Making the best use of Kinematograph Weekly and its online index Making the best use of Kinematograph Weekly and its online index

This page aims to demonstrate to its reader how to best make use of the cinema managers' trade journal Kinematograph Weekly and its online index. The editorial changes to the content of the magazine over its eighty-year history, mirroring the changes in the British film industry, meant the form of the trade paper changed vastly throughout its run. For example an issue in 1915 could be in excess of two hundred pages long, while an issue from the mid-1940s averages a mere fifty pages including sections that were to become Kine Weekly standards on issues such as industry news, studio news, reviews for showmen, CEA proceedings, technical developments and showmanship reports. The first seventy years of Kine Weekly are also characterised by the density of the issues making them a daunting prospect for a researcher. By the 1960s, however, the issues had slimmed down to a modest twenty pages incorporating very distinct and clearly labelled sections on those established standards and new fields of interest and debate such as television and bowling.


The trade journal also published multiple supplements aimed at the more specific sections of cinema management. The Ideal Kinema, for example, is concerned with efficient management of a cinema and therefore includes contemporary advice and information for the cinema manager. This advice could be about technological developments, projection techniques, cinema architecture or a whole range of subjects that were concerning managers of the day. Another popular supplement was the Kine Sales and Catering Review which is fairly self-explanatory. It was launched in October 1953 after sugar had been removed from rationing and confectionery and soft drinks were being promoted as competitive industries. The Studio Review; Sub-standard Film: Commercial, Cultural and Industrial Review; and many promotional supplements for films, studios, anniversaries or cinemas were also published throughout Kine's run.


The organisation of Kine Weekly has remained loosely the same throughout its run. The front half is mainly concerned with industry news, incorporating editorial comments – including the longest running column in the Kine, Long Shots – news from across Britain, world news, union and organisation meeting reports – most often the CEA, the NATKE, the BFPA and the AIC – and company finances. The middle of the trade journal is taken up with film and cinema news including film reviews, release dates, trade show announcements and reports, box office news and production news. And finally comes any other news such as meeting reports, television news (1954-1971), appointments, etc. Each issue then finishes off with the showmanship section which is made up of film campaign reports sent in by cinema managers battling it out for the coveted Kine Company of Showmen awards or studio contests. This section also includes other showmanship issues such as reviews of, or suggestions for, organ music and records, discussion of studio campaign books, reviews of paperback publications (1960's) and any other showmanship-related gimmicks or ploys.


The Kine Weekly online index covers the years 1955 to the end of the publication in 1971. It also contains materials from the late 1890s [The Optical Magic Lantern Journal], early-1915, 1943 to mid-45 and January to June 1954.


The database is searchable by fields entitled Film; TV Programme; Organisation; Venue, Location; Person; Subject; Description; Section; Date; Issue no. You can search using one or more than one field These fields enable the researcher to conduct a closely defined or a broad search for their topic. To search for a film, for example, one need only type in the title (or any title the film was known as) to receive a full history of that film in the pages of Kine Weekly, the same applies to television programmes, members of the industry or organisations. Venues, such as cinemas, can be searched for by using both the Venue and the Location fields for the most effective result. For example, searching for the Gaumont, Coventry would be much more resourceful than single cinema searches as they would yield numerous results. The database can also be searched by Section so if industry gossip is the focus of the research typing Long Shots into this field will locate all the reports from the index, and as above used in conjunction with other fields can produce very specific results.


To successfully search the database the researcher must be aware that the index is made up of contemporary keywords, i.e. the index reflects the language used in Kine Weekly at the time. Having said that, the Subject field tries to give a broad topic outline for the researcher, for example when looking up cinemas the researcher may sub-divide the category into cinema architecture, cinema equipment or cinema lighting to name but a few. Because of the nature of some of the reports in Kine Weekly it's best to search both the Subject field and the Description field for key words or phrases for maximum benefit.


The online index provides a thorough and valuable research tool for those investigating cinema and film in Britain throughout the periods covered. It also provides the researcher with an easy-to-access introduction to the pages of Kine Weekly and the debates and issues discussed therein. So, whether the index is used as a specific tool to locate precise resources and information or as an introduction to the British cinema/film industry its value as a gateway to these materials is immense.

 

Database searching tips

When you first log into the database, all records (over 110,000 of them) are available to you for browsing one by one. Selecting the Next or Previous buttons or the Circled Arrow icon adjacent to them will move you through the database one record at a time. The given record number is displayed on the left of the screen. NOTE THAT the Rectangular Arrow button to the right of the record number is not functional in this version of the Web index.

Along the top of the page are a row of buttons. Table View displays 25 records at a time in tabular form. In this view the Next and Previous options move you through the index 25 records at a time. In Table View you will need to use the horizontal scroll bar to view a whole record. If you find a record of interest to you, select any field in the records and display will revert to Form View (you can also use the Form View button).

Selecting the Search button will produce a blank form for you to enter your search criteria (see below). Once you have done this select the Start Search button. The database will then return any records that match your criteria, initially in Table View. However, if you select Form View you will be able to see the selected records more easily, and browse through the selection one at a time using the Previous and Next options.

You can search for a particular record or a group of records. To find records, you specify search criteria (the values you want to find) in the Search page. A search examines all the records in the database and returns the search results, the set of records that matches the search criteria. The search results are displayed in Table View, but you can, as mentioned above, change to Form View.

To find a record or group of records:

1. On the search page, choose Match all words on page (AND) to find values that match all the search criteria in the same field or across fields. Choose Match any word on page (OR) to find vaules that match one or more search criteria in the same field or across fields.

See Search tips for more information.

2. Choose the type of search next to the field you want to search on.

3. For the field you want to search on, enter the search criteria.

To refine your search, you can type additional operators for the field you want to search. For example to find all the records that are between five and ten, type 5...10 directly into the Criteria field. See the table of operators for more information.

4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for as many fields as you want to search (for example, a specific last name and first name).

5. Click Start Search to search the database. The record or records are displayed in Table View.

6. If you need to reset the search criteria, select the Clear Form option.

 

Search tips

The Match all words on page (AND) and Match any words on page (OR) options search both inside and across fields.

 

To search for Select And type
All records about the British Broadcasting Corporation (but not other records containing the the words British or broadcasting or corporation in the Organisation field) Match all words on page (AND) British Broadcasting Corporation in the Organisation field
All records about the British Broadcasting Corporation and the Independent Television Authority (but not other records containing the words British or broadcasting or corporation or independent or television or authority in the Organisation field) Match all words on page (AND)  British Broadcasting Corporation Independent Television Authority  in the Organisation field (eg. try this in 1956)
All records about the British Broadcasting Corporation and the Independent Television Authority (as well as other records containing the words British or broadcasting or corporation or independent or television or authority in the Organisation field) Match any word on page (OR)  British Broadcasting Corporation Independent Television Authority  in the Organisation field
All records about the promotion of Mary Poppins Match all records on the page (AND)  Mary Poppins in the Film field and promotion in the Subject field (for example try this in 1965)

 

 

Note You cannot combine AND / OR searches on a page.

 

You can refine your search by using the following operators inside the field. For example:

 

To find values that are Use this operator Example
Less than what you type next < <40
finds all records less than 40
Less than or equal to what you type next <= <=05:00:00
finds all the records less than or equal to 05:00
Greater than what you type next > >=05:00:00
finds all the records after 05:00
Greater than or equal what you type next >= >=Smith
finds all the records whose name is "Smith" and all records alphabetically after "Smith"
An exact match, although the fields may contain other values =(before criteria)

=Smith
finds all records where the name is "Smith" including "John Smith" but not "Smithson"

 

An exact match, in the order you specify, and the field contains no other values == (before criteria) ==Smith
finds all the records where the name is "Smith" but not "John Smith" or "Smithson"
One unknown or variable text character @

@on
finds all the records that have 3 characters and end in "on" like "Don"

Zero or more unknown or variable text characters * *smith*
finds all the records that have "smith" in the name, like, "Smithson" , "Blacksmith"
Literal text in a field (to find characters that aren't searched, such as "," " " ", Ltd."
finds all the records that have ", Ltd."
Empty fields (for example records of unfulfilled orders) = =
finds all the records that have no values