The latest Creative Writing News The latest Creative Writing News

Friendly Bombs by Christopher James

Friendly Bombs, a new play about John Betjeman by UEA alumnus Christopher James, opens at the Maddermarket theatre in Norwich this evening. Chris (pictured) graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Poetry) at UEA in 1997 and was the recipient of an Eric Gregory Award in 2002, when he also won the Bridport Prize for Poetry. His debut collection of poetry The Invention of Butterfly was published in 2006 and in 2008 he was the winner of the National Poetry Competition. He has since published three other poetry collections and two novels about Sherlock Holmes. Christopher works in London as head of corporate communications for the Scouts Association and will publish a new collection of poetry, The Penguin Diaries, next year.


Air by Ryan Gattis

Air is the first novel for young adults by UEA alumnus Ryan Gattis and is published by Adaptive Books this week. Ryan was born in Illinois, USA, and raised in Colorado. He graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2002 and published his first novel Roo Kickkick and the Big Bad Blimp in 2004. This was followed by Kung Fu High School in 2005 and two novellas, The Big Drop: Homecoming in 2012 and The Big Drop: Impermanence in 2013. His most recent novel, All Involved: A Novel Of The 1992 LA Riots, was published by Picador last year and is being adapted for TV by the American television company HBO. Ryan was a founding member of the publishing collective Black Hill Press, and taught English and Creative Writing for ten years at Chapman University. He currently lives in Los Angeles.


DW Wilson wins 2016 Manchester Fiction Prize

UEA alumnus DW (Dave) Wilson has been announced as the winner of the this year’s £10,000 Manchester Fiction Prize for his short story ‘All This Concrete Beneath Your Feet’. Dave (pictured) was born in British Columbia and joined UEA as the inaugural recipient of the Booker Foundation bursary. He graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2010 and from the PhD in Creative and Critical Writing in 2014. His first collection of short fiction, Once You Break A Knuckle, was published in 2011 and shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize. One of the stories, ‘Dead Roads’, was the winner of the 2011 BBC National Short Story Award. His first novel Ballistics was published in 2013 and shortlisted for the 2014 Desmond Elliott Prize. Last year he was the winner of Canada’s $6,000 CBC Short Story Prize. He currently teaches Creative Writing at the University of Victoria in Canada.


Rebecca Tamás wins 2016 Manchester Poetry Prize

UEA writer Rebecca Tamás has been announced as the co-winner of the 2016 Manchester Poetry Prize.  She shares the £10,000 prize with Dante Di Stefano. Rebecca (pictured) was born in London and studied at the University of Warwick and the University of Edinburgh, where she won the Grierson Verse Prize. She is currently studying for a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at UEA under the supervision of Denise Riley and Tiffany Atkinson. Her poetry pamphlet, The Ophelia Letters, was published by Salt in 2013 and she was included in the anthologies Best British Poetry 2014 and Best British Poetry 2015.


Kazuo Ishiguro, Anne Enright and Natasha Pulley longlisted for International Dublin Literary Award

Three UEA alumni have been included on the longlist for the 2017 International Dublin Literary Award, which is worth €100,000 to the winner and is nominated by libraries worldwide. Kazuo Ishiguro (pictured), who graduated from the UEA Creative Writing MA in 1980, is nominated for The Buried Giant (Faber). Anne Enright, who graduated from the MA in 1987 and is, like Ishiguro, a former winner of the Man Booker Prize, is nominated for The Green Road (Vintage). Natasha Pulley, who graduated from the MA in 2012, is nominated for her debut novel The Watchmaker of Filigree Street (Bloomsbury), which was previously shortlisted for the Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award and the Betty Trask Award. The shortlist for the International Dublin Literary Award will be announced on 11th April and the winner on 21st June 2017.


Rose Tremain and Denise Riley shortlisted for Costa Book Awards

Two UEA writers have been shortlisted for this year’s Costa Book Awards. The Gustav Sonata by Rose Tremain (Chatto & Windus) is nominated in the Novel category, while Say Something Back by Denise Riley (Picador) is nominated in the Poetry category. Rose (pictured) graduated from UEA with a BA in English in 1967 and later returned to the university to teach on the Creative Writing MA and, more recently, to become the University’s first female Chancellor. Among her many other acclaimed novels are Music and Silence (1999), which won the Whitbread Novel Award, and The Road Home, which won the 2008 Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction. She was made a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours of 2007. Denise is currently a Professor of Poetry and the History of Ideas at UEA, and was formerly the convenor of the MA in Creative Writing (Poetry). Say Something Back was shortlisted for the 2016 Forward Prize for Best Collection and is also on the shortlist for the TS Eliot Prize, the winner of which will be announced in January. The winners of each of the five Costa categories will be awarded £5,000 when they are announced on 3rd January. The five category winners will then be considered for the Costa Book of the Year Award, which is worth £30,000 and will be announced on 31st January.


The Story Cure by Susan Elderkin and Ella Berthoud


The Story Cure: An A-Z of Books to Keep Kids Happy, Healthy and Wise
is a literary guidebook compiled by UEA alumna Susan Elderkin and her friend Ella Berthoud and is published this week by Canongate. Ella and Susan (pictured) met as English Literature students at Cambridge University before Susan joined the UEA Creative Writing MA in 1993. Susan subsequently published two novels, Sunset Over Chocolate Mountains (2000) and The Voices (2003), and was listed by Granta in 2003 as one of the Twenty Best Young British Novelists. She and Ella set up a bibliography service at The School of Life in London in 2008 and published The Novel Cure: An A-Z of Literary Remedies in 2013.


Forbidden Line by Paul Stanbridge


Forbidden Line is the debut novel by UEA alumnus Paul Stanbridge and has just been published by Galley Beggar Press. Paul grew up in Essex and studied literature at the universities of Reading and Manchester before joining UEA to undertake his doctoral thesis, The Making of David Jones’s Anathemata. He gained his PhD in 2011, since when he has divided his working time between music and writing. Forbidden Line was last week longlisted for The Republic of Consciousness Prize for Small Presses along with Light Box by UEA alumna KJ Orr (MA 2007


Five UEA writers nominated for 2017 CILIP Carnegie Medal

Five UEA alumni have been nominated for the 2017 CILIP Carnegie Medal, which is now in its 80th year and rewards an outstanding book for children and young people. The nominated titles are Bad Apple by Matt Whyman (Creative Writing MA 1992),Twenty Questions for Gloria by Martyn Bedford (Creative Writing MA 1994), The Boy At The Top Of The Mountain by John Boyne (Creative Writing MA 1995), Nightwanderers by CJ Flood (pictured, Creative Writing MA 2010) and Sophie Someone by Hayley Long (American Studies MA 2016). The longlist for the CILIP Carnegie Medal will be announced on 16 February 2017, the shortlist on 16 March, and the winner on 19 June.


DW Wilson shortlisted for Manchester Fiction Prize

UEA alumnus DW (Dave) Wilson has been shortlisted for the 2016 Manchester Fiction Prize for his short story 'All This Concrete Beneath Your Feet'. Dave (pictured) was born in British Columbia and joined UEA as the inaugural recipient of the Booker Foundation bursary. He graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2010 and from the PhD in Creative and Critical Writing in 2014. His first collection of short fiction, Once You Break A Knuckle, was published in 2011 and shortlisted for both the British Columbia Book Prize and the Dylan Thomas Prize. One of the stories, Dead Roads, was the winner of the 2011 BBC National Short Story Award. His first novel Ballistics was published in 2013 and shortlisted for the 2014 Desmond Elliott Prize. Last year he was the winner of Canada’s $6,000 CBC Short Story Prize. He currently teaches Creative Writing at the University of Victoria in Canada. The winner of the Manchester Fiction Prize, which is worth £10,000, will be announced on 25th November.


Rebecca Tamás shortlisted for Manchester Poetry Prize

UEA writer Rebecca Tamás has been shortlisted for the 2016 Manchester Poetry Prize, for which entrants submit a short portfolio of three to five poems. Rebecca (pictured) was born in London and studied at the University of Warwick and the University of Edinburgh, where she won the Grierson Verse Prize. She is currently studying for a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at UEA. Her poetry pamphlet, The Ophelia Letters, was published by Salt in 2013 and she was included in the anthologies Best British Poetry 2014 and Best British Poetry 2015. The winner of the Manchester Poetry Prize, which is worth £10,000, will be announced on 25th November.


Eleanor Herzog selected for John Brabourne Award


UEA alumna Eleanor Herzog has been selected as one of twelve recipients of a  John Brabourne Award by the Cinema and Television Benevolent Fund (CTBF). Each recipient will receive a grant of up to £5,000 to support the development of their career in writing for film or television, alongside professional support from the CTBF. Eleanor (pictured) graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Scriptwriting) earlier this year, having previously studied Literature at the University of Sussex.  She began her writing career in Hong Kong with Siren Films and has worked most recently as a development editor in Keshet UK’s drama department. She is currently developing a magical realism feature with director Brian Williams and producing her first short film, Come Home. She was recently selected to participate in the BFI Creative England Talent Module.


Nineveh by Henrietta Rose-Innes

Nineveh by UEA writer Henrietta Rose-Innes is the first of her novels to be published in the UK and the USA. It will be published this week by Aardvark Bureau in the UK and by Unnamed Press in the US. Originally published in South Africa in 2011, Nineveh was shortlisted for the M-Net Literary Award and South Africa’s Sunday Times Fiction Prize, while the French translation Ninive was the winner of the François Sommer Literary Prize in 2015. Henrietta is from Cape Town, South Africa, and is currently completing her PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at UEA. She is the author of three other novels and a collection of short stories, including most recently the novel Green Lion, which was published in South Africa in 2015 and will be published in the UK next year. Henrietta was the winner of the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2008 and the HSBC / PEN Short Story Prize in 2007, and was runner-up in the BBC Short Story Award in 2012. Her work is included in the Granta Book of the African Short Story (2011) and is published in several other languages.


Jean McNeil wins Phyllis and Don Munday Award

Ice Diaries: an Antarctic Memoir by UEA Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing Jean McNeil has won the $4,000 Grand Prize - the Phyllis and Don Munday Award - at the Banff Mountain Film Festival book competition. The book was published by ECW Press in North America earlier this year. Originally from Nova Scotia, Canada, Jean is the co-Director of the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) at UEA and the author of ten previous books, including four novels and a collection of short fiction. Her work has been shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize, the Governor-General’s Prize for fiction (Canada) and the Journey Prize for short fiction (Canada). She has twice been the Mellon Foundation Visiting Scholar in South Africa, and works for part of each year in South Africa and Kenya. Her new novel The Dhow House was recently published in the UK by Legend.


Meadhbh Ní Eadhra wins national Irish language literary award.

UEA alumna Meadhbh Ní Eadhra has won an Oireachtas Irish language literary award for her unpublished novel for teenagers, Faye. The award is worth €2,000. Meadhbh (pictured) graduated from the Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) MA in 2013.  She is the author of two award-winning Irish language books for young people, Rua and Fáinne Fí Fífí, and was the winner of the 2013 Moth Short Story Prize.  Last month her short story ‘Friday’ was shortlisted for the 2016 Over The Edge New Writer of The Year award.

 


The Corner of Moon Street by Tom Saunders

The Corner of Moon Street is the new collection of short stories by UEA alumnus Tom Saunders and is published by Reuben Books this week. Tom graduated from the MA in Creative Writing in 1987 and is the author of four other books, including most recently To The Boy (2014). His short stories have been published widely and in 1995 he was an award winner in the Ian St James international short story competition. His story ‘Roof Whirl Away’ was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2006.


The Power by Naomi Alderman

The Power is the new novel by UEA alumna Naomi Alderman and is published by Viking this week. Naomi graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2003. Her first novel Disobedience (2006) won the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award and the Orange Broadband Prize for New Writers. Her second novel The Lessons (2010) was serialised for BBC Radio 4’s Book at Bedtime. Her third novel The Liars’ Gospel was published in 2012, when she was selected by the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative to be mentored by Margaret Atwood. In 2013 she was named as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. From 2004 to 2007 Naomi was lead writer on the alternate reality game Perplex City. She has written online games for Penguin and the BBC, among others, and in 2012 she co-created the top-selling smartphone fitness game and audio adventure Zombies, Run.


Gull Stones and Cuckoos edited by Lynne Bryan and Belona Greenwood

Gull Stones and Cuckoos is an anthology of contemporary rural lifewriting edited by UEA alumnae Lynne Bryan (MA 1985) and Belona Greenwood (MA 2005). It is published by Unthank Books this week. Supported by Arts Council England, the anthology is the culmination of the Rural Writes project, a partnership between Norfolk Libraries and Words and Women that brought together novice women writers from around Norfolk for workshops with professional writers Belona Greenwood and award-winning poet Heidi Williamson. The project was coordinated by Anna Brett of Create Projects and the book is illustrated by Rose Cowan. It will be launched at series of events in Norfolk libraries this week.


Ruby Robinson and Denise Riley shortlisted T S Eliot Prize

UEA alumna Ruby Robinson and UEA professor Denise Riley have been shortlisted for this year’s T S Eliot Prize for poetry.  Ruby (pictured) is nominated for her debut collection Every Little Sound, which was published by Liverpool University Press earlier this year and shortlisted for the 2016 Felix Dennis Prize for Best First Collection. She graduated from the BA in English Literature at UEA in 2006. Denise Riley is nominated for Say Something Back, published by Picador last year and shortlisted for the 2016 Forward Prize for Best Collection. Denise is Professor of Poetry and the History of Ideas at UEA, and was formerly the convenor of the MA in Creative Writing (Poetry). The winner of the T S Eliot Prize will be announced in January.


Versailles by Yannick Hill

 

Versailles is the debut novel by UEA alumnus Yannick Hill and has recently been published by Unbound.  Yannick graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2003, having previously gained a distinction on the UEA BA in English Literature with Creative Writing.  He has since worked as a professional editor and journalist. 

 


Rubber Ring by James McDermott

Black and White photo of James McDermott Rubber Ring is the new solo show by UEA alumnus James McDermott and will open at the Pleasance Theatre Islington in London on 31st October and run until 6th November before touring. James (pictured) graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Scriptwriting) this year. He has performed his solo shows Beached (INK, Latitude and Southwark Playhouse) and Dogsbody (Southwark) at theatres and festivals across the country including Cambridge Junction, Southwark Playhouse and Latitude. His first full length play Half A Person opened in Norwich earlier this year and was shortlisted for Soho Theatre’s Verity Bargate Award. James is currently developing work with The Garage and London-based comedy theatre company Velvet Trumpet.


Anne Enright and Rowan Hisayo Buchanan nominated for Books Are My Bag Readers Awards

Two UEA authors have been nominated for the inaugural Books Are My Bag Readers Awards, supported by National Book Tokens. Former Booker Prize-winner Anne Enright, who graduated from the Creative Writing MA in 1987, has been shortlisted in the Fiction category for her latest novel, The Green Road (Vintage). Current Creative & Critical Writing PhD student Rowan Hisayo Buchanan (pictured) is shortlisted in the Breakthrough Author category for her debut novel Harmless Like You (Sceptre). The winner in each category will be selected by public vote.


KJ Orr wins BBC National Short Story Award

'Disappearances’ by UEA alumna KJ (Katherine) Orr has been announced as the winner of this year’s £15,000 BBC National Short Story Award. Katherine (pictured) graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2007 and subsequently completed a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at the University of Chichester. She was previously shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award in 2011, when UEA alumnus DW Wilson was the winner, and has also been shortlisted for The Bridport Prize and the KWS Hilary Mantel International Short Story Competition. In 2012 Daunt Books published a special edition of her story ‘The Inland Sea’, and last year she was included in the anthology Best British Short Stories 2015.  Her debut collection, Light Box, was published by Daunt Books earlier this year, and ‘Disappearances’ is taken from that collection.  Katherine is currently a Teaching Fellow at UEA.


Meadhbh Ní Eadhra shortlisted for Over The Edge New Writer of The Year award

‘Friday…’, a new short story by UEA alumna Meadhbh Ní Eadhra, has been shortlisted for the 2016 Over The Edge New Writer of The Year award, an international short story competition organized by Galway City Library. Meadhbh (pictured) graduated from the Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) MA in 2013.  She is the author of two award-winning Irish language books for young people, Rua and Fáinne Fí Fífí, and was the winner of the 2013 Moth Short Story Prize.


Tom Watson shortlisted for Bristol Short Story Prize

‘Magda’, a short story by current UEA student Tom Watson, has been shortlisted for the 2016 Bristol Short Story Prize. Tom (pictured) was born and raised in London and worked in commodities for a Japanese trading house before joining the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) at UEA. His short story 'The Cafe at the V&A' was runner-up for the Sean O’Faolain Short Story Competition in 2012, and his fiction has since appeared in Southword and several anthologies. The Bristol Short Story Prize was won by UEA alumna Emily Bullock (MA 2004) in 2011.  Krishan Coupland (MA 2014; current PhD) and Bethany Proud (BA 2011) were shortlisted in 2014.  Claire Griffiths (BA 2007; MA 2009; PhD 2016) was the runner-up in 2014.  The winner of this year’s prize will be announced on 8th October and will receive £1000. The 20 stories on the shortlist will be published in the ninth Bristol Short Story Prize Anthology.


Judy O’Kane and Deborah Spring shortlisted for the Tony Lothian Prize

Two alumnae of the MA in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction at UEA have been shortlisted for this year’s Tony Lothian Prize (formerly known as the Biographers' Club Prize), which is awarded for the best proposal by an uncommissioned, first-time biographer. Judy O’Kane has been nominated for ‘Thirst’, a project exploring wine, terroir and identity, while Deborah Spring has been nominated for 'A Woman of Ideas – Lady Anne Bacon 1528–1610'Judy (pictured) graduated from the MA in 2012 and is currently completing a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at UEA with Vesna Goldsworthy and Clare Connors. She was the winner of the Listowel Writers’ Week Original Poem prize in 2015 and has published her work in Landfall (New Zealand), The World of Fine Wine (UK) and Alquimie (Australia). Deborah gained a BA in Archaeology and Anthropology from Cambridge before completing an MA in Garden History at Birkbeck in 2007.  She is the editor of Hertfordshire Garden History, vol 2, and graduated from the MA in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction last year. The Tony Lothian Prize is worth £2,000 and was previously won by UEA alumnae Jane Willis (MA 2001) in 2012 and Ann Kennedy Smith (MA 2015) in 2015. Linda Randall (MA 2006) was shortlisted in 2009, and Carrie Chandler (MA 2010) in 2012. The winner of this year’s prize will be announced on 15th November. 


KJ Orr shortlisted for BBC National Short Story Award.

Disappearances’ by UEA alumna KJ (Katherine) Orr has been shortlisted for this year’s BBC National Short Story Award, which is worth £15,000 to the winner.  Katherine (pictured) graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2007 and subsequently completed a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at the University of Chichester. Her short fiction has been published by the Dublin Review, The White Review, the Sunday Times Magazine, Lighthouse and Comma Press, among others. She was previously shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award in 2011, and has also been shortlisted for The Bridport Prize and the KWS Hilary Mantel International Short Story Competition. In 2012 Daunt Books published a special edition of her story ‘The Inland Sea’, and last year she was included in the anthology Best British Short Stories 2015.  Her debut collection, Light Box, was published by Daunt Books earlier this year.  Katherine is currently a Teaching Fellow at UEA. The winner of the BBC National Short Story Award will be announced on 4th October.


Eleanor Wasserberg shortlisted for 2016 East Anglian Book Awards

Foxlowe, the debut novel by UEA alumna Eleanor Wasserberg, has been shortlisted in the Fiction category of 2016 East Anglian Book Awards. Eleanor (pictured) was born in Staffordshire and graduated with a BA in Classics and English from the University of Oxford before joining the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) at UEA in 2009. She began writing Foxlowe while on the MA and was subsequently awarded a grant from Arts Council England to complete the novel, which was published by Fourth Estate earlier this year.  Eleanor has taught English in Paris and Trivandrum and currently teaches in a school in Norwich. The East Anglian Book Awards are staged in partnership between the Eastern Daily Press, Jarrolds, Writers’ Centre Norwich and UEA. The overall East Anglian Book of the Year winner, selected from the six category winners, will be announced on November 3rd, and will receive a £1,000 prize.


The Two of Us by Kathy Page

The Two of Us is the new collection of short stories by UEA alumna Kathy Page and is published by Biblioasis in Canada this week. It has already been longlisted for this year’s Scotiabank Giller Prize. Kathy graduated from the MA in Creative Writing in 1988 and is the author of seven novels, including The Story of My Face, which was shortlisted for the Orange Prize in 2002, and Alphabet, which was shortlisted for Canada’s Governor General's Award in 2005, and as well as two other collections of short stories: As In Music (1990) and Paradise and Elsewhere (2013). In 2012 she co-edited In the Flesh with Lynne van Luven, a collection of personal essays about the human body. Kathy has lived in British Columbia in Canada since 2001.


Sister Sebastian's Library by Phil Whitaker

Sister Sebastian's Library is the new novel by UEA alumnus Phil Whitaker and is published by Salt this week.  Phil graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 1996 and published his first novel Eclipse of the Sun in 1997. This went on to win the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and a Betty Trask Award and was shortlisted for the Whitbread First Novel Award. His second novel Triangulation, also published by Weidenfeld) was the winner of the 2000 Encore Award.  The Face was published by Atlantic in 2004, and Freak of Nature (also Atlantic) in 2007.


The Dhow House by Jean McNeil

The Dhow House is the new novel by UEA Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing Jean McNeil and is published this week in the UK by Legend Press. It will be published by ECW in the USA and Canada next March. Originally from Nova Scotia in Canada, Jean (pictured) is the co-Director of the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) and the author of eleven previous books, including four novels and a collection of short fiction. Her work has been shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize, the Governor-General’s Prize for fiction (Canada) and the Journey Prize for short fiction (Canada). She has twice been the Mellon Foundation Visiting Scholar in South Africa, and works for part of each year in South Africa and Kenya. Ice Diaries: An Antarctic Memoir was published by ECW in North America earlier this year.


Badminton by Molly Naylor

Badminton is the new collection of poetry by UEA alumna Molly Naylor and has just been published by Burning Eye Books. Molly graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Scriptwriting) in 2008 and her first solo show, Whenever I Get Blown Up I Think Of You, debuted at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2010 before touring internationally. Besides her work for theatre, she has published one other poetry collection, You Clown (2012), and is currently collaborating with artist Liz Greenfield on a graphic novel adaptation of her 2014 storytelling show If Destroyed Still True. Her six-part comedy drama, After Hours, co-written with UEA graduate John Osborne,  was broadcast on Sky1 last year. She has previously been commissioned by BBC Radio 4, Sky, The BFI, The Royal Shakespeare Company, Creative England, The Bush Theatre, Oxford Playhouse and Battersea Arts Centre


Nutshell by Ian McEwan

Nutshell is the fourteenth novel by UEA alumnus Ian McEwan and is published by Jonathan Cape this week. Ian was the inaugural graduate of the UEA Creative Writing programme in 1971, and published his first collection of short stories, First Love, Last Rites, in 1975. His second novel The Comfort of Strangers (1981) was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, as were Black Dogs (1992), Atonement (2001), Saturday (2005) and On Chesil Beach (2007). He won the prize with Amsterdam in 1998. His most recent novel, Sweet Tooth, was published in 2012. He was awarded a CBE in 2000 and has accepted the honorary awards of Distinguished Writing Fellow and Jubilee Professor of the University of East Anglia from the university


Catriona Ward selected for Fresh Talent promotion

Rawblood, the debut novel by UEA alumna Catriona Ward, is among the twelve titles selected for the WH Smith Fresh Talent promotion. Catriona (pictured) was born in Washington DC and grew up in America, Kenya, Madagascar, Yemen and Morocco. She studied English at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, and graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) at UEA in 2011, having begun her novel while on the course. She now works as a writer and researcher for Bianca Jagger’s human rights foundation and lives in London. Rawblood was published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson last year and was shortlisted for the 2016 Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award.


The Last Pearlfisher of Scotland by Julia Stuart

The Last Pearlfisher of Scotland is the new novel by UEA alumnus Julia Stuart and is published by Vintage this week. Julia graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2013 and is the author of three previous novels. Her debut, The Matchmaker of Périgord, was published in 2007 and adapted for film by Andrew Birkin, who wrote and directed The Cement Garden, based on the novel by Ian McEwan. In 2010 her second novel was published in the UK as Balthazar Jones and the Tower of London Zoo. In America it was published as The Tower, the Zoo, and the Tortoise and became a New York Times bestseller and an NRP Best Book of the Year. The Pigeon Pie Mystery was published in America in 2012 and was selected as a Book of the Week, as well as an ‘Unputdownable Mystery’, by Oprah.com. Her books have also been published in France, Italy, Taiwan, Portugal and Russia.


Seven UEA alumni nominated for Not The Booker Prize

Seven books by UEA alumni have been included in the longlist for The Guardian’s annual Not The Booker Prize competition. All the nominated novels, as well as the eventual winner, are selected by readers of the newspaper. In 2015 UEA alumna Tasha Kavanagh was included in the shortlist of six for her novel Things We Have in Common. The seven titles longlisted this year are: Everyone Is Watching (Picador) by Megan Bradbury (MA 2005); River Of Ink (Picador) by Paul MM Cooper (MA 2013; current PhD); Nine Folds Make A Paper Swan (Atlantic Books) by Ruth Gilligan (MA 2011); The Living (Fourth Estate) by Anjali Joseph (MA 2008; PhD 2014); Sometimes A River Song (Linen Press) by Avril Joy (BA 1972); Owl Song At Dawn (Legend Press) by Emma Claire Sweeney (MA 2004); and Fowlowe (Harper Collins) by Eleanor Wasserberg (MA 2010). The shortlist will be announced in 15th August.


Thomas Morris wins Wales Book of the Year Award

We Don’t Know What We’re Doing, the debut collection of short stories by UEA alumnus Thomas Morris, has been announced as the overall winner of the 2016 Wales Book of the Year Award. Judged in three categories - Poetry, Fiction and Creative Non-Fiction - and in two languages - Welsh and English - the award is administered by Literature Wales. Thomas’s collection was first awarded the Rhys Davies Trust Fiction Award before being selected for the main English-language award. It also won the public vote for the Wales Arts Review People’s Choice Award. Thomas (pictured) graduated from the Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) MA in 2013 and is currently the editor of the Irish literary journal The Stinging Fly. In 2014 he edited Dubliners 100, a centenary collection of new short stories by Irish writers based on James Joyce’s Dubliners. Earlier this year We Don’t Know What We’re Doing, published by Faber & Faber in 2015, received a Somerset Maugham Award and was shortlisted for the Edge Hill Short Story Prize.


The Lauras by Sara Taylor

The Lauras is the second novel by UEA student Sara Taylor and is published by William Heinemann this week. Sara graduated from UEA’s MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2013 and is currently studying at UEA for her PhD in Creative & Critical Writing. Her debut novel The Shore was published by William Heinemann in March last year and was shortlisted for the Sunday Times/PFD Young Writer of the Year Award and longlisted for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction, The Guardian First Book Award, and the Edinburgh International Book Festival First Book Award


Divya Ghelani longlisted for SI Leeds Literary Prize

Runaway, the debut novel by UEA alumna Divya Ghelani, has been longlisted for this year’s SI Leeds Literary Prize for unpublished fiction by Black and Asian women. The prize is run by Soroptimist International of Leeds in partnership with the Ilkley Literature Festival and independent publisher Peepal Tree Press. Soroptimist International is a global volunteer movement working to educate, empower and enable opportunities for women and girls. The shortlist for the prize will be announced in September and the prize awarded at the Ilkley Literature Festival in October. Divya (pictured) graduated from the UEA MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2007 and subsequently gained an MPhil in Literary Studies from the University of Hong Kong. In 2015 the University of Leicester commissioned her to research and write a historical short story, ‘An Imperial Typewriter’, which she is now adapting as a short film, and earlier this years she was selected as a Word Factory Apprentice. Runaway was the recipient of a Writing East Midlands Mentorship, a Literary Consultancy Mentorship and an Arts Council Grant. An early draft received an honorary mention in the Harry Bowling Prize for New Writing, and it was recently longlisted for the inaugural Deborah Roger's Prize.


Imogen Hermes Gowar and JY Yang secure publishers

Two UEA authors have recently secured book deals. Vintage has acquired The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock, the debut novel by Imogen Hermes Gowar following a 10-publisher auction. It will be published in 2018. Imogen graduated with a BA in Art History from UEA in 2012 and with an MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2014, when she was the winner of that year’s Curtis Brown Prize. The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock was a finalist in the MsLexia First Novel Competition in 2015 and one of three novels shortlisted for the inaugural Deborah Rogers Foundation Writers’ Award. The science fiction and fantasy publisher Tor has meanwhile acquired two novellas from JY Yang, a current student on the Creative Writing (Prose Fiction MA). J (pictured) is a journalist and former scientist from Singapore whose short fiction has been published in Lightspeed, Uncanny, Clarkesworld and Strange Horizons. Her novellas, The Red Threads of Fortune and The River Runs Red, will be published simultaneously in summer 2017.


Eight Rivers of Shadow by Leo Hunt

Eight Rivers of Shadow is the new novel for young adults by UEA alumnus Leo Hunt and is published this week by Orchard Books in the UK and Candlewick Press in the US. Leo (pictured) graduated from UEA in 2014 with First Class Honours in Creative Writing and American Literature. His first YA novel, Thirteen Days of Midnight, was published last year and was nominated for the 2016 Branford Boase Award and shortlisted for the Waterstones Children's Book Prize.


Kim Sherwood wins Bath Novel Award

Testament, the debut novel by Picture of Kim SherwoodUEA alumna Kim Sherwood, has won this year’s Bath Novel Award, a competition open to writers of any nationality who have yet to be traditionally published. Kim (pictured) grew up in Camden and graduated from the BA in Literature with Creative Writing at UEA in 2011 and from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2012. She is currently completing her PhD in Critical and Creative Writing and has taught on the undergraduate programme at UEA and the MA in Critical and Creative Writing at the University of Sussex. Her work has appeared in Lighthouse Journal Going Down Swinging, Mslexia, The Letters Page and Belleville Park Pages.  The 2016 Bath Novel Award is worth £2,000 and was judged by Susan Armstrong of the Conville & Walsh literary agency. Current UEA student Annetta Berry was longlisted for the award for her historical novel, The Binding Frame. 


Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan by Ruth Gilligan

Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan is the fourth novel by Picture of Ruth GilliganUEA alumna Ruth Gilligan and is published by Atlantic Books today. It will be published by Tin House Books in the US in January. Ruth was born in Dublin in 1988 and studied at Cambridge and Yale before coming to UEA. She graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2011, and completed a PhD in English at Exeter in 2014. She currently teaches Creative Writing at the University of Birmingham. Ruth’s first novel, Forget, was published in 2006, and was followed by Somewhere in Between (2008) and Can You See Me? (2009). All three were bestsellers in Ireland. She writes regular literary reviews for the Times Literary Supplement, LA Review of Books, Guardian and Irish Independent, where she was a columnist for a number of years.  


The Sex Lives Of English Women by Wendy Jones

The Sex Lives Of English Women: Intimate Questions and Unexpected Answers is the new book by The Sex Lives Of English Women Front CoverUEA alumna Wendy Jones and is published today by Serpent’s Tail. Wendy graduated with an MA in Life Writing at UEA in 2000 and subsequently gained a PhD from Goldsmiths in Creative Writing. She published her first book, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Girl, in collaboration with the artist Grayson Perry in 2006. She is the author of two novels, The Thoughts and Happenings of Wilfred Price, Purveyor of Superior Funerals (2012) and The World is a Wedding (2013). She also writes for television

Katharine Norbury shortlisted for the Wainwright Prize

The Fish Ladder: A Journey Upstream by Katharine Image of Katharine NorburyNorbury has been included in the shortlist for the 2016 Wainwright Prize, which celebrates the best writing on the outdoors, nature and UK-based travel writing. The prize is sponsored by Wainwright Golden Beer and is awarded in association with The National Trust and selected with the assistance of a committee from The Wainwright Society. Katharine (pictured) graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2011 and is currently undertaking a PhD in Creative Writing at Goldsmiths College, London. The Fish Ladder was published by Bloomsbury last year and was longlisted for the Guardian First Book Award. The winner of the £5,000 award will be announced on 5th August.


Eliza Robertson shortlisted for Canadian Authors Emerging Writer Award

UEA author Eliza Robertson has been shortlisted the 2016 Canadian Authors Emerging Writer Award.  She was also shortlisted in 2015. The award is organized by the Canadian Authors Association and the shortlists in four categories are chosen from over 300 nominations. Eliza (pictured) joined the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) at UEA in 2011 as that year’s recipient of the UEA-Booker Foundation scholarship. She graduated in 2012 as the recipient of the Curtis Brown Award and is currently studying for her PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at UEA. In Canada she has won three national awards for her short fiction and has twice been longlisted for the Journey Prize. In 2013 she was a finalist for the CBC Short Story Prize and the winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize. Her debut collection of stories, Wallflowers, was published in the UK by Bloomsbury last year.


Sophie Collins and Emily Berry in relaunched Penguin Modern Poets

UEA alumna Sophie Collins and current PhD student Emily Berry are to be published alongside Anne Carson in the first volume of the relaunched Penguin Modern Poets series. Sophie was born in 1989 and grew up in North Holland. She studied Creative Writing at Goldsmiths College, London, before joining the UEA Creative Writing (Poetry) MA in 2012. Her work has appeared in Mercy and Oxford Poetry, as well as the Clinic and Stop Sharpening Your Knives anthologies. She received an Eric Gregory Award from the Society of Authors in 2014 and is currently working towards a PhD in Poetry and Translation at Queen’s University, Belfast. Emily grew up in London and studied English Literature at Leeds University and Creative Writing at Goldsmiths College before joining UEA to undertake a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing under the supervision of Denise Riley. Her debut collection Dear Boy was published by Faber in 2013 and won the Forward Prize for Best First Collection and the Hawthornden Prize and was shortlisted for the Fenton Aldeburgh First Collection Prize. She is the editor of Best British Poetry 2015 (Salt Publishing). Her second collection, Stranger, Baby, will be published in 2017. Penguin Modern Poets 1: If I’m Scared We Can’t Win will be published on 28th July.


Owl Song At Dawn by Emma Claire Sweeney

Owl Song At Dawn is the debut novel by UEA alumna Emma Claire Sweeney and is published by Legend Press this week. Emma graduated from the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) in 2004, and has since won Arts Council, Royal Literary Fund and Escalator Awards for her writing. She has written for the Guardian, the Independent on Sunday and The Times, and teaches Creative Writing at New York University. She co-runs SomethingRhymed.com - a website on female literary friendship - with fellow UEA alumna, Emily Midorikawa, with whom she is co-writing A Secret Sisterhood: The Hidden Literary Friendships of Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot and Virginia Woolf, which will be published next year by Aurum Press in the UK and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in the USA.


Hannah Garrard highly commended for New Welsh Writing Award

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UEA alumna Hannah Garrard has been highly commended for the 2016 New Welsh Writing Award for travel writing. Hannah (pictured) graduated from UEA with a BA in English Literature in 2005 and with an MA in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction in 2015. She grew up in Suffolk and now lives in Norwich, where she works for a young person’s charity and writes for journals, anthologies and news sites. Her commended essay ‘No Situation is Permanent’ was written as her MA dissertation and will now be published in the autumn edition of the New Welsh Review’s creative magazine, New Welsh Reader.


Thomas Morris wins Somerset Maugham Award

UEA alumnus Thomas Morris has been awarded a Somerset Maugham Award worth £2,000 at this year’s Society of Authors Awards Ceremony for his debut collection of short stories, We Don’t Know What We’re Doing, which was published by Faber & Faber last year. Thomas (pictured) graduated from the Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) MA in 2013 and is currently the editor of the Irish literary journal The Stinging Fly. In 2014 he edited Dubliners 100, a centenary collection of new short stories by Irish writers based on James Joyce’s Dubliners. Earlier this year his collection was shortlisted for the Edge Hill Short Story Prize and the Wales Book of the Year Award. Thomas was also longlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award.