2022 sixth warmest year on record for global temperature

Published by  News Archive

On 12th Jan 2023

A thermometer against a blue sky with blazing sun
Getty Images

Globally 2022 was the sixth warmest year in a series stretching back to 1850, according to figures released today by the Met Office and University of East Anglia.  

2022 is the ninth year in succession that has equalled or exceeded 1.0 °C above the pre-industrial period (1850-1900).  

The global average temperature for 2022 was 1.16 °C above the pre-industrial baseline; 0.04 °C warmer than the value for 2021. This places 2022 nominally the sixth warmest year in the HadCRUT5 global temperature dataset, which runs from 1850 and is compiled by the Met Office and the Climatic Research Unit at UEA, with support from the National Centre for Atmospheric Research.

Dr Colin Morice is a Climate Monitoring and Research Scientist with the Met Office. He said: “2022 was another near-record year for global average temperatures, despite the slight cooling influence of La Niña: a pattern of climate variability in the tropical Pacific that typically acts to suppress global temperatures.  

“Climate variability has always imparted an influence on global temperature, making some years slightly warmer or cooler than others. The influence of natural variability throughout the 173-year-long observed temperature record is small compared to the ongoing warming due to human-induced climate change.”  

Even those years with a temporary cooling influence from La Niña, such as 2022, are now much warmer than all years before 2015, even those that had been boosted by a warm influence from El Niño. 

2016 - which experienced a significant El Niño event - is currently the warmest year in the series since 1850. 

Prof Tim Osborn, Director of the Climatic Research Unit, said: “Our global temperature data show that 2022 was consistent with the long-term warming of 0.2 °C per decade that we have observed over the last 50 years. 

“Unless we can take action that slows this rate of warming, the world’s climate will reach 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels within the next 15 years.” 

Global warming and other long-term climate change trends are expected to continue as a result of record levels of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. 

“Sharp and sustained reductions in greenhouse gas emissions would slow, and eventually stop, the climate change trends caused by human activity,” added Prof Osborn. 

Commenting in the effect of La Niña Prof Adam Scaife, Principal Fellow and Head of Monthly to Decadal Prediction at the Met Office, said: “Our long-range forecasts now suggest that this run of La Niña winters is likely to end later this year, raising the prospect of even higher global temperatures.” 

The Met Office global temperature forecast for 2023 is here

The HadCRUT5 dataset shows that 2022 was 0.80 ± 0.04 °C above the 1961-1990 average, placing it sixth warmest in the series. When compared with the pre-industrial global reference period, the year was 1.16 ± 0.08 °C above the 1850-1900 average. This aligns extremely well with figures published today by other international centres. 

The World Meteorological Organization uses six international data sets to provide an authoritative assessment of global temperature change. They report 2022 was around 1.15 ± 0.13°C warmer than the 1850-1900 baseline based on an average of the six data sets.

The long-term warming is clear. Since the 1980s, each decade has been warmer than the previous one and this is expected to continue. 

The impact on other key climate indicators can be seen on the Met Office global climate dashboard.
  
 

Latest News

 
A forest fire in the Amazon rainforest.
27 Jan 2023

Human activity has degraded more than a third of remaining Amazon rainforest

The Amazon rainforest has been degraded by a much greater extent than scientists previously believed, according to a new study.

Read more >
 
A child learning to write the alphabet.
27 Jan 2023

Poor literacy linked to worse mental health worldwide, study shows

Read more >
 
A Vitamin D tablet being held up to the sun.
26 Jan 2023

80-year-old medical mystery that caused baby deaths solved

Researchers at the University of East Anglia have solved an 80-year-old medical mystery that causes kidney damage in children and can be fatal in babies.

Read more >
 
A loudspeaker at a protest.
23 Jan 2023

There may be more power in the hand of the worker than previously thought

Employers who disproportionately punish striking workers may be acting unlawfully, according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Read more >
Are you searching for something?
 
A loudspeaker at a protest.
23 Jan 2023

There may be more power in the hand of the worker than previously thought

Employers who disproportionately punish striking workers may be acting unlawfully, according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Read more >
 
Two bottles of hormones held in a gloved hand.
14 Jan 2023

HRT could ward off Alzheimer’s among at-risk women

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) could help prevent Alzheimer’s Dementia among women at risk of developing the disease – according to University of East Anglia...

Read more >
 
A thermometer against a blue sky with blazing sun
12 Jan 2023

2022 sixth warmest year on record for global temperature

Globally 2022 was the sixth warmest year in a series stretching back to 1850, according to figures released today by the Met Office and University of East Anglia.

Read more >
 
Photo of Heidi Crisp
01 Jan 2023

HSC apprentice shortlisted for finalist in prestigious awards

Occupational therapist apprentice, Heidi Crisp has been shortlisted as one of three finalist  for Apprentice of the Year in the Norfolk Apprenticeship Awards. 

Read more >
 
Andy Cammidge
24 Jan 2023

New research grant will investigate novel organic materials

Prof Andy Cammidge (CHE) and colleagues have been awarded £800k from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to investigate the synthesis of new...

Read more >
 
James Bevan presenting at UEA. He is wearing glasses, a black jacket and grey trousers.
24 Jan 2023

UEA praised for 'outstanding' work on climate research

Sir James Bevan, Chief Executive of the Environment Agency, praised UEA’s outstanding work on climate research and highlighted the need to focus on climate...

Read more >
 
Steve Smith holding his award up with another person. Steve is wearing a grey suit.
11 Jan 2023

Nur-sing when you’re winning

National nursing award announced for retired university academic Steve Smith, aka the ‘Singing Lecturer’.

Read more >