News stories from 2007 News stories from 2007

Mark McNay wins the 2007 Saltire Society First Book of the Year Award

Mark McNay (MA 2004) has won the 2007 Saltire Society First Book of the Year Award for his novel Fresh (Canongate), which earlier in the year won the Arts Foundation Prize for New Fiction and was recently shortlisted for the Glen Dimplex New Writer of the Year Award.

Dec 5, 2007

Toby Litt appointed as the latest UEA Creative Writing Fellow

Toby Litt has been appointed as the latest Creative Writing Fellow at UEA and will teach on the undergraduate programme in the Spring semester. The Fellowship, which is jointly administered by UEA and the New Writing Partnership with support from Arts Council England, East, is awarded annually to a writer of established reputation and has been running since 1971. Previous Fellows include Derek Mahon, David Lodge, Maggie Gee, Adam Mars Jones, Paul Muldoon, Michele Roberts, Ali Smith, Bernadine Evaristo and John Boyne. Toby graduated from the UEA Creative Writing MA in 1995 and is the author of eight books: Adventures in Capitalism (1996), Beatniks: An English Road Movie (1997), Corpsing (2000), Exhibitionism (2001), Deadkidsongs(2001), Finding Myself (2003), Ghost Story (2004) and Hospital (2007).

Dec 4, 2007

Winterton Blue by Trezza Azzopardi

Winterton Blue, the latest novel by UEA creative writing lecturer Trezza Azzopardi, has been named among the '100 Notable Books of 2007' by the New York Times. Trezza graduated from the UEA Creative Writing MA in 1998. Two other UEA alumni also appear in the list - Ian McEwan (1971) for the Booker shortlisted On Chesil Beach and Anne Enright (1987) for this year's Booker Prize-winning novel, The Gathering. 

Dec 2, 2007

Two UEA Creative Writing alumni nominated for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award

Two UEA Creative Writing alumni have been nominated for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, which is open to books written in any language and is worth €100,000 to the winner. Naomi Alderman (2003) has been nominated forDisobedience and John Boyne (1995) for The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas. The award has been running since 1996 and was won in 1999 by UEA alumnus Andrew Miller (1990) for his novel Ingenious Pain.

Nov 11, 2007

Ben Borek has publishes first book

Poetry MA graduate Ben Borek has published his first book, Donjong Heights, a mock heroic verse novella set in a tower block in South East London and following a young man's quest to host a Christmas party on what might be his last day on earth. Ben was born in Camberwell in 1980 and is currently living in Poland. He graduated from the MA with distinction in 2004.

Nov 4, 2007

The Needle In The Blood by Sarah Bower

The Needle In The Blood, the first novel by Sarah Bower (2002), has been selected as one of just eight fiction titles by The Guardian in its Christmas catalogue of 'the year's best fiction and non-fiction titles'. Sarah's novel of 'sex, lies and embroidery' explores the world of the Bayeux tapestry and its making and was published by Snowbooks in May this year.

Nov 3, 2007

Moon Dance by Graeme Harper

Moon Dance, a new novel by UEA alumnus Graeme Harper (aka Brooke Biaz, PhD 1997), is published by Parlor Press later this month. Graeme is now Professor of Creative Writing at Bangor University, Wales and Honorary Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Bedfordshire. Small Maps of the World, a novel and collection of short stories, was published by Parlor Press last year. He has recently completed the first UK AHRC report on practice-led research in Creative Writing.

Nov 1, 2007

Mark McNay shortlisted for the Glen Dimplex New Writer of the Year award

Mark McNay (MA 2004) has been shortlisted in the Fiction category of the Glen Dimplex New Writer of the Year awards for his first novel, Fresh (Canongate, 2007). The prize is administered by the Irish Writers' Centre and the category winner will receive €5,000 and go forward for the overall prize of €20,000. The winner will be announced at an awards ceremony in Dublin on November 26th. Mark's novel won a £10,000 Arts Foundation Prize for New Fiction earlier this year. Three UEA alumni - Jane Harris, Naomi Alderman and James Scudamore - were shortlisted for the Glen Dimplex Awards in 2006.

Oct 22, 2007

Kathryn Simmonds runner-up in Asham Award Short Story Competition

Kathryn Simmonds, a graduate of the MA in Poetry in 2002, is one of the runners-up in this year's Asham Award Short Story Competition. Her story Pentecost is included in the recently published anthology of Asham short stories, Is This What You Want?Kathryn's stories have appeared in a number of magazines and been broadcast on Radio 4, and in 2006 she won the Poetry London competition.

Oct 19, 2007

Ed Parnell and Clare Jarrett selected for the 2007 Escalator Literature Awards Programme

Ed Parnell and Clare Jarrett, who graduated from the Creative Writing MA this year, have been selected for the 2007 Escalator Literature Awards Programme, which is managed by The New Writing Partnership (now the Writers' Centre Norwich) on behalf of Arts Council England, East.  Ed was chosen for his novel Nothing But The Birds In The Trees and Clare for her novel In Pieces by a panel of writers comprising Michelle Spring (Chair), Sally Cline, Courttia Newland, Midge Gillies and Katharine McMahon. The benefits of the scheme include a programme of career development workshops, creative mentoring and networking opportunities, editing services, research and travel costs, and support in making a bid to the Arts Council England, East's Grants for the Arts scheme. Megan Dunn, a graduate of the last year's MA, was selected for the 2006 Escalator programme for her novel The Gingerbread Man, as was Ferron Anderson, a graduate of UEA's English Literature BA and the Creative Writing Advanced Diploma, for his novel I Still Miss Someone. MA graduates Lucy Yates and Katy Darby were last year highly commended.

Oct 18, 2007

Anne Enright wins the Man Booker Prize

UEA graduate Anne Enright (MA 1987, pictured above) has won the Man Booker Prize for Fiction for her novel The Gathering, published by Jonathan Cape. Anne, who was born in Dublin in 1962, studied Creative Writing at UEA under Malcolm Bradbury and Angela Carter and worked for six years as a TV producer and director in Ireland, where she still lives. One of her previous novels What Are You Like? was shortlisted for the Whitbread Novel Award and won the Encore Award. Her first collection of stories The Portable Virgin won the Rooney Prize. She has published two other novels, The Wig My Father Wore and The Pleasure of Eliza Lynch, and one work of non-fiction, Making Babies: Stumbling into Motherhood. She is the third UEA alumnus to win the Booker Prize, following Kazuo Ishiguro with The Remains of the Day (1989) and Ian McEwan with Amsterdam (1998). McEwan was also on this year's shortlist for his novel On Chesil Beach, having previously been shortlisted in 1981, 1992, 2001 and 2005. The other UEA alumni to have been shortlisted are Tash Aw (2005), Trezza Azzopardi (2000), Kazuo Ishiguro (1986. 2000 and 2005), Andrew Miller (2001) and Rose Tremain (1990).

Oct 17, 2007

This year's Creative Writing anthology

This year's Creative Writing anthology, featuring work by students on all four MA writing strands, is entitled Cheque Enclosed (pictured above) and will be launched at UEA this evening and at the Poetry Cafe in London on October 18th. Tonight's event will feature readings by poet Steph Leal, scriptwriter Stephen Stigwood, lifewriters Linda Woodrow and Angie Athanassiades, and prose writers Liz Adams, Clare Jarrett, Chris Rose, Kate Moorhead-Kuhn, Gunnar Jaeck and Beth Settle. The London launch will feature the poets Jenny Thompson and Sarah Hesketh, and the prose writers Melanie Mauthner, Helen Butcher, Dan Timms, Mike Hines, Katherine Orr, Joanne Hayden and Martha Schabas. Both events will be introduced by the novelist and UEA creative writing tutor Andrew Cowan (pictured above).

Oct 9, 2007

Six new creative writing teachers at UEA

A special event was held at the Savile Club in London last night to mark the appointment of six new creative writing teachers at UEA and six Distinguished Writing Fellows. Drawn from the worlds of poetry, scriptwriting, lifewriting and fiction, the teachers are: novelist and journalist Giles Foden; poet and novelist Lavinia Greenlaw; biographer and journalist Kathryn Hughes; novelist and academic Rebecca Stott, poet and translator George Szirtes; and novelist, poet and critic Amit Chaudhuri. They will join the current team of Michele Roberts, Val Taylor, Trezza Azzopardi, Andrew Cowanand Denise Riley. The Distinguished Fellows are some of the most successful of contemporary British writers and each has a longstanding connection with UEA: Ian McEwan and Kazuo Ishiguro are both graduates of the Creative Writing MA; Louis de Bernieres has taught on the undergraduate programme and, like Graham Swift, is a regular visitor to UEA's autumn and spring literary festivals; Rose Tremain is a graduate of UEA and taught for a number of years on the Creative Writing MA; Richard Holmes was UEA's first Professor of Lifewriting. The Fellows will make regular visits to the campus to discuss the practice of writing with students.

Oct 3, 2007

Catherine Cole joins the UEA creative writing faculty

Australian writer Catherine Cole has joined the UEA creative writing faculty this semester as a Visiting Fellow. Catherine (pictured above) is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Technology, Sydney where she teaches writing. She has published three novels – the crime fiction, Dry Dock and Skin Deep and The Grave at Thu Le, a novel about French colonialism in Hanoi. Her non-fiction book Private Dicks and Feisty Chicksexplores the theories which underpin genre fiction. She has also published poetry, short fiction, articles and book reviews. Her next non-fiction book is The Poet who Forgot, which chronicles her friendship with the late poet A.D. Hope and will be published in February.

Oct 1, 2007

Tiffany Murray appointed Lecturer in Creative Writing at The University of Gloucestershire

Tiffany Murray (MA 1999, PhD 2004) and author of Happy Accidents (2005: 4th Estate) has been appointed Lecturer in Creative Writing at The University of Gloucestershire.

Sep 26, 2007

"Oblique House" by Jacob Huntley

"Oblique House", a short story by current PhD student Jacob Huntley, has been accepted for publication in the next issue of the web-based new writing journal 3:AM Magazine. Another of Jacob's stories was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 earlier this summer. He is a graduate of the UEA Creative Writing MA and is soon to complete his first novel.

Sep 20, 2007

Film adaptation of Ian McEwan's Booker-shortlisted novel Atonement

Working Title / Focus Features have released the film adaptation of Ian McEwan's Booker-shortlisted novel Atonement, starring Keira Knightley and James McAvoy. The book won the WH Smith Literary Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Prize for Fiction and the Santiago Prize for the European Novel. Previous novels by Ian McEwan (MA 1971) to be adapted for screen include The Cement Garden, The Comfort of Strangers, The Innocent and Enduring Love.

Sep 7, 2007

Ian McEwan and Anne Enright shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize

Ian McEwan (MA 1971) and Anne Enright (MA 1987) have been included on the shortlist of six for this year's Man Booker Prize for Fiction. The winner will be announced on October 16th at an awards ceremony at the Guildhall, London.

Sep 6, 2007

Two UEA alumni on the longlist for this year's Man Booker Prize

Two UEA alumni have been named on the longlist for this year's Man Booker Prize for Fiction: Ian McEwan (MA 1971) for Chesil Beach and Anne Enright (MA 1987) for TheGathering. Both books are published by Jonathan Cape. McEwan was previously shortlisted for the prize in 1981 with The Comfort of Strangers, in 1992 with Black Dogs, and in 2001 with Atonement. He won the prize in 1998 with Amsterdam. One of Enright's previous novels What Are You Like? was shortlisted for the Whitbread Novel Award and won the Encore Award. Her first collection of stories The Portable Virgin won the Rooney Prize.

Aug 17, 2007

The Importance of Music to Girls by Lavinia Greenlaw

Faber & Faber have just published The Importance of Music to Girls, the first work of non-fiction by Lavinia Greenlaw, who is shortly to join the UEA faculty as Professor of Creative Writing. Lavinia has previously published three books of poems, most recently Minsk, which was shortlisted for the TS Eliot Prize, the Forward Prize and the Whitbread Poetry Prize, and two novels: Mary George of Allnorthover, which won France's Prix du Premier Roman Etranger, and An Irresponsible Age. Her work for radio includes programmes about the Arctic and Baltic, Emily Dickinson, Elizabeth Bishop, and Dutch landscape painting, as well as several dramas. She also writes opera libretti and song texts.

Aug 16, 2007

Clare Wigfall's debut collection of stories

Clare Wigfall's debut collection of stories The Loudest Sound and Nothing is published by Faber on August 30.  Clare (MA 2000, pictured above) was born in London in 1976 and lived for some time as a child in Berkeley, California. She completed a BA in English & American Literature at Manchester in 1998, after which she worked in an art gallery in Prague before coming to UEA to take her MA in Creative Writing, graduating the same year as Clare Allen, Doug Cowie, Panos Karnezis and Ben Rice. After graduation she moved back to Prague, where she still lives. She teaches creative writing, runs a face painting and clown company, Little Clown, and a community figure-drawing workshop. Her stories have been published in Prospect, New Writing 10, Tatler, the Dublin Review, the anthology X-24: unclassified, and commissioned for Radio 4.

Aug 9, 2007

Rachel Hore publishes second novel

UEA tutor Rachel Hore has just published her second novel The Memory Garden (Pocket Books). Rachel worked in publishing for many years and teaches the Publishing course at UEA that leads to the production of the annual anthology of work by students on the MA in creative writing. Her first novel The Dream House was published in 2006 and she reviews regularly for the Guardian, the Independent on Sunday and the Literary Review.

Aug 6, 2007

Suzannah Dunn publishes seventh novel - The Sixth Wife

Suzannah Dunn's seventh novel The Sixth Wife has just been published by Harper Perennial. Suzannah graduated from the MA in 1989 and is also the author of two collections of short stories: Darker Days Than Usual, which she began while at UEA, and Tenterhooks. Her eighth novel The Queen's Sorrow will be published in 2008.

Aug 2, 2007

David Flusfeder publishes fifth novel

David Flusfeder's fifth novel The Pagan House has just been published by Fourth Estate. David graduated from the MA in 1988 and was the UEA Creative Writing Fellow in 2004. He has published four other novels: Man Kills Woman (1993), Like Plastic(1996), Morocco (2000) and The Gift (2003).

July 28, 2007

Creating Harmony by Jacob Huntley

"Creating Harmony", a short story by current PhD student Jacob Huntley, will be broadcast on Opening Lines, the Radio 4 afternoon reading slot, on Thursday, July 26th. Jacob graduated from the UEA Creative Writing MA in 2002 and currently teaches on the undergraduate programme. He is completing his first novel.

July 24, 2007

Second novel by Panos Karnezis

Jonathan Cape have just published The Birthday Party, the second novel by Panos Karnezis (MA, 2000). Panos was born in Greece in 1967 and came to England in 1992 to study engineering. He worked for a while in industry before joining the creative writing MA and went on to publish his first collection of stories Little Infamies in 2002. His first novel The Maze also published by Cape, was shortlisted for the Whitbread First Novel Award in 2004. His stories have be broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and have appeared in Granta, New Writing 11, Prospect and Areté.

July 18, 2007

Three UEA research students appointed to faculty positions in prominent UK universities

Three UEA research students in Creative and Critical Writing have recently been appointed to faculty positions in prominent UK universities. Current student Barrie Sherwood, who recently published his second novel Escape From Amsterdam (Granta) and will complete his PhD next year, has been appointed Lecturer in Creative Writing at the University of York. Doug Cowie, a graduate of both the MA and PhD at UEA, has been appointed Lecturer in Creative Writing at Royal Holloway, University of London. Doug's first novel Owen Noone and the Marauder was published by Canongate in 2005 and he was featured in the most recent British Council New Writing anthology. Meanwhile, the most recent graduate of the UEA PhD, Laura Fish, who also took the MA (2002), has been awarded a Research Councils UK Academic Fellowship in Creative Writing at Newcastle University, which lasts for five years and leads to a permanent position as a lecturer. Laura's second novel Strange Music will be published by Cape in 2008.

July 12, 2007

'Thanks for Telling Me, Emily' by Deirdre Madden

Thanks for Telling Me, Emily (published by Orchard Books) is the second novel for children by Deirdre Madden (MA 1985), who teaches at the Oscar Wilde Centre for Irish Writing at Trinity College, Dublin, and has published six novels for adults includingThe Birds of the Innocent Wood (1988), which won the Somerset Maugham Award, and One By One in the Darkness (1996), which was shortlisted for the Orange Prize.

 

July 6, 2007

Film adaptation of The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas

The film adaptation of The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas by John Boyne (MA 1995) has just completed shooting in Budapest. A Miramax / Heyday Films production, the film is directed by Mark Herman and stars David Thewlis. The book has just spent twelve months at the top of the Irish bestseller charts. John is the author of four other novels, and was the UEA Creative Writing Fellow in 2005.

July 5, 2007

Are You With Me? by Stephen Foster

Stephen Foster's latest novel Are You With Me? has just been published by Simon and Schuster. Stephen was born in Stoke on Trent in 1962 and worked as a chef, mini-cab driver, and in the building trade before enrolling at Norwich School of Art and Design, from where he graduated in Cultural Studies in 1997. He completed his first collection of short stories It Cracks Like Breaking Skin while on the UEA Creative Writing MA, from which he graduated in 1998. This collection, published by Faber in 1999, was nominated for a MacMillan PEN Award. His first novel Strides, published by Faber in 2001, was described by the Financial Times as ‘an engaging and breathtakingly vital love story of a modern madman.' Stephen has since written three books of non-fiction: She Stood There Laughing (Scribner, 2003), The Book of Lists, Football (Canongate, 2006) and the bestselling Walking Ollie (Short Books, 2006). She Stood There Laughing was named after a line in the Tom Jones song Delilah which Stoke City fans sing to celebrate goals and is an account of a season spent following Stoke in the company of his young son. It was one of the top-selling sports books of 2003. Walking Ollie is the story of Stephen's difficult relationship with his lurcher and will be published by Penguin America in 2008. Stephen lives in Norwich with fellow UEA graduate Trezza Azzopardi (MA 1998), a young Saluki called Dylan, and Ollie, the lurcher. He has just been appointed as the new Royal Literary Fund Writing Fellow at UEA.

July 4, 2007

Aifric Campbell completes a two-month residency at the Yaddo artists' community in Saratoga Springs

Aifric Campbell (MA 2003, PhD 2007) has just completed a two-month residency at the Yaddo artists' community in Saratoga Springs, New York, which she began on completion of her PhD. Her first novel The Semantics of Murder will be published next spring by Serpent's Tail. Aifric was born in Dublin and lived in Sweden for five years, where she read Linguistics at the University of Gothenburg. She worked for twelve years as an investment banker in London before coming to UEA and is currently working on a novel set in the late 1980s financial markets.

July 1, 2007

Hearing Myself Think by Richard Beard

Hearing Myself Think, a short story by Richard Beard (MA 1995), is included in New Writing 15, the British Council's annual anthology, which has just been published by Granta. Richard is the author of four novels, including Damascus (1998), and two books about sport, most recently Manly Pursuits: Beating the Australians (2006). Meanwhile,Natural Selection, a short story by Martha Schabas (MA 2007) has just been published in the latest issue of Canadian magazine Broken Pencil. Martha is the current holder of UEA's David Higham Bursary Award and this is her first published fiction. Her play Prophetic was produced at last year's Summerworks Festival in Toronto.

June 30, 2007

UEA alumni recipients of literary prizes at the annual Society of Authors' awards ceremony

A number of UEA alumni were among the recipients of literary prizes at the annual Society of Authors' awards ceremony, held at Bart's Great Hall in London on June 14th. Adam Foulds (MA 1999) won a Betty Trask Award for his first novel The Truth About These Strange Times, which was published by Weidenfeld earlier this year. Naomi Alderman (MA 2003) and Susan Elderkin (MA 1994) both received Travelling Scholarships, while James Scudamore (MA 2004, pictured above) won a Somerset Maugham Award for his first novel The Amnesia Clinic, which is published by Harvill Secker and was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize earlier this year and for the Costa First Novel Award, the EDS Dylan Thomas Prize, and the Glen Dimplex Award in 2006.

June 15, 2007

First novel by Owen Sheers

Resistance (Faber & Faber) is the first novel by UEA Poetry MA alumnus Owen Sheers(1998). Owen has published two collections of poetry: The Blue Book (2000), which was shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award and the Forward Poetry Prize (Best First Collection), and Skirrid Hill (2005), which won a Somerset Maugham Award. The Dust Diaries (2004), a non-fiction narrative set in Zimbabwe, was short-listed for the Ondaatje Prize and won the 2005 Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award.

June 7, 2007

Naomi Alderman and Jane Harris named among the Waterstone's '25 Authors for the Future'

Naomi Alderman (MA 2003) and Jane Harris (MA 1992, PhD 1995) have been named among the twenty-five writers whom Waterstone's predict will be the biggest names of the next twenty-five years. The '25 Authors for the Future' were nominated by publishers, editors and agents, who were asked to select the emergent British authors whom they believed would go on to produce the most impressive body of work over the next quarter of a century. Over a hundred nominations were received and the final twenty-five selected by a panel at Waterstone's.

May 17, 2007

Lavinia Greenlaw and Giles Foden join the UEA creative writing faculty as Professors of Creative Writing

Lavinia Greenlaw and Giles Foden have joined the UEA creative writing faculty as Professors of Creative Writing. They will teach on the MA in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction), supervise research students in Creative and Critical Writing, and contribrute to undergraduate teaching. Giles is the author of three novels - The Last King of Scotland (1998), which won the 1998 Whitbread First Novel Award and has been made into an Oscar-winning film, Ladysmith (1999) and Zanzibar (2002) - as well as a work of narrative non-fiction, Mimi and Toutou Go Forth (2005)He is one of this year's judges of the MAN Booker Prize and is completing his fourth novel, Turbulence. Lavina has published three books of poems - Night Photograph (1993), A World Where News Travelled Slowly (1997) and Minsk (2003), which was shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot, Forward and Whitbread Poetry Prizes - and two novels: Mary George of Allnorthover(2001), which won France's Prix du Premier Roman Etranger, and An Irresponsible Age(2006).  Her memoir The Importance of Music to Girls will be published later this year.

May 8, 2007

Fadia Faqir's third novel My Name is Salma published

Fadia Faqir's third novel My Name is Salma has just been published by Doubleday. Fadia is a Jordanian/British writer and campaigner for human rights, especially women's rights in the Arab world. In 1990 she was awarded the first PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at UEA.

May 7, 2007

Kathryn Hughes joins the UEA faculty as Professor of Lifewriting and the new Director of the MA programme in Lifewriting.

Kathryn Hughes has joined the UEA faculty as Professor of Lifewriting and the new Director of the MA programme in Lifewriting. Kathryn's first book The Victorian Governess (1994) was based on her PhD in Victorian History.  In 1999 she published George Eliot: the Last Victorian, which won the James Tait Black award, and in 2005 The Short Life and Long Times of Mrs Beeton, which was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize and the Andre Simon Prize.  Both books have been filmed by the BBC. Kathryn is also editor of George Eliot: A Family History (2000) and has won many national prizes for her journalism and historical writing. She regularly presents 'Open Book' and is a critic for 'Saturday Review' and 'Front Row' (all on Radio 4) and is a contributing editor to Prospect magazine as well as a book reviewer and commentator for the Guardian.

May 1, 2007

Winter Tennis by Todd Swift

Winter Tennis (DC Books) is the fourth collection by Todd Swift (Poetry MA 2004). Widely anthologised, Todd is the editor of seven poetry anthologies and had been Oxfam's poet-in-residence since 2004.

April 30, 2007

The Gathering by Anne Enright

The Gathering by Anne Enright has just been published by Jonathan Cape. Anne graduated from the MA in 1987 and published her first collection of stories The Portable Virgin in 1991. She has published three other novels: The Wig My Father Wore (1995),What Are You Like? (2000), which was shortlisted for the Whitbread Novel Award and won the Encore Award, and The Pleasures of Eliza Lynch (2002). She is also the author of Making Babies: Stumbling Into Motherhood (2004).

April 28

Tamara Britten wins the Curtis Brown Award

This year's Curtis Brown Award for the best prose fiction student on the UEA creative writing MA has been awarded to Tamara Britten for her novel-in-progress Flame of the Forest, which is set in Kenya in 1952 at the outbreak of the Mau Mau Emergency. Tamara (pictured above, right) is currently working on a safari camp in the Masai Mara and flew in from Nairobi especially to receive the prize from literary agents Camilla Hornby (pictured above, left) and Elizabeth Sheinkman (pictured above, centre). The prize, which this year is worth £7,500, was set up by the Curtis Brown literary agency in memory of their colleague Giles Gordon, who died in November 2003. The inaugural prize was awarded last year to Joe Dunthorne, whose first novel Submarine will be published by Hamish Hamilton next year. The winner is chosen by Curtis Brown from a shortlist of students achieving the highest marks on the MA.

April 25, 2007

Poppy Shakespeare by Clare Allan shortlisted for Orange Broadband Prize for New Writers

The first novel by Clare Allan (MA 2000), Poppy Shakespeare, has been shortlisted for this year's Orange Broadband Prize for New Writers. If successful it will be the third year in succession that the prize has been won by a UEA graduate, following Naomi Alderman (MA 2003) who won with Disobedience in 2006, and Diana Evans (MA 2003) who won the prize in 2005 for her novel 26a.

April 24, 2007

George Szirtes joins the UEA creative writing faculty as a Reader in Creative Writing

George Szirtes has joined the UEA creative writing faculty as a Reader in Creative Writing. He will teach on the MA in Creative Writing (Poetry), supervise research students in Creative and Critical Writing and contribute to undergraduate teaching. Born in Budapest in 1948, George came to England as a refugee following the Hungarian Uprising in 1956. He trained a painter and is the author (and editor) of numerous collections of poetry, the first of which, The Slant Door (1979), won the Faber Memorial Prize, and the most recent of which, Reel (2004), won the T.S. Eliot Prize. George is also a translator from Hungarian to English and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

April 20, 2007

Jane Harris shortlisted for the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction

Jane Harris (MA 1992, PhD 1995, pictured above) has been shortlisted for the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction for her first novel The Observations. Jane was shortlisted last year for the Waterstone's Newcomer of the Year Best Novel Award and the inaugural Glen Dimplex Award.

April 17, 2007

First novel by Erica Wagner

Faber & Faber have just published Seizure, the first novel by Erica Wagner (MA 1991). Erica has previously published a collection of short stories Gravity (Granta, 1997) and an account of the relationship of Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath, Ariel's Gift(Faber & Faber, 2000). She is the literary editor of The Times, a frequent reviewer for other journals, and has published both poetry and short fiction. She has been a judge of the Man Booker Prize, the Orange Prize, the Whitbread First Novel Award and the Forward Prize, and sits on the Executive Committee of PEN and the Advisory Committee of the Man Booker Prize.

April 6, 2007

Hospital by Toby Litt

Hamish Hamilton have just published Hospital by Toby Litt (MA 1995). This is Toby's eighth book, following (in chronological and alphabetical order) Adventures in Capitalism(1996), Beatniks: An English Road Movie (1997), Corpsing (2000), Exhibitionism (2001),Deadkidsongs (2001), Finding Myself (2003) and Ghost Story (2004).

April 5, 2007

Rebecca Stott joins UEA creative writing faculty

Rebecca Stott has joined the UEA creative writing faculty as Professor of Literature and Creative Writing and the new Director of the English Literature with Creative Writing BA. Rebecca is both a novelist and an academic and has published widely in the Victorian period including a book called The Fabrication of the Victorian Femme Fatale, a collection of essays on Tennyson and articles on Rider Haggard, Joseph Conrad, H.D., Virginia Woolf, Carlyle and aspects of Victorian science. She is currently finishing a book on the history of evolutionary ideas before Darwin entitled Speculators: Poets and Philosophers of Evolution. Rececca's first novel, the historical thriller Ghostwalk, was published this year by Random House in the US and Weidenfeld and Nicholson in the UK and is being translated into 14 languages. She is currently completing her second novel The Coral Thief, which will be published in 2009.

March 27, 2007

Naomi Alderman awarded Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award

Naomi Alderman (MA 2003) has been awarded this year's Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award for her novel Disobedience, which last year won the Orange Broadband Prize for New Writers and was shortlisted for the inaugural Glen Dimplex Award. Naomi will be one of this year's judges of the Orange Broadband Prize for New Writers.

March 25, 2007

Ian McEwan publishes eleventh novel

UEA's first graduate in Creative Writing, Ian McEwan, has just published his eleventh novel On Chesil Beach (Jonathan Cape).

March 23, 2007

Dirty Work by Julia Bell

Dirty Work, Julia Bell's second novel for young adults, has just been published by Young Picador. Julia completed her MA in Creative Writing in 1996. 50p from the sale of each copy of Dirty Work will be donated to UNICEF for their work with the victims of child trafficking. 

March 6, 2007

Burning Bright, fifth novel by Tracy Chevalier

Burning Bright is the fifth novel by Tracy Chevalier (MA 1994) and has just been published by Harper Collins. Tracy's first novel The Virgin Blue (1996) was begun when she was on the MA at UEA. Her second novel Girl with a Pearl Earring (1999) was released as a film starring Scarlett Johannson and Colin Firth in 2003.

March 5, 2007

Winterton Blue, Trezza Azzopardi's third novel

Trezza Azzopardi's third novel Winterton Blue has just been published by Picador in the UK and Grove Press in the USA. Trezza is a graduate of the UEA MA (1998) and one of the faculty who now teaches on the course. Her first novelThe Hiding Place was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2000 and was the winner of the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize in 2001.

Feb 22, 2007

Freak of Nature (Atlantic) is the latest novel by Phil Whitaker (MA 1996), whose first novel Eclipse of the Sun was written while he was on the MA and was published in 1997, when it won the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and a Betty Trask Award and was shortlisted for the Whitbread First Novel Award. His second novel Triangulation (1999) won the Encore Award, while his third The Face (2003) received a Southern Arts Writers Award. 

Feb 8, 2007

The Oystercatchers, Susan Fletcher's second novel

Susan Fletcher's second novel The Oystercatchers has been published by Fourth Estate. Susan graduated from the MA in 2002 and published her first novel Eve Greenin 2004. Eve Green went on to win the Whitbread First Novel Award in 2004 and a Betty Trask Award in 2005. 

Feb 5, 2007

Measuring Time, Helon Habila's second novel

Helon Habila's second novel Measuring Time has been published by Hamish Hamilton. Helon is currently studying for a PhD at UEA and was previously a Writing Fellow here. His first novel Waiting For An Angel was published in 2002 and received a Commonwealth Writers' Prize (Africa Region, Best First Book).

Feb 1, 2007

Mark McNay awarded Arts Foundation Award

Mark McNay (MA 2004) has just been awarded an Arts Foundation Award of £10,000. The award was presented by Will Self, and two other UEA alumni were on the shortlist of four: Clare Allan (MA 2000) and Diana Evans (MA 2003). Mark's first novelFresh will be published by Canongate this spring.

Jan 25, 2007