Join our friendly online taster sessions to discover what it's like to study your chosen subject at university. You might even meet your future lecturer.

Not only are taster lectures a great way to get a feel for a subject, you can also ask questions and even write about it on your personal statement.

Questions? Email us at HEwebinars@uea.ac.uk

The full Programme

Art, Media and American Studies (including Film Studies)

 
  • Editing techniques
    A recorded introduction will be provided in advance of this live and interactive film tutorial, where we will explore editing techniques.
    Monday 8 November, 16.45-17.30 - details and register

Business

 
  • COP26: The Role of Responsible Business & Marketing in Creating Sustainable Futures
    What role do businesses play in creating a sustainable future? How does being a responsible business impact an organisation’s strategic and marketing decision-making? In this session, Lucill Curtis from Norwich Business School will be joined by former student Mo Özsoy, who has set up his own award-winning company, Squiish. The company is looking to revolutionise the personal care products industry by providing alternatives to plastic packaging for liquid products such as shampoo. Join us to find out more about what it really means to be a responsible business.
    Thursday 4 November, 14.15-15.00 - details and register
    Thursday 11 November, 10.30-11.15 - details and register

Chemistry

 
  • Computational chemistry
    In this session, Dr Vasily Oganesyan from the School of Chemistry will lead a skills and insight masterclass for students exploring the exciting and expanding field of computational chemistry. The session will outline the basic principles behind computational chemistry and the role that computer modelling plays in modern chemical research. It will be illustrated by topical examples demonstrating predictive powers of computational chemistry and how it greatly complements the work of experimentalists in understanding molecular properties and chemical phenomena. The role of computational chemistry in university curriculum will also be discussed.
    Thursday 4 November, 12.45-13.30 - details and register

Critical Thinking (multi-disciplinary)

 
  • COP26: Preferred futures – societies, education and economies
    In this session, a panel of researchers from across UEA will discuss how society prepares young people for the future, and how we can explore different futures. We’ll look at future societies, education, and economies – thinking about what sorts of futures we are making and how we can head towards preferred futures. Exploring critical thinking techniques, we will invite, discuss and integrate ideas from the audience to shape these possible futures and describe our journey towards them.
    Tuesday 9 November, 13.00-13.45 - details and register

Economics

 
  • COP26: Economists vs. humans
    Through demonstrations and interactive quizzes, economist Mike Brock shows that we don’t always behave as rationally as we might like to think. This introduction to behavioural economics will explore how difficult it can be to encourage humans to act in in ways that benefit the environment, but with the right mixture of nudges and incentives, economists just might have the answer to tackling climate change.
    Tuesday 2 November, 11.15-12.15 - details and register
     
  • Externalities and government intervention
    Can traditional economics create market-based solutions to pollution problems? Considering overproduction, overconsumption and overpopulation, this session queries the value of standard externality analysis. Introducing competing environmental approaches, it asks: Does global warming demand a more radical solution?
    Wednesday 3 November, 11.15-12.15 - details and register

English Literature, Drama and Creative Writing

 
  • Classical civilisation: The epics of Homer
    Full details TBC.
    Tuesday 23 November, 11.15-12.15 - details and register
     
  • Dystopian literature
    Full details TBC.
    Tuesday 7 December, 10.30-11.30 - details and register
     
  • Drama/English Literature: Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure: The world through stage design
    This session focuses on the world of Measure for Measure and how it has been expressed through stage design. You’ll read and analyse short sections of the play to learn more about its themes. You’ll then compare past production designs and do a creative design task, setting one of the scenes in a space. You’ll gain an insight into how staging shapes the meaning of a play, as well as a new angle on textual analysis.
    Wednesday 17 November, 11.15-12.15 - details and register

Geography and Environmental Science

 

History

 
  • COP26: COP in Context – A Historian’s Guide to the ‘Do’s And Don’ts’ Of Diplomacy, 1815-2021
    In this session, we'll consider what makes international conferences succeed or fail - drawing on historical examples, from the great congresses of the Napoleonic era, through the wars of the twentieth century, to the present.
    Thursday 11 November, 12.45-13.25 - details and register

Humanities (History, Philosophy, Politics and related subjects)

 
  • Researching Weather, The Environment and Climate Change in the Humanities
    When people think of the global warming it is usually to the Sciences that they first look for explanation, understanding and solutions, but responding to the challenge of climate change will take collaboration and innovation – and that happens when we learn from other, perhaps less familiar, cultures, disciplines and perspectives. To this end, the study of the Humanities and an interdisciplinary approach has a lot to contribute. How can looking to the past help to contextualise and help us understand our changing environment and attitudes towards it today? What ethical challenges might we encounter in making changes? What political aspects do we need to consider? In this session, we will examine how students can draw on a number of different disciplines, with a particular focus on how changes in weather and climate were experienced by societies and individuals in the past, to enhance their understanding of the environment and climate change.
    Wednesday 10 November, 10.30-11.15 - details and register

International Development

 
  • COP26: Justice and climate change
    The climate is in crisis and we need to change the way we interact with the landscapes we live in. But who gets to decide how that change is made? Who do we listen to, and why? And how do we make change fair? In this interactive workshop, we’ll begin from a case study from Highland Scotland – where deer are causing conflict. And we’ll use it as springboard to start grappling with questions at the heart of the search for environmental justice.
    Monday 8 November, 10.30-11.15 - details and register

Languages and Communication

 
  • COP26: Learning a language for a more sustainable climate
    World-wide we are facing a climate crisis. This emergency means that we need to change the way we prioritise what we teach and learn to become better informed citizens. In this session, we’ll be looking at how a change of perspective can make a huge difference in covering a topic, in the context of language teaching. Working towards resolving this crisis is a way to work for justice, but to resolve a crisis we need first to know more about it. Learning a language can get you closer to that knowing.
    Wednesday 10 November, 13.00-13.45 - details and register
     
  • Exploring the link between language and power
    In this talk we will look at the relationship between power and ideologies, and how individuals can be persuaded to change or enforce their ideologies — their view of the world — through linguistic devices found in political speeches and newspaper articles. How are we being persuaded to believe the same as those who are producing these discourses through word choice? By using Critical Discourse Analysis, we will work together to explore how we can identify this language and build up further knowledge about who produced it and what their goal is — is it to bring people together? Is it to divide? This talk mirrors modules students can take at UEA in the final year of their degree in the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies and will be of interest to students studying language and linguistics, but also politics and sociology.
    Monday 22 November, 16.45-17.30 - details and register

Medicine and healthcare

 
  • Medicine and healthcare: Preparing for university interviews
    Applying for medicine or a health related course at university might seem daunting. If you’re feeling nervous about an upcoming interview, fear not – in this session, we’ll talk you through some tips and tricks to ensure you are fully prepared when the time comes. We’ll be joined by some current UEA students who will share their experience of going through the process. They’ll also be plenty of time for any questions you might have.
    Tuesday 30 November, 16.30-17.00 - details and register

Physics

 
  • Fields: Examining cutting edge research
    Full details TBC.
    Wednesday 17 November, 09.10-10.10 - details and register

Politics, International Relations and Philosophy

 
  • Exploring the link between language and power
    In this talk we will look at the relationship between power and ideologies, and how individuals can be persuaded to change or enforce their ideologies — their view of the world — through linguistic devices found in political speeches and newspaper articles. How are we being persuaded to believe the same as those who are producing these discourses through word choice? By using Critical Discourse Analysis, we will work together to explore how we can identify this language and build up further knowledge about who produced it and what their goal is — is it to bring people together? Is it to divide? This talk mirrors modules students can take at UEA in the final year of their degree in the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies and will be of interest to students studying language and linguistics, but also politics and sociology.
    Monday 22 November, 16.45-17.30 - details and register

Psychology

 
  • COP26: Climate change and behaviour change
    The climate is changing - why aren't we? Despite wide recognition that climate change poses a major threat, people are yet to adapt their lifestyles at the scale needed. What influences our everyday behaviours that contribute to climate change? What can be done to enable people to adopt more climate-friendly behaviours? Join Jordan Harold from UEA’s School of Psychology for a look at how people think and make decisions and the impact this could have on our collective response to climate change.
    Friday 12 November, 10.30-11.00 - details and register

How to join 

How to log in to your webinar

 

'Join here'
If your taster lecture says 'join here', simply click on the link 10 minutes before the scheduled start time, so you can check your computer settings. There's no need to download any additional software but if possible, we recommend using Chrome in incognito mode. 

Please note that your browser may ask for permission to access your microphone and video - don't worry, we won't be able to see or hear you, but granting permission means you'll be able to see and hear us! You can type any questions you have into the chat box.
 

'Details and register'
If your taster lecture says 'details and register', you'll need to visit the Channel Talent website and complete a short form to register for these sessions. Channel Talent will then send you all the details you need to log in on the day.

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

UEA has also partnered with FutureLearn to deliver MOOCs – free, easily accessible online courses that are available to anyone. They’re a great way to develop your understanding of a subject – or to gain the general study skills you’ll need when you start university.

Preparing for University MOOC

View all UEA subject-specific MOOCs