Researching across disciplines Researching across disciplines

The Literacy and Development Group (LDG) brings together researchers from the Schools of Education and Lifelong Learning, International Development and Language and Communication Studies at UEA.
 
Formed in 2003, the group takes a ‘situated literacy' approach, aiming to combine theory and practice to engage actively with key policy institutions in the UK and internationally and to encourage cross-cultural interaction between literacy researchers and practitioners around the world.
 
Researching literacy practices in schools, adult learning programmes, development organisations and universities in a range of country contexts, we focus particularly on issues of power, inequality and social change. We promote inter-disciplinary perspectives and methodologies, particularly collaboration between anthropologists, linguists and economists. 
 
We have strong links with development agencies and organisations, including UNESCO, the Asia and South Pacific Bureau for Adult Education (ASPBAE), British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) and various NGOs in South Asia. LDG is also represented on the UK Literacy Working Group and UK Forum for International Education and Training (UKFIET)
 
Our regular conferences have brought together researchers from across the world to debate issues around education, literacy and development, including:- ‘Literacy Inequalities', ‘Gender and Adult Education', and ‘Literacy, Identity and Social Change'. We have conducted commissioned research for major development agencies, including the mid-term review of the UN Literacy Decade and UNESCO's Global Monitoring Reports on Education For All.
 
The Literacy and Development Group researchers provide valuable support for the MA Adult Literacy, Lifelong Learning and Development course. We welcome applications from literacy activists, trainers, adult educators, policy makers and others interested in studying in this area. 

Our Research

 

 

LDG Members

 

 

Policy Impact