Career History

Bibliographical Sketch

1984-1989 Mechanical Engineering, HTBL Graz, Austria, Ing.
1989-1996 B.Sc. Physics & MSc. Theor. Physics, Erzherzog Univ. Graz
1996-2000 PhD in Comp. Protein Cryst., EMBL & Karl-Franzens Univ. Graz. 
2000-2002 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Computational Crystallography - Dr. G. Bricogne, Cambridge
2002-2005 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Structural Bioinformatics - Prof. J. Thornton, EBI, Hinxton
2005- Project Leader in Computational & Systems Biology, JIC
2010- Head of Department, Computational & Systems Biology, JIC

All Publications

Sun, J., Miller, J. B., Granqvist, E., Wiley-Kalil, A., Gobbato, E., Maillet, F., Cottaz, S., Samain, E., Venkateshwaran, M., Fort, S., Morris, R. J., Ané, J., Dénarié, J., Oldroyd, G. E. D.

(2015)

Activation of symbiosis signaling by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in legumes and rice,

in The Plant Cell

27

(3)

pp. 823-838

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Rickett, L. M., Pullen, N., Hartley, M., Zipfel, C., Kamoun, S., Baranyi, J., Morris, R. J.

(2015)

Incorporating prior knowledge improves detection of differences in bacterial growth rate,

in BMC Systems Biology

9

article no. 60

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Miller, J. B., Pratap, A., Miyahara, A., Zhou, L., Bornemann, S., Morris, R. J., Oldroyd, G. E. D.

(2013)

Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase is negatively and positively regulated by calcium, providing a mechanism for decoding calcium responses during symbiosis signaling,

in The Plant Cell

25

(12)

pp. 5053-5066

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Grandison, S., Leggett, R., Morris, R.

(2007)

Measuring the elastomechanical properties of filamentous organisms with the calculus of variations,

in Systems Biology and Statistical Bioinformatics

pp. 110-113

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

Systems biology of plant-microbe interactions. The main research focus of my group is on the application of mathematical and computational models to help understand plant-microbe interactions. We are particularly interested in how biological entities process information and communicate through `noisy channels' to deliver biomechanical responses. The approaches range from standard numerical and theoretical physics techniques to methods of artificial intelligence, machine learning, computational geometry, computer vision, information theory, Bayesian inference, evolutionary programming and the development of new algorithms.