Biography

Jules is an agricultural and environmental economist concerned with helping small-scale farmers in the developing world to access climate resilient livelihood pathways. He has worked extensively as a consultant in developing countries, while also publishing academic and policy papers based on his experience. 

He holds a PhD in Agricultural Economics from University of Oxford, a MSc in Environmental Economics from University College London, a MSc in Environmental Management from University of Oxford, and a BA in Ecology from University of California Berkeley. His PhD thesis examined the local knowledge used by small-scale farmers in Tanzania to inform their decisions vis-a-vis farming and natural resource management. It looked at how this knowledge changes in response to shifting resource constraints and exposure to outside knowledge, and how different farmers negotiate such changes.

His work as a consultant has focused primarily on small-scale agriculture and climate change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Roles have included project and programme design, programme management, technical assistance, capacity building, applied research, and evaluation. Clients have included African Development Bank, CARE, COMESA, DFID, European Union, Expertise France, IFRC, Oxfam, TearFund, UNEP and the World Bank. He has worked in Bangladesh, Belize, Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Tanzania, United Kingdom, United States, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Areas of technical expertise include climate smart agriculture, edible algae, climate adaptation & mitigation, agro-ecological practices, and cost-benefit analysis. He began his career as a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal, where he spent two years living in a remote village and working as an agricultural extension agent. He has also lived in Ethiopia and Tanzania.

 

All Publications

Siedenburg, J.

(2016)

Community-based cost benefit analysis. Findings from DFID Kenya’s Arid Lands Support Programme,

Evidence on Demand

Full Text

(Commissioned report)

(Published)


Siedenburg, J., Brown, S., Hoch, S.

(2016)

Voices from the field – carbon markets and rural poverty as seen from Madagascar and Mali,

in Climate and Development

8

(1)

pp. 10-25

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Siedenburg, J.

(2015)

Trialling demand-led climate finance in Ethiopia: Towards effective disbursement modalities,

in International Journal of Green Economics

9

(1)

pp. 77-93

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Siedenburg, J.

(2012)

No Regrets Options,

in Encyclopedia of Global Warming and Climate Change.

Sage

ISBN 9781412992619

Full Text

(Entry for encyclopedia/dictionary)

(Published)


Siedenburg, J., Martin, A., Mcguire, S.

(2012)

The power of 'farmer friendly' financial incentives to deliver climate smart agriculture: A critical data gap,

in Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences

9

(4)

pp. 201-217

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Siedenburg, J., Samessekou, O.

(2011)

Renewable energy: An innovative rural energy solution for Mali, with help from the carbon market,

in Appropriate Technology

38

(4)

pp. 62-66

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Siedenburg, J.

(2008)

Local knowledge and natural resource management in a peasant farming community facing rapid change: A critical examination,

UEA Repository

(Working paper)

(Published)


Siedenburg, J.

(2006)

The Machakos case study: Solid outcomes, unhelpful hyperbole,

in Development Policy Review

24

(1)

pp. 75-85

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Siedenburg, J. R.

(2005)

Critical knowledge differences and adaptation to shifting resource constraints: Evidence from Shinyanga District, Tanzania,

in Danish Journal of Geography

105

(1)

pp. 57-65

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

Jules’ research focuses on climate change and agriculture in developing countries, and how climate finance can  help vulnerable communities transition to sustainable, climate resilient livelihood pathways. This includes conducting applied research on understanding key constraints on selected pathways and possible ways to address these constraints. His research involves gathering empirical evidence using mixed methods, combining quantitative and qualitative data, and emphasising the voices of villagers and local practitioners.

One interest is how the ‘triple wins’ promised by climate-smart agriculture could be scaled up across vulnerable communities, i.e., beyond project areas. Another is examining edible algae as an innovative crop and food source for small-scale farmers and pastoralists who are vulnerable to climate change impacts and often food insecure. The focus follows repeated calls from the United Nations and others to find ways to unlock the potential of this promising technology. A third interest is identifying avenues for viable, pro-poor integration of small-scale farmers into climate resilient supply chains.