Biography

I am currently employed full-time as a Tutor in Business for Norwich Business School (NBS). In this role I mainly deliver seminars (with some lectures) to business students on economics, international trade, management issues associated with international businesses, quantitative methods and marketing. In past years I have also co-lectured a module (buyer behaviour and interactive marketing) for the MBA programme, taught seminars and guest lectured for the School of Economics (Labour Economics). I also passed my PhD viva (subject to minor corrections) in Nov'17. This was undertaken with the School of Economics and investigated the determinants of UK Higher Education participation across multiple cohorts. My examiners were Prof. John Micklewright (UCL) and Dr. Jo Blanden (Surrey).

All Publications

Whybrow, J.

(2014)

Bitcoin: Currency or Commodity? Is there a future for virtual currencies?,

Full Text

(Featured article)

(Published)


Whybrow, J., Zheng, J.

(2012)

Are we capable of being altruistic?,

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(Featured article)

(Published)


Whybrow, J.

(2012)

Book Review: ‘Micro Trends – Surprising tales of the way we live today’,

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(Book/Film/Article review)

(Published)


Whybrow, J.

(2011)

Are we spending too much or too little on Higher Education?,

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(Featured article)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

My PhD research is interdisciplinary but broadly falls under the Economics of Education. Specifically, I assess the changing cultural and social influences with respect to UK Higher Education participation. To do this I utilise 3 cohorts, namely the National Child Development Study (NCDS), British Cohort Study (BCS70) and Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE). In my first chapter I estimate a logistic model of HE participation for the NCDS and BCS70, controlling for a range of individual (inc. a measure of cognitive ability) and background characteristics. To this I add some simple comparable measures (principal components) of Cultural and Social Capital. My second chapter estimates a more comprehensive model for the more recent LSYPE cohort. The main contribution of this chapter is, that we also introduce additional measures of Habitus and contextual Social Capital (at home and at school). My last chapter, also utilising the LSYPE, estimates a multilevel logistic model (given the two-stage stratified sampling design), with the aim of assessing the role schools and their characteristics play in relation to these capitals and Higher Education more generally. To my knowledge this is the first UK focused study to explore the influences of these capitals on determining who goes on to study in Higher Education.