UEA Academic wins prestigious International Electrochemistry prize

Published by  Communications

On 12th Aug 2021

Julea Butt

Professor Julea Butt from UEA’s Schools of Chemistry and Biological Sciences has been awarded the Katsumi Niki Prize for Bioelectrochemistry, from the International Society of Electrochemistry.  

The prestigious prize may be awarded every two years to a scientist who has made an important contribution to the field of bioelectrochemistry. 

Julea was given the award in recognition of her outstanding research, in which the development and application of electrochemical methods plays a central role. 

At the heart of Julea’s research are studies of electron transfer and catalysis in bacterial proteins. She has provided fresh insight into the mechanisms used by infectious bacteria to survive in the digestive tract, and by ‘electric’ bacteria to produce green electricity from resources that are typically consider as waste. 

Julea said: “I’m honoured and delighted to receive this Prize. I owe a big debt to the many talented researchers and students I’ve have the good fortune to work with over the years and am excited by the new directions our research is taking.”

Julea’s present work provides fundamental insight into the coupling of enzymes to electrodes and synthetic light-harvesting materials with the aims of inspiring new biotechnology including sustainable electronic materials and approaches to semi-artificial photosynthesis. 

Head of Chemistry, Prof Nick Le Brun said “I am sure you will join me in congratulating Julea on this outstanding achievement! It is very well deserved.”

As part of the Prize, Julea will give a 40-minute lecture at a symposium of ISE Division 2 "Bioelectrochemistry" in 2022. 

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