The latest Creative Writing News The latest Creative Writing News

You by Phil Whitaker


You is the new novel by UEA alumnus Phil Whitaker and has recently been published by Salt.  Phil graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 1996 and published his first novel Eclipse of the Sun in 1997. This went on to win the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and a Betty Trask Award and was shortlisted for the Whitbread First Novel Award. His second novel Triangulation was the winner of the 2000 Encore Award.  The Face was published in 2004, Freak of Nature in 2007, and Sister Sebastian’s Library in 2016. He writes a fortnightly column on health matters for the New Statesman and divides his time between writing and working as a general practitioner.

 


Deepa Anappara wins Deborah Rogers Writers’ Award

Djinn Patrol On The Purple Line by UEA writer Deepa Anappara has been announced as the winner of the 2018 Deborah Rogers Writers’ Award for debut authors, which is worth £10,000 and honours the memory of the literary agent Deborah Rogers who died in 2016. Deepa (pictured) is a journalist and editor who graduated last year from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) at UEA and has since joined the PhD in Creative & Critical Writing. Djinn Patrol On The Purple Line was the winner of the 2017 Bridport / Peggy Chapman-Andrews Award for a First Novel and has recently been shortlisted for the Lucy Cavendish Fiction Prize. The inaugural Deborah Rogers Award was won in 2016 by UEA graduate Sharlene Teo, while fellow alumna Imogen Hermes Gowar was shortlisted.


Tom Watson wins Curtis Brown Award

Tom Watson has been named as the recipient of this year’s £1,500 Curtis Brown Award, which is awarded annually to the best student on the UEA Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) MA, as chosen by a panel of Curtis Brown agents.  The prize was established by the agency in memory of their colleague Giles Gordon, and was presented to him this week by literary agent Karolina Sutton (pictured). Tom was born in London in 1982 and worked for a number of years trading commodities at a Japanese trading house before joining UEA.  He was shortlisted for the 2016 Bristol Short Story Prize and was runner-up for the 2012 Sean O Faolain Prize and is currently completing his first novel.


Faber & Faber to publish ‘film-poem’ by Owen Sheers

Faber & Faber has recently acquired To Provide All People, a 'film-poem' by UEA alumnus Owen Sheers, which it will publish in July to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the National Health Service Act and the broadcast of the Vox Pictures/BBC Wales production of the same name.Owen (pictured) graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Poetry) in 1998 and published his first collection of poetry, The Blue Book, in 2000. His first work of non-fiction, The Dust Diaries, was the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year in 2005, while his second collection of poetry, Skirrid Hill, won the 2006 Somerset Maugham Award. His most recent novel, I Saw A Man, was shortlisted for Wales Book of the Year andthe Prix Etranger in France. Earlier this year he was awarded the Wilfred Owen Poetry Award.


Richard Beard shortlisted for James Tait Black Prize

The Day That Went Missing, a memoir by UEA alumnus Richard Beard, has been shortlisted for this year’s James Tait Black (Biography) Prize, which is worth £10,000 to the winner. Richard graduated from the MA in Creative Writing in 1995 and has published six novels including Lazarus is Dead, Dry Bones andDamascus, which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He has been shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award and longlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Private Bank Short Story Award. His most recent novel Acts of the Assassins was shortlisted for the Goldsmiths Prize in 2015. Richard is also the author of three previous books of narrative non-fiction and was a Teaching Fellow in Creative Writing at UEA between 2014 and 2017. The Day That Went Missing was recently shortlisted for the Rathbones Folio Prize.The winner of the James Tait Black Prize will be announced on 18 August at the Edinburgh International Book Festival.


The Colour of the Sun by David Almond

The Colour of the Sun is the new novel for children by UEA alumnus David Almond and has just been published by Hodder Children’s Books. David graduated from UEA with a BA in English and American Studies in 1973 and began a career as a teacher before publishing his first novel in his late forties. He has since published nearly twenty other books, including two novels for adults. His previous novel for children, A Song for Ella Grey, was published in 2014 and was the winner of the 2015 Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize and shortlisted for The Bookseller’s inaugural YA Book Prize.

 


Deepa Anappara shortlisted for Deborah Rogers Writers’ Award

Djinn Patrol On The Purple Line by UEA writer Deepa Anappara has been shortlisted for the 2018 Deborah Rogers Writers’ Award for debut authors, which is worth £10,000 to the winner and honours the memory of the literary agent Deborah Rogers who died in 2016.Deepa (pictured) is a journalist and editor who graduated last year from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) at UEA and has since joined the PhD in Creative & Critical Writing. Her short fiction has been nominated for several awards, while Djinn Patrol On The Purple Line was the winner of the 2017 Bridport / Peggy Chapman-Andrews Award for a First Novel and has recently been shortlisted for the Lucy Cavendish Fiction Prize. The winner of the Deborah Rogers Award will be announced on 16th May. It was won last year by UEA graduate Sharlene Teo, while fellow alumna Imogen Hermes Gowar was shortlisted.


Mitch Johnson shortlisted for Branford Boase Award

Kick by UEA alumnus Mitch Johnson has been shortlisted for this year’s Branford Boase Award. The Award is given annually to the author of a debut children’s novel and their editor. Kick was published by Usborne last year. Mitch graduated from the BA in English Literature with Creative Writing at UEA in 2014 and currently works as a bookseller in Waterstones, Norwich. The Branford Boase Award was won by UEA alumna CJ Flood (MA 2010) in 2014 for her debut Infinite Sky. This year’s winner will be announced on 4th July.


Whistle In The Dark by Emma Healey

Whistle In The Dark is the second novel by UEA alumna Emma Healey and is published by Viking this week. Emma graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2011 and published her first novel Elizabeth Is Missing in 2014, winning the Costa First Novel Award, a Betty Trask Award, and Italy’s Premio Salerno Libro D’Europa prize. The novel was shortlisted for the Jarrold New Writing Award, the Independent Booksellers Week Awards, the Desmond Elliott Prize, The Times Breakthrough Award, and the Blackwell’s Book of the Year Award, and was longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize and the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. The adaptation rights have recently been acquired by the BBC for a 90 minute drama to be broadcast in 2019.  


The Language of Kindness: A Nurse’s Story by Christie Watson


The Language of Kindness: A Nurse’s Story 
is a memoir by UEA alumna Christie Watson and is published by Chatto & Windus this week. Christie trained as a paediatric nurse at Great Ormond Street Hospital and worked in nursing for twenty years. She graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2007, when she was the recipient of the Malcolm Bradbury Memorial Bursary. Her bestselling debut novel, Tiny Sunbirds Far Away, was published in 2011 and won the Costa First Novel Award and the Waverton Good Read Award. Her second novel Where Women Are Kings was published by Quercus in 2013. Her books have been translated into eighteen languages. 


Wrestliana by Toby Litt



Wrestliana 
is a new work of non-fiction by UEA alumnus Toby Litt and is published by Galley Beggar Press this week. Toby graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 1995 and was included in the Granta list of Best of Young British Novelists in 2003. He is the author of nine novels and three collections of short stories and a book of essays, Mutants, published by Seagull Books in 2016. His most recent collection of short fiction was Life-Like, published by Seagull in 2014. He is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at Birkbeck, University of London.


Paula Cocozza shortlisted for Desmond Elliott Prize

How to be Human by recent UEA graduate Paula Cocozza has been included on the shortlist of three for this year’s Desmond Elliott Prize for debut novels. Paula (pictured) is a feature writer for the Guardian and graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2015, when she was the recipient of the David Higham Award. How to Be Human was published by Hutchinson last year. The prize is worth £10,000 to the winner and was previously won by UEA graduates Anjali Joseph in 2011 and Edward Hogan in 2009. This year’s winner will be announced on 20 June.


Deepa Anappara, Poppy Sebag-Montefiore and Lauren Van Schaik shortlisted for Lucy Cavendish Prize

Three UEA Creative Writing students and alumni have been shortlisted for the 2018 Lucy Cavendish Fiction Prize for unpublished female authors. They are: Deepa Anappara for Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line; Poppy Sebag-Montefiore for Listeners; and Lauren Van Schaik for Joplin. Deepa graduated from the MA in Creative Writing last year and is currently doing a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing. She previously worked as a journalist in India and has won or been shortlisted for a number of prizes for her short fiction. Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line won the Bridport/Peggy Chapman-Andrews Award for a First Novel in 2017. Poppy (pictured) graduated from the MA in 2014 as the recipient of the Malcolm Bradbury Scholarship. She worked for several years in China as a correspondent and producer for the BBC and Channel4 and currently teaches Modern Chinese Fiction at Kings College London and Kingston University. Lauren was born in Missouri, grew up in Ohio, and now lives and works in London. She studied History at Bryn Mawr College, Oxford, and UCL, and graduated from the UEA Creative Writing MA in 2016 as the recipient of the David Higham bursary. The winner of the Prize will be announced on 24 June and will receive £1,500. The 2015 Prize was won by UEA alumna Emily Midorikawa (MA 2005). Kathryn Simmonds (MA 2002) was shortlisted in 2012 and Kelleigh Greenberg-Jephcott (MA 2017) in 2016.

 


Imogen Hermes Gowarshortlisted for Women’s Prize for Fiction

The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock, the debut novel by UEA alumna Imogen Hermes Gowar, has been shortlisted for the 2018 Women’s Prize for Fiction, which is worth £30,000 to the winner. Imogen graduated from UEA with a BA in Archaeology, Anthropology and Art History in 2012 and from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2014, when she was the winner of the Curtis Brown Award. An early draft of her novel, which she began while completing her MA, was a finalist in the MsLexia First Novel Competition in 2015 and was shortlisted for the inaugural Deborah Rogers Foundation Writers’ Award. It was also recently longlisted for the Desmond Elliott Prize. After a ten-publisher auction, Vintage secured the rights to the novel for a six figure sum in 2017. The winner of the Women’s Prize for Fiction will be announced on 6 June. It was won last year by UEA alumna Naomi Alderman (MA 2003).

 


Jenny Karlsson shortlisted forThe White Review Short Story Prize

‘Love & Accommodation’ by UEA alumna Jenny Karlsson has been shortlisted for the year’s The White Review Short Story Prize, which is worth £2,500 to the winner. Jenny (pictured) grew up in a steel town in Swedish Lapland and worked in factories in Leicester before joining the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2010. She graduated in 2011 as the recipient of the Malcolm Bradbury Memorial bursary, and is currently editing a short story collection. The winner of theThe White Review Short Story Prize will be announced on 17 May.


Jane Harris shortlisted for Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction

Sugar Money by UEA graduate Jane Harris has been shortlisted for this year’s Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction, which is worth £25,000 to the winner and £1,000 to each shortlisted author. Jane graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 1992 and the PhD in Creative and Critical Writing in 1995. Her first novel The Observations was published in 2006 and nominated for numerous prizes, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction and the Saltire Society First Book of the Year Award. Her second novel Gillespie & I was published in 2011 and longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. Sugar Money, her third novel, was published by Faber last year. Another UEA alumna, Natasha Pulley (MA 2012), was longlisted for the Walter Scott Prize for her novel The Bedlam Stacks (Bloomsbury) last year. The winner will be announced at the Borders Book Festival on 15th June.


Rosie: Scenes from a Vanished Life by Rose Tremain



Rosie: Scenes from a Vanished Life
is a new memoir by UEA alumna Rose Tremain and has just been published by Chatto & Windus. Rose graduated from UEA with a BA in English in 1967 and later returned to the university to teach on the Creative Writing MA and, more recently, to become the University’s first female Chancellor. She was made a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours of 2007. Among her many acclaimed novels are Music and Silence (1999), which won the Whitbread Novel Award, and The Road Home, which won the 2008 Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction. Her most recent novel The Gustav Sonata was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize, the Independent Bookshop Week Book Award and the Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction


Break.up by Joanna Walsh



Break.up
is the new work of fiction by Joanna Walsh and is published by Semiotext(e) and Tuskar Rock this week. Joanna is completing her PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at UEA, exploring the possibilities of digital narrative. She is a contributing editor at 3:AM Magazine and Catapult.co, and has previously published her work in Granta, The Dalkey Archive, gorse journal, The Stinging Fly, The Dublin Review and Best British Short Stories. Her first book Fractals was published in 2013 and has been followed by Grow a Pair (2015), Vertigo (2015), Hotel (2015), Seed (2017) and Worlds From The Word’s End (2017). She was a judge on the 2016 Goldsmiths Prize, and won the 2017 Arts Foundation Fellowship in the Creative Non-Fiction category


Ponti by Sharlene Teo



Ponti is the debut novel by UEA alumna Sharlene Teo and is published by Picador this week. Originally from Singapore, Sharlene graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2013, when she was the recipient of that year’s Booker Prize Foundation Scholarship. She subsequently became the David T K Wong Creative Writing Fellow at UEA before undertaking her PhD in Creative and Critical Writing, also at UEA. In 2014 she was a Fellow at the Sozopol Seminars in Bulgaria, and in 2017 she was shortlisted for the Berlin Writing Prize and received a fellowship from the University of Iowa International Writing Program. Ponti was the winner of the inaugural Deborah Rogers Writers' Award in 2016, and translation rights have been sold throughout the world.


Self & I: A Memoir of Literary Ambition by Matthew De Abaitua



Self & I: A Memoir of Literary Ambition
is a new memoir by UEA alumnus Matthew De Abaitua and has recently been published by Eye Books. Matthew was born in Liverpool in 1971 and graduated from the MA in Creative Writing in 1994, after which he lived and worked as Will Self’s amanuensis in a remote cottage in Suffolk. Self & I is his account of that time. Matthew’s first novel, The Red Men, was published in 2007 by Snow Books and was shortlisted for the Arthur C Clarke Award. His book about camping with his family, The Art of Camping, was published by Penguin in 2012.  His science fiction novels, If Then and The Destructives, were published by Angry Robot in 2015 and 2016.  Matthew has worked as Deputy Editor of The Idler and as Literary Editor of Esquire, has written and presented a nine-part documentary series for Channel 4 about British science fiction called SF:UK.