Biography

Prior to joining the School of International Development at UEA I was a lecturer with the Centre for Civil Society in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics.  I have also taught at the Institute for Commonwealth Studies in London, and have worked for the World Bank in their Poverty Reduction Research Group.  As a graduate student I interned for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Democratic National Committee.  I am currently guest faculty at the Centre for African Studies at the University of Copenhagen.  I have also served for the past five years on the governing council of the Development Studies Association.

 

Academic Background

I have BA in History from the University of Cambridge and an MA in International Relations from the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)  of Johns Hopkins University.  My PhD was in the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics.  My doctoral thesis was awarded the William Robson Memorial Prize.  After my PhD I took up a post-doctoral fellowship with the Danish Social Science Research Council before joining the University of East Anglia. 

All Publications

Jones, B.

(2017)

Looking Good: Mediatisation and International NGOs,

in European Journal of Development Research

29

(1)

pp. 176–191

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2013)

The making of meaning: Churches, development projects and violence in Eastern Uganda,

in Journal of Religion in Africa

43

(1)

pp. 74-95

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B., Juul Petersen, M.

(2013)

Beyond faith-based organizations: critiquing recent work on religion and development,

in Third World Quarterly

4

(1-2)

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B., Petersen, M.

(2011)

Instrumental, narrow, normative?: Reviewing recent work on religion and development,

in Third World Quarterly

32

(7)

pp. 1291-1306

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2011)

Colonialism and civil war: religion and violence in East Africa,

in The Blackwell Companion to Religion and Violence.

Wiley-Blackwell

pp. 498-510

ISBN 978-1405191319

UEA Repository

(Chapter)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2010)

Bridging the divide: reviewing the Katine community partnerships project,

UEA Repository

(Working paper)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2009)

Book review: African Pentecostalism: an introduction by O. Kalu,

in The Journal of Modern African Studies

47

(04)

pp. 632

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2008)

Beyond the state in rural Uganda,

Edinburgh University Press

ISBN 9780748635191

UEA Repository

(Book)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2007)

The Teso insurgency remembered: churches, burials and propriety,

in Africa

77

(04)

pp. 500-516

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2007)

Book review: Inside West Nile: Violence, History and Representation on an African Frontier by Mark Leopold,

in Cahiers d'Études africaines

47

(4)

pp. 188-190

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2007)

Book review: The Illusion of Cultural Identity by Jean-Franois Bayart,

in Nations and Nationalism

13

(2)

pp. 347-349

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2006)

Uganda,

in Encylopedia of Politics and Religion.

Congressional Quarterly Press

pp. 897-900

ISBN 978-0-87289-323-8

UEA Repository

(Chapter)

(Published)


Jones, B.

(2005)

The church in the village, the village in the church: Pentecostalism in Teso, Uganda,

in Cahiers d'Études africaines

(178)

pp. 497-517

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Jones, B., Lauterbach, K.

(2005)

Bringing religion back in: religious institutions and politics in Africa,

in Journal of Religion in Africa

35

(2)

pp. 239-243

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

Social Development, Civil Society; NGOs; Rural Livelihoods; Religion; Christianity; Pentecostalism; Local Politics; Government; Africa; Uganda; Teso.

Research Groups:
 Politics, Governance and the State

Research

I am currently part of a major research programme looking at the way different donor organisations make sense of their commitment to the norm of gender equality.  The programme is based at the Danish Institute for International Studies.  My case study looks at the World Bank and its changing relationship to the role of gender in development.  I am particularly interested in the way new methodologies in the field of development economics – impact evaluation, behavioural economics, randomized control trials – have changed the way the World Bank thinks about gender.

 

More broadly my work looks at institutions and their significance in processes of development and change.  I am particularly interested in organizations working at the local level such as churches, non-governmental organizations, courts, and institutions organized around family or social obligations and their relationship to government.  My regional expertise is on sub-Saharan Africa with a focus on the Teso region of eastern Uganda.  

 

I have discussed my work on the Teso region in a number of places, including Yale University’s Agrarian Studies Colloquium and Brown University’s International Advanced Research Institutes.  My book, Beyond the State in Rural Uganda, looks at the after-effects of a violent insurgency in the Teso region, and discusses the role of churches, burial groups and village courts in making sense of this history of violence.   It won the 2009 Elliott P. Skinner Book Award by the Africanist section of the American Anthropological Association.   Reviews of Beyond the State included the following:

'A refreshing and original antidote to the myopic habits of conventional scohlarsihp, an illuminating, astute, against-the-grain study of real-existing development', Prof. James C. Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science and Anthropology, Yale University.

I have written for The Guardian newspaper about their Katine development initiative, and have contributed to their Global Development website.  At present I am authoring a series of articles looking at the media, development and the particular experience of people living in Katine sub-county in the years after the project ended.

 

I welcome applications for doctoral research, with a particular interest in proposals that use ethnographic work to explore examples of political and social change in the developing world.  Please contact me by e-mail if you would like to discuss further.

 

Current PhD Students

Fariba Alamgir: Ethnicity, conflict and land in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (co-tutelle with the University of Copenhagen).  Fariba was awarded a writing-up grant by the Foundation for Urban and Regional Studies

Marc-André Boisvert: Military culture in Mali: tracing the coup and collapse of 2012 (UEA studentship)

Harry Greatorex: Patronage for revolutionaries: the politics of community organising in a Venezuelan township (ESRC studentship)

Stéphen Huard: Local politics and land in rural Myanmar (UEA Studentship)

Sugandha Nagpal: Gender, religion and migrant projects in rural Punjab (UEA studentship)

Samuel Rushworth: Learning to live together: education, identity and citizenship in Rwandan schools (ESRC studentship)

Brendan Whitty: Negotiating results: subject positions and discursive practices in DFID’s grant-giving (UEA studentship)

Hailing Zhao: The new politics of civil society in southern China (UEA studentship)

 

 

 

Completed PhD Students

Hannah Atkins: Contingent futures: navigating aspirations among the Banyole of Uganda (UEA studentship)

Juliet Colman: How social relations and identities are reconstituted through consumption in Botswana

Will Monteith: Power, negotiation, place: an ethnography of politics in Nakasero market, Kampala (UEA studentship).  Will was awarded a writing up grant by the British Institute for East Africa

Daniel Wroe: 'What can I do?’ Living with doubt and uncertainty in the Central Region of Malawi. (ESRC studentship)

Teaching Interests

I teach on the following modules:

  • Introduction to Social Anthropology (year 1) 
  • Sub-Saharan Africa (year 2)
  • Engaging Anthropology in Development (year 3)

I have also recently taken on responsibility for the Research Skills Workshop for first year PhD students along with Laura Camfield and Maren Duvendack.

I have taught at Copenhagen University, the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (University of London), Roskilde University and the London School of Economics.  I have also served as Guest Faculty on Brown University’s International Advanced Research Institute in “development and inequality in the global south”.