BA Education


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
X300
A-Level typical
BBB See All Requirements
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Key facts

DLHE 2013/14 (six months post-graduation) top for student experience and your future employability

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Every teacher knows that keeping control of the classroom is a tough task…

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Third year student, Neil Bullett, would like to become a primary school teacher. Neil has enjoyed the time he has spent on placements and is making the most of his university experience.

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Find out more about UEA’s School of Education & Lifelong Learning

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“The course kept me challenged … challenging my ideas about education and learning, challenging me to move out of my comfort zone and ultimately, challenging me to achieve things that I never dreamt I would be capable of.”

In their words

Claire Williams, BA Education Graduate

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After getting a first in maths, UEA graduate, duathlete and ex-army cadet Tom Cook is now completing his PGCE with us.

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This degree programme encompasses the psychology, sociology, history, and philosophy of education. You will follow a flexible pathway of study enabling you to tailor the degree according to your own personal interests.

We will provide you with the knowledge, understanding and expertise to enable you to consider education within schooling, question different approaches and contexts to learning and how we develop as lifelong learners.

Outside of the classroom, we consider the role of education within societies and cultures and the interplay between education, childhood, adolescence and lifelong learning.

Overview

The BA Education aims to equip you with the relevant experience and knowledge to pursue a career within the education sector or proceed onto the primary PGCE. As organisations develop their role as providers of training and development, opportunities are likely to continue to expand. The course also provides a strong foundation for a diverse range of career opportunities at a time of rapid change in education, including:

  • Managerial and administrative roles in schools and local authorities.
  • Work in early years settings.
  • Careers in youth, community and charity work.
  • Work in human resources departments
  • Museum and gallery education.
  • A range of caring professions.

The second year of the BA Education will provide you with the opportunity to undertake a placement in an educational setting, for example, in a school or a museum. In addition to this, you will be able to participate in a number of visits to a variety of education providers throughout the course. This combination of academic and applied study will enable you to complement theory with observed practice.

Course Structure

The academic year consists of two 12-week semesters, followed by an examination period. In each semester, you will typically take three modules, usually consisting of two lectures plus one two-hour seminar per week. Lectures are attended by everybody, whilst in seminars you will be part of a small group, interacting with the tutor and fellow students alongside engaging in group activities. In addition, there are occasional reading groups, led by more advanced students and supervised by members of staff.

Year 1

In the first year you will be introduced to how people learn with reference to a wide range of educational institutions in and beyond the UK. The modules that you will study will cover a range of subjects, including an introduction to education as an academic discipline; international education; learning and teaching in the digital world; and an introduction to the history, philosophy, and psychology of education. These modules will help you to build the basic knowledge you will need as your studies progress.

During the first year you will also study a specially designed module, equipping you with research method experience in education and the higher level learning skills that underpin the whole course.

Year 2

You will take a number of compulsory modules in your second year to help you construct an understanding of education in a particular context. The compulsory modules are ‘Educational Psychology’, in which you will examine one of the disciplines at the heart of education, and the placement module, where you will take part in a small-scale research-project within an educational (but not necessarily a school) setting.

Optional modules are available for you to define your own curriculum of learning, including ‘Learning Environments and Environmental Learning’; ‘Study of Language in the Context of Learning’; ‘Teaching and Educational Policy’; ‘Spirituality, Education and the Whole Child Children’; and ‘Special Educational Needs’ , and ‘Childhood, Youth and Transitions’.

Year 3

In the third year you will complete a dissertation, allowing you to carry out your own research project- from planning to disseminating findings under the supervision of a research active member of staff.

You will also select two modules from a diverse range offered by the school, including:

  • ‘Pedagogy’
  • ‘Social Construction of Childhood’
  • ‘Mathematics and Society’
  • ‘Motivation in Education’
  • ‘The History, Philosophy and Politics of Education’
  • ‘Creativity in Education’
  • ‘Education in the Wider World: Education and the Media.’

In both years two and three, you are given the opportunity to choose a module from a range selected by the School, enabling you to expand and enrich your studies.

Assessment

We use a wide range of assessment methods in the course. Together with the more traditional seen and unseen exams you will be assessed by reports, essays, portfolios, presentations and individual and group projects. The range of assessment methods aims not only to assess understanding and knowledge but also to develop transferable skills such as presenting and working as part of a team which will be very useful in the workplace.

What Next?

The multi-disciplinary nature of this degree ensures you will enter the workplace as a skilled and confident graduate and an advocate for education. Our graduates are successful in securing employment across a range of sectors and organisations, including:

  • Teaching within Schools and Universities
  • Museum and Library Service
  • Business / Commerce Research
  • Educational Research
  • Managerial and Administrative roles within Schools
  • Caring Professions
  • Youth, Community or Charity Work
  • City Councils

You will also graduate with the skills and knowledge necessary to progress to a PGCE in primary school teaching. In addition, many of our graduates decide to continue their studies and undertake other postgraduate courses including Master’s degrees. 

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT IN EDUCATION

This module will provide you with both an introduction to studying at higher education (HE) level and a foundation for lifelong learning. It will support you with the development of successful basic and academic study and research skills in the context of Education. The focus will be on developing study skills and techniques to help you meet both your immediate and long-term study needs. Aims: Engage with a range of key theoretical perspectives and contemporary issues and adopt a critical enquiry based approach to the exploration of key aspects of Education; Develop as educators within a community of learners, building on the assets you bring to the learning process and developing the academic competencies and practices appropriate for higher education. Develop specific academic study and research skills: locating, interpreting, analysing and critically evaluating an extensive range of relevant information sources; communicating your ideas in an accurate, focused and structured manner; Develop a range of 'translatable skills' required by employers, including problem-solving and reasoning, teamwork, communication and presentation of information. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB4006Y

40

EDUCATIONAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

The module covers the basic elements of educational ideas and theories within a historical and policy-based context. These elements include philosophy of education and educational psychology. Aims: The aim is to give students a basic grounding in educational ideas; Promote familiarity with educational ideas and the issues/problems involved; Encourage students to be familiar with and unafraid of concepts which have a philosophical and/or psychological dimension; Give students a basic grounding in the trajectory of post-1944 UK education; To promote investigative skills and attitudes that takes students away from Google and into the library: Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB4007Y

40

GLOBAL AND DIGITAL PERSPECTIVES IN EDUCATION

This module focuses on how educational systems, their pedagogies and approaches differ around the world. The module looks in detail at how education is experienced all over the world and also in detail at how technological developments have changed the way education is experienced in the UK and abroad. Aims: By the end of the module students will be able to: Articulate the differences between pedagogical approaches: Identify the barriers and benefits of different approaches to education from around the worlds and with global perspective; Relate ideas and opinions on different approaches to education to wider social, cultural and political understandings: Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB4008Y

40

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

This module will provide you with an introduction to key areas of psychology with a focus on learning and teaching in education. Aims: By the end of the module students should be able to: Discuss the role of perception, attention and memory in learning; Compare and contrast key theories related to learning, intelligence, language, thinking and reasoning; Critically reflect on key theories related to learning,intelligence, language, thinking and reasoning in the practical context; Discuss the influence of key intrapersonal, interpersonal and situational factors on pupils learning and engagement in educational settings. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB5012A

20

RESEARCH AND LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE( PLACEMENT)

THIS MODULE IS NOT AVAILABLE AS A FREE CHOICE OPTION. Aim: To provide the opportunity for students to take control of their own learning through planning and experiencing a work placement within an educational setting. Learning Outcomes: a) Understand the relationship between institutional practices and individual learning trajectories; b) Develop the ability to plan, conduct and complete independent educational enquiries. Content: Students will undertake an extended part-time work placement. There will be extensive briefing and debriefing so they are able to maximise their learning. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB5002Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CHILDHOOD, YOUTH AND TRANSITIONS

This module will explore key ideas, contemporary issues and notions of 'risk' within the context of childhood, youth and transitions. It will draw on psychological and sociological theories to consider the role of education within these areas. Aims: This module aims to provide students with: Knowledge and understanding of the sociology and psychology relating to transitions within childhood and youth sectors; A theoretical understanding of notions of 'risk' and transition; An analytical understanding of educational and social policy, provision and practice relating to childhood and youth sectors; A critical understanding of contemporary issues for children and young people. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB5013A

20

WHAT IS TEACHING? THE TEACHER'S ROLE AND PRACTICE IN DIFFERENT SETTINGS

Aim: To explore and gain insight into the nature of' 'teaching' and 'learning' in a range of educational institutions and settings in the UK. By the end of this module students will be expected to understand: what it means to be a teacher in different educational contexts; a range of teaching strategies and practices used to support effective learning in various settings and the need for a critical appreciation of the function of different educational institutions, the opportunities they offer and their cultural contexts. There will be opportunities to investigate specific aspects of teaching which are of particular interest to individuals. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB5001A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CHILDREN AND SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS AND DISABILITY

THIS MODULE IS NOT AVAILABLE AS A FREE CHOICE MODULE. Aim: Familiarity with a range of diagnostic techniques and educational responses to learning difficulties. Learning Outcomes: a) Understand relationships between assessment of need and different teaching and learning responses; b) Understand the relationship between institutional practices and learning trajectories. Content: Students should become familiar with patterns of special need and the ways in which different settings seek to respond to these needs. They should understand inter-professional working and the developing pattern of early years provision including children's Excellence Centres and so on. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB5015B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND OUTDOOR LEARNING

Aim: The module explores the theories and practicalities associated with learning outside the classroom. By participating in a series of fieldtrips students are exposed to a variety of different outdoor learning opportunities, including practical examples pitched at a range of different age groups. In addition, a variety of curricular and cross-curricular subjects are explored through outdoor teaching and learning. Theories around the benefits of outdoor learning and styles of teaching delivery are introduced and students are encouraged to reflect upon their experiences. Learning Outcomes To explore the terminology associated with outdoor learning. To gain an appreciation of the perceived benefits of outdoor education. To understand the different teaching approaches to delivering outdoor education. To gain an appreciation of the organisational demands of running educational visits. To develop skills of personal reflection, through the perspective of both a participant and a prospective trip leader. To practice and develop fieldwork techniques. To raise awareness of locations for fieldwork within the locality. Assessment: Coursework 100% 4000 word written assignment

EDUB5004B

20

THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE IN THE CONTEXT OF LEARNING, TEACHING AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY

Aim: To help students consider the complex relationship between language and learning, the implications this relationship has for teaching, and how education-policy has addressed some issues to do with language and 'literacy'. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course it is hoped students will better understand: a) key issues surrounding the learning and/or teaching of reading, writing, talking and listening in English; b) the importance for learning of different kinds of talk in classrooms; c) contrasting approaches to understanding and teaching 'literacy'; d) how the language of formal education can construct particular views of the child. Content: Through seminars, mini-lectures, student presentations and creative work students will meet and investigate some ideas and theories to do with language and learning in English, and some educational policy related to this. Why isn't teaching just a matter of telling, and learning just a matter of listening? How do children learn, or teach themselves, to read, write and talk? Whose English (spoken and written) counts in formal education, who says, and why? If new technologies are changing English, what are the implications for formal education? And how might your language create your identity as well as express it?

EDUB5017B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students may select a further 20 credits from Option range C. Option range B modules will be available if the module has not reached the target. Please note that if you would like to study a module not listed below, please speak to the Course Director. The modules listed below are available subject to confirmation from the school.

Name Code Credits

APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCES

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR NON-PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS. The module explores a range of contemporary applications of psychological science with a focus on 'mental health', 'crime and justice', plus 'potential, performance and self-understanding'. Regarding mental health topics: current and historical understandings of the origin, phenomenology and treatment of a range of mental health issues are considered. This includes: exploration of the historical and cultural contexts of 'abnormal' behaviour, consideration of the difficulties in formulating acceptable definitions of mental ill health, consideration of a range of perspectives on the origins of major mental health problems, plus exploration of theory and evidence relating to a sample of interventions in a selection of major mental health problems. Through exposure to, and engagement with, the range of topic areas covered, students will be assisted to develop an awareness of the psychosocial nature of mental health and ill health. Regarding crime and justice topics: the module takes an international perspective in exploring gender, violence and crime. Students will be introduced to gendered differences in competition, aggression, violence (both victimisation and perpetration), and crime; before learning about programs and interventions designed to promote resilience, create turning points, and rehabilitate offenders. Theoretical approaches and research will be covered alongside examples from popular media, films, current events, and case studies. Regarding 'potential, performance and self-understanding' topics: the module explores how psychology relates to health and wellbeing and aims to develop an understanding of how psychological research may inform the promotion of health and optimal functioning. In discussing the scientific findings and practical applications of psychology in the area the module draws upon fields such as sport, health, developmental, personality and organisational psychology. Particular emphasis is places on exercise, motivation, team work and performance. The module represents the movement in psychology towards a positive approach to wellbeing which relates to other areas of everyday life including performance, stress and burnout and relationship issues such as teamwork and communication.

PSY-5014B

20

CHILDREN AND SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS AND DISABILITY

THIS MODULE IS NOT AVAILABLE AS A FREE CHOICE MODULE. Aim: Familiarity with a range of diagnostic techniques and educational responses to learning difficulties. Learning Outcomes: a) Understand relationships between assessment of need and different teaching and learning responses; b) Understand the relationship between institutional practices and learning trajectories. Content: Students should become familiar with patterns of special need and the ways in which different settings seek to respond to these needs. They should understand inter-professional working and the developing pattern of early years provision including children's Excellence Centres and so on. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB5015B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND OUTDOOR LEARNING

Aim: The module explores the theories and practicalities associated with learning outside the classroom. By participating in a series of fieldtrips students are exposed to a variety of different outdoor learning opportunities, including practical examples pitched at a range of different age groups. In addition, a variety of curricular and cross-curricular subjects are explored through outdoor teaching and learning. Theories around the benefits of outdoor learning and styles of teaching delivery are introduced and students are encouraged to reflect upon their experiences. Learning Outcomes To explore the terminology associated with outdoor learning. To gain an appreciation of the perceived benefits of outdoor education. To understand the different teaching approaches to delivering outdoor education. To gain an appreciation of the organisational demands of running educational visits. To develop skills of personal reflection, through the perspective of both a participant and a prospective trip leader. To practice and develop fieldwork techniques. To raise awareness of locations for fieldwork within the locality. Assessment: Coursework 100% 4000 word written assignment

EDUB5004B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE IN THE CONTEXT OF LEARNING, TEACHING AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY

Aim: To help students consider the complex relationship between language and learning, the implications this relationship has for teaching, and how education-policy has addressed some issues to do with language and 'literacy'. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course it is hoped students will better understand: a) key issues surrounding the learning and/or teaching of reading, writing, talking and listening in English; b) the importance for learning of different kinds of talk in classrooms; c) contrasting approaches to understanding and teaching 'literacy'; d) how the language of formal education can construct particular views of the child. Content: Through seminars, mini-lectures, student presentations and creative work students will meet and investigate some ideas and theories to do with language and learning in English, and some educational policy related to this. Why isn't teaching just a matter of telling, and learning just a matter of listening? How do children learn, or teach themselves, to read, write and talk? Whose English (spoken and written) counts in formal education, who says, and why? If new technologies are changing English, what are the implications for formal education? And how might your language create your identity as well as express it?

EDUB5017B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

THIS MODULE IS NOT AVAILABLE AS A FREE CHOICE OPTION ."Note that this module is restricted to students on theBA Education programme and is NOT available to visiting or exchange students." Aim: To introduce students to a range of methods for conducting educational enquiry, and plan, conduct and complete a piece of original educational research. Learning Outcomes: a) To critically appraise underlying principles or approaches to the study of education; b) To develop the ability to plan, conduct and complete independent educational enquiry. Content: Students will be introduced to a range of educational research methodologies in order to enable them to plan conduct and complete small scale educational enquiry. Assessment: Dissertation 100%

EDUB6001Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CHILDREN, TEACHERS AND MATHEMATICS

This module is worth 20 credits. The written assignment consists of a brief review of readings on a mathematics education topic. In W5 a list of topics for your consideration is distributed, alongside a set of indicative papers to be reviewed towards the completion of the assignment. You work on the assignment between W5 and W12 and you present it briefly - and receive feedback on it - in W12. You hand it in by the end of W12 and it is marked by mid-January. The mini project will engage you with activities related to the module over the whole semester and will be assessed through submission of a report of learning outcomes from this engagement. You will hand in your mini project report in early January. There will be written feedback on both items of coursework and also a 2h feedback drop-in session in January / February. Assessment: Written Assignment 40% 3000 words Mini Project 60% 4500 words

EDUB6006A

20

MOTIVATION IN EDUCATION

Aim: This module is designed to introduce students to the psychological process underpinning motivated behaviour in education settings. Students will examine the role of the teacher in creating motivational climates for learning and assessing some of the key motivational challenges that may occur in educational settings. Learning Outcomes: a Critically examine a range of intrapersonal, interpersonal and situational influences on motivation in education; b Apply a range of motivational theories to understand motivated behaviour in education settings; c Critically examine the role of the teacher in motivating students in educational settings: d Understand how to overcome key motivational challenges, such as learned helplessness, self- handicapping, procrastination and disengagement in educational settings. Content: What is motivated behaviour?; outcomes of motivated behaviour (e.g. effort, persistence, task choice); motivation through feelings of competence, confidence and control; motivational theories(e.g. attribution theory, expectancy-value theory, achievement goal theory, self-determination theory); interest and value; motivational climates (e.g. TARGET and autonomy-supportive); effects of rewards on motivation; motivational challenges (self-handicapping, procrastination, disengagement, learned helplessness, perfectionism); social influences; teacher-pupil relationship.

EDUB6016A

20

SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF CHILDHOOD

Aim: To develop advanced understanding of comparative ideas about childhood and child development in different settings. Learning outcome: a) Understand the complexity of relationships between teaching and learning in different early years settings; b) Develop an in-depth understanding of patterns of child development in different cultural settings. Content: Comparative exploration of ideas about childhood, learning and education. Assessment Coursework 100%

EDUB6003A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CREATIVITY AND LEARNING

Aim: This module examines the theory and practice, philosophy and policy of creativity in relation to education. Ideas and issues explored in the lectures and seminar discussions underpin the practical, reflective, art-based learning activities carried out in the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts (SCVA). The module aims to help you: #Understand some of the different perspectives on creativity in education #Consider creative teaching strategies and practices used to support effective learning in educational environments #Develop an awareness of creative initiatives introduced at national and local levels #Explore your own creative processes through the planning, creation and presentation of an art piece #Further your knowledge of creative approaches to pedagogy and practice. Assessment: Coursework 100% (Essay 50%; creative portfolio 50%)

EDUB6004B

20

MEDIA, CULTURE AND LEARNING

Aim: To critically consider the multi-faceted relationship between education and the media. Learning Outcomes: a) Identify comparative approaches to the structure and practice of Education in different settings; b) Develop critical understandings of the workings of educational institutions in relation to their role in society. Content: There will be three strands - the first will relate to the presentation of education issues in the media. The second will relate to the influence of the mass media on education; and the third will consider the role of the media as an informal educator. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB6002B

20

Students will select 20 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Please note that if students wish to study a module that is not listed below, please speak with the course director. The modules listed below are available subject to confirmation by the school.

Name Code Credits

CHILDREN, TEACHERS AND MATHEMATICS

This module is worth 20 credits. The written assignment consists of a brief review of readings on a mathematics education topic. In W5 a list of topics for your consideration is distributed, alongside a set of indicative papers to be reviewed towards the completion of the assignment. You work on the assignment between W5 and W12 and you present it briefly - and receive feedback on it - in W12. You hand it in by the end of W12 and it is marked by mid-January. The mini project will engage you with activities related to the module over the whole semester and will be assessed through submission of a report of learning outcomes from this engagement. You will hand in your mini project report in early January. There will be written feedback on both items of coursework and also a 2h feedback drop-in session in January / February. Assessment: Written Assignment 40% 3000 words Mini Project 60% 4500 words

EDUB6006A

20

CREATIVITY AND LEARNING

Aim: This module examines the theory and practice, philosophy and policy of creativity in relation to education. Ideas and issues explored in the lectures and seminar discussions underpin the practical, reflective, art-based learning activities carried out in the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts (SCVA). The module aims to help you: #Understand some of the different perspectives on creativity in education #Consider creative teaching strategies and practices used to support effective learning in educational environments #Develop an awareness of creative initiatives introduced at national and local levels #Explore your own creative processes through the planning, creation and presentation of an art piece #Further your knowledge of creative approaches to pedagogy and practice. Assessment: Coursework 100% (Essay 50%; creative portfolio 50%)

EDUB6004B

20

MEDIA, CULTURE AND LEARNING

Aim: To critically consider the multi-faceted relationship between education and the media. Learning Outcomes: a) Identify comparative approaches to the structure and practice of Education in different settings; b) Develop critical understandings of the workings of educational institutions in relation to their role in society. Content: There will be three strands - the first will relate to the presentation of education issues in the media. The second will relate to the influence of the mass media on education; and the third will consider the role of the media as an informal educator. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB6002B

20

MOTIVATION IN EDUCATION

Aim: This module is designed to introduce students to the psychological process underpinning motivated behaviour in education settings. Students will examine the role of the teacher in creating motivational climates for learning and assessing some of the key motivational challenges that may occur in educational settings. Learning Outcomes: a Critically examine a range of intrapersonal, interpersonal and situational influences on motivation in education; b Apply a range of motivational theories to understand motivated behaviour in education settings; c Critically examine the role of the teacher in motivating students in educational settings: d Understand how to overcome key motivational challenges, such as learned helplessness, self- handicapping, procrastination and disengagement in educational settings. Content: What is motivated behaviour?; outcomes of motivated behaviour (e.g. effort, persistence, task choice); motivation through feelings of competence, confidence and control; motivational theories(e.g. attribution theory, expectancy-value theory, achievement goal theory, self-determination theory); interest and value; motivational climates (e.g. TARGET and autonomy-supportive); effects of rewards on motivation; motivational challenges (self-handicapping, procrastination, disengagement, learned helplessness, perfectionism); social influences; teacher-pupil relationship.

EDUB6016A

20

SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF CHILDHOOD

Aim: To develop advanced understanding of comparative ideas about childhood and child development in different settings. Learning outcome: a) Understand the complexity of relationships between teaching and learning in different early years settings; b) Develop an in-depth understanding of patterns of child development in different cultural settings. Content: Comparative exploration of ideas about childhood, learning and education. Assessment Coursework 100%

EDUB6003A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students may select one of the following modules if spaces are available.

Name Code Credits

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND OUTDOOR LEARNING

Aim: The module explores the theories and practicalities associated with learning outside the classroom. By participating in a series of fieldtrips students are exposed to a variety of different outdoor learning opportunities, including practical examples pitched at a range of different age groups. In addition, a variety of curricular and cross-curricular subjects are explored through outdoor teaching and learning. Theories around the benefits of outdoor learning and styles of teaching delivery are introduced and students are encouraged to reflect upon their experiences. Learning Outcomes To explore the terminology associated with outdoor learning. To gain an appreciation of the perceived benefits of outdoor education. To understand the different teaching approaches to delivering outdoor education. To gain an appreciation of the organisational demands of running educational visits. To develop skills of personal reflection, through the perspective of both a participant and a prospective trip leader. To practice and develop fieldwork techniques. To raise awareness of locations for fieldwork within the locality. Assessment: Coursework 100% 4000 word written assignment

EDUB5004B

20

WHAT IS TEACHING? THE TEACHER'S ROLE AND PRACTICE IN DIFFERENT SETTINGS

Aim: To explore and gain insight into the nature of' 'teaching' and 'learning' in a range of educational institutions and settings in the UK. By the end of this module students will be expected to understand: what it means to be a teacher in different educational contexts; a range of teaching strategies and practices used to support effective learning in various settings and the need for a critical appreciation of the function of different educational institutions, the opportunities they offer and their cultural contexts. There will be opportunities to investigate specific aspects of teaching which are of particular interest to individuals. Assessment: Coursework 100%

EDUB5001A

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

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  • UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS

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Entry Requirements

  • A Level BBB excluding General Studies
  • International Baccalaureate 31 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate BBBBBB OR 6 subjects at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass 45 credits with Merit at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 70%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

A GCE A-Level in General Studies is not accepted.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level BBB excluding General Studies
  • International Baccalaureate 31
  • Scottish Highers ABBBB one Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBB (acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications)
  • Irish Leaving Certificate BBBBBB
  • Access Course Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 70%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Special Entry Requirements

A-Level General Studies is not accepted for this course.

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE's Mathematics and English Language at grade C or above. Please note, that if you have a long term goal to complete a PGCE  Primary programme you will be required to have GCSE Science C or above for this programme. 

Assessment

Key factors used to assess an application include:

  • Past and future achievement in examinations
  • Academic interest in the subject
  • Personal interests and extra-curricular activities
  • The reference

All applications are considered on their own individual merits.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Admissions Office (Education)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

 

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515

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