Philosophical perspectives of music, literature and film Philosophical perspectives of music, literature and film

We have a distinctive concentration of expertise in the area of philosophy and the arts. One member of our research staff focuses almost exclusively on this area, while several others dedicate a good deal of their energy to research in the subject.

Our researchers have particular expertise in the following areas of Philosophy and the Arts:

  • Aesthetics
  • Philosophy of Literature
  • Metaphor
  • Philosophy of and as Film

You can read more about our research in this area by downloading a detailed description, where each member of staff who focuses their research on philosophy and the arts personally introduces a portrait of their current work.

We enjoy an excellent relationship with several other relevant subject areas at UEA, including Music, Literature and Creative Writing, History of Art and Film and Media Studies. Where appropriate, their expertise can be drawn on for graduate supervision.

We welcome applications from Postgraduate students wishing to work on topics relating to Philosophy and the Arts. Please feel free to email any of us to discuss supervisory and other arrangements.

Academic members working in this area

Dr Jerry Goodenough has a special interest in both the philosophy of film and film as philosophy. (See Publications and Academia.edu page.)

Dr Rupert Read's interest in the philosophy of literature and film intersects with his interests in the philosophy of psychopathology and in applying Wittgenstein's thought. He is currently working on the conceiving of (some) films as therapeutic works of philosophy, including, unexpectedly, Lord of the Rings and Avatar. (See Academia.edu page)

Prof Catherine Rowett works on ancient philosophy. Her interests include Plato's use of fictional characters; Plato's attention to beauty, seduction and desire as key aspects of the philosopher's motivation to seek truth; the relation between form and content in Pre-Socratic philosophy; the use of the imagination in philosophical thinking. (See Academia.edu page: published as Catherine Osborne until 2011)

Recent Publications:
Catherine Rowett (2013). Literary genres and judgements of taste: some remarks on Aristotle's remarks about the poetry of Empedocles' in M. Erler (ed.): Argument und literarische Form in antiker Philosophie (De Gruyter), pp. 305-14.
Catherine Osborne (2007). Dumb beasts and dead philosophers: humanity and the humane in ancient philosophy and literature Oxford University Press. (Paperback edition 2009)