Social Work

BA SOCIOLOGY

Key details 

BA SOCIOLOGY

Start Year
2022
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
L302
Entry Requirements
BBB

Year 1

In your first year you will study five compulsory modules which will develop your understanding of sociology and create a foundation from which you can shape your sociological interests. 

You will discover how sociology has developed. You will grapple with how concepts have been created, and the contested nature of knowledge. You will be introduced to the process of research and evidence. The final two compulsory modules will introduce you to the themes covered in the four pathways introduced in year two. This includes exploring your module options for years two, three and four. 

You will experience a range of assessment methods which are used to check your progress and ensure your academic development. These include coursework essays, reports, projects, presentations and examinations. 

You will experience a range of assessment methods which are used to check your progress and ensure your academic development. These include coursework essays, reports, projects, presentations and examinations.   

You will be assessed based on coursework and, for some modules, project and examination results. For each module you will have the chance to undertake ‘formative’ work which will help you to develop the skills you need to approach the assignments. Your final year includes an assessment through a dissertation which allows you to carry out an in-depth exploration of a sociological issue which you find fascinating. 

The balance of assessment by coursework and exam depends on the modules you choose, but on average Level 4 is 80 percent coursework and 20 percent exam, Level 5 is 80 percent coursework and 20 percent exam and Level 6 is 100 percent coursework, but depends on optional modules chosen . Coursework activities include academic assignments, group presentations and project work.  

Feedback 

You will get feedback on formative work to help you improve your work in areas such as your use of evidence and argument before your final formal or “summative” assignments. Feedback on summative work will help you to reflect on your learning so you can build your knowledge and skills as you progress through the degree. We encourage you to discuss your feedback with your tutors so you can monitor your progress and take on helpful advice. 

Teaching 

The academic year consists of two semesters. A typical module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars each week. While lectures are attended by all students taking a specific module, seminars are held in smaller groups where you can interact more directly with the tutor and your peers to address and discuss different topics. 

Academic advising 

Throughout your studies you’ll have an adviser who will be able to support and advise you on your studies and developing career ambitions. 

Independent study 

Alongside your taught sessions you’ll be required to work independently, and with your peers in groups. Lecturers will ask you to complete preparatory reading and tasks and bring these with you to sessions. You’ll also be required to submit formative work, where lecturers will give you feedback to help you improve, and summative work, which contributes to your overall mark. Your independent study tasks are designed by the course team to help you to develop as an independent and self-regulated learner.

Compulsory Modules (120 credits)

Code: SOL-4002A  Credits: 20
This module introduces two of the pathways that begin in years 2 and 3 of your degree: the sociology of children and families; and the sociology of social change. The lectures will provide you with an overview of some of the general concepts and ideas within each of these two pathways, to help inform your decision-making for your optional modules. The first part of the module will explore the sociology of childhood and of family life, whilst the second half of the module will examine inequality and social justice issues within society.

Code: SOL-4003Y  Credits: 40
This module provides you with an introduction to the justification for researching social life, the different forms of evidence which can be gathered and the practical processes of social inquiry. You will work collaboratively to consider problem based practical activities such as observing people, interviewing and developing questionnaires. You will use these techniques to address topical questions and gain first hand experience of different research methods.

Code: SOL-4004B  Credits: 20
This module introduces students to the second two pathways: criminology; and digital sociology. This will include a series of lectures introducing you to criminological theories and a series of lectures on digital and political sociology.

Code: PPLX4053A  Credits: 20
This module is about the role of the individual within society and the ways in which society shapes our lives. It considers a range of contemporary and classical sociological theories in making sense of social identities and formations as well as forms of interaction.

Code: SOL-4001B  Credits: 20
The module introduces you to key concepts in social sciences. As such this module forms an important stepping-stone to the applied modules that follow in years 2 and 3. You will be encouraged to comprehend, evaluate and compare the major perspectives in sociology and a number of key theories in psychology, and begin to use these perspectives as tools for understanding the kinds of psychosocial problems that exist in society. The module requires you to explore and reflect on key societal contexts which influence individuals' daily lives, eg demographic changes and socio-economic structures, including age, gender, cultural diversity and different ethnicities. A central theme will be the interaction of 'self' and social context. The learning from the teaching and wider reading will be applied to real life situations.

 

Year 2

In your second year you will study compulsory modules designed to consolidate your core understanding of sociology. 

All students will study qualitative methods. We also offer students a choice of engaging with quantitative ideas and social statistics . You can of course take both qualitative and quantitative modules if you wish to ensure you have a broad methodological grounding. 

In addition to your compulsory modules you have the opportunity to choose from a range of options, within the four pathways, from childhood through to political ideas, the media, wellbeing, and crime. 

These specialist modules are arranged and designed to enable you to create specific routes through the degree. You will be encouraged to consider how these pathways may relate to your career plans. 

You will experience a range of assessment methods which are used to check your progress and ensure your academic development. These include coursework essays, reports, projects, presentations and examinations. 

You will experience a range of assessment methods which are used to check your progress and ensure your academic development. These include coursework essays, reports, projects, presentations and examinations.   

You will be assessed based on coursework and, for some modules, project and examination results. For each module you will have the chance to undertake ‘formative’ work which will help you to develop the skills you need to approach the assignments. Your final year includes an assessment through a dissertation which allows you to carry out an in-depth exploration of a sociological issue which you find fascinating. 

The balance of assessment by coursework and exam depends on the modules you choose, but on average Level 4 is 80 percent coursework and 20 percent exam, Level 5 is 80 percent coursework and 20 percent exam and Level 6 is 100 percent coursework, but depends on optional modules chosen . Coursework activities include academic assignments, group presentations and project work.  

Feedback 

You will get feedback on formative work to help you improve your work in areas such as your use of evidence and argument before your final formal or “summative” assignments. Feedback on summative work will help you to reflect on your learning so you can build your knowledge and skills as you progress through the degree. We encourage you to discuss your feedback with your tutors so you can monitor your progress and take on helpful advice. 

Teaching 

The academic year consists of two semesters. A typical module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars each week. While lectures are attended by all students taking a specific module, seminars are held in smaller groups where you can interact more directly with the tutor and your peers to address and discuss different topics. 

Academic advising 

Throughout your studies you’ll have an adviser who will be able to support and advise you on your studies and developing career ambitions. 

Independent study 

Alongside your taught sessions you’ll be required to work independently, and with your peers in groups. Lecturers will ask you to complete preparatory reading and tasks and bring these with you to sessions. You’ll also be required to submit formative work, where lecturers will give you feedback to help you improve, and summative work, which contributes to your overall mark. Your independent study tasks are designed by the course team to help you to develop as an independent and self-regulated learner. 

Compulsory Modules (40 credits)

Code: SOL-5001A  Credits: 20
This module aims to provide you with the opportunity to develop further research skills using a number of qualitative approaches. In particular the module will examine analytical approaches including phenomenology, grounded theory, narrative analysis, and critical discourse analysis. Participatory research methods and mobile/visual/creative methods will also be explored, as these are becoming more commonly used to explore diverse social phenomena within society. This module outlines the potential for students to review qualitative approaches in different sociological research studies, and then apply such methods in a brief project of their choice. The main aim of this module is to enable students to demonstrate how to use diverse qualitative and participatory methods in their research.

Code: PPLX5162B  Credits: 20
Political systems around the world are facing profound challenges and transformations. Established democracies in Europe and North America have seen the rise of populism, as marked by election of Donald Trump in the USA, the Brexit referendum in the UK or Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil. Democracy has also been in retreat in many states which democratised or partly democratised after the cold war such as Russia and Poland. At the same time, autocratic regimes in the Middle East and North Africa have come under pressure, with movements such as the Arab Spring signalling aspirations amongst many people for a more democratic system of governance. Meanwhile, there are new threats to democracy worldwide posed by the spread of 'dark money' in election campaigns and online misinformation. This module provides you with a critical understanding of how political systems vary around the world and the pressures facing them. It begins by focusing on the drivers of democratisation. It then proceeds to consider how political institutions such as the executive, legislature and the degree of decentralisation vary - and the effects that this has. Finally, we consider new trends in citizen's voting behaviour at the ballot box and pressure groups campaigning for change. You'll gain a critical awareness of current debates in comparative politics and develop key skills including critical evaluation, analytical investigation, written presentation, and oral communication.

 

Options Range A

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Code: DEV-5001A   Credits: 20
This interdisciplinary module will begin by exploring the various approaches to understanding gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The module then applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: gender analysis of economic growth, divisions of labour and incomes, land and property rights, environmental change, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence and religion.

Code: DEV-5003A  Credits: 20
This module provides you with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will begin by introducing you to some key policy themes in education and international development, and some established theories such as human capital, human development and capabilities, and theory on education as social reproduction. The module then goes into more depth with thematic content on themes such as early childhood development, conflict, gender and difference.

Code: DEV-5004A  Credits: 20
On this module you’ll learn the concepts and debates that are fundamental to social anthropology, and their relationships with development and change. The teaching methods on this module include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. Topics you’ll cover include economic anthropology, ecological anthropology, personhood, embodiment, the anthropology of talk, identity and gender, cultural rights, technical change and the anthropology of development.

Code: EDUB5013A  Credits: 20
This module will explore key ideas, contemporary issues and notions of 'risk' within the context of childhood, youth and transitions. It will draw on psychological and sociological theories to consider the role of education within these areas. This module aims to provide you with: - Knowledge and understanding of the sociology and psychology relating to transitions within childhood and youth sectors; - A theoretical understanding of notions of 'risk' and transition; - An analytical understanding of educational and social policy, provision and practice relating to childhood and youth sectors; - A critical understanding of contemporary issues for children and young people.

Code: HUM-5007A  Credits: 20
How do notions of gender and sexuality shape culture, and how are in turn our understanding and experiences of gender and sexuality shaped by cultural production? How important are other times, places and identifications – associated with class, race, ethnicity – to these understandings and experiences? And to what extent can a film, an image, a testimony, or a place capture such complexity? Addressing these questions from an interdisciplinary approach, the aim of the module is to explore the ways in which gender and sexuality are constituted through a broad array of experiences, practices, and cultural products. The module focuses on issues raised in classical and contemporary research in history, politics, media, cultural studies and visual cultures such as: representation and cultural production; subjectivity; identity; identification; bodies and embodiment; performance and performativity; among others. Overall, by exploring theory in conjunction with queer cultural production that explores questions of power, identity, and desire across different racial, national, and cultural landscapes, the module aims to problematise how gender and sexuality are not stable identities or classifications but are instead processes involving normalisations, hierarchies and relations of domination that can be challenged, troubled and/or queered.

Code: LAW-5031A  Credits: 20
This module will introduce students to the concept of crime and will cover a range of fundamental ideas and concepts that are important to the study of Criminology. These include how crime is defined and perceived; the prevalence, patterns and impact of crime in society and ways in which crime prevention and punishment are conceptualised. PLEASE NOTE THIS MODULE WILL BE RUNNING FROM 2021/22

Code: PPLL5170A  Credits: 20
Do accents define us? Do we need to change how we speak depending on who we are speaking to? Is language sexist? These are key questions to consider when think about sociolinguistics, the study of language and society. After all, Language is a powerful thing, an aspect of human behaviour that both defines and reflects the cultural norms of different societies. Our aim is to provide an introduction to sociolinguistics and throughout the module you will discover a wealth of different approaches to analysing language in relations to many different social variables, such as class, gender or social distance. You’ll gain a firm grounding in sociolinguistic frameworks, methods and concepts, and also learn how to communicate linguistic ideas, principles and theories by written, oral and visual means. You’ll begin with an overview of the field of sociolinguistics and key social variables. You’ll then delve deeper, uncovering core concepts such as dialectology, Code-switching, genderlects, language policy, multilingualism, and interpersonal dynamics. By looking at the different methods and types of evidence used by sociolinguists, you’ll become proficient in the different ways of working in this fascinating subject. Learning will be through a mixture of seminars and self-directed study. Seminars will include practical opportunities to practice your skills in linguistic analysis. You’ll be assessed though coursework (100%), but will present your research for your coursework during the module as part of the formative assessment. The module is open to anyone interested in learning more about sociolinguistics, and you do not need to be studying a language to take this module – just have an interest in language and how we use it. On successful completion of the module, you’ll have the knowledge and skills to take your understanding of language and society, and how we communication and interpret this communication, and apply it to many different areas of study. You’ll develop your research, writing and presentation skills. And you’ll be able to communicate your ideas more effectively, putting your thinking to the test by sharing it with others.

Code: PPLM5002A  Credits: 20
Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. You will examine both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media and sociology, politics and cultural studies, you will explore the relationship between feminist theory and activism.

Code: PPLM5053A  Credits: 20
For better or worse, digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide you with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media.

Code: PPLX5047A  Credits: 20
How do scientists in the fields of political science, media, and international relations actually perform their research? How do they know what they claim to know? How can we use scientific methods to study the political and social world? Throughout the module, you will learn how do evaluate research, and more importantly, how to perform your own research using scientific methods. You will acquire knowledge of the theory and practice of a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. You will acquire a variety of skills - computerised data analysis, interviewing, observation, focus groups, taking fieldwork notes, and report writing. We will begin by examining ways of thinking about the world, developing ideas and hypotheses, and ways of testing them. We will explore a variety of ways to examine these hypotheses using a variety of basic quantitative/statistical methods. We will then explore a variety of qualitative, in-depth methods, of collecting and analyzing data such as interviewing and focus groups. You do not need to have any mathematical background to follow this module.

Code: SOL-5002A  Credits: 20
This module will explore the sociological concept of ‘family’ and how this is understood within a life course discourse. Specifically, this will examine how notions of ‘family’ have changed markedly from post war Britain. We will discuss the importance of the ‘family’ as a sociological construct and as an institution over which the Government relies greatly, but has very little direct control. We will examine how time has changed the structure of the family. We will examine the role that marriage/civil partnerships play in family life, and consider how the state understands single parent families, ‘blended families’, Lesbian and gay families, and families that foster/adopt. One of the key theses affecting all families is ‘transitions’ and this will be explored as a concept through the life course. We will also consider the role that family plays for older adults during their later years, and the impact that this has on the state’s role. We will look at gender and the family, and ethnicity and family in modern Britain. Finally, we will consider ‘intimacy’ within family life, particularly in relation to relationships, sex and notions of ‘belonging’, as well as violence and abuse.​​​​​

Code: SOL-5003A  Credits: 20
This module gives students the opportunity to explore some of the key factors through which personal and social diversity and oppression may be experienced, including race and ethnicity, gender and disability, and other protected characteristics. We will reflect on these dimensions through the lens of our own lives and experiences and gain confidence in managing our own opinions and emotions in professional contexts. We will also explore a number of contemporary social contexts in which some of these equality and diversity issues have clashed and examine some of the political and social responses to these.

 

Options Range B

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Code: DEV-5019B  Credits: 20
This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors’ intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. Although open to all students it is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

Code: EDUB5015B  Credits: 20
This module aims to provide you with an understanding to the background and legislation influencing special educational needs education. It will enable you to identify historical, social, cultural and political considerations and to understand key issues related to the education of children with special educational needs. Drawing primarily on social, psychological and educational perspectives you will develop a critical approach to analysing special educational needs policy and reflect on how contemporary issues and the current Special Educational Needs Code of Practice is being put into practice in Early Years and Primary Settings. The module is underpinned by a reflection on our attitudes towards children and challenges of inclusion. It is expected that by completing this module, you will be able to: 1. Identify, outline and critically examine key legislation, regulations and codes of practice in relation to supporting children/young people with special needs and disabilities; 2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the strategies for intervention and the impact of the assessment process on children, their parents and their settings; 3. Demonstrate a critical understanding of current inclusive educational policies and practices within settings; 4. Identify and develop strategies that overcome barriers to learning in a range of educational contexts; 5. Reflect on your own values in relation to children and special educational needs; 6. Demonstrate individually and/or cooperatively a range of problem- solving and reasoning skills, ethics, synthesis, communication and presentation of information. It is expected that by completing this module, you will be able to: • consider the historical and cultural background to current government policy regarding Special Educational Needs; • have an understanding of the SEN Code of Practice and assessment process; • have an understanding of the range of provision and professional support available; • consider the implications of the assessment process on children, their parents and their settings.

Code: EDUB5017B  Credits: 20
The aim of this module is: To help students consider the complex relationship between language and learning, the implications this relationship has for teaching, and how education-policy has addressed some issues to do with language and 'literacy'. By the end of the course it is hoped you will better understand: a) key issues surrounding the learning and/or teaching of reading, writing, talking and listening in English; b) the importance for learning of different kinds of talk in classrooms; c) contrasting approaches to understanding and teaching 'literacy'; d) how the language of formal education can construct particular views of the child. Content: Through seminars, mini-lectures, student presentations and creative work you will meet and investigate some ideas and theories to do with language and learning in English, and some educational policy related to this. Why isn't teaching just a matter of telling, and learning just a matter of listening? How do children learn, or teach themselves, to read, write and talk? Whose English (spoken and written) counts in formal education, who says, and why? If new technologies are changing English, what are the implications for formal education? And how might your language create your identity as well as express it?

Code: EDUB5018B  Credits: 20
The spread in the teaching and learning of English as a Second Language is huge across the world and we refer to English as an ‘international language’. What exactly does this mean and what are the implications for teaching and learning this language? In this module you’ll focus on the complexity of approaches to teaching and learning English as a second language. You’ll learn about Language Awareness skills (i.e. how language works), explore some second language learning and teaching theories, and identify and critically appraise trends and issues that have resulted in specific learning, teaching and assessment practices. During the module, you’ll be encouraged to reflect and draw upon your own second language experiences and attitudes to second language learning and the challenges faced in becoming proficient. You’ll also learn some teaching techniques so that if you wish to go on to be an English as a second language teacher, you will have gained some basic practical skills. Your knowledge and understanding will develop through a mixture of lecture input, seminars, group work, pair work, microteaching and self-directed study. Through following and studying this module you’ll develop understanding about the principles and practice of teaching and learning English as a second language, and be able to communicate your ideas about the place of English as an ‘international language’.

Code: LAW-5032B  Credits: 20
This module considers key theoretical perspectives in criminology, drawing upon this foundational knowledge to understand and explain different kinds of criminal behaviour, and society’s response to them. It considers how crime is defined and researched, situating the criminal law in social context. The aim of the module is to introduce students to the study of criminology, and to engage students in critical discussions of how crime is defined and by whom; why criminal behaviour is an enduring feature of contemporary liberal societies; and society's response to crime. The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of: • key theoretical and empirical issues in criminology; • the value of theory in explaining patterns of crime and criminalisation. • the nexus between criminological theory and criminal justice policy in relation to specific case study examples.

Code: PPLM5003B  Credits: 20
What role do media and communication play in processes of globalisation? How is an ever more global media creating cultural change? In this module you will explore the cultural implications of global media and culture by investigating audience practices and media representations. It begins by introducing the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation, before examining how these work in practice. Indicative topics include the power of global branding, global celebrity culture, global publics and local audiences, transnational cultures, and representations of migration.

Code: PPLM5042B  Credits: 20
How do the media shape how we see ourselves? Or indeed how others see us? In a world of social media, self-branding and the increasing importance of mediated forms of identity, on this module you will explore critical ways of thinking about the relationship between culture, media and the self. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module asks you to use research methods from autoethnography to content analysis to explore both their own identities and the way in which identities more broadly are formulated through contemporary media culture. Through discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, you will critically reflect upon the relationship between media culture and social power and consider how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, you should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption. Assessment is by group presentation and independent research project.

Code: PPLX5159B  Credits: 20
This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th & 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

Code: PSY-5014B  Credits: 20
This module explores a range of contemporary applications of psychological science. Theoretical approaches and research will be covered alongside examples from popular media, films, current events, and case studies.​​​​​

Code: SOL-5005B  Credits: 20
This module will enable you to apply sociological and psychological theories around child development to a child, by organising and taking part in a series of observations of a young child in a nursery setting. This will enable you to become familiar with: the social life of a child within a nursery setting; children’s play – based learning approaches; role modelling behaviours; the role of boundaries as a driver to change behaviour; gender based issues in their natural environments. The psychological theories that students will learn about include cognitive theories, psychoanalytical theories, behavioural and social learning theories, evolutionary developmental theory etc. The Sociological theories includes theories of socialisation, sociology of childhood, dominant discourses on contemporary childhood, sociocultural systems theory etc. This module uses Observations as a key strategy to discover how young children interact and make sense of their world in their natural setting. It gives students the opportunity to critically explore some key dichotomies in the social sciences around the relationships, between biology and society, nature and nurture and the individual and society. Students are furthermore encouraged to adopt a critical stance when exploring this notion of ‘traditional development’, taking into consideration how children were subjected to standard measures of testing (Piaget’s intelligence testing, the Strange Situation), whereby their progress is continually contrasted against the yardstick of a ‘normal’ child based on ‘normal’ expectations of childhood within western societies, particularly Europe and the United States (Woodhead, 1999); the role of interventions to get them back on this path of development is also considered.

Code: SOL-5006B  Credits: 20
This module examines offending and justice for female offenders compared to male offenders. Specific topic areas will vary but are likely to cover pathways into offending, the complex relationship between offending and victimisation for women and girls, offenses committed by women and girls—ranging from status offenses (e.g. running away from home) to theft and shoplifting, against the person crimes and participation in gangs—experiences within the criminal justice system and, finally, desistance from offending. Theoretical perspectives drawn upon will include sociology, feminist criminology, and intersectionality, particularly the interplay between gender, age, class, socioeconomic status, race, and sexual orientation. Theoretical approaches and research will be covered alongside examples from popular media, film, current events, and case studies.

Code: SOL-5007B  Credits: 20
Social policy traditionally focuses on the ‘five giants’ of welfare: poverty, health, housing, education and unemployment. This module will consider these and enable students to explore key concepts and sociological theories that underpin the analysis and practice of social policy. In addition, students will be asked to analyse a number of current social problems in their societal context, such as: social justice and inequality; needs and rights; vulnerability; citizenship as well as substantive issues such as migration, demography and labour markets. Students will be asked to consider how and why services do or do not meet the needs of specific groups, such as children, disabled people, women, older people, or members of minority ethnic groups, and the role that social policy can play in addressing this.

 

Year 3

In the third year you will complete a compulsory dissertation which will enable you to explore an area of sociology which you are particularly enthusiastic about. . 

In addition to your dissertation you will also take a range of modules which further advance your specialist knowledge and are designed to help you prepare for developing a constructive and stimulating career

You will experience a range of assessment methods which are used to check your progress and ensure your academic development. These include coursework essays, reports, projects, presentations and examinations. 

You will experience a range of assessment methods which are used to check your progress and ensure your academic development. These include coursework essays, reports, projects, presentations and examinations.   

You will be assessed based on coursework and, for some modules, project and examination results. For each module you will have the chance to undertake ‘formative’ work which will help you to develop the skills you need to approach the assignments. Your final year includes an assessment through a dissertation which allows you to carry out an in-depth exploration of a sociological issue which you find fascinating. 

The balance of assessment by coursework and exam depends on the modules you choose, but on average Level 4 is 80 percent coursework and 20 percent exam, Level 5 is 80 percent coursework and 20 percent exam and Level 6 is 100 percent coursework, but depends on optional modules chosen . Coursework activities include academic assignments, group presentations and project work.  

Feedback 

You will get feedback on formative work to help you improve your work in areas such as your use of evidence and argument before your final formal or “summative” assignments. Feedback on summative work will help you to reflect on your learning so you can build your knowledge and skills as you progress through the degree. We encourage you to discuss your feedback with your tutors so you can monitor your progress and take on helpful advice. 

Teaching 

The academic year consists of two semesters. A typical module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars each week. While lectures are attended by all students taking a specific module, seminars are held in smaller groups where you can interact more directly with the tutor and your peers to address and discuss different topics. 

Academic advising 

Throughout your studies you’ll have an adviser who will be able to support and advise you on your studies and developing career ambitions. 

Independent study 

Alongside your taught sessions you’ll be required to work independently, and with your peers in groups. Lecturers will ask you to complete preparatory reading and tasks and bring these with you to sessions. You’ll also be required to submit formative work, where lecturers will give you feedback to help you improve, and summative work, which contributes to your overall mark. Your independent study tasks are designed by the course team to help you to develop as an independent and self-regulated learner. 

Compulsory Modules (20 credits)

Code: SOL-6001Y  Credits: 20
The dissertation is an extended piece of writing which enables students to explore in depth a sociological issue of concern for them. There is a free choice of topic, subject to the approval of the module leader. Students may, for example, choose a topic, which has interested them throughout the course, which they now want to explore in greater depth, or they may identify a contemporary issue which they feel needs further exploration. The topic must lend itself to completion within the total word limit of 8000 words. The dissertation can be a review of the literature on a given topic, or a small empirical piece of work.

 

Options Range A

Students will select 40-60 credits from the following modules:

Code: DEV-6003A  Credits: 20
Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of Wars & Humanitarian Crises is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; and strategies and challenges of peace-building.

Code: EDUB6003A  Credits: 20
The module will explore different understandings of ‘childhood’ and the implications of these. It will challenge taken-for-granted understandings, through using different lenses to look at childhood – for example, social, historical or legal/political lenses will show us different ways of thinking about ‘what is a child’, some of these contradictory. There will be lectures to attend, group activities to participate in, movies/documentaries to watch and biographies to analyse and present. By exploring the constructed nature of childhood, we hope you will develop a deeper understanding of how childhood is a diverse and multi-layered concept, and thus how working with a child/children becomes a complex activity, and how it comes to be shaped by a number of social, cultural and historical factors.

Code: HUM-6006A  Credits: 20
The transnational movement of bodies, images, and capital has transformed modern conceptualisations of gender and sexuality. Sexual practices, identities, and subcultural formations have been altered through processes of migration and globalisation, as well as by the advent of new media technologies and the wide-reaching circulation of categories such as gay, lesbian, and transgender. In this context, this module aims to situate categories of gender and sexual difference within specific cultural and political contexts, and investigate non-normative gender and sexual formations in relation to emerging discourses on race and class and to anti-colonial theories of modernity and global capitalism. At the centre of the module sit questions such as: How have queer subjects been incorporated into nationalist projects and consumer culture? How has the liberal framework of human rights reshaped the struggles of queer movements outside the West? In what ways have transnational discourses on multiculturalism reshaped notions of queer community and belonging in global cities and in postcolonial metropolitan spaces? What role have media technologies and various forms of visual culture played in the reconstitution of gender and sexual identities and of representations of queer desire, affect, and kinship? Addressing these questions from an interdisciplinary perspective, and drawing on case studies from different geographical regions and from different disciplinary fields, the overall aim of the module is to explore the varied ways local histories and geographies interact with the forces of political, economic, and cultural globalisation, focusing especially on the experiences of sexual minorities in the Global South and of queer diasporas in the Global North.

Code: PPLM6078A  Credits: 20
Today's political world is more than ever influenced by digital technologies, from innovative social movements to 'fake news' and digital election campaigns. We will explore how the technologies influence political processes and how political processes in turn influence technology. We will examine the impact of digital media on electoral politics, examining key election campaigns (including recent UK and US elections) and the impact of social media, big data, and targeted advertising on their results. We will investigate how social movements (from Black Lives Matter to the Alt-Right) have been transformed through their use of digital networks. We will navigate the world of online politics, with a particular focus on the new culture wars being fought out in online environments. Finally we will explore the politics of the everyday, and the political effects of the technology platforms on which we live our online lives.

Code: PPLX6066A  Credits: 20
Would an ideal society have no more crime? Who would be wealthy? Would politics be outlawed? Do utopians wish to impose their views on the rest of us? This module explores questions such as these, which are central to political and social theory, through the prism of selected utopian and dystopian novels and other utopian texts ranging from Thomas More’s Utopia (1516) to the present. It focuses on themes such as property, social control, gender, work, the environment and politics. A major question which the module addresses is the political significance and effects of utopian ideas - often derided as frivolous or impractical in their own time - and the historical role of utopian ideas in political theory and social reform. This module is a 20-credit version of Better Worlds? Utopias and Dystopias.

Code: SOL-6002A  Credits: 20
This module specifically examines the concept of the family within the 21st century and discusses how it has changed as a structural form. Whilst families have generally become more diverse, there are still strong ‘normative’ ideologies present within society that can create significant tensions within individuals, families and communities. We will present research which explores a number of these tensions by examining: the role of fathers in family life; lesbian and gay families; the role of fostering and adoption; an examination of trans families through the life course; the experiences of ethnic minority families, and other contemporary issues.

Code: SOL-6003A  Credits: 20
This module explores power and crime, focusing upon exploitation and the relationships between crime and inequality in the context of adolescence and young adulthood. Three facets of exploitation—victimisation, offending, and justice—will be explored though offences involving young people such as social media, sexual exploitation, sex work, against the person crimes, knife crime and country lines. Theory will be drawn from sociology, developmental/ social psychology, and criminology and will explore concepts such as the relationship between early adverse experiences and maltreatment and later offending/victimisation, differences between criminalisation and offending, agency and victimhood, and children in care who become involved in offending. The module will include learning about programmes and interventions designed to promote resilience and create turning points. Theoretical approaches and research will be covered alongside case studies.

 

Options Range B

Students will select 40-60 credits from the following modules:

Code: DEV-6011B  Credits: 20
This module builds upon key themes in the politics of development that recur throughout the politics-related modules in DEV: distributions of power and resources, geographies of poverty and inequality, and dynamics of social and political change. The module mixes lectures with student led sessions that are intended to provide space for students to draw out their experiences of development in practice, and to think through concrete strategies for making human society a little less unequal, violent, and destructive. Students are encouraged to approach ‘development’ as a ‘relational whole’, and to think critically about the complex and often contradictory nature of change. The module culminates in a workshop in which groups of students will present strategies for fostering more equitable processes of social change.

Code: EDUB6002B  Credits: 20
You will critically consider the relationship between media and education, considering what effect the media has in shaping knowledge, what role education plays in supporting media narratives, and how media and education influence cultural and social issues. You will draw upon current social and cultural issues and explore how these issues are shaped and discussed through the intersecting narratives of media and education. You will consider and reflect on current topics that may include issues around gender, sexuality, religion, youth, class, and sport.

Code: PPLM6079B  Credits: 20
How do grassroots and third sector organisations campaign for social and political change? Rather than pose this as an abstract question, you will partner with existing organisations to conduct campaigns on specific issues such as climate change, tax avoidance or gender inequality. You will receive a brief from a partner organisation and be supported in planning, devising, and carrying out activities that will achieve the aims of the brief. Taught content will include strategies for both online and offline activism, analysing power relations at different scales, and ways of assessing the effectiveness of your campaigns, but the bulk of this module will be the experience of a “live” campaign. You will combine applied research skills with professional practice in the form of a “reverse internship.” As the partner organisations are embedded in the module, you will build valuable skills for employability as well as an opportunity for being supported in the exercise of engaged citizenship. You will be assessed by presentation and critical reflection. In the year 2017-2018 the partner organisation was Greenpeace, but partners may change each year.

Code: PPLX6098B  Credits: 20
You’ll examine one of the fundamental and enduring questions of normative political theory and applied ethics: who should get what? You’ll focuse on some of the leading contemporary theorists of distributive justice, including Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Elster, and Sen. As well as exploring macro questions of justice (e.g. What principles of justice for the basic institutions of society? Equality or sufficiency? Need or desert?) you’ll also spend time on a range of micro questions about just allocation (e.g. How should household chores be divided between men and women? On the basis of what criteria should scarce donor organs be distributed in hospitals?) In addition to this, you’ll also address, through the work of Beitz, Pogge, and Miller, questions of global distributive justice (Is global economic inequality unjust? If so, why? Do people have a right to an equal share in the value of the Earth’s natural resources?). The format of the module will be a two-hour workshop each week, comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussions, practical exercises, textual reading, balloon debate, and essay writing and research-skills mini-sessions. The assessment will be comprised exclusively of a series of short workshop briefing papers, with a heavy emphasis on formative feedback on drafts to be discussed during optional weekly one-to-one tutorials.

 

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Entry Requirements

A Levels

BBB or ABC or BBC with an A in the Extended Project

T Levels

No acceptable pathways for 2022 entry.

BTEC

DDM excluding BTEC Public Services, Uniformed Services and Business Administration

Scottish highers

AABBB

Scottish highers advanced

CCC

Irish leaving certificate

2 subjects at H2, 4 subjects at H3

Access course

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3

European Baccalaureate

70%

International Baccalaureate

31 points

GCSE offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE. 

Additional entry requirements

INTO UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA  

If you do not meet the academic and/or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:  

International Foundation in Business Economics Society and Culture  (for Year 1 entry to UEA) 

International Foundation in Humanities and Law (for Year 1 entry to UEA) 

 

Alternative Entry Requirements 

 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.  

Important note

Once enrolled onto your course at UEA, your progression and continuation (which may include your eligibility for study abroad, overseas experience, placement or year in industry opportunities) is contingent on meeting the assessment requirements which are relevant to the course on which you are enrolled.

Students for whom english is a foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):  

  • IELTS: 6.0 (minimum 5.5 in all components) for year 1 entry 

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components) for year 2 entry   

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.  

  

INTO University of East Anglia   

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:  

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.  

Gap year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.

Intakes

This course is open to UK and International applicants. The annual intake is in September each year.  
Course Reference Number: 6060658

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of additional course-related costs.

Course Reference Number: 6060658

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.  

 

UCAS Apply is an online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.  

 

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14.  

Course Reference Number: 6060658
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
L302
Entry Requirements
BBB
Get to grips with how society really works. You’ll explore how we fashion our identities, how communities change, how relationship dynamics work in families, and how power operates within institutions. If you’re looking to understand how the world currently operates, but you want to help change it for the better, then this is the degree for you.
Schools
Social Work
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