How ‘smell training’ could help overcome post-viral smell distortions

Published by  Communications

On 28th Nov 2020

If you’ve been experiencing odour distortions after Covid-19, then ‘smell training’ could help you start smelling normally again – according to new research involving the University of East Anglia.

Parosmia is a symptom where people experience strange and often unpleasant smell distortions. Instead of smelling a lemon you may smell rotting cabbage, or chocolate may smell like petrol. The symptom has been linked to smell disturbance in Covid-19, as well as due to other viruses and head injuries.

A new paper published today shows that the presence of parosmia is associated with clinically relevant recovery in smell performance (identifying and distinguishing smells) in patients with smell loss caused by viral infections who are undertaking smell training.

Prof Carl Philpott from UEA’s Norwich Medical School, said: “Some degree of smell loss is thought to affect up to one quarter of the general population.

“Smell loss is also a prominent symptom of Covid-19, and we know that the pandemic is leaving many people with long-term smell loss, or smell distortions such as parosmia – this may now be as many as 90,000 people in the UK.

“For people with parosmia, the smell of certain things – or sometimes everything – is different, and often unpleasant. So for example, someone with parosmia could sniff at a cinnamon stick, but to them it would smell like something horrible – perhaps rotten food, or worse.

“Smell training involves sniffing at least four different odours twice a day every day for several months. It has emerged as a simple and side-effect free treatment option for various causes of smell loss.

“It aims to help recovery based on neuroplasticity - the brain’s ability to reorganise itself to compensate for a change or injury.

“We wanted to find out more about how it relates to the likelihood of recovery in patients with smell loss due to viruses.”

The research team worked with 143 participants who had experienced a loss or change in their sense of smell due to post viral infection.

The participants received a variety of smell training kits – consisting of different odours, including eucalyptus, lemon, rose, cinnamon, chocolate, coffee, lavender, honey, strawberry and thyme.

The participants were tested for how well they could smell different odours at the start of the trial, and after six months of smell training.

Prof Philpott said: “We found that the presence of parosmia and worse smell performance on testing of odour identification and discrimination was associated with clinically significant recovery in smell function for people experiencing post-viral smell disorders.

“This means that smell training can help the smell pathways to start to regenerate and recover.

“We also found that older people in particular were more likely to start to recover their sense of smell. And that the biggest improvements happened in those that had lost the most amount of smell function in the first place.”

The research was carried out prior to Covid-19, however the researchers say their findings could be helpful to people who have lost their sense of smell as a result of the pandemic.

The research was led by the Technical University of Dresden (Germany) in collaboration with the University of East Anglia (UK), the Norfolk Smell and Taste Clinic at the James Paget University Hospital (UK), the Medical University of Vienna (Austria), University Hospitals of Cologne (Germany), and the University of Wroclaw (Poland).

Parosmia is associated with relevant olfactory recovery after olfactory training in postinfectious smell loss’ is published in The Laryngoscope.

Latest News

  News
Prince Philip at UEA campus
09 Apr 2021

UEA pays tribute to His Royal Highness Prince Philip

Read more >
  News
EasternARC logo
31 Mar 2021

UEA signs open letter to Government on research funding reductions

UEA is one of a consortium of universities from the East of England to sign an open letter sent to UK Chancellor Rishi Sunak requesting a reconsideration on the...

Read more >
  News
31 Mar 2021

How comorbidities increase risks for Covid patients

Comorbidities such as heart disease, respiratory disease, renal disease and cancer lead to an increased risk of death from Covid-19 according to new research...

Read more >
  News
26 Mar 2021

Intensity of tropical cyclones is probably increasing due to climate change

Many tropical cyclone-prone regions of the world are expected to experience storm systems of greater intensity over the coming century, according to a review of...

Read more >
Are you searching for something?
  News
26 Mar 2021

Intensity of tropical cyclones is probably increasing due to climate change

Many tropical cyclone-prone regions of the world are expected to experience storm systems of greater intensity over the coming century, according to a review of...

Read more >
  News
Picture of young child with their dad on the beach
24 Mar 2021

Building a picture of fathers in the family justice system in England

The invisibility of dads who lose access to their children because of concerns about child neglect or their ability to provide safe care comes under the...

Read more >
  News
19 Mar 2021

World Water Day spotlight on UEA’s water security research centre

From adapting to climate change and tackling water scarcity to the burden of carrying water faced by millions of people, and particularly women, around the world...

Read more >
  News
18 Mar 2021

The increasing cost of debt caused by climate change

Climate change will increase the cost of sovereign and corporate debt worldwide according to a new report from the University of East Anglia and the University...

Read more >
  News
A student studies in an ampitheatre
12 Mar 2021

Turing Scheme – UEA Puts In Bid

UEA will be applying to be a part of the new Turing Scheme which will enable UK students to study in other countries.

Read more >
  News
15 Mar 2021

UEA switches to Ecosia to turn internet searches into thousands of trees

UEA is switching its default search engine on campus computers to Ecosia, in a move that will potentially result in over 100,000 more trees being planted each...

Read more >
  News
11 Mar 2021

Food allergies leave parents living in fear

Parents of children with food allergies face significant worry, severe anxiety and post-traumatic stress – according to new research from the University of East...

Read more >