Nurturing Bright Futures - 7-8 June Nurturing Bright Futures - 7-8 June

This is a free, CPD accredited, two-day residential conference for education professionals working with sixth form students as they apply for and progress to Higher Education. Led by internationally renowned researchers and academics, this lively and engaging event will provide you with unparalleled advice and guidance to support your students. You will receive tips and advice on subject choice, admissions procedure and the latest UCAS updates, and have the opportunity to network not only with fellow delegates, but also with academics, current students and recruitment and admissions staff, to gain insight into UEA life and the university sector.

Book your place

View the programme

View the full schedule

The programme for 2018 will feature central sessions led by Jeremy Dry from Maximise Your PotentialJohn Street and Fabio Arico.

ANY QUESTIONS?

For more information get in touch with us via email or call us on 01603 591767.

Quotes from previous delegates Quotes from previous delegates

“It was a totally absorbing experience from the time that I arrived to my departure. I would recommend it to new and experienced careers advisers alike for the whole package, welcome, events, dinner, participants, seminars were all of a high quality - I have taken much away from the experience not to mention the campus itself.”

"This conference exceeded my expectations ... it was an outstanding event that fulfilled our need to be totally up-to-date with developments at HE."

"The course was a great chance to network with other teachers, get some up-to-date insights and, frankly, have a very nice time."

 

The conference is CPD certified so make sure to log your hours for attending.

Breakout Sessions Breakout Sessions

As part of the conference you will have the option to select breakout sessions from a programme of topics. These sessions can be found below. The Tours and Breakout booking form also allows you to sign up for option tours of the nursing teaching facilities, our media facilities, archives and the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts and offers you the chance to experience some hands on science in one of our undergraduate labs.


Thursday Tours & Sessions


Hands-on Humanities

Stephen Bennett, Lecturer in Humanities, Interdisciplinary Institute of the Humanities; Justine Mann, Project archivist

Tour of our humanities-related facilities: the Media Suite, the British Archive of Contemporary Writing, the Sculpture Trail, and the gallery of the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts


From Medicines to Robotics

Dr Zoe Waller, Lecturer in Chemical Biology, School of Pharmacy; Dr Rudy Lapeer, Senior Lecturer, School of Computing Sciences; Dr Andrew Hemmings, Reader in Chemistry, Schools of Biological Sciences and Chemistry

Experience some hands-on science in a range of demonstrations in one of our state-of the–art undergraduate labs.


Tour of nursing teaching facilities

Tony Jermy, Lecturer, School of Health Sciences, UEA

Tour of UEA’s clinical simulation teaching facilities within the Edith Cavell Building.  We currently have two traditional skills laboratories that replicate an acute ward and critical care settings with associated beds, equipment etc.  These can be used as stand alone environments, or combined depending on the simulation scenario.  Live video linking is available to stream and record simulation events to other seminar rooms within the university.

We also have a new state of the art immersive classroom which has just been installed last year.  This has transformed a conventional seminar teaching space into a 270 degree immersive simulation environment enabling us to capture and record real clinical settings on high definition cameras and project these videos onto the walls of our immersive classroom. 


What resources? And other matters …

Teacher-led discussion

Howard Dymock, Head of Sixth Form, St Helen’s School

Roshan Walkerley, HE Advice Manager, UEA

 

The sheer volume and range of materials, websites, guidance, opinions and league tables aimed at helping young people choose their options is a major problem. The focus of this discussion will be on sharing experience on what colleagues have found works well and is recommended – as well as what has been less helpful. Delegates attending this session are encouraged to bring materials with them and be happy to talk briefly about them, and perhaps share a handout. However, if you are new to advising this is definitely not compulsory.

Also under discussion will be some of the hot topics in the sector such as: predictions without the AS, unconditional offers, applicant behaviour, latest trends in applications, university offers and so on.

 


Friday Breakout Session 1: 11:30 - 12:15


Option 1: “Education for Industrie 4.0”? (equipping learners for the digital age), Professor Lawrence Coates and Dr Kathryn Coventry, UEA

Society is currently experiencing the impact of a new industrial revolution – the digital revolution. Consequently, there is much discussion concerning the characteristics and skill-sets to be nurtured in learners who will enter the workforce and labour markets of the future. How do we as educators ensure that we are appropriately tooling learners as they come through our education systems with the skills and knowledge required to meet this new industrial age?

This session will introduce participants to the themes and significance of a revolution characterised by its speed of progression and significant uncertainty. Participants will be shown how presenting students with the opportunities to explore and seek solutions to complex, open design challenges presents an environment to nurture the innovation and creativity that the UK government is trying to promote within its workforce, to aid Productivity.

Lawrence Coates studied a BSc in civil engineering at City University with integrated experience at Freeman Fox and Partners’ bridge design offices and on site.  He is a chartered civil engineer.  His PhD involved a numerical and experimental study of water wave actions on vertical cylinders in the context of offshore structures.  Fluid mechanics research in the Aeronautics department at Imperial College was followed by lecturing in civil engineering at the University of Birmingham.  His career progressed from naïve traditional lecturer to innovative educator using student-centred learning and other techniques to encourage students to great heights.  For example he is the only academic in the UK to have had teams win the final of the npower energy challenge on three separate occasions, in two institutions.  He took senior roles in the School of Engineering where he introduced the innovative Special Technology Programme and later the new degrees combining fundamental engineering with a theme in energy engineering. He joined UEA in 2011 to help to establish a strength in engineering in response to pleas from regional industry.   A feature of the growing portfolio of degrees is the mutual benefits derived from working with a range of companies and practising individuals.  Lawrence has always valued the interaction with industry that keeps his academic teaching grounded and provides real world examples to enliven the study.  Having taught a variety of topics from water engineering to design, computational techniques, professional ethics and risk assessment he enjoys taking a broad view of engineering education.

Kathryn Coventry graduated as a Civil/ Structural Engineer and after a period in industry working for engineering consultancies in Scotland and the South West of England, she returned to academia to complete a PhD in Geotechnics and Soil Science and began her university lecturing career. After 10 years lecturing in the South West of England she spent some time living in a research establishment in Germany returning to England to an academic post in the North of England. Now based in Norfolk and working as Director of Undergraduate Engineering Programmes at UEA, she is eager to realise the opportunities available to promote and support the engineering sectors operating in the East Anglia region and encourage a wider dialogue to promote the societal benefits of STEM education.

 


Option 2: Multiple Mini Interviews for health professional courses, Katrina Emerson, UEA

This interactive session gives delegates the opportunity to take part in the process used to select students to health professional courses. Multiple mini interviews (MMIs) consist of four short, structured interview stations used to assess candidates’ non-cognitive qualities including, maturity, teamwork, empathy, and reliability and communication skills.  Prior to the start of each MMI rotation, candidates receive either a question or scenario and have a very short period of time to consider their answer.  Once the student has read the scenario they are directed to the relevant station where an interviewer asks them questions.  At the end of each mini interview, the interviewer evaluates the candidate’s performance while the applicant moves to the next station. This pattern is repeated through four rotations.

Katrina Emerson is Associate Dean Admissions Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. She joined FMH in 2002 having worked for a number of years in sexual health and HIV.  Katrina is involved in teaching reproductive and sexual health across pre and post registration programmes.  In addition, she maintains her interest in sexual health by continuing to practice in reproductive and sexual health. Katrina’s research interests include the construction of the homosexual identity in education, early recognition of cognitive impairment in patients with late HIV disease, the psychological impact of termination of pregnancy and the value of multiple mini interviews (MMIs) as a means of identifying resilience in pre-registration health care students.

 


Option 3: Writing a UCAS reference, Paul Ingham, Hills Road Sixth Form College

This session will include ideas on how to keep references personal and meet the needs of admissions tutors.  The use of a reference header, explaining the nature of the centre and examination policy is encouraged by UCAS, with the addition of a live link to a more detailed centre description. How many of the 47 lines do we use, and what to say?  What do admissions staff want to read about?  How do we avoid formulaic writing? There will be the opportunity to discuss what we understand by good practice during this session.

Paul Ingham has been the Director of Careers and HE Liaison in Hills Road Sixth Form College, Cambridge for 14 years and will be retiring this summer after 39 years of teaching. He has been a sixth form tutor since 1992 and taught in three Suffolk comprehensives in Great Cornard, Haverhill and Newmarket, and in the County High School for Girls in Colchester.  Previous experiences were as Head of Geography and Humanities. He has supervised the sending of around 13,000 UCAS forms and UCCA and PCAS forms – remember them?   


Option 4: Laying the Groundwork Why do a Foundation Year? Dr Joy Hawkins, UEA

Increasing numbers of institutions are offering students the chance to begin their Higher Education studies with a Foundation Year in the Humanities. Through this interactive session, we will discover the exciting opportunities that a Humanities Foundation Year can offer your students when they may not reach the grades for a three-year degree. We will consider what doing a ‘Foundation’ Year really means and think about the sorts of students who will benefit from an extra year of study and support. A Foundation Year can open doors for students to a stimulating, challenging but supportive study environment. We will use UEA’s unique and innovative Foundation Year as our example to show you how students can truly unlock their potential and become first class undergraduates.

Joy Hawkins is a Lecturer in Humanities who has many years of experience teaching on: UEA’s Humanities Foundation Year programme, medieval and social history modules at all levels in the School of History, return to study short courses and international summer school programmes. She is the module organiser for the Humanities Foundation Year compulsory skills module, Techniques and Methods, and she is currently the Admissions Director for all the Humanities Foundation Year programmes.


Friday Breakout Session 2: 13:00 - 13:45


Option 1: Getting the right medicine: what can Pharmacy and Pharmacology degrees offer? Dr Zoё Waller, UEA

Think Pharmacists just run a shop and count pills? What do Pharmacists actually do? What’s the difference between Pharmacy and Pharmacology? Why study Pharmacy? This interactive session will take you on a journey to discover what Pharmacy is about, and the many different things you can do with a degree in Pharmacy. Ideal for advisers of students studying Chemistry and considering their options, students considering medicine as a career and looking at alternatives as well and those who already know they would like to become an expert in medicines.

Zoё Waller graduated with a MChem (Distinction) in Chemistry with Pharmaceutical and Forensic Science from the University of Bradford in 2005. She then moved to the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge to continue her studies towards a PhD in Chemical Biology. After completing her PhD in 2009 she gained teaching experience within the secondary education sector before taking up a position as Senior Demonstrator in Medicinal Chemistry in the School of Pharmacy at UEA. After gaining some further experience in industry at HFL Sport Science she returned to the School in late 2010 as a Junior Lecturer in Chemical Biology. She was promoted to Lecturer in 2014 and Senior Lecturer in 2017 and is currently the Director of Admissions.

 


Option 2: Doing what psychologists do: practical experience at UEA Psychology, Dr Charles Seger, UEA

In this session we will discuss opportunities that students have to engage with the field of psychology, conduct actual psychological research, learn a variety of research tools such as eye tracking, EEG, virtual reality, working in schools and with young children, and earn placements in industry or with psychology-related services as part of the degree

Charles Seger is a Social Psychologist who studies intergroup relations and conflict. He has published recently on topics such as Brexit, intergroup contact, and how people learn information about individuals when they already have pre-existing towards their social groups. He teaches the Social Psychology and the Psychology of Good and Evil. Dr Seger received his PhD from Indiana University and joined UEA in 2010.


Option 3: Applying for a language degree – with or without a language A level, Dr Roger Baines and Dr Alberto Hijazo-Gascon, UEA

We will discuss applying for a language degree with or without a language A level, types of courses and content available. We will also go through how a language degree is organised for an ab initio language learner in terms of skills and progression.

Roger Baines is the Admissions director and a Senior Lecturer in French and Translation Studies in the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies.

Alberto Hijazo-Gascon is the head of Spanish and a Senior Lecturer in the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies


Option 4: Qualifications – how UEA handles qualifications in an ever changing landscape, Alix Delany, UEA

Ever wondered what happens when a UCAS application arrives in a University?  The Head of Admissions at UEA, Alix Delany will provide you with an insight into the world of University admissions, how offer making is approached for different subjects of study, with applicants presenting with a range of different qualifications from the UK and all over the world.

Alix Delany graduated with a History degree from UEA in 1998. After working in London, she returned to Norwich and UEA in 2002.  Alix started working in Undergraduate Admissions in 2005 and in 2012 became the Assistant Head of Admissions, responsible for admissions for all the undergraduate courses at UEA.  In 2015 Alix became the Head of Admissions for the University, which admits approx. 5,500 students a year, and is responsible for the admissions for all Taught programmes at UEA at Undergraduate, Masters and PGCE level.


Option 5: League Tables, TEF and the new world that is with us, Dr Garrick Fincham, UEA

This session will look at how league tables and TEF work, what they mean, what they don’t mean, and why we need to look at a more subtle way at what information is out there to understand how student are making their choices in a fast changing environment.

Garrick Fincham is Head of Planning at UEA, and has worked for the institution for over a decade. Early training as an archaeologist led him into a fatal interest in data and the stories that it can tell. How we tell those stories is changing, and that is what keeps him interested.


Friday Breakout Session 3: 13:45 - 14:30


Option 1: Talking like a pro: 25 reasons to do a Speech & Language Therapy Degree, Dr Matthew Moreland, UEA

Speech & Language Therapy (SLT) degrees offer training in a wide range of highly in-demand transferable skills, and many courses do not have A level subject requirements. Summarising 25 reasons why A level students should consider degrees in SLT, this interactive session focuses on the example of how SLT training can enhance presentation skills.

Matthew Moreland is qualified Speech & Language Therapist and Lecturer in Phonetics on the SLT programme at UEA. He is also a freelance Pronunciation Editor for the Oxford English Dictionary.


Option 2: Banter or Crime in the Snapchat generation: information for teachers and advisers, Kristina Garner, UEA

This session will explore how social media interacts with the law and the operational limits of free speech. We will discover who owns students data and what employers and universities can do with online content.

Kristina Garner is a lecturer in the UEA Law School, focusing particularly on Criminal Law and English Legal Process. I am also responsible for a number of community engagement projects including the pro-bono Street Law group where our students run educational programmes to introduce young people to their legal rights and responsibilities. My role allows me to combine my interests in both criminal law and educational policy and I have responsibility for strategy and operation for widening participation in the Social Sciences


Option 3: Applying for subjects not studied at A level, Dr Clare Connors, UEA

The changing pattern of A levels means that increasingly students are applying to study at degree level subjects in which they don’t have an A level. In this session, we will explore the different aspects of this situation. We will be looking at how to advise students on the range of degree-level subjects available, and how these might hook up with specific A levels; how to navigate the open day process and university websites if your pathway isn’t immediately clear, and how to write personal statements for subjects you’re not studying.

Clare Connors is Associate Dean for Admissions for the Humanities at UEA. In her own work (in the literature department) she is interested in all sorts of overlapping subjects (including philosophy, cultural studies, politics and linguistics) none of which she studied at A-level.


Option 4: Multiple Mini Interviews for health professional courses, Katrina Emerson, UEA

This interactive session gives delegates the opportunity to take part in the process used to select students to health professional courses. Multiple mini interviews (MMIs) consist of four short, structured interview stations used to assess candidates’ non-cognitive qualities including, maturity, teamwork, empathy, and reliability and communication skills.  Prior to the start of each MMI rotation, candidates receive either a question or scenario and have a very short period of time to consider their answer.  Once the student has read the scenario they are directed to the relevant station where an interviewer asks them questions.  At the end of each mini interview, the interviewer evaluates the candidate’s performance while the applicant moves to the next station. This pattern is repeated through four rotations.

Katrina Emerson is Associate Dean Admissions Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. She joined FMH in 2002 having worked for a number of years in sexual health and HIV.  Katrina is involved in teaching reproductive and sexual health across pre and post registration programmes.  In addition, she maintains her interest in sexual health by continuing to practice in reproductive and sexual health. Katrina’s research interests include the construction of the homosexual identity in education, early recognition of cognitive impairment in patients with late HIV disease, the psychological impact of termination of pregnancy and the value of multiple mini interviews (MMIs) as a means of identifying resilience in pre-registration health care students.


Option 5: Making sense of Student Finance, Myles Smith, UEA

Come and find out more about student finance. Whether you are new to the game, or an old hand, there will be something for you.

Myles Smith is an experienced Higher Education Adviser at UEA. From Student Finance to the nitty gritty of the UCAS process, there aren’t many things that take him by surprise.


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