Contact

Role: Principal Investigator

Email: K.Bunning@uea.ac.uk

Tel: 01603 591254

Location: School of Health Sciences, UEA

Role: Co-Investigator 1

Email: Peter.Langdon@warwick.ac.uk

Location: The University of Warwick

Role: Co-Investigator 2

Email: A.Killett@uea.ac.uk

Tel: 01603 593319

Location: School of Heath Sciences, UEA

Role: Co-Investigator 3

Email: R.Heywood@uea.ac.uk

Tel: 01603 592262

Location: School of Law, UEA

Role: Advisor

Email: C.Shiggins@uea.ac.uk

Tel: 01603 591686

Location: School of Health Sciences, UEA

Role: Research Associate

Email: H.Ryan@uea.ac.uk

Location: School of Health Sciences, UEA

ASSENT Research Team

  • Karen Bunning
    Dr Karen Bunning - Reader
    Karen is a reader in Speech & Language Therapy with a particular focus on children and adults with intellectual disability. Karen’s research interests lie in the field of developmental disability, in particular children and adults with severe to profound, intellectual and multiple disabilities associated with complex communication needs. This interest has supported research both in the U.K. and in Kenya. The driving force in Karen’s research activities lies in the explication of human interaction with a particular focus on children and adults with developmental disability. This is defined by four key areas: Assistive technology: the development and application of rich and multiple media, exploration of methods to augment natural communication methods and the role of human mediation. Childhood disability in developing countries, in particular Africa: social responses and impact of disability, habilitation opportunities provided, e.g. speech & language therapy. Human interaction: in particular the communication partnership of individual with intellectual disability and a typically functioning supporter, e.g. teacher and student with intellectual disability; support worker and user of services. Accessibility of language forms, including discourse in text, on television and on the World Wide Web. Recent and ongoing research has involved investigating rehabilitation provision for young people growing up with disability in a rural part of Kenya, teacher-student talk in the special needs classroom, the role of human mediation in computer-based activities, the effects of a home-based intervention on children with complex communication needs in a rural part of Kenya. Karen has written and contributed to a number of texts on the subject of intellectual disability.
  • Peter Langdon
    Professor Peter Langdon - Professor of Clinical and Forensic Psychology
    Peter completed his undergraduate degree at Memorial University of Newfoundland, and went on to complete his Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College, London as a Lord Rothermere Fellow. Following this, he completed his PhD at the Tizard Centre as an NIHR Research Fellow. Before joining the Tizard Centre, he was a Clinical Senior Lecturer at Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia. His research and clinical work focuses upon the development and evaluation of psychological therapies and systems of care for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities, including those who have come into contact with criminal justice. He has completed several clinical trials in this area, and is working to evaluate innovative technologies for use as adjunctive interventions to help improve the accessibility of psychological interventions for people who have intellectual disabilities and autism. He was twice previously a research fellow of the National Institute for Health Research, and is the Editor of the Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities.
  • Anne Killett
    Anne Killett - Lecturer in Occupational Therapy
    I'm a senior lecturer at the University of East Anglia. I'm an occupational therapist, so a lot of my teaching is with the people studying with us to be occupational therapists. As an 'OT', I'm very interested in how what we spend our time doing affects how we feel and our wellbeing. This got me interested in participatory research - where the people who are most affected are actively involved in the research. I have worked on participatory projects with older people, and younger people with mental health difficulties. On the ASSENT project I am really looking forward to meeting the Working Group members. I am sure we will have some really useful discussions.
  • Rob Heywood
    Professor Rob Heywood
    Rob is a Professor of Medical Law at the UEA Law School, Norwich. He has specific expertise in the field of clinical negligence, informed consent, mental capacity, end-of-life decision-making and advance decision-making. Rob has authored numerous articles in the Medical Law Review, the leading journal in the field of medical law. He has also co-authored, along with Professor José Miola (Leicester University), what is now regarded as the leading substantive academic article on the legal developments on informed consent post-Montgomery v Lanarkshire, a recent landmark decision of the Supreme Court. This piece appeared in the University of Oxford’s highly respected generalist law journal, the Law Quarterly Review. Rob’s published work on informed consent has also recently been cited, with approval, by the highest court in Singapore. See, Hii Chii Kok v Ooi Peng Jin London Lucien and Others [2017] SGCA 38. In respect of mental capacity, Rob’s written evidence was cited in the recent ‘Law Commission Consultation Paper No 222 – Mental Capacity and Deprivation of Liberty’. Having undertaken multi-disciplinary empirical research on informed consent, Rob has skills in working with a range of healthcare professionals, patients and medical students. He has knowledge of qualitative research methods and data analysis, and is also familiar with the process of gaining ethical approval for research carried out in the NHS. Rob sits on the editorial boards of the Medical Law Review, Medical Law International, the Journal of Professional Negligence, the Journal of Medical Law and Ethics and the BMC Medical Ethics. He also sits as a member of UEA’s GREC Ethics Committee. He is delighted to be acting as a co-investigator on the ASSENT multi-disciplinary funded project from the Nuffield Foundation.
  • Ciara Shiggins
    Dr Ciara Shiggins
    Ciara has a clinical background in Speech and Language Therapy, with experience working with people with a variety of developmental and acquired communication difficulties. She currently works as an Academic Fellow, in the School of Health Sciences, UEA. Her particular interest is working with adults with acquired communication difficulties, predominately aphasia post-stroke. Her recently completed PhD explored how routine rehabilitation could be made more efficacious, to enhance learning for people with aphasia. Her current research looks at the application of an asset-based approach when working with people with aphasia and how this approach is best operationalised across the stroke pathway. She has a vast amount of experience co-producing research with people with aphasia, including: co-design projects; co-authoring reports; data collection; public engagement events; and dissemination. She also helped to organise an international conference, specifically for and accessible to people with aphasia and their family members and facilitates the Aphasia Café in Norwich. She completed an internship with the World Health Organisation, in their Disability and Rehabilitation team, in the Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila. Ciara has skills in qualitative research methods, mainly ethnography and interviews, and systematic reviews.
  • Dr Florence Jimoh
    Dr Oluseyi F Jimoh
    Florence is a Senior Research Associate at the University of East Anglia. Having previously obtained a PhD in Biochemistry, she completed an MRes in Clinical Science at UEA . This allowed her to transition from lab-based research to clinical studies. She has since been part of several research projects within and outside UEA. Florence has experience with people living with dementia, autism, and mental health difficulties. She has worked with advisory groups, steering groups and has been involved in public engagement events and research dissemination. She has skills in both quantitative and qualitative research methods as well as systematic reviews. She is delighted to be part of Project ASSENT and hope to use her skills and experience to support the inclusion of adults with capacity and communication difficulties in ethically-sound research.