Skip to Content
 
Back

Opportunity for organisations to propose topics for student projects


Large Image
Student Projects

Opportunity for organisations to propose topics for student projects

The School of Environmental Sciences at the University of East Anglia is inviting organisations to submit proposals for student projects by the end of November 2015 to mken@uea.ac.uk. Further information about the nature of student projects is provided below, but please get in touch if you have any questions. Student projects are an excellent way for organisations to address environmental problems or explore new areas of research, whilst building collaborative links with the world-class academic partners at the University.

More information:

BSc independent (honours) projects and M-level projects

In the final year of a BSc and M-level course students in the School of Environmental Sciences student carry out an independent research project on a topic of their choice. Project topics typically address an environmental problem or explore a new area of research related to environmental sciences. We welcome the opportunity for students to undertake projects that involve external organisations and where the project outcome has the potential to be of value to the organisation and provides students with a valuable experience working in collaboration with an external organisation.

It is important to manage the scope of the project. These projects contribute to 30% of students’ final year marks so it is important to ensure the academic requirements for the project are met. This is best achieved through discussions with the student and the member of staff in the School whom the student agrees will supervise their project.

Summary of the project requirements

Students are required to identify a project area that is of interest to them and apply and develop their knowledge and skills acquired in modules taken in years 1 and 2.

Plan a project that has attainable aims and objectives, within the scope of the project. The student arranges meetings with their ENV project supervisor to discuss their project ideas and ensure it meets the required academic requirements and is realistic and achievable, whilst also challenging.

During the development and execution of the project the students will liaise with their ENV project supervisor and their contact at the external organisation, contact with the latter is likely to be greatest through the period of data collection.

There is the opportunity for students to present their project results to their organisation contact at an interim meeting, and/or a final meeting.

Criteria for the project topics

A project should have a clear aim, usually to investigate a specific phenomenon in a particular location or test a precisely formulated hypothesis or research question about the environment.

The norm is a project involving the analysis and interpretation of a set of raw data that students collect (primary data) and/or obtain from existing sources (secondary data). Data are usually collected in the field, from measurements on samples in the laboratory, or from data abstracted from an existing source (such as census reports, daily weather reports, online data banks, from interviews or social surveys etc). Either or both quantitative or qualitative methods may be used. Projects involving simulation exercises or the development or use of computer programs are also possible, provided that the project involves input from, or comparison with, the real environment.

Project stages

Choosing a project topic will generally involve the student undertaking most of these stages:

Deciding on a general area in discussion with the organisation and ENV project supervisor.
Defining, with the supervisors, the general approach.
Selecting an appropriate research location.
Ensuring that any permission to visit study sites or for supplying data will be attainable for the relevant period of work.
Defining the specific aims and formulating a hypothesis or research question.
Identifying appropriate methodology.
Identifying appropriate analyses.
Designing a data collection programme.
Meeting organisation and ENV supervisors at timely intervals to report and check progress.
Completing a written report of the project (dissertation) for submission by early January.
Providing the host organisation with a copy of the dissertation.
The ENV project supervisor should be satisfied that a particular project is suitable for you to undertake.

Students are provided with a ‘Project handbook’ which provides thorough and complete guidance through all stages of the project, whilst t allowing flexibility for each students to shape their own project in discussion and agreement with their project supervisors.

An M-level project can be considered as an extended and more academically challenging version of the BSc project.

Timing of project stages

BSc

End of February, students choose their project topic and agree an ENV supervisor.

Mid-March, students submit a project proposal which summarise the background to the project, the project aims, with the planned method and a Gantt chart with timescale for completing the project collect data over the summer period, analyse and write up the dissertation with submission in early January of the following year.

Mid-June to mid-Sept data collection, particularly field work, typically between 1 and 3 weeks.

January – submission of the dissertation

M-level

End of April, students choose their project topic and agree an ENV supervisor.

End of May , students submit a project proposal which summarise the background to the project, the project aims, with the planned method and a Gantt chart with timescale for completing the project collect data over the summer period, analyse and write up the dissertation with submission in early January of the following year.

Mid-June to mid-Sept data collection, particularly field work, typically 2+ weeks.

Mid- March – submission of the dissertation"

Posted by Lisa Johnson on Mon, 30 Oct 2017



No comments yet. Be the first.