How can we tackle inequalities?

Published by  News Archive

On 21st Oct 2020

Understanding how and why gender matters is vital to the arts and humanities, whether our interests lie primarily in artistic, social and cultural questions or in historical and political perspectives.​

We’re proud of the quality of speakers that are headlining our event series this year, adding depth to the MA Gender Studies programme and providing an insight into the fundamental debates you can explore at UEA. This year’s events focus on action, transformation and change.

Our MA Gender Studies responds to the contemporary moment in which issues of equality and diversity are seen as vital for organisational success; and public feminism has a renewed prominence in culture – yet tackling gender inequalities remains a challenge. The MA programme has at its core an understanding that the study of gender is enriched and complicated by an emphasis on ethnicity, sexuality and religion.

These virtual events are free to attend and open to all students, staff and the public. You will need to register so that we can send you a secure invitation to join the event. With the move online, we are looking forward to more people being able to hear from our host of amazing speakers.

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