Biography

I am currently a post-doctoral research associate at the University of East Anglia (UEA), working on the glider data obtained as part of the OSMOSIS project (Ocean Surface Mixing Ocean Submesoscale Interaction Study).  OSMOSIS aims to develop new, physically-based parameterisations of processes that deepen and shoal the ocean surface boundary layer.  I am involved in processing, calibration and interpretation of the data.  I will examine the water masses found in the area and assess the relative importance of advection.  The Seaglider data will be used to assess the structure and evolution of the ocean surface boundary layer over the seasonal cycle, examine particular case studies of deepening/shoaling events, study the impact of the physics on the biogeochemistry, and ask the question of whether biological activity could be used as a marker for physical change.

All Publications

Damerell, G., Heywood, K., Thompson, A., Binetti, U., Kaiser, J.

(2016)

The vertical structure of upper ocean variability at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain during 2012-2013,

in Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans

121

(5)

pp. 3075–3089

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Thompson, A., Lazar, A., Buckingham, C., Naveira Garabato, A. C., Damerell, G., Heywood, K.

(2016)

Open-ocean submesoscale motions: A full seasonal cycle of mixed layer instabilities from gliders,

in Journal of Physical Oceanography

46

pp. 1285–1307

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Buckingham, C., Naveira Garabato, A. C., Thompson, A., Brannigan, L., Lazar, A., Marshall, D. P., Nurser, A. G., Damerell, G., Heywood, K., Belcher, S. E.

(2016)

Seasonality of submesoscale flows in the ocean surface boundary layer,

in Geophysical Research Letters

43

(5)

pp. 2118–2126

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Hemsley, V. S., Smyth, T., Martin, A., Frajka-Williams, E., Thompson, A., Damerell, G., Painter, S. C.

(2015)

Estimating oceanic primary production using vertical irradiance and chlorophyll profiles from ocean gliders in the North Atlantic,

in Environmental Science and Technology

49

(19)

pp. 11612–11621

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Damerell, G., Heywood, K., Stevens, D.

(2013)

Direct observations of the antarctic circumpolar current transport on the northern flank of the Kerguelen Plateau,

in Journal of Geophysical Research

118

(3)

pp. 1333-1348

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Frants, M., Damerell, G. M., Gille, S. T., Heywood, K. J., Mackinnon, J., Sprintall, J.

(2013)

An assessment of density-based fine-scale methods for estimating diapycnal diffusivity in the Southern Ocean,

in Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology

30

pp. 2647-2661

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Damerell, G., Heywood, K., Stevens, D., Naveira Garabato, A. C.

(2012)

Temporal Variability of Diapycnal Mixing in Shag Rocks Passage,

in Journal of Physical Oceanography

42

pp. 370-385

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

My current reseach involves working on the Seaglider observations for the OSMOSIS project.  The gliders measure temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, dive-averaged currents, chlorophyll fluorescence, CDOM fluorescence and PAR.  I am involved in calibration and interpretation of the data, including assessing the structure and evolution of the ocean surface boundary layer over the seasonal cycle, examining particular case studies of deepening/shoaling events and their impact on the biogeochemistry, and examining the temporal variability, in particular, the first observations in this region of intraseasonal variability below 150 m, which dominates the variability in the heat content of the upper ocean here.

 

The research for my PhD centred around diapycnal mixing in the Southern Ocean calculated from CTD and LADCP data using finescale parameterization methods, and modification of these methods to produce diffusivity time series from moored ADCP data.  I was involved in an assessment of finescale parameterization and Thorpe length scale methods for XCTD data, as part of the DIMES project (Diapycnal and Isopycnal Mixing Experiment in the Southern Ocean), in conjunction with collegues at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego.  I also used hydrographic survey data collected around the Kerguelen plateau as part of the SOFine project (Southern Ocean Fine Structure) to study transport in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.