Big Ideas in Education: Past, Present and Future.

How we learn to think about the world shapes what can be thought about it. Education, then, is philosophy in action. Now, in these times of enormous challenge and change, it has never been more important to question what it is we do when we teach and learn.

This lecture series invites a team of experts to discuss some of the 'big ideas' in education. Looking back and forward for inspiration, it explores what is taught, how, when, and why. Finally, it imagines what possible learning lives future generations might hope to lead.

Thank you to our sponsor, The Royal Institute of Philosophy.

If you have any questions, please contact: philosophyevents@uea.ac.uk.

All events are free and open to all. The series will be held in person at Thomas Paine Study Centre Lecture Theatre (see campus map). Free parking is available in the UEA West Carpark from 17:30 the night of the event. UEA West Car Park is located on Chancellor’s Drive, next to TPSC.

Please arrive at 18:00 for a 18:15 start, the lectures and Q&A will run until approximately 20:00.

For information on Covid safety, please see the UEA Covid webpages. UEA event staff and volunteers will be wearing face coverings (except interviewers on stage) and we would encourage our audience to do the same if you are able.

 

Tue 1 February 2022 | 18:15 – 20:00 | Thomas Paine Study Centre Lecture Theatre, UEA
Why is Lawrence Stenhouse Still Important?
- Professor John Elliot (UEA)

Professor John Elliot introduces the life and work of Lawrence Stenhouse, an influential figure in educational theory and founding director of the innovative Centre for Applied Research in Education here at UEA. This lecture will locate Stenhouse’s ideas in a particular philosophical tradition and explore their relevance for society today.


Tue 8 February 2022| 18:15 – 20:00 | Thomas Paine Study Centre Lecture Theatre, UEA
Beyond the Ivory Tower?
– Victoria Showunmi (UCL) and Sophie Scott-Brown (UEA)

Victoria Showunmi will address diversity in higher education, relating the concept to what it means in terms of practice, structure, and educational leadership. Sophie Scott-Brown will reflect on the different concepts of diversity and inclusivity, and the implications of this for 'widening participation' in higher education.  


Tue 22 February 2022 | 18:15 – 20:00 | Thomas Paine Study Centre Lecture Theatre, UEA
Why has Education become so Instrumental?
- Geoff Hinchliffe (UEA), with UEA student support

The idea that education is “worthwhile in itself” often appears somewhat out-dated and naïve. Education is experienced as a process driven by tests, exams and an achievement culture. For government, education’s prime role is seen in economic and employability terms. This presentation will give some reasons why this is so, drawing on both the post-war political trajectory in England and also the ideas of Max Weber, Michel Foucault and Lyotard. The lecture concludes by suggesting a different, enabling role of the state in educational provision and giving greater responsibilities and scope to those engaged in educating.


Tue 15 March 2022 | 18:15 – 20:00 | Thomas Paine Study Centre Lecture Theatre, UEA
Where and How Will Education Take Place?
- Professor Judith Suissa (UCL)

Philosopher, Professor Judith Suissa reflects on the 'other' spaces of education, the informal forms of learning that takes place between peers and friends, within families and communities. While less acknowledged, these spaces are vital to human development and flourishing, and, if supported, offer rich potential for the future.


Tue 22 March 2022 | 18:15 – 20:00 | Thomas Paine Study Centre Lecture Theatre, UEA 
"What If?" - Imagining Future Landscapes of Education
- Harry Dyer, John Gordon, Esther Priyadharshini (all UEA)

This lecture will explore the future landscapes of education, bringing together explorations and discussions of alternative and possible futures and imaginaries in education. The goal of surviving and thriving in and beyond the 21st century is increasingly challenging, as is the task laid out to educators in preparing students for uncertain and precarious futures. Research suggests that young people are increasingly concerned about their futures yet equally feel unprepared for what these futures hold for them. The task of preparing students for these precarious futures not only increasingly involves financial and social discussions, but, as this lecture explores, also involves dealing with broader discussions around their hopes and fears of and for their futures, and the pressures and expectations of their presents.

Followed by a free drinks reception.
 

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Explore our previous lectures listed below. 

Public Lectures 2020-21

 

Bad News is Good News? The Upside of Down

We live in times of endemic crisis... The long drawn-out epochal phenomenon of climate-decline. The shorter emergencies that are pandemics. And many more. It is obvious that events such as these have the capacity to hurt us badly, even to destroy us. But what about the other side of the coin? Are there ways in which these crises can enrich us?... Even make us?

This series will look at that question from the perspective of popular philosophising. How can we truly make the best out of the crises caused by our civilisation? What is the potential upside of down? 

Thank you to our sponsor, The Royal Institute of Philosophy.

If you have any questions please contact: philosophyevents@uea.ac.uk
 

Tue 9 February 2021 | 18:15 – 20:15 | Online

Silver Linings From the Ecological Emergency - Amitav Ghosh (Author, The Great Derangement) in conversation with Rupert Read (UEA)

 

Tue 23 February 2021| 18:15 – 20:15 | Online

Silver Linings From the National Scandal of Covid-19 - Richard Horton (Editor of the Lancet)

 

Tue 9 March 2021 | 18:15 – 20:15 | Online

Making the Most of Our Flawed Education System, At a Time of Global Crisis - Sophie Scott-Brown (UEA)


 

Tue 23 March 2021 | 18:15 – 20:15 | Online

Can We Adapt Transformatively To Climate Decline? – Roundtable discussion: Nick Brooks, Joanne Clarke and Rupert Read (all UEA)

 

Public Lectures 2019-20

 

Crisis and Control

How should we respond to the multitude of crises that seem to define the contemporary age? Do we need to ‘take back control’? What would that really mean? We all face moments of crisis, but in the world today crisis seems to have become near permanent state, infecting every aspect of our public and private lives.

The 2020 Philosophy Public Lecture Series will explore crisis in family life, in our prison system, in political rhetoric and our emotions, and ask why so many people today are turning to the ancient philosophy of stoicism for answers.

 

Tuesday 14 January, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Managing a Domestic Crisis: Seneca, Stoicism and the Family” Dr Elizabeth Gloyn (Royal Holloway)

Listen back to the lecture:

 

Tuesday 28 January, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Philosophy and Freedom: Practicing Stoicism in Prison” Dr Ben Walker (Crito Project and UEA)

Listen back to the lecture:

 

Tuesday 11 February, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Is there a Crisis of Rhetorical Culture” Professor Alan Finlayson (UEA)

Listen back to the lecture:

 

Cancelled: Tuesday 3 March, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Who's in Charge of our Emotions?” Dr Birgit Breidenbach (UEA)

Owing to the ongoing national dispute between Universities UK (UUK) and the University and College Union (UCU), and resultant strike action by members and supporters of UCU, ‘Who’s In Charge of Our Emotions?’ with Dr Birgit Breidenbach has been cancelled. The event will not be rescheduled as part of this series, we apologise for any disappointment and inconvenience caused.

 

Postponed: Wednesday 18 March, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“The Rise of Modern Stoicism” Dr John Sellars (Royal Holloway) 

In light of the concern relating to COVID-19 and the increased necessity to contain the spread of infection, UEA has taken the decision to postpone public events.

We place great value on our public events programme and will continue to monitor the situation carefully, making every effort to reschedule cancelled events wherever possible. We apologise for the disappointment caused, and we very much look forward to bringing you notice of new dates as soon as possible.

Public Lectures 2018-19

 

Being Governed

What does it mean to be governed? We usually associate being governed with politics. In modern democracies, we are supposedly self-governing. But what does it mean to govern ourselves? And do we, really? Or perhaps we should associate being governed with the laws of nature; then being governed comes as necessity. The 2019 Public Philosophy Lecture Series will explore ways in which our lives are being governed that fall in the space between the voluntarism of politics and the necessity of laws of nature, including by way of ‘economics’, ‘rules’, ‘nature’, ‘social science’ and ‘populism’.

We seek to make all our public lectures as accessible as possible. You can listen to audio recordings of all the public lectures in this series, using the links below. 

 

Tuesday 22 January, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Being Governed by Economics” Dr Alex Douglas (St. Andrews)

Discussant: Prof. Robert Sugden (UEA)

Listen back to the lecture:

 

Tuesday 5 February, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Being Governed by Rules for Belief” Dr James Andow (UEA)

Discussant: Ian Hare (UEA)

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Tuesday 19 February, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Being Governed by Nature” Dr Rupert Read (UEA)

Discussant: Dr Janosch Prinz (UEA) and Dr Sophie Scott-Brown (UEA)

Listen back to the lecture:

 

Tuesday 5 March, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Being Governed by Social Science” Dr Michael Frazer (UEA)

Discussant: Dr Zeynep Pamuk (Oxford) 

Listen back to the lecture:

 

Tuesday 19 March, 6:15pm

Thomas Paine Lecture Theatre

“Being Governed by Populist Logic” Dr Marina Prentoulis (UEA)

Discussant: Dr Emmy Eklundh (KCL)

Listen back to the lecture:

Public Lectures 2017-18

 

Apocalypses Now?

 

Tuesday 16 January

"Where one should find hope, in the face of a deteriorating climate."

John Foster, response from Samantha Earle.

This event is followed by a drinks reception which is free and open to all.

 

Tuesday 30 January

"Are robots going to supplant humanity?"

A panel discussion with Dr Gareth Jones, Dr Rupert Read and Dr Ryan Dawson, chaired by Prof Catherine Rowett.

 

Tuesday 13 February

"It's already eternal Treblinka for animals"

Prof Gary Francione, response from Prof Catherine Rowett.

This event is followed by a drinks reception which is free and open to all.

 

Tuesday 27 February - CANCELLED

"This civilisation is finished"

Dr Rupert Read, response from Deepak Rughani (Co-founder Biofuelwatch)

Read the text of the lecture: Some thoughts on ‘civilisational succession’

 

Tuesday 13 March

The Curve at the Forum

"That we carry on like this IS the catastrophe"

Chris Hedges (Pulitzer Prize Winner), response from Dr Rupert Read.