Your Health Economics Masters programme is embedded within the Health Economics Group, a research active group of health economists within the Norwich Medical School. 

  • Ruth Hancock
    I am a Professor in the Economics of Health and Welfare, and the Course Director for the MSc in Health Economics. Before becoming a university academic, I was a government economist in the (then) UK Department of Health and Social Security. My research interests are in the economics of ageing, with a particular focus on how to pay for long-term care for older people. I contribute to teaching on the Health Economics module and am keen to supervise dissertations concerned with the economics of health and social care for older people, typically through analysis of large scale household survey data.
  • Garry Barton
    I am a Professor of Health Economics and the module lead for the Economic Evaluation module of the MSc in Health Economics. I have been an academic health economist for over 20 years. My main research interest is the conduct of economic evaluations alongside randomised trials, and would be happy to supervise dissertations that use such trial data to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a particular health care intervention.
  • Tracey Sach
    I am a Professor of Health Economics, and the module lead for the dissertations module of the MSc in Health Economics. I have been an academic health economist for nearly 18 years, before which I spent time as an assistant economist at the (then) Department of Health. Most of my research is funded via competitive grants from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). I enjoy undertaking economic evaluations alongside randomised controlled trials in the areas of dermatology, older people and rehabilitation. I am happy to supervise dissertations in these areas.
  • Ed Wilson
    I am a Senior Lecturer in Health Economics, head of the Health Economics Group and module lead for the Health Economics module of the MSc in Health Economics. I have over 20 years’ experience in the field, having worked at the Universities of York, Cambridge and East Anglia, as well as spells in consultancy and the pharmaceutical industry. I have particular expertise in decision analytic modelling and efficient research design (value of information analysis) and I’m happy to supervise dissertations involving decision analytic modelling, especially those involving value of information analysis. Find me on twitter at @EdCFWilson.
  • Apostolos Davillas
    I am a Lecturer in Health Economics. Before joined the University of East Anglia, I worked as a Research Fellow (and, previously, as a postdoctoral researcher) at the Institute for Social & Economic Research, University of Essex. My research interests are in the area of micro-econometrics and health economics with a particular focus on the social and economic determinants of health, inequalities in health and healthcare, the economics of obesity, health care demand and costs. I am keen to supervise dissertations for the MSc in Health Economics concerning with these topics, with a particular focus on the analysis of large social science/multipurpose datasets. I am also the Health Economics theme leader for the medical undergraduate course. Find me on Twitter at @ADavillas.
  • David Turner
    I am a Senior Research Fellow (SRF). I have 25 years’ experience of working as a health economist and have worked at the Universities of Keele, Leicester, Southampton, and UEA. I have also worked as a health economist in the NHS. My work is primarily focussed on the conduct of economic evaluations. My current portfolio comprises both economic evaluations alongside clinical trials as well as economic modelling. Research areas include: mental health interventions in adolescents; molecular diagnostics in hospital acquired pneumonias; and pre-surgical exercise in cancer patients.
  • Adam Wagner
    I am a Senior Research Fellow (SRF), primarily working within the Health Economics and Prioritisation Theme of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration in the East of England (https://arc-eoe.nihr.ac.uk/). Completing a medical statistics PhD in 2010, I subsequently worked as an applied statistician in medical and health services research. Between 2014 and 2016, I completed the MSc in Health Economics (studying part-time); upon its completion, I moved to UEA to focus on health economics research. As an SRF, my primary focus is research (primarily economic evaluations), but I also deliver a few seminars on the Economic Evaluation module.
  • Jenny Whitty
    I am a Professor of Health Economics and I lead the Health Economics and Prioritisation Theme of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration in the East of England. I am also the Postgraduate Research Director for the Norwich Medical School and I supervise PhD students undertaking health economics and outcomes related research theses. I have over 15 years’ experience in health economics and outcome research, having worked at universities in both Australia and the UK. I have particular expertise in eliciting preferences and valuing outcomes in health and social care to inform economic evaluation and evidence-based decisions. Prior to developing a career in health economics and outcomes research, I practiced as a pharmacist in the UK and Australia, in hospital, community and health policy settings.