New project aims to improve rates of patients taking medicines for type 2 diabetes

Published by  Communications

On 15th Jan 2021

The University of East Anglia (UEA) is working with the Universities of Oxford and Amsterdam to test a community pharmacy service designed to support people with type 2 diabetes to improve the management of their condition.

 

The research project called Intense, is for people with type 2 diabetes who are not taking their medicines as prescribed.  It is known that half of people prescribed medicines for type 2 diabetes do not take them as prescribed.  This leads to their diabetes being poorly controlled and long-term problems such as damaged eyesight and kidneys as well as avoidable costs for the NHS.  

 

The Intense project has received €500,000 of European funding to test the effects of community pharmacy teams providing help that is tailored to each patient’s needs so that the patient gets the best out of their diabetes medicines.  The service will be mainly delivered using digital resources such as online programs and text messages.  This makes the research possible during this COVID-19 pandemic.  A total of 300 people will be included in the Intense project and half will be randomly assigned to get usual care whilst the other half will get the new service.  By increasing the number of people taking their medication as prescribed, we hope to improve health and reduce NHS costs.

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