MSc Physiotherapy - John Neves

MSc Physiotherapy graduate John Neves talks about studying at UEA and working in the health sector.

Can you tell us about your current job role?

I currently work in a physiotherapy company that my father and I started in 2014.

At that point, I was transferring from an International Relations programme. I then moved towards kinesiology which would have been the fundamentals to go either to Med school or physiotherapy school here in Canada.

It just happened to be a good time as my father was thinking of going into private practice and he needed help and we became business partners.

Due to the pandemic, I haven't been able to become a fully registered physiotherapist in Canada yet, as there were delays with examinations which I have to do. So at the moment, I'm a physiotherapy assistant in the company.

What drew you to UEA?

It was the interview process that that drove me towards UEA.

I was interviewed by very nice staff and found them very welcoming, instead of feeling intimidated as I had felt at other university interviews. 

What was your favourite thing about studying MSc Physiotherapy at UEA?

I enjoyed the anatomy labs

They helped us to view the human body through an evolutionary lens.

Which skills that you acquired on the course were the most important for you?

It was such a practical course: we spent eight months of two years on placements.

One of my most valuable skills was developing patience with myself and others.

Did you use the careers service at UEA?

I used Student Services to help me with writing skills.

I’m Brazilian, now living in Canada and I found that when returning to University after a break to do my Master’s, my writing skills were not up to par.  Their support was very helpful.

Do you have any further aspirations for your career in physiotherapy?

I would like to continue with geriatrics.

It would also be interesting to branch out into neurology as I enjoyed my placement in that setting. 

What excites you the most about your current role?

The diversity of the people who I meet from different generations and helping patients who have complex health issues.

It’s very rewarding.  

Would you have any words of advice for students who might be considering doing a masters in physiotherapy?

Being open to learning about yourself is important.

The course and the programme will push you at certain points and you will find out things about yourself that perhaps you didn't know, or perhaps you don't like about yourself that you're going to have to work on.

Also, don't take the assessments as personal criticism as that just isn't productive. Celebrate the little victories with your friends!