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Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Master of Arts

Course Organiser

Dr. Oliver Springate-Baginski


The MA Agriculture and Rural Development offers cutting-edge insights and skills on the linkages between agriculture and rural development. As these topics have moved back to the top of the international development agenda, the Masters provides first-class training on how agriculture can contribute to poverty alleviation and rural development in low income countries.

This Masters is unique for its focus on the dynamic interactions between local livelihoods in rural areas and agriculture understood as a globalised industry. It advances an interdisciplinary perspective on the linkages between global, national and local-level processes shaping agriculture and rural development by integrating knowledge from the social sciences, economics and natural resource studies. The course combines the delivery of theoretical knowledge with empirical insights and case studies grounded in the teaching team’s hands-on experience with agriculture and rural development in a large variety of low income countries.

The Masters provides an overview of agriculture, rural livelihoods and rural policy and politics to strengthen students’ analytical skills and to transfer key professional skills of relevance to work on rural development and agriculture. Lectures, seminars, group work and individual assignment will cover the policies and practices of the major international institutions in rural development, including the World Bank, Food and Agriculture Organisation and United Nations Development Programme, just as much as of civil society organisations, such as La Via Campesina and Brazil’s Landless Workers Movement.

The MA Agriculture and Rural Development degree is offered over one year full-time, or two years part-time.


Course Profile

Our Masters courses require students to undertake 180 credits:

  • Compulsory and Optional modules (120 credits)
  • Examination (20 credits)
  • Dissertation (40 credits)

Students will receive detailed module outlines, including information about lectures and seminars, full reading lists and assessments once they have registered at the beginning of their course. 
 


Professional, Employability and Practical Skills

A range of optional seminars and workshops are offered during your Masters programme for the teaching and strengthening of student skills. Sessions to support learning - in particular essay and dissertation writing - occur throughout the year. Development practice training is also provided. Please click to access further information about the Skills Training and Development Practice programme.


International Development Research Groups

Research in the School of International Development addresses contemporary challenges in developing and transition economies via disciplinary and multi/interdisciplinary approaches. Please click to access further information about our International Development Research Groups and our current research projects.


The School of International Development at the University of East Anglia is a globally renowned department for teaching, research and consultancy on international development. We are committed to making a difference and are involved in advising on policy for major global challenges such as poverty reduction and environmental sustainability. With students from over 40 countries, we are a friendly, thriving and cosmopolitan department.

The School of International Development offers a range of postgraduate taught degree courses. Our objectives are clear, we will:

  • offer individual students unrivalled training in their chosen subject area delivered by dedicated and experienced academics and practitioners.
  • provide professional skills training desired by employers: we offer practice-based training workshops to develop professional skills such as project design and proposal writing for NGOs, project management, financial management, advocacy work and the use of social media for communication and business purposes. We also offer more specialised professional skills training in areas including humanitarian assistance, Geographical Information Systems and film-making.
  • provide students with the option of undertaking a professional internship during their degree between the months of June and August. 
  • offer a memorable and enjoyable life-changing year, making new friends and contacts from across the world. You may decide to use your enhanced knowledge and continue with further research (PhD), or use your newly developed skills which will be attractive in the employment market.

Why choose to study at the School of International Development at UEA? What makes us distinctive and our degrees so highly valued by students and employers?

  • High quality research and impact: The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) rank the School of International Development 4th (Times Higher Education) in the country for overall research, with 74% of our research ranked “world-leading” or “internationally excellent”.
  • Strong League Table rankings: The School is consistently ranked highly. We are in the top 10 of the Guardian and Times League Tables for Geography and Environmental Sciences; in 2012/13 we were ranked 3rd in the Guardian’s University Guide and 9th in The Times League Table.
  • Excellent staff-student ratios: We recruit about 120 postgraduate students each year, with an overall student population of 400. With 40 members of academic staff this means a staff-student ratio of 1:10 with one member of academic staff for every three postgraduate students.
  • A supportive and friendly learning environment: Our excellent staff-student ratios and teaching methods mean we offer small class sizes and a close-knit, friendly and personal learning environment; staff can dedicate time to individual students. We come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds so can design and offer coherent courses and teaching across academic disciplines without having to rely on other departments. All our staff teach, whether they are professors or junior lecturers.
  • Excellent career opportunities: our graduates have been successful in entering a broad spectrum of employment including working for organisations such as the World Bank, the United Nations, DfID, JICA, Christian Aid, and Save the Children. Examples of positions from a recent careers analysis survey of our postgraduates reveals the diversity of employment possibilities:
    • NGO management in Japan
    • soil and water conservation in Pakistan
    • construction consultancy in Sri Lanka
    • export management in Norway
    • rural development coordination in Nigeria
    • senior inspector of schools in Kenya
    • development education work in the UK
    • doctoral research within the School, or elsewhere.
  • We offer a series of regular seminars on ‘Working in Development’, with guest speakers from development agencies.
  • We offer specific support to our international students in their transition to studying in the UK, with additional academic skills training if needed.

The School embraces theoretical innovation, interdisciplinary collaboration and a commitment to our research making a difference. We work with a wide range of partners and clients, including national and international development agencies, governments, NGOs and private clients. Since 2001, we have worked with an estimated 600 different partner organisations and in any year we have 100 or more live projects underway.

You will find that we give high priority to our teaching and we are proud of the learning experience we offer. See some of our students’ own feedback for more insights. If you choose to join us, you will discover exciting opportunities for engaging in development issues, you will meet people from different cultures, explore challenging problems, build your individual and team skills and discover fascinating new career directions.

Dr John McDonagh
Head of the School

Come and Visit Us

Our Open Days will give you the opportunity to experience the University of East Anglia's unique campus atmosphere.

If you are not able to visit us in person, check out our Virtual Open Day experience which we hope will help to provide you with an insight into life and study at the University of East Anglia.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Admissions Office (Development)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to download the School of International Development Postgraduate Prospectus or register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

Year

Compulsory Study (120 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

Production of a short (8000-12000) dissertation on an approved topic.

DEV-M04X

40

GLOBALISED AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS

The aim of this module is to understand how food security is affected by policies, environmental processes, and actions that occur at the international level. Food security is a central theme, and how it is constructed and contested at international level, involving global institutions, interest groups, and diverse policy agendas. This exploration does not confine itself exclusively to production, but also considers other areas of concern, including: global environmental change, dietary shifts, 'post-production' concerns with food quality or ecosystem integrity, agribusiness, public versus private agricultural innovation, intellectual property rights, and strategies for technological development. Students will gain critical understanding of these debates and how different policy actors engage with them at both the local and the global level. These actors include firms, public RandD institutions, civil society, farmers' movements, consumers' groups, and major donors and philanthropic organizations. The module will help students develop a critical and inter-disciplinary understanding of key international policy debates that have relevance to agriculture. Additionally, students will gain a better understanding of how trends in globalised agriculture affect poor people, particularly smallholder farmers, but also consumers and those involved in value chains.

DEV-M106

20

MA IN RURAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Rural Development.

DEV-M030

20

RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND AGRARIAN CHANGE

Rural Livelihoods and Agrarian Change is a core module for all MAARD and MAGAID students and is an option for all other masters students. It is an inter-disciplinary module that uses a social relations perspective to understand how people make a living in contexts of poverty and vulnerability. It aims to provide an overview of rural livelihoods and approaches to their analysis as well as a critical assessment of the implications of gender relations and poverty, for livelihood building. The interconnections between the wider context within which livelihoods are built, including national policies and the character of specific locations, the social structure and rules that determine entitlements, the assets or resources available to individuals and groups, and their livelihood strategies, will be examined. The links between rural and urban, farm and non-farm for the livelihoods of rural people, over time, will also be explored.

DEV-M061

20

RURAL POLICIES and POLITICS

Around three-quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas and the gap between poor and rich continues to widen. The fate of the rural poor can be greatly influenced by policies in areas such as agriculture, land, social protection, natural resources, health, education and trade. This module reviews key policies and issues in these and other areas. It also guides students to critically analyse policy choices within specific contexts. Rural Policies recognises the importance of looking at rural policies with consideration of particular socio-economic contexts and in relation to larger-scale trends that are affecting rural areas: globalisation, urbanisation, de-agrarianisation, rural-urban linkages, conflict, HIV/AIDS and decentralisation. At the same time, it is based on the premise that rural areas require particular policies because of the distinct conditions characterizing them.

DEV-M016

20

Option A Study (20 credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ECONOMETRIC METHODS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this introductory module is to expose students to basic econometric theory and provide them with sufficient knowledge and practical skill for competent use of econometrics in empirical research. The module also enables students to understand and interpret econometric research results. By the end of the module students acquire sufficient knowledge and skill to apply multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data to a wide range of macro- and micro-economic problems of development. In addition to lectures, the module includes computer workshops on Stata (widely used econometrics software) and seminars.

DEV-M067

20

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS

The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: # Development research and research ethics # Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews # The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods # Participatory and action research # Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are taught using SPSS.

DEV-M027

20

TOOLS AND SKILLS IN ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to introduce a range of tools and frameworks used by researchers, government agencies, businesses and NGOs to inform and develop their environmental management strategies in a sustainable development context. Students will gain familiarity with the most important available approaches and an understanding of the key assumptions and ideas in environment-development research, monitoring and management systems. The module is taught through workshops and practical sessions, lectures and field or study visits within Norfolk. There is an emphasis on putting concepts into practice and understanding how environmental assessments guide management actions. Both individual and team projects will be important. Tools and frameworks covered may include environmental and social impact assessments, survey techniques for land, water or biodiversity, GIS and modelling of social-ecological systems, sustainable livelihoods analysis and integrated conservation and development.

DEV-M064

20

Option B Study (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Modules can be taken outside of DEV with the permission of the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

APPLIED METHODS FOR IMPACT EVALUATION

This module aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the most important methods of impact evaluation. For that purpose, it provides instruction in and hands on experiences of the main quantitative and qualitative impact evaluation methods, with an emphasis on the quantitative.

DEV-M096

20

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT I: SCIENCE, IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION

This module introduces students to the phenomenon of climate change, interconnections between climate change and development and theory and practice for adapting to climate change, in the context of developing countries. The first part of the module covers key aspects of climate change science necessary for a basic understanding of the causes of climate change, future projections of climate change and key impacts as well as methods for assessing these. The second part of the module focuses on adaptation to climate change by introducing the concepts of adaptation, vulnerability and resilience. National and sectoral policy making for adapting to climate change is then explored with reference to case studies. Finally the interconnections between disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation are explored. Seminars explore climate science and adaptation topics.

DEV-M103

20

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT II: GOVERNANCE, POLICY AND SOCIETY

This module critically examines international/national climate change governance and policy and societal impacts from and responses to climate change and climate change policy. The first half of the semester (Section A) will discuss the history and politics of the international climate change negotiations and then critically examine the way the climate regime (UNFCCC) operates. The following three lectures will look in detail at two items under negotiation with significant implications for developing countries. Finally we will discuss global carbon markets. The second half of the semester (Section B) will turn to the interface of climate change and society. It will start by discussing urban responses to climate change before critically examining geoengineering and other ethical/justice related debates before examining the role of energy demand and lifestyle in tackling climate change and ending with a session on conflict and human security implications from climate change. The seminars will be interactive and enable students to better understand the international negotiating process and ways to engage positively with climate change.

DEV-M118

20

CONCEPTUALISING SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH

This module provides students at school and faculty level with a generic introduction to social science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of social science research, research design, the nature of quantitative and qualitative research methodology, and examines the process and skills needed for social science research. The module is the core module for DEV's 3 MRes programmes: MRes International Development; MRes Development Practice and MRes Social Science Research (Faculty-wide). The module focuses on social science research in terms of design and methodology and complements other modules being offered in DEV and other schools on social science research methods and tools.

DEV-M087

20

CONFLICT GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

Thi is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA Conflict Governance and International Development.

DEV-M054

20

CONFLICT, PEACE AND SECURITY

The aim of CPS is to promote an understanding of the driving forces behind armed conflicts, including civil wars, riots, and communal conflicts, which have become a major obstacle to development. It situates these within the global political economy, particularly within the neo-liberal politics of the last few decades, as well as within concepts of post-colonial state building. Security is conceptualised broadly as not just national/international security but also as the right to security of individuals, including women and children, as well as civilian men. Gender is an important analytical lens here, used not as a proxy for women but as a vitally important component of global militarism, particularly as regards the part played by hegemonic masculinist concepts and ways in which masculinisms play out in specific conflict settings. Peace is conceptualised not just as the situation that breaks out after the signing of a peace treaty but also in relation to post-conflict levels of direct and structural violence that affect individuals and groups of citizens, including women and children at the domestic as well as other levels. Humanitarian agendas are discussed along with their effects on conflict as well as the politics of the UN, and conflicts arising out of competition over natural resources. Students who have taken this module should be able to situate the causes of conflict within the global political economy and understand how conflicts relate to the wider regional and international contexts.

DEV-M052

20

CONTEMPORARY WORLD DEVELOPMENT

This module is guided by the premise that theoretical perspectives about development are shaped by historical contexts and conditions that shape them. These contexts critically influence the issues and processes that are identified as the key concerns of development. They also impact upon the nature of the agency that is chosen to offer solutions to these concerns. Contemporary World Development explores how key development perspectives inform the most important issues in development today and different kinds of agency.

DEV-M002

20

DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES

The objective of this module is to explore different theoretical ideas and debates about development, and place these in their historical and political contexts. We will critically assess the various ways in which development has been conceptualized, from the end of the Second World War to the present day. Topics covered will include modernisation theory; dependency theory; the role of the state; neo-liberalism and the Washington Consensus, neo-institutionalism and the post-Washington Consensus; poverty and basic needs; human development and capabilities; equity and justice; rights and empowerment; and sustainable development. A key point of the module is to show how ideas in development emerge and how they shape policies and practice in development in the present day.

DEV-M003

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK PLACEMENT

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON THE FOLLOWING ROUTES ONLY; Media and International Develpment, Clmate Change and International Development and Environment and International Development. This module is offered as an alternative to the 40 credit dissertation module (DEV-M04X) that all MA/MSc students in DEV currently take. Whilst an academic dissertation will benefit most master's students, for others there may be more benefit to be gained from an appropriate, challenging work experience placement that is then linked to theory and reflected on critically in a report. Students will be responsible for finding a suitable placement but will be given a range of support from DEV which includes: giving the students access to the DEV internship host data base compiled over nearly a decade; advice on identifying appropriate placements; advice on CV design, fund-raising (where necessary), health and safety, ethical considerations etc.; facilitate communication between student and potential host, in some cases acting as a mediator. Whilst we cannot guarantee a placement we are confident that most students who take this module and apply themselves to identifying an internship, will be successful. If there are any students who cannot find a suitable internship then they will automatically transfer to the standard dissertation module.

DEV-M06X

40

DISSERTATION

Production of a short (8000-12000) dissertation on an approved topic.

DEV-M04X

40

ECONOMETRIC METHODS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this introductory module is to expose students to basic econometric theory and provide them with sufficient knowledge and practical skill for competent use of econometrics in empirical research. The module also enables students to understand and interpret econometric research results. By the end of the module students acquire sufficient knowledge and skill to apply multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data to a wide range of macro- and micro-economic problems of development. In addition to lectures, the module includes computer workshops on Stata (widely used econometrics software) and seminars.

DEV-M067

20

EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND PRACTICE FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is to enable students to understand current debates on education and development and their implications for international and national education strategies. Students will critically examine education policy documents (including web-based literature), investigate policy development processes and develop the ability to locate global, national and local levels policies and practices within a range of discourses and theoretical frameworks. These processes will be investigated in relation to particular policy agendas including access and quality, educational governance, social justice and school choice, as well as areas such as education and conflict, poverty and marginalisation, gender and HIV and AIDS.

DEV-M046

20

GENDER CONCEPTS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aims of this module are to provide students with a solid understanding of both the theoretical perspectives and concepts that have underpinned the field of gender and development; and to enable students to understand the link between gender and key debates within development studies such as poverty, violence, religion and the role of men in gender and development. The module begins by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, as they have evolved in recent decades. It then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analysis. The second part of the module applies these concepts in examining a selection of important and policy relevant debates: the nature of the household and kinship, gender roles, power and empowerment, poverty, violence, masculinities, religion and the gendered nature of institutions. The module builds the foundation for the more applied units which follow, and whilst it touches on policy implications as they arise, it does not focus on gender policy as such.

DEV-M015

20

GENDER DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

This module explores relations between social policies (defined broadly) and various forms of identity and difference. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries and pays particular attention to gender issues, although other aspects of diversity (such as ethnicity, disability and age) are also addressed explicitly. The module has both theoretical and more practical components, including sessions on gender planning and mainstreaming analysis. This module has a limit of 40 students.

DEV-M066

20

GLOBALISATION, BUSINESS AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an understanding of the economic, social and environmental impacts of globalisation. It focuses on the role of business, particularly corporate social responsibility, and the changing role of the state in promoting economic development.

DEV-M110

20

GLOBALISED AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS

The aim of this module is to understand how food security is affected by policies, environmental processes, and actions that occur at the international level. Food security is a central theme, and how it is constructed and contested at international level, involving global institutions, interest groups, and diverse policy agendas. This exploration does not confine itself exclusively to production, but also considers other areas of concern, including: global environmental change, dietary shifts, 'post-production' concerns with food quality or ecosystem integrity, agribusiness, public versus private agricultural innovation, intellectual property rights, and strategies for technological development. Students will gain critical understanding of these debates and how different policy actors engage with them at both the local and the global level. These actors include firms, public RandD institutions, civil society, farmers' movements, consumers' groups, and major donors and philanthropic organizations. The module will help students develop a critical and inter-disciplinary understanding of key international policy debates that have relevance to agriculture. Additionally, students will gain a better understanding of how trends in globalised agriculture affect poor people, particularly smallholder farmers, but also consumers and those involved in value chains.

DEV-M106

20

GOVERNANCE DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT

The concepts of governance and democracy hold very different meanings for distinct political trends. Thus, on the one hand democracy is cited as the only way for citizens to have meaningful input into their government, while on the other it is seen as empty of most substantial content consisting mainly of relatively meaningless formal components such as multi-party elections, a vehicle for enabling globalisation. Similarly, there are multiple ways of conceptualising governance. Recently, 'good governance' has become a development buzzword that now occupies a central place in development thinking, policy-making and practice. But what does good governance mean and why has it become so important for development? How are democracy and governance related to the state and how are they affected by global governance? What does it mean to be a citizen, whether of a state or globally and how does gender, in the form of masculinisms, affect the way all these are conceptualised? These are some of the key issues and questions that this module will try to address. Students who have taken this course should understand the historical roots of democracy and the political aims behind the governance agenda. They will also have gained theoretical perspectives, analytical tools, and basic information that can help them evaluate wider debates about political development, democracy, and governance.

DEV-M065

20

HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a broad introduction to health issues in a context of development. It reviews different cultural understandings of health, and relationships between health, socio-economic change, livelihoods and poverty. The module also examines health policies of particular relevance to developing countries. While the module looks at health issues in general, it pays particular attention to links between HIV/AIDS and development.

DEV-M070

20

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROJECT

In this module, students will conduct and write up their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD8X

60

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY

This module provides an understanding of the economics of international trade and investment and their implications for development. It analyses the impacts of international trade, foreign investment and technology transfer on developing countries and evaluates the effects of national trade and investment policies and international economic agreements and institutions. It covers both trade theory and more applied topics such as the impact of trade on labour and the environment.

DEV-M056

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES-EXAMINATION

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Relations and Development Studies.

DEV-M048

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT FIELDWORK

This module will help prepare students for development fieldwork and focus on practical and ethical issues. Topics covered will include understanding the local context and culture, working with marginalised, vulnerable and privileged groups, negotiating access to field sites and power relations. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD3X

20

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is for students to understand current debates on the principles and theories linking education to development in a range of social contexts. The module will introduce students to theories of education and development including international and comparative education. These are examined in relation to the broader challenges of development. Topics in the module may include: theories of human development and capabilities, human capital and rights based approaches, theories of equity, social justice and inclusive education. We will examine schooling in contexts of chronic poverty, models of schooling and de-schooling, formal and non-formal education, the challenges of linguistic and cultural diversity, inclusive education and disability, gender inequalities, and the education of nomads and other migratory groups.

DEV-M007

20

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS

The module will provide an overview of different research methods and how they can be applied within the context of development practice. Among other things, it will cover the following topics: interviewing, mixed methods approaches, participatory research methods and basic statistical analysis. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD2Y

20

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH (MRES DP)

This module provides students with a generic introduction to Social Science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of Social Science research, research design and the nature of quantitative and qualitative research methodology. It also examines the skills needed for Social Science research. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD1Y

20

MA IN EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT - EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Education and Development.

DEV-M036

20

MA IN GENDER ANALYSIS IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Gender Analysis in International Development.

DEV-M034

20

MA IN GLOBALISATION BUSINESS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA Globalisation Business and Sustainable Development: Exam.

DEV-M114

20

MA IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Development.

DEV-M112

20

MA IN INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Social Development.

DEV-M038

20

MA IN MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Media and International Development.

DEV-M084

20

MA IN RURAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Rural Development.

DEV-M030

20

MACROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

Why are some countries richer than others? The objective of the module is to provide a rigorous analysis of economic growth issues and examine macroeconomic models that describe determinants of long-term growth and income. We will study the role of capital accumulation, initial income, population growth, education, technological progress, and institutions in determining different patterns of economic development. Theory and data analysis will jointly help explain why some countries embark on divergent development paths.

DEV-M076

20

MASTER IN RESEARCH DISSERTATION

15,000 to 20,000 words on an approved topic.

DEV-M05X

80

MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

In this module students will be working in the university and in the local community to design, implement and evaluate their own 'live' media and development project. This module is taught and facilitated by lecturers from DEV and by a team of professionals from a media and development organisation, called New Media Networks (NMN). NMN is a creative industries company that works in the UK and internationally for lasting social change. Students will also be working with staff (and possibly volunteers) from the local organisations we collaborate with.

DEV-M099

20

MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the analysis of the different approaches to development communication and the wider relationships between media and development.

DEV-M082

20

MEDIA AND SOCIETY

This module is intended to provide all students studying media related postgraduate degrees with a broad, current and inter-disciplinary understanding of the media today. Our guiding philosophy is that in order properly to understand the media, whether as a lawyer, economist, development studies professional, media studies specialist or political scientist, it is essential to have a wide-ranging and multi-disciplinary understanding of the modern media. What we shall be doing over the year, therefore, is to look at the structure of media today in the UK and globally. We will consider, from several different academic perspectives, how media content is constructed, what shapes content and how content may be controlled and even censored. We will also look at the media industry, examining how it is currently organised and managed, what factors influence its current organisation and consider how it might develop. We will examine how media affects peoples and societies, particularly with the rise of social media, and review the debates about media influence and power. Finally, we will seek to draw together key aspects of modern media.

DEV-M105

20

MICROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module provides the building blocks for microeconomic analysis of development. Topics include: #Poverty, inequality and welfare #Agricultural household production #Intra- household allocation #Risk, uncertainty and insurance #Markets and Institutions: credit #Markets and institutions: labour #Human capital : education, health and nutrition #Public goods, collective action #Institutions, transaction costs #Policy reforms #Household surveys and their analysis. The module consists of lectures, seminars and workshops. Students are assessed by essay and exam.

DEV-M057

20

MSC IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Climate Change and International Development.

DEV-M086

20

MSC IN DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Development Economics.

DEV-M116

20

MSC IN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Environment and International Development.

DEV-M042

20

MSC IN IMPACT EVALUATION FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Impact Evaluation for International Development.

DEV-M108

20

MSC IN WATER SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Water Security and International Development.

DEV-M104

20

PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBALISATION

The module is designed to provide a broad overview of the debates on globalisation and its implications for developing countries. It is taught from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives and considers a range of views and critiques. It addresses key issues such as the impact of globalisation on poverty and inequality, the role of the state, and conflict and security, as well as addressing the resistance to globalisation and the rise of global social movements.

DEV-M071

20

POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This course seeks to provide students with a solid understanding of political ecology theory and to enable them to apply this theory for analyzing environment and development problems. After a brief introduction to key theoretical concepts in political ecology, students review key contributions to major policy fields in environment and development. They do this in a series of reading seminars, covering agriculture and biotechnology, climate change, conservation, fisheries, forestry, water management and other fields. The course ends with a workshop on the role of policy in political ecology.

DEV-M090

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 1

In this module, students will conduct an organisational and policy analysis for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD4Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 2

In this module, students will design and pilot their own research instruments for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD5Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 3

In this module, students will develop a detailed research proposal for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD6Y

20

RESEARCH SKILLS WORKSHOP: DESIGN AND WRITING

RSW:DW will focus on identifying research questions; scoping existing knowledge and finding literature; critical reading and writing; editing and planning arguments; comparing conceptual approaches and preliminary thinking about theory-data linkages.

DEV-M091

10

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS

The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: # Development research and research ethics # Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews # The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods # Participatory and action research # Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are taught using SPSS.

DEV-M027

20

RSW: ELABORATING RESEARCH DESIGN

This module continues from where RSW1 leaves off. It provides students with the skills to complete their procedural paper, particularly focusing on methodology and moving further on theory-data linkages towards the construction of a conceptual framework.

DEV-M092

10

RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND AGRARIAN CHANGE

Rural Livelihoods and Agrarian Change is a core module for all MAARD and MAGAID students and is an option for all other masters students. It is an inter-disciplinary module that uses a social relations perspective to understand how people make a living in contexts of poverty and vulnerability. It aims to provide an overview of rural livelihoods and approaches to their analysis as well as a critical assessment of the implications of gender relations and poverty, for livelihood building. The interconnections between the wider context within which livelihoods are built, including national policies and the character of specific locations, the social structure and rules that determine entitlements, the assets or resources available to individuals and groups, and their livelihood strategies, will be examined. The links between rural and urban, farm and non-farm for the livelihoods of rural people, over time, will also be explored.

DEV-M061

20

RURAL POLICIES and POLITICS

Around three-quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas and the gap between poor and rich continues to widen. The fate of the rural poor can be greatly influenced by policies in areas such as agriculture, land, social protection, natural resources, health, education and trade. This module reviews key policies and issues in these and other areas. It also guides students to critically analyse policy choices within specific contexts. Rural Policies recognises the importance of looking at rural policies with consideration of particular socio-economic contexts and in relation to larger-scale trends that are affecting rural areas: globalisation, urbanisation, de-agrarianisation, rural-urban linkages, conflict, HIV/AIDS and decentralisation. At the same time, it is based on the premise that rural areas require particular policies because of the distinct conditions characterizing them.

DEV-M016

20

SOCIAL ANALYSIS FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Over the last few years, social development has become a leading focus in international development policy. Most international agencies and many of the larger NGOs have their own departments or divisions of social development. This module offers a detailed theoretical analysis of key concepts issues in social development, such as power relations, social capital, social exclusion, participatory development and different understandings of poverty. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries.

DEV-M063

20

TOOLS AND SKILLS IN ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to introduce a range of tools and frameworks used by researchers, government agencies, businesses and NGOs to inform and develop their environmental management strategies in a sustainable development context. Students will gain familiarity with the most important available approaches and an understanding of the key assumptions and ideas in environment-development research, monitoring and management systems. The module is taught through workshops and practical sessions, lectures and field or study visits within Norfolk. There is an emphasis on putting concepts into practice and understanding how environmental assessments guide management actions. Both individual and team projects will be important. Tools and frameworks covered may include environmental and social impact assessments, survey techniques for land, water or biodiversity, GIS and modelling of social-ecological systems, sustainable livelihoods analysis and integrated conservation and development.

DEV-M064

20

UNDERSTANDING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This module provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the analysis and understanding of issues of environmental change, and of the relationships between environment and development. Students will have a critical understanding of social constructions of cause and effect relationships in environment and development issues, including a critical understanding of scientific assessments. They will be able to link these understandings to topics encountered in other courses, and to develop their own perspectives on environment and development issues. In particular they should understand the somewhat different perspectives in 'less developed countries' on environment and development issues. The course consists of weekly workshops and seminar sessions, which include videos and discussions oriented around core issues and readings. Assessment is based on coursework and written examination.

DEV-M051

20

WATER SECURITY FOR DEVELOPMENT - THEORY AND CONCEPTS

The aim of 'Water Security Theory and Concepts' is to investigate the theory and conceptual frameworks that underpin research and policy work on 'water security'. The module explores the background to rising concerns regarding the protection and use of water, and outlines key issues and interests relevant to its current treatment in research and in practice. It examines the differences between water security and water resources security, and moreover, investigates the connections between water security with food, climate or energy security, and international, state and individual concerns regarding military security.

DEV-M101

20

WATER SECURITY FOR DEVELOPMENT - TOOLS AND POLICY

The aim of 'Water Security Tools and Policy' is to investigate and provide a working familiarity with established and cutting-edge analytical, decision-making, and development tools (such as water footprinting or climate impacts assessment) for effective water security policy. It will utilise case study material, physical models, computer exercises and material brought or sourced by students to audit the water security of a system of interest (e.g. city, region, country, irrigation scheme). The students will record and assess the factors that affect water security such as laws and legal frameworks; water supply and demand volumes; institutions for managing water; climate change science and models; climate risks and adaptation; and future projections regarding societal change. Actions to address security will be discussed and formulated.

DEV-M102

20

WELFARE AND EVALUATION IN DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of Impact Evaluation. For that purpose, the first part intends to address the theory of welfare, with particular reference to poverty, inequality and multi-dimensional ill-being. The second part of the module intends to provide an introduction the theories and practices of evidence based policy making, and the third part to cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis.

DEV-M097

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • Degree Subject: Social Sciences
  • Degree Classification: 2.1 or equivalent

Entry Requirement

 Applicants should normally have a good first degree from a recognised higher education institution. The University will also take into account the employment experience of applicants where relevant.

It is normal for undergraduate students to apply for entry to postgraduate programmes in their final year of study. Applicants who have not yet been awarded a degree may be offered a place conditional on their attaining a particular class of degree.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic requirements for this course, you may be able to study one of the International Graduate Diploma programmes offered by our partner INTO UEA. These programmes guarantee progression to selected masters degrees if students achieve the appropriate grade. For more details please click here:

International Graduate Diploma in International Development

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Fees and Funding

The tuition fees for 2015/6 will be confirmed shortly. Fees for the academic year 2014/15 were:

  • UK/EU Students: £6,000 (full-time), £3,000 (part-time)*
  • International Students: £12,900

* for each year of the course.

International applicants from outside the EU may need to pay a deposit.

Living Expenses

Approximately £7,500 living expenses will be needed to adequately support yourself.

Scholarships and Funding

A variety of Scholarships may be offered to UK students. Please click here for more detailed information about UK/EU Scholarships and Funding.

The University offers around £1 million of Scholarships each year to support International students in their studies. Scholarships are normally awarded to students on the basis of academic merit and are usually for the duration of the period of study. Please click here for further information about funding for International students. International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.


Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can apply online, or by downloading the application form.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.