; emotion is even, perhaps, the slyest of losses'. This module takes this 'perversity, under respectable appearance' as the starting point for asking how an an attention to our emotions - our feeling, affects, and intimacies, as well as our aversions - can make us rethink what it means to be critical and creative readers and writers. Drawing on a range of theoretical and critical work from literary studies, cultural theory, art, philosophy, sociology, neuroscience, psychology, creativity and creative writing studies, cognitive science, history and anthropology, we will ask what it means to read, and write, 'with feeling'. What is the relationship between language and feeling? Between the body and emotion? How does literature touch and move us? Are our 'aesthetic' emotions real? How does technology - the digital, virtual, prosthetic and online - affect our ideas about emotion? Are emotions universal and timeless, or historically and culturally specific? Private and personal, or collective and public? How do emotions construct gender, class, race, nationality, and other kinds of identity? Why do some feelings attract more critical interest than others? How does an attention to emotion affect our work as readers and writers? We will begin by building a theoretical and critical literacy for thinking feeling, before focusing our inquiry around specific themes that might include: Animal Passions; Pscyhe, Pathology and Resistances to Psychoanalysis; Feeling Texts: Touch, Texture and Fictional Fabrications; Moving Fictions: Cinema, Virtuality, and E-motion; Zombies: Can Dead Subjects Feel?; Affective Economies; Queering Feeling; and Feeling Human: Robots, Artificial Intelligence and Clones. We will engage with a range of literary texts and other aesthetic forms (such as art, film, etc.) chosen to correspond with our critical concerns. You will have the opportunity to engage both as critical and creative readers and writers, and there will be critical and creative assessment options. This module is open to all students. It will complement level 3 options such as 'Literature and Deconstruction', 'Nervous Narratives', 'Traumaturgies', ' Literature and Human Rights' and 'Queer Theory'.

LDCL6118B

30

THE CONTESTED PAST: LITERATURE AND THE POLITICS OF MEMORY

How do we negotiate the darker aspects of our past, particularly when individuals' experiences clash with official history? This module explores the public and private practices of remembering and forgetting in the aftermath of civil war, totalitarianism, colonialism or otherwise repressive rule. In particular, we will examine the writer's role as collaborator , witness, archivist or dissident: how does the writer facIlitate access to, and debate about, contentious, painful or obfuscated history? Our approach to the politics of commemoration is interdisciplinary and draws on ideas from philosophy, historiography, memory and cultural studies as well as heritage and museum studies. The primary material encompasses a range of fictional, non-fictional and visual material from a wide range of genres; most of it postwar and relatively recent. Since this is a global issue you will enounter writers from formerly colonised nations in Africa, from Central and Eastern Europe, South America, and the Near and Asia.

LDCL6097A

30

THE GOTHIC

This module seeks to cover some 'canonical' texts of the Gothic Novel (1764-1820) in Walpole, Radcliffe, Mary Shelley, and to consider some later developments of the gothic mode in later 19th and 20th centuries: Poe, Le Fanu, Stevenson, MR James, Elizabeth Bowen, David Storey and Angela Carter. The course also seeks to introduce students to some of the theoretical and historical arguments around the contested nature of the term 'gothic', the Uncanny, the subversiveness or otherwise of this kind of writing, and its relation to the novel genre.

LDCL6024A

30

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS: NONSENSE AND MODERN WRITING

It's widely recognised that modernist literature is characterised by a revolution of the word. Less widely recognised, and little explored, is the relationship between modernist linguistic experimentalism and literary nonsense, as practised by Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, and others. This course will begin with these well-known nonsense writers and explore their roots in seventeenth and eighteenth-century nonsense, before going on to examine some of the adventures in language of major modernist and postmodernist writers. Modernist and postmodernist authors studied are likely to include the Joyce of Finnegans Wake, early Auden, Wallace Stevens, Nabokov, and John Ashbery. This is not a course on children's literature, but on some very challenging modern literature, mostly poetry. It should appeal to those who take a childish pleasure in wordplay and fantasy. You will need to enjoy uncertainty and have good close-reading skills. To do this module you must have studied either Modernism or Critical Theory, unless you obtain a waiver from the lecturer.

LDCL6015A

30

TRAUMATURGIES: READING AND WRITING TRAUMA ACROSS CONTEXTS

Trauma haunts the writing of the twentieth century. Slavery, war, patriarchy, terrorism, genocide, colonialism, modernity, technology and post-modernity: these legacies demand to be written and read, and engender a writing singular to their traumas. Yet the writing of these wounds, and the critical work that reads it, raises fundamental questions about whether trauma can ever be represented or understood. Spreading beyond their contexts, these questions effect their own traumas, cracking open our assumptions about what it is possible to read, to write, and indeed to think. Working roughly from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, this module reads a selection of theoretical, literary and critical texts that aim to write and read trauma across cultural, historical, personal and public contexts.

LDCL6050A

30

ULYSSES

This module will provide students with the opportunity to read one of the most famous, yet notoriously unread, novels of the twentieth century. The module has a number of aims. First, it will give students the time and opportunity to try to read and understand James Joyce's Ulysses. Secondly, the module will introduce students to some of the formal innovations typical of modernist writing through the close analysis of techniques such as interior monologue and mythic analogy. Thirdly, it will allow students to read a wide range of responses to Ulysses, both among Joyce's contemporaries, and in the history of twentieth century criticism. Fourthly, the module will situate the text historically, with a particular focus on the way that the text's obscenity affected its reception and circulation in the 1920s and 1930s.

LDCL6076B

30

UNLIKE THEM ALL, AND BETTER? ENGLISHING THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE

This module is predicated on Petrarch's explanation of imitatio, which is that a poet ought to draw upon a number of sourceswithout making any of them explicitly apparent and 'blend them into a oneness that is unlike them all, and better'. As such the module analyses English translations and imitations of influential late medieval and early modern texts, such as Dante's Commedia, Boccaccio's Filostrato, Petrarch's Canzoniere and Ariosto's Orlando furioso. The course will also examine late medieval and early modern theories of translatio and imitatio formulated by Italian and English authors. In each case the text will be read in modern translation, with excerpts from the original Italian provided, and then compared with a late medieval or early modern translation or imitation. In the case of longer texts specific sections will be identified for study. Petrarach's dictum will be measured via the coursework, which is comprised of two creative-critical crossover exercises. Students are by no means expected to know any Italian or Latin in advance, the triangulation method of analysis (original text, early translation, modern translation) will enable those students who are willing to pick up the very basics if they so choose. Further exercises will be made available via Blackboard in this area. Each three-hour session will involve a workshop element, in which students practise imitation and translation, and each week a student will open the session with a translation from/imitation of the text under examination as a means of initiating the discussion.

LDCL6124B

30

URBAN VISIONS: THE CITY IN LITERATURE AND VISUAL CULTURE

This interdisciplinary module explores the idea of 'the city' through a selection of writings (fiction, poetry, essays, theory), visual (painting, photography, film) and, occasionally, other sensory material (sound, smell), spanning 1850 to the present day and focused on two great capitals of modernity, Paris and London. In this period, the growth of the great European cities created a new and diverse set of environments and possibilities. Utopias, dystopias, sites of ruin and construction of all kinds; what different, contradictory or coherent versions of urban experience do these texts and images offer? We'll investigate what kinds of wiritng, art, discourses and attitudes cities seem to generate. Along the way, we'll test out Malcolm Bradbury's assertion that modernism found its natural habitat in cities, was indeed 'an art of cities'. How do textual and pictorial techniques intersect, for example, in the case of nineteenth-century Impressionist art and writing, twentieth-century surrealism and situationism, or contemporary street art and photography? In the company of the flaneur/flaneuse and other urban wanderers, we'll consider aspects such as space, place, urban being and time, love and eroticism, hauntings, memory and the presence of the past, the individual and the crowd, the role of consumer capitalism, nature and the natural, psychogeography, and the pressures, preoccupations and thrills peculiar to urban living. Writers to be studied may include Balzac, Dickens, Pei, Baudelaire, Zola, Gissing, Conan Doyle, Celine, Aragon, Breton, Woolf, Iaian Sinclair, Peter Ackroyd and China Mieville alongside a selection of theorists, poets, artists and photographers, as well as Patrick Keiller's film, London and a selection of other city films.

LDCL6114B

30

VIRGIL'S CLASSIC EPIC

This module will explore the centrality of Virgil's Aeneid to Medieval and Renaissance culture. It will examine developing attitudes to the Classical literary legacy and accommodation and reinvention of Virgil's epic poem within new religious, political and literary contexts. The course will begin with exploration of Virgil's poem on its own terms before turning to re-workings of the 'Aeneid' by Augustine, Dante, Chaucer, Douglas and Marlowe, the Renaissance invention of a 13th Book to 'complete' Virgil's poem, and the recasting of classical epic within the very different conventions of medieval and Renaissance romance. Previous experience of classical or medieval literature is not required.

LDCL6054B

30

WRITING LIFE: BIOGRAPHY AND CREATIVE NON-FICTION

How do writers attempt to capture 'life' in all its various forms? What, if any, are the different requirements in writing the life of a famous (or not so famous) person and that of a city or landscape? What about the 'life' of travel or food and how do you approach writing about the natural world? These are just some of the questions that this module sets out to address. We will be reading a wide variety of texts, from the 'traditional' biography to some of the more experimental examples of creative non-fiction. From Samuel Johnson to essays in The New Yorker, all human (and non-human) life will be there! Students may choose between writing their own piece of Biography or creative Non-Fiction as their final project or submitting a critical essay.

LDCL6026B

30

Option C Study (60 credits)

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

18TH CENTURY VOYAGE LITERATURE

The eighteenth-century reading public eagerly devoured narratives of voyages around the world. In this course we will survey the diverse ranGe of voyage litearature this century produced. We will read accounts of actual and fictional Voyages, as well as narratives that fall somewhere between the real and the imaginary. Key questions for us will be how voyagers' identities and ideas are reshaped through th experience of the sea and its islands, how our texts both articulate and question the ideologies underpinning Britain's maritime empire, and how voyage literature connects to other literary genres, including the novel, romance, history, utopia and anecdote. Texts include Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, James Cook's Endeavour Journal, Daniel Defoe's The Storm, Olaudah Equiano's The Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano, Janet Schaw's Journal of a Lady of Quality and Tobias Smollett's Roderick Random. THIS COURSE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6108B

30

AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

This module aims to introduce students to the fascinatingly wide and diverse area of American autobiography. It takes a broadly chronological structure in order to introduce key narratives and writers in the history of American autobiography, and will also enable students to engage with important theoretical debates influencing how we might understand autobiography - debates which can perhaps best be described as attempting to determine what is at stake in writing, reading and defining the autobiographical 'I'. Questions to be explored will include: What do we mean by autobiography? Why is it so difficult to define autobiography? What is 'American' about autobiography?

AMAL6007A

30

AMERICAN GOTHIC

American fiction began in the period of the European Gothic novel, which thus marked the American tradition from the first. In this seminar module we will establish the meaning of gothic conventions and consider their persisting effects in American fiction.

AMAL6024B

30

AMERICAN PARADISE: LAND AND CULTURE IN THE USA

This module is about land. It is about the dream of the American wilderness, of bountiful nature in a land of plenty, and about earth turned to profit. It is about plants and botany - and the way in which the American people have responded to the natural environment around them. For scientists, explorers, artists and writers, that could mean a sense of wonder. In rural America, though, it often meant, more prosaically, viewing the land as a resource, to be exploited, by cultivation or mineral extraction and mining, perhaps. In the industrial city, it often meant creating protected enclaves - gardens, parks, national parks - which might offer a retreat from urban smokestacks. In the post-industrial age, it has very often meant returning to derelict land to plant crops or parks where factories once stood, to grow food and, possibly more importantly, to regrow communities. Above all, this module is about the many different ways in which Americans have defined their own sense of their nation and their own identities through reference to the natural world.

AMAS6046B

30

CALIFORNIA DREAMING: NOVELS OF THE GOLDEN STATE

This module looks at the ways in which California has represented itself, or been represented, in fiction. Beginning with the 'first' published Californian novel of 1854, The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta, the Celebrated California Bandit, we will trace the development of the Californian novel into the early twenty-first century. One particular interest is the ways in which Californian novels engage with, dissect, and critique notions of California as a 'dream' or ideal/idyll; and we will explore how novelists address crucial, and often contentious, historical moments in Californian history. Topics include settlement and 'removal'; migration and immigration; corporate interests and 'big business'; Los Angleles as the City of Dreams; and 'global' California. Writers will include some or all of the following: Mary Austin, T C Boyle, Joan Didion, Chester Himes, Frank Norris, Kem Nunn; John Rollin Ridge, Upton Sinclair, John Steinbeck, Helena Maria Viramontes, Nathaniel West, and Karen Tei Yamashita.

AMAL6044A

30

CHARLES DICKENS: BEYOND REALITY

Charles Dickens has been described, and cherished, as one fo the great chroniclers of the panorama of mid-Victorian society. At the same time, much modern criticism has rightly emphasised what a strange and innovative writer he is, less a documentary social realist than an early practitioner of what might now be called 'magical realism',. This module will examine works from across Dickens's writing career, in a variety of different modes - fiction, journalism, drama, and public speaking - reading them not only in the context of Dickens's times, but also in the context of how other writers in those times dealt with comparable questions. As a result, students will be able to develop their larger interests in the relationships between social reality and its literary representations.

LDCL6089B

30

CHAUCER

This module explores Chaucer's major writings in their historical, cultural and literary contexts. The module will introduce Chaucer's writing in a range of genres and will examine his works' representation and exploration of society, identity, chivalry, politics, religion and gender, and will also consider the medieval reception of Chaucer's writing. Previous experience of medieval literature will be useful but is not required.

LDCL6053A

30

CULTURES OF SUBURBIA

The history of twentieth-century literature is often told from the perspective of the metropolitan avant-garde. Modernist writers and intellectuals by turns celebrated or abominated the modern metropolis, but they tended to agree that the urban and the modern were inextricably linked. They were also often united by a hatred of suburbia, which they associated with the rise of a pooterish middle class and in turn with an irredeemably philistine, socially conservative middlebrow culture. Wyndham Lewis famously blasted 'the purgatory of Putney'. Yet in certain respects the twentieth century was the suburban century, as the cities continued their horizontal expansion and the separation of 'life' and 'work' that is the suburban response to industrialism became widespread. The growth of suburbia from the late nineteenth century to the present day has provoked a fascinating variety of cultural responses, including, but not limited to, hostile denunciations. Writers, artists and filmmakers found much opportunity for comedy in suburban habits, values and aspirations. They considered the emergence of the suburban housewife and the implications for this for women and for feminism. They debated the architecture and planning of the suburbs, notably through engagements with the Garden City and Garden Suburb movements. They speculated about the political implications of the growth of a literature, home-owning suburban middle class. They depicted the effects of mass immigration on suburbia and the development of suburban multiculture. They pointed to the uncanny and even the surreal aspects of suburban life. This module explores the literature and cultural geography of the English suburbs, and in so doing it suggests an alternative history of modernity, told not from the centre but from the periphery. Writers covered might include: George and Weedon Grossmith, Arthur Machen, William Morris, C.F.G Masterman, Ebenezer Howard, H. G. Wells, G.K. Chesterton, John Galsworth, Dorothy Richardson, George Orwell, Stevie Smith, John Betjeman, Elizabeth Bowen, Doris Lessing, Hanif Kureshi, J. G Ballard, Jonathan Meades and Julian Barnes.

LDCL6095A

30

DRAMA AND LITERATURE: THE QUESTION OF GENRE

This seminar will explore the boundaries between drama and other genres (kinds, art-forms, media) in an attempt to investigate a number of interrelated theoretical questions. We shall explore these issues via various types of activity - practical criticism, critiques of literary theory, performance analysis, personal theatrical adaptations. The set texts are works of literature which do not quite fit generically - particularly plays that seem to be in some sense 'epic', or novels in some sense 'theatrical', ranging from Shakespeare in the 17th century through to Gay and Fielding in the 18th and Dostoyevsky and Chekhov in the 19th.

LDCL6017B

30

FIN DE SIECLE: FANTASIES OF DECADENCE AND DEGENERATION

Max Nordau's 1892 Degeneration, attacking fin de siecle decadence, draws together fears of cultural decline and corrupting artistic practice through pseudo-Darwinian thinking about devolution. Yet Nordau's urgent and apocalyptic claims about 'diseased' art draw an ambivalent response from contemporary writers, such as those associated with the aestheticism and decadence of The Yellow Book. It is within the fantastic, however, that Nordau is most directly confronted and social norms most explicitly deformed by art. Wilde's swift move from pedestal to pederast may remove a key figure, but texts such as The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Novel of the White Powder; Dracula; Wells' science fiction dystopias and, more recently, Moore and Campbell's From Hell, rehearse, react to, or reflect upon such concerns. These writings share a central tension: are the effects of decadence and degeneration offering pessimistic prophesy or optimistic alternatives? This module would complement nineteenth-century options and offer a perspective on the Modernist module. For students also taking the Gothic it would be related, although usefully focusing on the closing years of the nineteenth century with a different emphasis.

LDCL6028B

30

HENRY JAMES: QUESTIONS OF ART, LIFE AND THEORY

In this module students engage with the range of Henry James's writing and also the reproduction of his life and work in contemporary culture. This module aims not simply to add to understanding of James but also to explore the issues that his work raises in relation to the art and history of fiction, philosophy and cultural reproduction. It is suitable not only for literature students who want to study this writer who spans realism and modernism, and short stories, literary criticism and fiction, but also for creative writing students and literature and philosophy students. The final assignment will have a creative writing option that comprises a piece of creative writing with a critical reflection. It can be taken by students who have studied modules in nineteenth-century writing or modernism.

LDCL6075B

30

IMAGINING THE PACIFIC

This module considers the ways in which American literature has represented the opening up of Pacific space from the early nineteenth century to the present. From Melville's adventures on whaling vessels throughout the Pacific, to Pearl Harbour and anxieties about Japanese presence in and beyond the borders of the United States, to writing by contemporary Asian-American and Pacific authors, the texts on this course chart the ways in which the Pacific Ocean and its peoples have contributed to, created, and contested American national narratives. The module will develop students' insights into issues of U.S. national history and cultural geography, and deepen their engagement with current theories of nationalism and transnationalism as a frame for reflection on their studies abroad. At its heart a course in American literature, students will encounter an array of different genres of writing, including novels, travel narratives, poetry, short stories, and memoirs.

AMAL6042B

30

IMAGINING THE PAST IN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE

In the English Renaissance (roughly the period 1500-1650), the way writers thought about their country's past was changing radically. The emergence of modern nationalism, the radical religious changes brought about by the Reformation, and new understandings of our relationship to the English language and to the British landscape, all fundamentally reshaped writers' relationship to the past. How did Renaissance writers imagine their ancestors? How did they negotiate their complicated relationship with the age that came before them, the period we tend to call the 'middle ages'? How did they situate themselves among Britain's often wild and remote landscape? How did war and colonialism demand radical transformations of history? What was the creative potential of the English language's messy, hybrid history? And -perhaps most importantly - how did all these pressures shape the poetry and drama of the period? This module will ask these large questions of the English Renaissance's most important writers, including Edmund Spenser, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, and you will be introduced to some of their greatest works. These works will be read alongside some texts (icluding non-literary texts), which are less well-known today, but were considerd important in their own age. The module will proceed through a series of close-readings of pieces of poetry, prose and drama, allowing large questions to emerge from short passages of text during the seminars. There will be short written exercises regularly during the module to help you prepare for the final Project, and there will the the opportunity for one-on-one-tutorials too. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6100B

30

LATIN AMERICAN NARRATIVES

While the term 'narrative' in Spanish is often used to denote fiction it is not restrictive to the genre. The aim of this module is to explore the core of storytelling that underpins Latin American literature and which surfaces in various forms of writing from the 'microrelato' to the short story, the prose poem as well as the 'rewriting' exercise/critical appraisal, such as Alejandra Pizarnik's the Bloody Countess. A further aspect of this module is to attempt to disentangle the web of literary influences woven into some of these Latin American narratives as well as to trace the itinerary of these influential threads as they travelled from the South of the American continent to other literatures. As the editors of Issue 113 of Granta have stated "who would hve imagined fifteen years ago that writings of the outcast Chilean Roberto Bolano who washed ashore in Barcelona via Mexico, would exercise so wide an influence on writers in Spain, Latin America and across the world:" And yet, Bolano's literary output is unthinkable without Borges, just as the Colombian Juan gabriel Vasquez' Secret History of Costaguana is inconceivable without Conrad's Nostromo. Readings will include works by Borges, Cortazar, Bolano, Juan Gabriel Vasquez, Clarice Lispector, Alejandra Pizarnik, amongst others. The module would elaborate upon the level one Writing Texts module and would complement World Literature: Reading Globally.

LDCL6093A

30

LITERATURE AND DECONSTRUCTION

In an interview with Derek Attridge, Jacques Derrida describes literature as 'this strange institution which allows one to say everything'. This module explores the writings of Derrida and related thinkers alongside a range of literary texts, including works by Keats, Shakespeare and Joyce. Through a combination of lectures and seminars, we will think about the strangenesses of literature, look at the ways in which it is an 'institution' and consider the kinds of freedom - of speech, writing and thinking - it permits. Our aim throughout will be to establish the possibilities for literary criticism opened up by deconstruction. The module is open to everyone, but may be of particular interest to those who studied critical theory in the second year.

LDCL6048A

30

LITERATURE AND OPERA

Sixteenth-century Italian literati created opera as the rebirth of Greek Tragedy. From its basic form as word-plus-music to its repeated reforms that have put now text, now music, now drama first,opera and literature have constantly complemented and competed with each other. This module explores the relationship between opera and various kinds of literature, including drama, prose, and poetry. We will ask "How can an orchestra narrate?" "How is an opera libretto like a movie script?" "Why do certain literary texts invite musical adaptation more than others?" and "What is the 'best' literary analogy for opera: drama, poetry, or the novel?" Students will also compare various operas with their literary sources in order to better understand how different media represent race, gender, and nationality. Composers will include Brittten, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Rossini, and Weill. Authors will include Shakespeare, Wilde, Brecht, James, Scott, Joyce and Aeschylus.

LDCL6101B

30

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module explores the relations between literature and philosophy and differing understandings of the self, love and ethics through close reading of philosophical and literary texts. It is organised chronologically and moves from the classical writing of Plato to modern literature. The module designed for final year students who are studying Literature and Philosophy. It is also open only to students in Literature who have taken modules in Philosophy in years one and two; or by special concession at the discretion of the module organiser to other students who have substantial experience in both Honours level Literature and Honours level Philosophy.

LDCL6025A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (AUT)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period from 1789 to the present day (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6018A

30

LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (SPR)

This module is an advanced-level module, for final year students only. It provides students with the opportunity to write an 8000-word dissertation on literature of the period from 1789 to the present day (excluding American literature). The dissertation topic must be agreed by a supervisor, and both topic and supervisor approved by the module organiser by the end of the previous semester.

LDCL6019B

30

LYRIC

The module will incorporate a historical survey of Western lyric, looking at its inception in the poetry of Pindar and Sappho, and the Aristotelian division of poetic arts in lyric, dramatic and epic. It will cover lyrics from Provencal troubadour poets through the Italian and English renaissance to Romantic lyric. Finally, it will cover the fate of lyric in the present day, from 'conceptual writing' and 'post-humanism' which offer a thoroughgoing rejection of lyric, to the embrace of lyric in contemporary young poets. The module will start by considering the question: 'What is lyric'? The purpose is not to establish a transhistorical concept of lyric as genre or mode, but rather to see how different thinkers at different times have approached it. This is a particularly timely question for literary criticism and poetics. We will isolate certain tropes, ethics, and focal points that are taken to be characteristic of lyric, whilst at the same time probing the historicity of lyric as a concept, especially regarding the ideology of the lyric 'I' that is associated with romanticism. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6087A

30

MEDIEVAL GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Gender and sexual identities are neither given nor fixed, but rather learned and insistently fluid. It is the aim of this module to tease out their complexity and challenge assumptions. The medieval is constantly imagined as a key moment in the history of sexuality, though it is rare for critics to gree on quite why this should be so and provokes lively and contentious debate. Examining a range of medieval poems, narratives, drama and images, students will explore the historical construction of the body, virginities, heterosexuality, homosexuality, the polymorphous erotics of female mysticism, the medieval understanding of cross-dressing, and the intersectionof sexuality with race, gender, and religion. By the end of the module, students will have improved their knowledge of medieval writing and culture and will have considered the writing and performance of gender in historical context.

LDCL6120A

30

NATIVE AMERICAN WRITING AND FILM

This module considers Native American writing and film as sites of cultural and political resistance, analysing the ways in which a diverse range of Native authors, screenwriters and directors within the United States respond to contemporary tribal socio-economic and political conditions. Taking popular ideas of 'the Indian', this module considers the ways in which stereotypes and audience expectations are subverted and challenged. Topics include race and racism, indigeneity, identity, culture, gender, genre, land and notions of 'home', community, dialogue, postcolonial theory in its application to those who remain colonised, and political issues such as human rights and environmental racism.

AMAS6027B

30

NERVOUS NARRATIVES

'We all say it's nerves, and none of us knows what it means', says a character in Wilkie Collins' 1860 novel, The Woman in White. Our aim is to think about how a discourse of the 'nerves' - the 'nervous temperament' and nervous illness - can be both so pervasive culturally and so slippery in its meaning. This interdisciplinary module takes you from the late 17th century, when the concept of 'neurologie' first emerged, to the 21st century, linking literary, medical and philosophical writing to explore the representation of the 'nerves'. The historical range of the module is not meant to imply a transhistorical understanding of nervous illness or temperament, but rather will enable us to analyse the historically specific nature of the nervous body and what it is made to mean, culturally, within different contexts. In this way, we will be working with issues as diverse as religious 'enthusiasm', hysteria and hypochondria, sensibility, sensation, fear of modernity, manliness and effeminacy, shell-shock, PTSD and the concepts of the healthy or fragile body of the nation. Spanning time and genre, the literary texts studied will take us from the earliest, Jonathan Swift's satire, A Tale of a Tub (1704) up to the contemporary: Siri Hustvedt's novel, What I Loved (2003) and her analytical memoir, The Shaking Woman, Or, A History of My Nerves (2010).

LDCL6046A

30

NEW WORLDS: SCIENCE FICTION AND BEYOND

It has been suggested that science fiction was the authentic literature of the twentieth century, yet it has also been seen as a genre cut off from the literary mainstream, its provenance, tropes and generic limits contested. Are there distinctions betwen science fiction, speculative fiction and even sci-fi? This module aims to explore science fiction as a mode by investigating varous definitions of science fiction and asking: what possibilities does it offer to writers? How does it mediate the relationship between literature and science (and technology): And how have writers gone beyond the conventional limits of the genre (and we will also consider other media)? The module will look at thematic clusters of texts, often pushing the boundaries of the conventional sci-fi canon and encouraging students to think across different literary periods about the antecedents of science fiction. We will consider such themes as interplanetary travel, time travel, ecological catastrope, speculative fiction, experiments with scale, and steam punk and writers studied might include H.G. Wells, John Wyndham, Ursula K. Le Guin, J.G. Ballard, Margaret Atwood and China Mieville.

LDCL6116B

30

POETRY IN DARK TIMES?

This module will engage with the poetry of three major poets (Holderlin, Rilke, Celan) who, writing in (and against) the Romantic, Modernist and post-Holocaust eras respectively, test language (in this case German) to the very limits of its expressive possibilities, and thus present an equivalent challenge to some of the most gifted post-translators of our day. The focus will be on Rilke's Duino Elegies, one of the great works of 20th century Modernism, whose composition spans the period of the First World War. This seminar module offers an opportunity, by means of close reading, to explore these major works in detail, to consider the position of the poet and the lyric voice in times of crisis and transition, and to locate them within the wider Western poetic tradition. All texts studied are readily available in a range of English translations.

LDCL6023A

30

ROMANTIC ORIENTALISM, 1780-1830

The fascination with the "East" and the "Exotic" (the "Oriental Renaissance") was an important element of the British Romantic period. This module will explore the material history of British involvement in the 'East' in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; how that 'East' was constructed and represented for a western metropolitan audience; and explore the cultural productions of that involvement in poetry, fictional, prose and visual art. Texts discussed will include writing by well-known Romantic writers, such as S. T. Coleridge, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley and Thomas de Quincey, as well as those by William Beckford, Sir William Jones, Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan). It will explore the influence of Arabian Nights on Gothic and Romantic period writing. Areas discussed will include India, Persia, the Levant, and China. The module will discuss such writings in the light of contemporary postcolonial theories of Orientalism including criticism by Edward Said, Gayatori Spivak, Abdul JanMohammed and others. This module will concentrate in particular on the representation of the Indian people, places and cultures of the Indian sub continent.

LDCL6091A

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love.

LDCL6056B

30

SIN, SENTIMENT AND SENSATION: NINETEENTH CENTURY BESTSELLERS

This module offers the opportunity to become familiar with books that would once have been known and loved by millionsof readers - books that helped to define the very notion of what a "bestseller" was and might be. Packed with sin, sentiment and sensation, the texts on this module, by both British and American writers, defined the popular literary scene across the length of the nineteenth century on both sides of the Atlantic. We will analyse their massive appeal to nineteenth century readers in America and Britain, explore their contemporary recption, consider their multimedia adaptions and the place of publishing technology in their success, examine their role in moral panics and popular crazes, and think about why so many of these extraordinarily successful books are now forgotten, popularly and critically. What can the most read books of the nineteenth century tell us about the politics of popular literature, then and now?

AMAL6046B

30

STOP, LOOK, LISTEN

This is a module abut attention and description, and about how the two together might constitute a way of life. Our reference point will be the journal of the English poet R.F. Langley, an extraordinary volume of set-piece encounters with the natural world, with artworks and with everyday objects and spaces. We'll read Langley's descriptions alongside the words or images or objects to which he attends. We'll trace the aesthetic and philosophical influences that form what we'll consider as a poetics of attention, including Ruskin, Adrian Stokes and Merleau-Ponty. And we'll look at other examples of writing which seek closely to transcribe and account for acts of attention, whether involving nature (Hopkins, Richard Jefferies, Edward Thomas) or art (T.J.Clark, Mieke Bal). Attending to attention will require us to consider variously questions of perception, of ekphrasis (the rhetorical figure closest to the writing in question here) and of environmental literature. We'll have a chance also to visit a small number of appropriate places - a Norwich church, one or two local galleries - and see or ourselves how attentive we're willing to be. The module is intended for both literature and creative writing students, expecially those with an interest in visual art, aesthetics and nature writing. It will involve regular writing exercises and will offer considerable scope for creative-critical experiment.

LDCL6112A

30

T.S. ELIOT AND TWENTIETH CENTURY POETRY

The poetry of T.S. Eliot has a unique place in modern verse as a body of writing that combines mass popular appeal with intense intellectual challenge. The first half of this module will take students chronologically through the various stages of Eliot's Collected Poems, from the nineteenth-century influences that combined to prudcue 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' (1915) to the wartime contexts of his final major poem, Four Quartets (1944). It will also offer an introduction to Eliot's literary criticism as well as criticism written about him. The first coursework essay will take the form of an editorial commentary on a chosen poem or passage, giving students an opportunity to follow up allusions and interpretations through wider reading. The second half of the module will look more broadly at Eliot's influence as a poet, critic, and editor. Beginning with his own views of the need to reinvent poetry's cultural significance for the twentieth century, we will consider the importance of Eliot's example to later poets in Britain (W.H. Auden, W.S. Graham, Sylvia Plath, Geoffrey Hill, J.H. Prynne) as well as around the world, such as John Ashbery (American), Kamau Brathwaite (West Indies), Seamus Heaney (Ireland), Tomas Transtromer (Sweden) and Gwen Harwood (Australia). The final project will be 3,000-word essay on any Eliot-related topic of the student's choosing, and may take the form of a creative-critical poetry portfolio and self-commentary in response to the reading for the course.

LDCL6122B

30

TALES OF THE JAZZ AGE

This module examines American prose of the 1920s in the context of the Jazz Age. American literature of the 20s is often conflated with modernism, or the expatriate experience, or the Harlem Renaissance; this module will consider 1920s writing in the context of the market and the rise of professional authorship, anxieties about imitation and the middlebrow and conformism, and the pressures of commercial success on fiction. It will draw on reception studies and the influence of publication formats (mass-market magazines, serial publication, the burgeoning market for film adaptations). Texts will be drawn from a mix of "high" and "low." After considering the pressures of commercialism on the publication of The Waste Land, texts could include the short stories of Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise, The Sun Also Rises, The Great Gatsby, Babbitt, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Winesburg, Ohio, Glimpses of the Moon, and Manhattan Transfer. Students will also be expected to research journalism of the day, such as The New Yorker and the New York Times, which have accessible online archives.

AMAL6020A

30

THE ART OF EMOTION: LITERATURE, WRITING AND FEELING

According to Roland Barthes, emotion is 'a disturbance, a bordering on collapse: something perverse, under respectable appearances; emotion is even, perhaps, the slyest of losses'. This module takes this 'perversity, under respectable appearance' as the starting point for asking how an an attention to our emotions - our feeling, affects, and intimacies, as well as our aversions - can make us rethink what it means to be critical and creative readers and writers. Drawing on a range of theoretical and critical work from literary studies, cultural theory, art, philosophy, sociology, neuroscience, psychology, creativity and creative writing studies, cognitive science, history and anthropology, we will ask what it means to read, and write, 'with feeling'. What is the relationship between language and feeling? Between the body and emotion? How does literature touch and move us? Are our 'aesthetic' emotions real? How does technology - the digital, virtual, prosthetic and online - affect our ideas about emotion? Are emotions universal and timeless, or historically and culturally specific? Private and personal, or collective and public? How do emotions construct gender, class, race, nationality, and other kinds of identity? Why do some feelings attract more critical interest than others? How does an attention to emotion affect our work as readers and writers? We will begin by building a theoretical and critical literacy for thinking feeling, before focusing our inquiry around specific themes that might include: Animal Passions; Pscyhe, Pathology and Resistances to Psychoanalysis; Feeling Texts: Touch, Texture and Fictional Fabrications; Moving Fictions: Cinema, Virtuality, and E-motion; Zombies: Can Dead Subjects Feel?; Affective Economies; Queering Feeling; and Feeling Human: Robots, Artificial Intelligence and Clones. We will engage with a range of literary texts and other aesthetic forms (such as art, film, etc.) chosen to correspond with our critical concerns. You will have the opportunity to engage both as critical and creative readers and writers, and there will be critical and creative assessment options. This module is open to all students. It will complement level 3 options such as 'Literature and Deconstruction', 'Nervous Narratives', 'Traumaturgies', ' Literature and Human Rights' and 'Queer Theory'.

LDCL6118B

30

THE CONTESTED PAST: LITERATURE AND THE POLITICS OF MEMORY

How do we negotiate the darker aspects of our past, particularly when individuals' experiences clash with official history? This module explores the public and private practices of remembering and forgetting in the aftermath of civil war, totalitarianism, colonialism or otherwise repressive rule. In particular, we will examine the writer's role as collaborator , witness, archivist or dissident: how does the writer facIlitate access to, and debate about, contentious, painful or obfuscated history? Our approach to the politics of commemoration is interdisciplinary and draws on ideas from philosophy, historiography, memory and cultural studies as well as heritage and museum studies. The primary material encompasses a range of fictional, non-fictional and visual material from a wide range of genres; most of it postwar and relatively recent. Since this is a global issue you will enounter writers from formerly colonised nations in Africa, from Central and Eastern Europe, South America, and the Near and Asia.

LDCL6097A

30

THE GOTHIC

This module seeks to cover some 'canonical' texts of the Gothic Novel (1764-1820) in Walpole, Radcliffe, Mary Shelley, and to consider some later developments of the gothic mode in later 19th and 20th centuries: Poe, Le Fanu, Stevenson, MR James, Elizabeth Bowen, David Storey and Angela Carter. The course also seeks to introduce students to some of the theoretical and historical arguments around the contested nature of the term 'gothic', the Uncanny, the subversiveness or otherwise of this kind of writing, and its relation to the novel genre.

LDCL6024A

30

THE LITERARY 1960s

When thinking of the sixties, literature, in general, is not what immediately springs to mind - pushed, as it is, to the background of music and the counterculture. Yet the decade brought about many profound changes in the paradigms of literature. Amongst such changes was the proliferation of metafiction as a narrative response to both the 'exhaustion' of literature in the light of the period's dramatic events, and to the new literary and philosophical developments in critical theory (poststructuralism). There was also the emergence of two 'new' genres: new journalism, and the non-fiction novel. This module is an examination of literary responses to the many changes and challenges brought about in this decade. It will discuss whether literature simply recoiled into solipsistic abstraction or whether it was a motivating force in the general struggle to conceptualize a 'new' or countercultural American consciousness.

AMAL6040B

30

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS: NONSENSE AND MODERN WRITING

It's widely recognised that modernist literature is characterised by a revolution of the word. Less widely recognised, and little explored, is the relationship between modernist linguistic experimentalism and literary nonsense, as practised by Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, and others. This course will begin with these well-known nonsense writers and explore their roots in seventeenth and eighteenth-century nonsense, before going on to examine some of the adventures in language of major modernist and postmodernist writers. Modernist and postmodernist authors studied are likely to include the Joyce of Finnegans Wake, early Auden, Wallace Stevens, Nabokov, and John Ashbery. This is not a course on children's literature, but on some very challenging modern literature, mostly poetry. It should appeal to those who take a childish pleasure in wordplay and fantasy. You will need to enjoy uncertainty and have good close-reading skills. To do this module you must have studied either Modernism or Critical Theory, unless you obtain a waiver from the lecturer.

LDCL6015A

30

TRAUMATURGIES: READING AND WRITING TRAUMA ACROSS CONTEXTS

Trauma haunts the writing of the twentieth century. Slavery, war, patriarchy, terrorism, genocide, colonialism, modernity, technology and post-modernity: these legacies demand to be written and read, and engender a writing singular to their traumas. Yet the writing of these wounds, and the critical work that reads it, raises fundamental questions about whether trauma can ever be represented or understood. Spreading beyond their contexts, these questions effect their own traumas, cracking open our assumptions about what it is possible to read, to write, and indeed to think. Working roughly from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, this module reads a selection of theoretical, literary and critical texts that aim to write and read trauma across cultural, historical, personal and public contexts.

LDCL6050A

30

UNLIKE THEM ALL, AND BETTER? ENGLISHING THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE

This module is predicated on Petrarch's explanation of imitatio, which is that a poet ought to draw upon a number of sourceswithout making any of them explicitly apparent and 'blend them into a oneness that is unlike them all, and better'. As such the module analyses English translations and imitations of influential late medieval and early modern texts, such as Dante's Commedia, Boccaccio's Filostrato, Petrarch's Canzoniere and Ariosto's Orlando furioso. The course will also examine late medieval and early modern theories of translatio and imitatio formulated by Italian and English authors. In each case the text will be read in modern translation, with excerpts from the original Italian provided, and then compared with a late medieval or early modern translation or imitation. In the case of longer texts specific sections will be identified for study. Petrarach's dictum will be measured via the coursework, which is comprised of two creative-critical crossover exercises. Students are by no means expected to know any Italian or Latin in advance, the triangulation method of analysis (original text, early translation, modern translation) will enable those students who are willing to pick up the very basics if they so choose. Further exercises will be made available via Blackboard in this area. Each three-hour session will involve a workshop element, in which students practise imitation and translation, and each week a student will open the session with a translation from/imitation of the text under examination as a means of initiating the discussion.

LDCL6124B

30

URBAN VISIONS: THE CITY IN LITERATURE AND VISUAL CULTURE

This interdisciplinary module explores the idea of 'the city' through a selection of writings (fiction, poetry, essays, theory), visual (painting, photography, film) and, occasionally, other sensory material (sound, smell), spanning 1850 to the present day and focused on two great capitals of modernity, Paris and London. In this period, the growth of the great European cities created a new and diverse set of environments and possibilities. Utopias, dystopias, sites of ruin and construction of all kinds; what different, contradictory or coherent versions of urban experience do these texts and images offer? We'll investigate what kinds of wiritng, art, discourses and attitudes cities seem to generate. Along the way, we'll test out Malcolm Bradbury's assertion that modernism found its natural habitat in cities, was indeed 'an art of cities'. How do textual and pictorial techniques intersect, for example, in the case of nineteenth-century Impressionist art and writing, twentieth-century surrealism and situationism, or contemporary street art and photography? In the company of the flaneur/flaneuse and other urban wanderers, we'll consider aspects such as space, place, urban being and time, love and eroticism, hauntings, memory and the presence of the past, the individual and the crowd, the role of consumer capitalism, nature and the natural, psychogeography, and the pressures, preoccupations and thrills peculiar to urban living. Writers to be studied may include Balzac, Dickens, Pei, Baudelaire, Zola, Gissing, Conan Doyle, Celine, Aragon, Breton, Woolf, Iaian Sinclair, Peter Ackroyd and China Mieville alongside a selection of theorists, poets, artists and photographers, as well as Patrick Keiller's film, London and a selection of other city films.

LDCL6114B

30

VIRGIL'S CLASSIC EPIC

This module will explore the centrality of Virgil's Aeneid to Medieval and Renaissance culture. It will examine developing attitudes to the Classical literary legacy and accommodation and reinvention of Virgil's epic poem within new religious, political and literary contexts. The course will begin with exploration of Virgil's poem on its own terms before turning to re-workings of the 'Aeneid' by Augustine, Dante, Chaucer, Douglas and Marlowe, the Renaissance invention of a 13th Book to 'complete' Virgil's poem, and the recasting of classical epic within the very different conventions of medieval and Renaissance romance. Previous experience of classical or medieval literature is not required.

LDCL6054B

30

WRITING LIFE: BIOGRAPHY AND CREATIVE NON-FICTION

How do writers attempt to capture 'life' in all its various forms? What, if any, are the different requirements in writing the life of a famous (or not so famous) person and that of a city or landscape? What about the 'life' of travel or food and how do you approach writing about the natural world? These are just some of the questions that this module sets out to address. We will be reading a wide variety of texts, from the 'traditional' biography to some of the more experimental examples of creative non-fiction. From Samuel Johnson to essays in The New Yorker, all human (and non-human) life will be there! Students may choose between writing their own piece of Biography or creative Non-Fiction as their final project or submitting a critical essay.

LDCL6026B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Year Abroad

You may choose to study at another European university for one or both semesters of the second year.  Please see our Study Abroad pages for further information.

Entry Requirements

  • Qualification: BA (Hons)
  • A Level: AAB including English Literature (or the combined English Language & Literature A-level)
  • International Baccalaureate: 33 points overall with score of 5 in HL English
  • Scottish Highers: At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAB including English
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAABB including English
  • Access Course: Please contact the university for further information.
  • BTEC: Please contact the university for further information.
  • European Baccalaureate: 80% overall, including 70% in English Literature

Entry Requirement

The combined English Language and Literature A-level is acceptable instead of English Literature. A second Arts or Humanities subject at A-Level is encouraged, alongside English Literature. Students studying the IB programme should normally offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at Higher Level, alongside English. 

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.
 

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However some students will be invited to attend an interview. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

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Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English at Grade C or above at GCSE Level.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.


Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Literature, Drama and Creative Writing)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.