Investigating the automatic construction of radiotherapy treatment shells suitable for 3D printing Investigating the automatic construction of radiotherapy treatment shells suitable for 3D printing

Immobilisation for patients undergoing brain or head and neck radiotherapy is achieved using perspex or thermoplastic devices that require direct moulding to patients anatomy. The mould room visit can be distressing for patients and the shells do not always fit perfectly. In addition the mould room process can be time consuming. With recent developments in 3D printing technologies comes the potential to generate a treatment shell directly from a computer model of a patient. Typically a patient requiring treatment will have held a CT scan and if a computer model of a shell could be obtained directly from the CT data it would reduce patient distress, reduce hospital visits, obtain a close fitting shell and possibly enable the patient to start their radiotherapy treatment more quickly.

This project aims to investigate the automatic construction of models suitable for 3D printing using CT scans. This project has received funding in the form of a Big C Scientific/Clinical Research Grant.

automatic construction of radiotherapy pictures

References

  1. Hulse, M., Tam, M., Isherwood, S., Scrase, C., Laycock,, S.D., Mortimore, D., Patman, J., Short, S., and Bell, D., Production of 3-D Printer generated radiotherapy shells using DICOM Ct, MRI or 3-D surface laser scan – Acquired STL files: Preclinical feasibility studies, 8th NCRI Cancer Conference, Liverpool, November 2012.
 

Research Team

Dr. Stephen Laycock, Dr. Mark Fisher

Collaborators

  • Dr. Christopher Scrase (Ipswich Hospital) 
  • Dr. Mark Hulse (University Campus Suffolk) 
  • Suzanne Isherwood (Ipswich Hospital) 
  • Dr. Matthew Tam (Southend Hospital) 
  • Prof. G. Duncan Bell (University Campus Suffolk)
  • John Patman