Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies

BA POLITICS AND DIGITAL CULTURES

Key details 

BA POLITICS AND DIGITAL CULTURES

Start Year
2021
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
LP23
Entry Requirements
BBB or ABC

Assessment for Year 1

We use a variety of assessment techniques, including essays, exams, presentations, group work and portfolios. 

Some of our assessments are linked to work with professional organisations outside the university, which will help prepare you for your future career. 

Whatever the form the assessment takes, we’ll help you by providing formative feedback and guidance. 

Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Virtual Open Day   

Assessment for Year 2

We use a variety of assessment techniques, including essays, exams, presentations, group work and portfolios. 

Some of our assessments are linked to work with professional organisations outside the university, which will help prepare you for your future career. 

Whatever the form the assessment takes, we’ll help you by providing formative feedback and guidance. 

Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Virtual Open Day   

Assessment for Year 3

We use a variety of assessment techniques, including essays, exams, presentations, group work and portfolios. 

Some of our assessments are linked to work with professional organisations outside the university, which will help prepare you for your future career. 

Whatever the form the assessment takes, we’ll help you by providing formative feedback and guidance. 

Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Virtual Open Day   

Year 1

Compulsory Modules (80 credits)

 AMAM4028A  (20 Credits)


As knowledgeable as you may be about certain media products – like your favourite TV programmes, films, songs, video games or websites – how much do you know about the functioning of the industrial contexts from which these typically  emerge? It is easy to forget that standing between us and our favourite media products is a complex structure of interpenetrating cultural sectors and organisations. This module will introduce you to some of the core characteristics of  the media industries, providing you with a better understanding of how and why they operate in the ways they do. Throughout the module you will come to appreciate the distinctiveness of the media industries and their products, the  implications this has for producers and the broader effects implied for the overall structure of these industries. In addition, you’ll learn about the economic and political organisation of the media industries, the policies and  regulations to which they are subject, as well as the divisions of labour determined by their modes of organisation. You’ll begin with a consideration of the particular characteristics of media goods and the challenges involved in  commodifying and deriving revenues from them. Following this, you will explore issues of ownership, integration and concentration, before we consider such matters as policy and regulation, creative work, digitalisation, convergence and  media systems. Having considered examples of specific media organisations, franchises, texts and sectors, you’ll put your new knowledge into practice by developing your own case study project, aimed at explaining the functioning of one  aspect of the media landscape. Across the module you will also gain experience in communicating your ideas in seminars as well as through workshop tasks and written work.

 PPLX4052A  (20 Credits)


Politics is changing. And changing, faster than ever before. The rise of populist movements, environmental challenges, economic crises and the rise of digital politics are reshaping the relationships between states and citizens. Liberal democracy, once thought to be the triumphant political system, is under threat. This module will provide you with an overview of the different ways the subject has been approached so far to assess whether these are fit for purpose in new times. You’ll then be provided with knowledge of a series of case study countries including from Africa, Europe, Asia and the Americas, around the world from our in-house experts. Finally, we’ll explore the nature of these challenges thematically to give you a cutting-edge knowledge of contemporary politics.

AMAM4031B  (20 Credits)


This module introduces students to the study of digital media, focusing on both the technologies and platforms that drive the 'digital age' and the cultures they have produced. We will examine how scholars have theorised digital media since the early 1990s, mapping how the production, circulation, and, consumption of new media has changed over the past twenty years. Weekly case studies will allow students to apply theories to contemporary cultural events and phenomena, which may include #blacklivesmatter, selfie culture, the Arab Spring, and SciHub.

  PPLM4001B  (20 Credits)


Trump’s Tweets, Corbyn’s “fans”, and personalised campaign messages sent by algorithms…political communication has changed drastically in the last five years. Pundits and some scholars warn of serious dangers to democracy. What are the tricks of the trade in modern political communication and how different are they from those of the past? How does one now succeed to get across a message and gain support? Should we be worried about the implications for political discourse and decision-making? This module will enable you to critically assess the role of communication in national and international politics and help you understand the dynamics among political actors, media and citizens in opinion formation and decision-making. This is a professional practice module in which you will gain skills relevant to the conduct of political communications and to many other work environments, as well as experience working in a team on a task that requires critical thinking and collaborative strategizing. This module is ideal for anyone interested in working in politics, diplomacy, journalism, marketing, or for advocacy or activist civil society groups. Ideas about the power of communications and the ways that various political actors use that power are at the heart of this module. You’ll examine how these actors use the media in political communications. Lectures and readings will cover media effects, how political communication has changed with changes in media technology, branding and celebrity in politics, and soft power with political communication at the international level, as well as the tools used by various political actors, such as political parties or civic movements. Lectures are interactive, using an audience response system and open discussion. Seminar activities include practical tasks as well as ones to enhance understanding of the readings. The first assessed work is a group project in which you will play the role of junior analysts in a communications consultancy and you will work together to assess the political communications of a real political actor, your “client”, producing a report and presentation that includes recommendations for improvement. The second is an essay that gives you the chance to develop your ability to analyse and synthesise. By the end of this module you will be able to identify and describe the actors and their interests in a given political communications contexts, as well as formulate and articulate clear arguments about the relationships between political actors and the media in relation to power and agency. You will have gained experience in a simulated work scenario that will give you skills transferable across a number of professions as you will have delivered analysis and recommendations in a professional-style presentation and report. You will also be able evaluate political communications’ role in an international context, something increasingly necessary in the ever more globalized world both for political and corporate actors.

 

Options Range A

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

AMAM4034A  (20 Credits)


How do the media represent social groups and why does this matter? These two questions are central to Media Studies. On this module, we will give you an introduction to research across a range of topics, such as the representation of women, migrants and older people. You will learn how the media have represented these groups in the past and discuss whether and why representations have changed today. You will be introduced to theories that are central to Media Studies and which you will be able to explore in depth in more specialist modules in your second and third year, for example feminist theories, post-colonialism, critical race studies, queer theory, and disability studies. The assessment on this module is a small piece of independent research. You will write a literature review, a discussion of your research methodology and you will present and analyse the findings of a small piece of media analysis. This module will teach you the necessary skills of academic writing.

 PPLX4051A  (20 Credits)


This module introduces you to a few important and interesting writers and thinkers whose ideas have been so influential that they have become part of, and have even transformed, our society, culture and politics. As you read their work, learning how to make sense of it and arguing about it with others, you will come to think more deeply about the workings and politics of contemporary society and culture: the forces that shape it and the contradictions that define it. You will pay special attention to the three fundamental values that have shaped modern society and politics since the French Revolution: liberty, equality and fraternity. This will underpin your studies on other modules (in Political Science, International Relations, Media, History and Literature) and provide you with a strong basis upon which to develop your knowledge in Levels 2 and 3.

 

Options Range B

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

 PPLB4045B  (20 Credits)


Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4024B  (20 Credits)


Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it´s the right time to enrol to Beginners´ Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4033B  (20 Credits)


How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire q wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B  (20 Credits)


Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners’ course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you’ll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You’ll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher’s discretion.

PPLB4045B  (20 Credits)


Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4047B  (20 Credits)

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning you will achieve within this module. Our beginners’ course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

 PPLI4055B  (20 Credits)

 

 

Year 2

Compulsory Modules ( 20 credits)

PPLM5053A  (20 Credits)


For better or worse, digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide you with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media.

 

Options Range A

Students will select 0-40 credits from the following modules:

PPLM5002A  (20 Credits)


Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. You will examine both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media and sociology, politics and cultural studies, you will explore the relationship between feminist theory and activism.

PPLX5047A  (20 Credits)


How do scientists in the fields of political science, media, and international relations actually perform their research? How do they know what they claim to know? How can we use scientific methods to study the political and social world? Throughout the module, you will learn how do evaluate research, and more importantly, how to perform your own research using scientific methods. You will acquire knowledge of the theory and practice of a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. You will acquire a variety of skills - computerised data analysis, interviewing, observation, focus groups, taking fieldwork notes, and report writing. We will begin by examining ways of thinking about the world, developing ideas and hypotheses, and ways of testing them. We will explore a variety of ways to examine these hypotheses using a variety of basic quantitative/statistical methods. We will then explore a variety of qualitative, in-depth methods, of collecting and analyzing data such as interviewing and focus groups. You do not need to have any mathematical background to follow this module.

 PPLX5064A  (20 Credits)


In this second year module you will examine in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, and have shaped the ways in which we think about politics even today, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. You will also compare their work thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions. The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key primary texts and will enable you to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at 3rd year undergraduate level, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at first year level. The module is taught by a combination of weekly lectures and seminars, supported by private study of your own, and you will be assessed by coursework, usually a combination of an essay and a portfolio which reflects on your reading and seminar performance throughout the semester.

 

Options Range B

Students must enrol on a minimum of 40 credits from this option range if no credits are selected from Option Range A. If students are not enrolling on PPLX5166B - PSI Semester Abroad in Option Range G, you must select one 20 credit spring semester module from this option range.

Students will select 0-60 credits from the following modules:

PPLM5005B  (20 Credits)


How should we deal with the dissemination of 'fake news'? What role do algorithms play in the media we consume, and is it concerning? What kind of government intervention is there in media markets and in cultural life and how does this get decided? This module will enable you to understand the dynamics and issues of media and cultural policy and how various levels of governance are involved in regulating media cultural sectors. The module will start by introducing you to public policy and policy making processes, covering multi-level governance, multi-stakeholderism, and the policy cycle. It will then enhance your understanding though deep dives into current issues in media and cultural policy, such as audiovisual media policy, arts institutions, net neutrality, harmful content on platforms, sports and premium content rights, urban regeneration through culture, evolving models of (self/co-)regulation. The module will draw on examples from across the globe and at various level including local, regional, national and supra-national policy making, with special efforts made to integrate ones from non-Western contexts. You will have the opportunity to work on real policy issues and practice professional skills in simulations and assessment activities. This module is for anyone interested in media and culture or in public policy in general. It covers topics that touch our daily lives so would be useful to anyone concerned about the shape of our society.

PPLM5042B  (20 Credits)


How do the media shape how we see ourselves? Or indeed how others see us? In a world of social media, self-branding and the increasing importance of mediated forms of identity, on this module you will explore critical ways of thinking about the relationship between culture, media and the self. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module asks you to use research methods from autoethnography to content analysis to explore both their own identities and the way in which identities more broadly are formulated through contemporary media culture. Through discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, you will critically reflect upon the relationship between media culture and social power and consider how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, you should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption. Assessment is by group presentation and independent research project.

 

Options Range C

Students will select 20-40 credits from the following modules:

 AMAM5020A  (20 Credits)


You'll be provided with an understanding of media access, production, participation and use/consumption. Module content is organised around notions of space and place, thereby enabling engagement with issues including: globalisation/the global; national media and media systems; regional and local media; community and ‘grassroots’ media, domestic and ‘personal’ media. Over the course of the module, you'll develop an understanding of the range and reach of media and the multiplicity of factors determining how, when and where populations are enabled to access and participate in media activities. Parallel to the above will be an exploration, through selected case study examples, of media and cultural policy issues, spaces/places of media production as well as a critical engagement with questions of power in relation to these. The module also adopts a contemporary focus by incorporating debates about the role and potential of digital media and communications technologies in enabling new forms of media production, distribution and participation.

 AMAM5024A  (20 Credits)


Animation has long been one of the most popular and least scrutinised areas of popular media culture. This module seeks to introduce you to animation as a mode of production through examinations of different aesthetics and types of animation from stop motion through to cel and CGI-based examples. It then goes on to discuss some of the debates around animation in relation to case study texts, from animation's audiences to its economics. A range of approaches and methods will therefore be adopted within the module, including methods like political economics, cultural industries, star studies and animation studies itself. The module is taught by seminar and screening and is not a practice module.

HUM-5007A  (20 Credits)


How do notions of gender and sexuality shape culture, and how are in turn our understanding and experiences of gender and sexuality shaped by cultural production? How important are other times, places and identifications – associated with class, race, ethnicity – to these understandings and experiences? And to what extent can a film, an image, a testimony, or a place capture such complexity? Addressing these questions from an interdisciplinary approach, the aim of the module is to explore the ways in which gender and sexuality are constituted through a broad array of experiences, practices, and cultural products. The module focuses on issues raised in classical and contemporary research in history, politics, media, cultural studies and visual cultures such as: representation and cultural production; subjectivity; identity; identification; bodies and embodiment; performance and performativity; among others. Overall, by exploring theory in conjunction with queer cultural production that explores questions of power, identity, and desire across different racial, national, and cultural landscapes, the module aims to problematise how gender and sexuality are not stable identities or classifications but are instead processes involving normalisations, hierarchies and relations of domination that can be challenged, troubled and/or queered.

PPLM5002A  (20 Credits)


Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. You will examine both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media and sociology, politics and cultural studies, you will explore the relationship between feminist theory and activism.

PPLP5167A  (20 Credits)


History and politics are inseparable because human societies and communities develop and transform historically. Philosophical thinking about society and community requires us to question deep assumptions about the human good and how we form ideas about that good over time. Does history show that we have made political progress? What does ‘progress’ even mean? How should we think about our social understanding of the past? Does your historical situation limit your political horizons or your political culture limit your historical understanding? Is it in the person or the community that should not be divided, i.e. that is ‘in-dividual’? What kind of understanding, what kind of methods are involved in the disciplines of history and politics? Can philosophy ground a political system, and, if so, which political system(s) does philosophy ground? These are some of the question you’ll address in dialogue with key thinkers of history and politics, such as Hegel; Marx; Collingwood; Simone Weil; Arendt and Rawls.

PPLX5047A  (20 Credits)


How do scientists in the fields of political science, media, and international relations actually perform their research? How do they know what they claim to know? How can we use scientific methods to study the political and social world? Throughout the module, you will learn how do evaluate research, and more importantly, how to perform your own research using scientific methods. You will acquire knowledge of the theory and practice of a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. You will acquire a variety of skills - computerised data analysis, interviewing, observation, focus groups, taking fieldwork notes, and report writing. We will begin by examining ways of thinking about the world, developing ideas and hypotheses, and ways of testing them. We will explore a variety of ways to examine these hypotheses using a variety of basic quantitative/statistical methods. We will then explore a variety of qualitative, in-depth methods, of collecting and analyzing data such as interviewing and focus groups. You do not need to have any mathematical background to follow this module.

 PPLX5064A  (20 Credits)


In this second year module you will examine in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, and have shaped the ways in which we think about politics even today, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. You will also compare their work thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions. The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key primary texts and will enable you to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at 3rd year undergraduate level, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at first year level. The module is taught by a combination of weekly lectures and seminars, supported by private study of your own, and you will be assessed by coursework, usually a combination of an essay and a portfolio which reflects on your reading and seminar performance throughout the semester.

 PPLX5164A  (20 Credits)


The election of Donald Trump as President in 2016 has radically changed US politics. Yet to fully understand the current times, contemporary American politics needs to be put into context. This module covers the historical themes that exist in US politics from the eighteenth century to the present day. The emphasis will be on modern political history and contemporary politics, but this will be underpinned by a knowledge of the political philosophy at the time of the formation of the United States, the governmental structures, and political developments over historical time.

 

Options Range D

Students will select 0-20 credits from the following modules:

 AMAM5049B  (20 Credits)


The advertising and PR industries are central to public life: in business, politics and culture. Branding strategies reach into our intimate lives, whether this is through the ways that we promote ourselves in social media or how corporations collect, analyse and sell our data for marketing purposes. The purpose of this module is to introduce you to these developments, their histories, and the key ethical and political debates that surround them. Previous discussions have included how PR has informed politics and ideology since the 1920s, through the rise of the advertising in 1960s Manhattan, to today’s flow of brands across digital platforms. Also, the promotional cultures surrounding the film and television industries, including product placement, corporate sponsorship and celebrity. It could examine the ways in which we are encouraged to become micro-celebrities, using promotional techniques online and offline in order to market ourselves in an increasingly visual and commercialized culture. It may ask to what extent brands are integral to our social lives and subjectivities, how far they forge intimate relationships with and between users. It will use case studies that may touch on vlogging, selfies, viral marketing, and issues or controversies affecting the promotional cultures such as sexualisation, corporate social responsibility, greenwashing, sustainability, and surveillance.

  AMAS5049B  (20 Credits)


How do we know what is real and what is fake? Previous generations, we are told, could reliably turn to “the news”—but is that really true? From the very beginning, American news was always synonymous with low scandal, scurrilous rumour, and fakery. And yet, there is no doubt that there have been crucial moments when journalists and journalism have gone beyond merely reporting events, to shape the public imagination. “The news” has always manipulated as much as informed its audiences, and in this module you will learn about how this in turn has shaped American life. In learning about the history of journalism and its cultural impact in America in the wider global context, you will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the art of journalism, both critically and in practice. You will engage with questions surrounding print, broadcast and digital media—looking back to the past, reflecting on the present, and looking forward into the future of journalism. You will consider the ways in which marginalised peoples have sought to assert their voices through news media, by seizing the means by which our public understanding of reality is produced. The work will involve critical readings, engagement with primary source materials, seminar discussions, presentations, and critical writing with creative practice. You will have the opportunity to refine your communication skills, and especially the art of writing in different modes for different audiences.

PPLI5056B  (20 Credits)


Why are wars fought? What is peace? What is security? International Security introduces you to these key issues in global politics. In the first part of the module, you will explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have argued that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make violent conflict less relevant in today’s world, war and the use of force remain an integral part of the international system. In exploring these issues, you will study a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace to examine the roots of violent conflict and security problems in the present day. In the second half of the module, we will turn to contemporary ‘critical’ debates around international security. These include constructivist and feminist perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful is it to think of issues such as environmental degradation, gendered violences, and poverty as security issues? What do we gain and lose in broadening security studies beyond a narrow focus on warfare and military power?

  PPLI5161B  (20 Credits)


What if I told you that the West was no longer the power centre of the world’s economy? Could Pax Sinica provincialize the UK as political economic power settles over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta? What would Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich List have to say about global transformations underway in the global political economy? And, as Susan Strange famously put it: cui bono: Who benefits from all these transformations? Multinational corporations, nation states, financial sector, exporting economies, citizens? You’ll investigate the accumulation of wealth, movement of capital, centres of power, flows of globalisation, patterns of trade, and the ubiquity of finance in a world being transformed by innovation where emerging powers challenge the status quo of North Atlantic powerhouses.

 PPLM5002B  (20 Credits)


Political violence, individual or collective, is easily condemned as an irrational and barbaric phenomenon, with little relevance for understanding political developments and social change. A lot is down to LeBon’s famous nineteenth century accounts of the crowd as ‘a primitive being’ so destructive ‘that the interests of the individual, even the interest of self preservation, will not dominate them’ (LeBon, 1995). The taboo of violence persists despite attempts of social and political theorists to engage with the issue and understand different forms and contexts, from riots, to religious violence and terrorism. The aim of the module is to break this generalized taboo by tracing the role (explicit or implicit) of political violence in political theory and its function in processes of socio-political transformations and change. Critical engagement with contemporary theoretical and empirical debates around the issue and the examination of mass and new media representations of political violence will enable students to develop a sophisticated understanding of the origins, logics, perceptions and outcomes of political violence and conflict.

 PPLM5003B  (20 Credits)


What role do media and communication play in processes of globalisation? How is an ever more global media creating cultural change? In this module you will explore the cultural implications of global media and culture by investigating audience practices and media representations. It begins by introducing the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation, before examining how these work in practice. Indicative topics include the power of global branding, global celebrity culture, global publics and local audiences, transnational cultures, and representations of migration.

 PPLM5005B  (20 Credits)


How should we deal with the dissemination of 'fake news'? What role do algorithms play in the media we consume, and is it concerning? What kind of government intervention is there in media markets and in cultural life and how does this get decided? This module will enable you to understand the dynamics and issues of media and cultural policy and how various levels of governance are involved in regulating media cultural sectors. The module will start by introducing you to public policy and policy making processes, covering multi-level governance, multi-stakeholderism, and the policy cycle. It will then enhance your understanding though deep dives into current issues in media and cultural policy, such as audiovisual media policy, arts institutions, net neutrality, harmful content on platforms, sports and premium content rights, urban regeneration through culture, evolving models of (self/co-)regulation. The module will draw on examples from across the globe and at various level including local, regional, national and supra-national policy making, with special efforts made to integrate ones from non-Western contexts. You will have the opportunity to work on real policy issues and practice professional skills in simulations and assessment activities. This module is for anyone interested in media and culture or in public policy in general. It covers topics that touch our daily lives so would be useful to anyone concerned about the shape of our society.

PPLM5042B  (20 Credits)


How do the media shape how we see ourselves? Or indeed how others see us? In a world of social media, self-branding and the increasing importance of mediated forms of identity, on this module you will explore critical ways of thinking about the relationship between culture, media and the self. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module asks you to use research methods from autoethnography to content analysis to explore both their own identities and the way in which identities more broadly are formulated through contemporary media culture. Through discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, you will critically reflect upon the relationship between media culture and social power and consider how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, you should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption. Assessment is by group presentation and independent research project.

 PPLX5162B  (20 Credits)


Political systems around the world are facing profound challenges and transformations. Established democracies in Europe and North America have seen the rise of populism, as marked by election of Donald Trump in the USA, the Brexit referendum in the UK or Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil. Democracy has also been in retreat in many states which democratised or partly democratised after the cold war such as Russia and Poland. At the same time, autocratic regimes in the Middle East and North Africa have come under pressure, with movements such as the Arab Spring signalling aspirations amongst many people for a more democratic system of governance. This module provides you with a critical understanding of how political systems vary around the world and the pressures facing them. It begins by focusing on the drivers of democratisation. It then proceeds to consider how political institutions such as the executive, legislature and the degree of decentralisation vary - and the effects that this has. Finally, we consider new trends in citizen's voting behaviour at the ballot box and pressure groups campaigning for change. You'll gain a critical awareness of current debates in comparative politics and develop key skills including critical evaluation, analytical investigation, written presentation, and oral communication.

 

Options Range G

Students will select 0-60 credits from the following modules:

 PPLX5166B  (60 Credits)


Students often say that spending a semester abroad expands their horizons and improves their career prospects. You will be able to judge this claim for yourself by completing this module. You’ll experience a different educational culture and develop new perspectives on learning. Assessed formatively and summatively by the host university and on successful completion of the semester abroad, you’ll have developed the knowledge and skills to study in a foreign academic environment with more confidence. Assessment will be in the foreign institution and you might be assessed via different methods depending on the institution you attend. To check eligibility criteria it is important that you liaise with our Study Abroad Team.

 

Options Range H

Students can only select 20 credits from this option range if they are not taking PPLX5166B - PSI Semester Abroad in Option Range G.

Students will select 0-20 credits from the following modules:

PPLB4029A  (20 Credits)


This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. You will master the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. You are introduced to basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4030B  (20 Credits)


This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

 

Year 3

 Students must select an even balance of modules. Students cannot study more than two modules per semester.

Compulsory Modules (30 credits)

PPLM6077A  (30 credits)


Today's political world is more than ever influenced by digital technologies, from innovative social movements to 'fake news' and digital election campaigns. We will explore how the technologies influence political processes and how political processes in turn influence technology. We will examine the impact of digital media on electoral politics, examining key election campaigns (including recent UK and US elections) and the impact of social media, big data, and targeted advertising on their results. We will investigate how social movements (from Black Lives Matter to the Alt-Right) have been transformed through their use of digital networks. We will navigate the world of online politics, with a particular focus on the new culture wars being fought out in online environments. Finally we will explore the politics of the everyday, and the political effects of the technology platforms on which we live our online lives.

 

Options Range A

If you select PPLX6042Y: Dissertation from this option range you cannot take it from Option Range B.
Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

PPLM6076B  (30 credits)


How do grassroots and third sector organisations campaign for social and political change? Rather than pose this as an abstract question, you will partner with existing organisations to conduct campaigns on specific issues such as climate change, tax avoidance or gender inequality. You will receive a brief from a partner organisation and be supported in planning, devising, and carrying out activities that will achieve the aims of the brief. Taught content will include strategies for both online and offline activism, analysing power relations at different scales, and ways of assessing the effectiveness of your campaigns, but the bulk of the module will be the experience of a “live” campaign. You will combine applied research skills with professional practice in the form of a “reverse internship.” As the partner organisations are embedded in the module, you will build valuable skills for employability as well as an opportunity for being supported in the exercise of engaged citizenship. You will be assessed by presentation and critical reflection. In the year 2017-2018 the partner organisation was Greenpeace, but partners may change each year.


PPLX6042Y  (30 credits)


The dissertation module gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a project of your own choosing under the supervision of a member of academic staff. The goal is to produce a dissertation of 8,000-9,000 words, which involves in-depth research on a specialist topic. An undergraduate dissertation represents a piece of independent research produced over an extended period and which demonstrates elements of originality in the selection of the topic, the use of sources and the analysis or argument contained within it. It is an opportunity to demonstrate the depth of your understanding of what you have learned across your degree course by applying concepts and theories from one or several modules to new contexts. A limited number of parliamentary internships are also available as part of this module. You will be expected to attend a series of lectures in the autumn semester which provide general advice on the process of conducting a dissertation, as well as meeting your supervisor on a regular basis over the course of the year.

PPLX6026Y  (30 credits)


This module provides students the opportunity to write a research report for client such as a parliamentarian, governmental organisation or pressure group. You will be closely supervised by an academic tutor in collaboration with your host. Previous placements have been with government ministers, shadow ministers, London Assembly members, peers in the House of Lords, local government councillors and human rights groups, but vary each year.

PPLM6037A  (30 credits)


Popular culture links to politics in a variety of ways, some obvious, some less obvious. There are the politicians who seek the endorsement of film stars; there are the politicians who were film stars; and there are the rock performers who pretend that they are politicians. And then there are the states that censor popular culture, or those that sponsor it and use it as propaganda. We will explore the many ways in which popular culture and politics are linked. You will: - be introduced to competing theories of the politics of popular culture - those that see popular culture as political manipulation and those that see it as political resistance. - analyse examples of popular culture for the political ideas and values they represent. - look at how popular culture is used in political communication. - track developments in the political economy of popular culture, especially in relation to globalisation, digital media and power within the cultural industries. - debate the censorship of popular culture and use of state subsidies to promote it. - reflect on the effects of popular culture, and about its role in personal and collective identity.

PPLM6045B  (30 credits)


The role of public opinion is paramount in any democracy, as the public is often asked at election times and in-between elections to confer legitimacy to politicians and to their decisions. Yet what determines the public’s opinion? How much does the public know about politics? How does political communication influence the public’s positions? And last, but not least, how do we measure public opinion? You’ll discuss old and new directions in answering these questions, drawing on political psychology and communication theories. The module is well anchored in current politics, and will provide you with the tools to understand current public opinion trends in the UK and other democracies.

HUM-6005A  (30 credits)


The transnational movement of bodies, images, and capital has transformed modern conceptualisations of gender and sexuality. Sexual practices, identities, and subcultural formations have been altered through processes of migration and globalisation, as well as by the advent of new media technologies and the wide-reaching circulation of categories such as gay, lesbian, and transgender. In this context, this module aims to situate categories of gender and sexual difference within specific cultural and political contexts, and investigate non-normative gender and sexual formations in relation to emerging discourses on race and class and to anti-colonial theories of modernity and global capitalism. At the centre of the module sit questions such as: How have queer subjects been incorporated into nationalist projects and consumer culture? How has the liberal framework of human rights reshaped the struggles of queer movements outside the West? In what ways have transnational discourses on multiculturalism reshaped notions of queer community and belonging in global cities and in postcolonial metropolitan spaces? What role have media technologies and various forms of visual culture played in the reconstitution of gender and sexual identities and of representations of queer desire, affect, and kinship? Addressing these questions from an interdisciplinary perspective, and drawing on case studies from different geographical regions and from different disciplinary fields, the overall aim of the module is to explore the varied ways local histories and geographies interact with the forces of political, economic, and cultural globalisation, focusing especially on the experiences of sexual minorities in the Global South and of queer diasporas in the Global North.


Options Range B

 If you select PPLX6042Y: Dissertation from this option range you cannot take it from Option Range A.
 Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

 AMAM6113A  (30 credits)


Generation is a key part of media discourse. Young people are represented as having fewer opportunities than the generations before them. They are portrayed as narcissists, obsessed with brands and social media. Older generations, such as the ‘Babyboomers’, are represented as selfish and as having stolen young people’s future. This module complicates these stereotypes. You’ll explore theories of generation and their relation to media texts and media use. It asks, how are generations represented in the media, and what are the effects of this on people’s experience and identity? You’ll look at how media is used and consumed in different ways according to age, lifecycle and family structure. You’ll explore the ways that generation intersects with other identities such as race, class, gender, ability, sexuality, place. You’ll combine textual analysis and theory with an emphasis on personal experience and autoethnography. That is, you are expected to engage with the academic debates around generation but also to critically reflect on their own understandings of generation in relation to their peers, family, the past and the future.

 PPLI6039A  (30 credits)


What do you know about Africa? Is it still the Dark Continent, lost outside of time, or do you see it as the next exciting ‘happening’ place to follow fashion, use FinTech, and do business? Did you know that Timbuktu was one of the world’s greatest centres of learning? That West Africa’s gold underpinned the global economy? How about if I told you that an explosion of megacities is taking place in the Global South, principally in Africa as the continent’s population doubles to 2bn? You will look at Africa’s place and importance within the international system and more, including exploring China’s One Belt Initiative in East Africa, the African Union and security, and the African Development Bank’s ‘High five’ development plan.

 PPLI6040B  (30 credits)


Although the term terrorism goes back to the French revolution, it was rarely employed until the 1970’s. Contrast this with today when terrorism, it seems, is everywhere we look: in foreign policy decisions, military interventions, homeland security measures, legal frameworks, newspaper headlines, speeches and sermons, films and video games, and, of course, in university modules such as this. In this module, we engage in a critical exploration of terrorism, counter-terrorism, and the academic field of terrorism research. You will explore the history of terrorism, and engage in debates around the definition and character of terrorist violence. Is it possible, necessary, or even desirable to separate terrorism from other forms of violence, for instance? The module will introduce different perspectives on the causes, types, and threat of non-state terrorism. You will examine a range of strategies for countering terrorism, and their political and normative implications. The module also explores the emergence and contribution of critical terrorism studies, examining issues including state terrorism, gender and terrorism, cultural representations of terrorism, and the production and influence of terrorism ‘experts.’

PPLI6069A  (30 credits)


This module will introduce you to important themes in international relations within the Asia Pacific, at a time when the region has assumed great importance. There will be a particular focus on the important historical periods in the relations between the USA, China and Japan. An understanding of elements of the trajectory of these relationships will be provided by taking a selection of historical subjects for analysis. While you will address the knowledge of history, and of long-term themes, in the latter part of the module you will consider contemporary political issues. This will require you to develop an understanding of the interaction of the United States with Asia, and China and Japan in particular.
 

PPLI6093B  (30 credits)


This module aims to open your horizons as to the employment opportunities and skills required for working at the international level and to prepare you for an optional internship and volunteering abroad. New skills will be developed and existing ones strengthened during the module itself and throughout any follow-on internship which you may with our help be able to secure - for example from researching public policy issues to preparing reports and presenting papers, helping to organise events, attending meetings and producing briefing papers, or carrying out fieldwork. We will help you where we can to secure a follow-on internship abroad and we have good links with many internatiional NGOs and other potential internship hosts. We currently have a number of places in Brussels and PPL students taking this module may apply for one of these. We also have places elsewhere and are seeking to develop more, which you may apply for, and we will also support and advise you when seeking to create your own internship abroad. Financial support towards travel and accommodation will be provided for PPL students for suitable internships, and other forms of financial assistance from UEA may also be available.

PPLM6037A  (30 credits)


Popular culture links to politics in a variety of ways, some obvious, some less obvious. There are the politicians who seek the endorsement of film stars; there are the politicians who were film stars; and there are the rock performers who pretend that they are politicians. And then there are the states that censor popular culture, or those that sponsor it and use it as propaganda. We will explore the many ways in which popular culture and politics are linked. You will: - be introduced to competing theories of the politics of popular culture - those that see popular culture as political manipulation and those that see it as political resistance. - analyse examples of popular culture for the political ideas and values they represent. - look at how popular culture is used in political communication. - track developments in the political economy of popular culture, especially in relation to globalisation, digital media and power within the cultural industries. - debate the censorship of popular culture and use of state subsidies to promote it. - reflect on the effects of popular culture, and about its role in personal and collective identity.


PPLM6045B  (30 credits)


The role of public opinion is paramount in any democracy, as the public is often asked at election times and in-between elections to confer legitimacy to politicians and to their decisions. Yet what determines the public’s opinion? How much does the public know about politics? How does political communication influence the public’s positions? And last, but not least, how do we measure public opinion? You’ll discuss old and new directions in answering these questions, drawing on political psychology and communication theories. The module is well anchored in current politics, and will provide you with the tools to understand current public opinion trends in the UK and other democracies.

 PPLM6076B  (30 credits)


How do grassroots and third sector organisations campaign for social and political change? Rather than pose this as an abstract question, you will partner with existing organisations to conduct campaigns on specific issues such as climate change, tax avoidance or gender inequality. You will receive a brief from a partner organisation and be supported in planning, devising, and carrying out activities that will achieve the aims of the brief. Taught content will include strategies for both online and offline activism, analysing power relations at different scales, and ways of assessing the effectiveness of your campaigns, but the bulk of the module will be the experience of a “live” campaign. You will combine applied research skills with professional practice in the form of a “reverse internship.” As the partner organisations are embedded in the module, you will build valuable skills for employability as well as an opportunity for being supported in the exercise of engaged citizenship. You will be assessed by presentation and critical reflection. In the year 2017-2018 the partner organisation was Greenpeace, but partners may change each year.

PPLX6026Y  (30 credits)


This module provides students the opportunity to write a research report for client such as a parliamentarian, governmental organisation or pressure group. You will be closely supervised by an academic tutor in collaboration with your host. Previous placements have been with government ministers, shadow ministers, London Assembly members, peers in the House of Lords, local government councillors and human rights groups, but vary each year.

 PPLX6041A  (30 credits)


Would an ideal society have no more crime? Who would be wealthy? Would politics be outlawed? Do utopians wish to impose their views on the rest of us? This module explores questions such as these, which are central to political and social theory, through the prism of selected utopian and dystopian novels and other utopian texts ranging from Thomas More’s Utopia (1516) to the present. It focuses on themes such as property, social control, gender, work, the environment and politics. A major question which the module addresses is the political significance and effects of utopian ideas – often derided as frivolous or impractical in their own time - and the historical role of utopian ideas in political theory and social reform.

 PPLX6042Y  (30 credits)


The dissertation module gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a project of your own choosing under the supervision of a member of academic staff. The goal is to produce a dissertation of 8,000-9,000 words, which involves in-depth research on a specialist topic. An undergraduate dissertation represents a piece of independent research produced over an extended period and which demonstrates elements of originality in the selection of the topic, the use of sources and the analysis or argument contained within it. It is an opportunity to demonstrate the depth of your understanding of what you have learned across your degree course by applying concepts and theories from one or several modules to new contexts. A limited number of parliamentary internships are also available as part of this module. You will be expected to attend a series of lectures in the autumn semester which provide general advice on the process of conducting a dissertation, as well as meeting your supervisor on a regular basis over the course of the year.

 PPLX6072B  (30 credits)


This module looks at the political implications of the rise of multicultural societies in Europe and North America since the end of World War II. (Canada is given consideration because of its importance to these debates both as a practical model as well as a source of influential theorists.) The aim is to introduce students to a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives on multiculturalism and facilitate critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches in the face of competing political discourses such as nationalism and alternative forms of liberalism. Theorists under examination may include; Parekh, Kymlicka, Levy, Taylor and Modood as well as major liberal alternative views; Barry, Rawls and Raz. Among the module themes the following will be addressed; group differentiated rights; institutional racism, Islamophobia, recognition vs toleration and cultural offence. The module will also look at divergent policies adopted within European states (eg: France and Germany) and give attention to the attempts to operationalize multiculturalism in the UK in particular via the Parekh Report.

 PPLX6081B  (30 credits)


The nature of Capitalism and its possible futures is one of the preeminent issues of our time. You'll consider the past, present and possible future development of capitalism as a socio-economic system. Drawing upon a wide range of classical and contemporary theorists of capitalism, you’ll deliberate capitalism in relation to a range of issues, such as: freedom, urbanisation, imperialism, technology, climate change, art and culture and go on to consider capitalism’s tendency towards recurrent crises, and what the alternatives to a capitalist system might be. The module will enable you to develop a critical understanding of capitalism as a political, economic and cultural system.

 PPLX6097B  (30 credits)


You’ll examine one of the fundamental and enduring questions of normative political theory and applied ethics: who should get what? You’ll focuse on some of the leading contemporary theorists of distributive justice, including Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Elster, and Sen. As well as exploring macro questions of justice (e.g. What principles of justice for the basic institutions of society? Equality or sufficiency? Need or desert?) you’ll also spend time on a range of micro questions about just allocation (e.g. How should household chores be divided between men and women? On the basis of what criteria should scarce donor organs be distributed in hospitals?) In addition to this, you’ll also address, through the work of Beitz, Pogge, and Miller, questions of global distributive justice (Is global economic inequality unjust? If so, why? Do people have a right to an equal share in the value of the Earth’s natural resources?). The format of the module will be a two-hour workshop each week, comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussions, practical exercises, textual reading, balloon debate, and essay writing and research-skills mini-sessions. The assessment will be comprised exclusively of a series of short workshop briefing papers, with a heavy emphasis on formative feedback on drafts to be discussed during optional weekly one-to-one tutorials.

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Entry Requirements

A Levels

BBB or ABC or BBC with an A in the Extended Project.

BTEC

DDM. Excludes BTEC Public Services and Business Administration.

Scottish highers

AABBB

Scottish highers advanced

CCC

Irish leaving certificate

2 subjects at H2 and 4 subjects at H3.

Access course

Access to Humanities & Social Sciences pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3.

European Baccalaureate

70%

International Baccalaureate

31 points

GCSE offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Additional entry requirements

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes.

If you do not meet the academic and/or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture (for Year 1 entry to UEA)

International Foundation in Humanities and Law (for Year 1 entry to UEA)

 

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom english is a foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Pre-sessional English at INTO UEA

Academic English at INTO UEA

 

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.

 

Gap year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.

 

Intakes

This course is open to UK, EU and International applicants. The annual intake for this course is in September each year.

 

Course Reference Number: 1545725

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of course-related costs. 

Course Reference Number: 1545725

How to apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14.

FURTHER INFORMATION   

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

 

Course Reference Number: 1545725
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
LP23
Entry Requirements
BBB or ABC
Politics and Digital Cultures is a unique degree programme that starts from the assumption that digital technologies are rapidly transforming our lives, our cultures and our politics.
Schools
Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies
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