Faculty of Arts and Humanities

BA PHILOSOPHY (WITH A FOUNDATION YEAR)

Key details 

BA PHILOSOPHY (WITH A FOUNDATION YEAR)

Start Year
2022
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
V50F
Entry Requirements
CCC
Duration (years)
4

Assessment for Year 1

During your Foundation Year, you’ll be assessed in a variety of ways which will allow you to explore different learning styles and become familiar with the format and expectations of degree-level assessment. 

We use innovative methods to enable you to learn from your peers as well as from teaching staff. This in turn will help you to build confidence in your abilities and develop into a more independent learner. You will receive feedback on drafts of written work, allowing you to continue honing your critical thinking. 

You will also benefit from the support of one of the course lecturers as an adviser throughout your programme, receiving individual tutorials to ensure you are progressing well and achieving your full potential. 

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Assessment for Year 2

Each of the modules you choose will have its own designated assessment method. Our modules employ a wide range of methods of assessment to suit diverse learning styles including essays, logbooks, shorter exercises, podcasts, and more. All modules provide feedback and guidance in advance to help you improve your work before the final submission. Most of our modules are assessed through coursework. In a small number of optional Spring modules in your first and second year, assessment will involve an exam 

In the final year, most modules are assessed by a larger piece of your own work or a number of more in-depth essays. 

Your final degree result is based on the marks for all your modules in the last two years, weighted 40:60 so that more importance is attached to the fully mature work of your third year.

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Assessment for Year 3

Each of the modules you choose will have its own designated assessment method. Our modules employ a wide range of methods of assessment to suit diverse learning styles including essays, logbooks, shorter exercises, podcasts, and more. All modules provide feedback and guidance in advance to help you improve your work before the final submission. Most of our modules are assessed through coursework. In a small number of optional Spring modules in your first and second year, assessment will involve an exam 

In the final year, most modules are assessed by a larger piece of your own work or a number of more in-depth essays. 

Your final degree result is based on the marks for all your modules in the last two years, weighted 40:60 so that more importance is attached to the fully mature work of your third year. 

Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Open Days   

Assessment for Year 4

Each of the modules you choose will have its own designated assessment method. Our modules employ a wide range of methods of assessment to suit diverse learning styles including essays, logbooks, shorter exercises, podcasts, and more. All modules provide feedback and guidance in advance to help you improve your work before the final submission. Most of our modules are assessed through coursework. In a small number of optional Spring modules in your first and second year, assessment will involve an exam 

In the final year, most modules are assessed by a larger piece of your own work or a number of more in-depth essays. 

Your final degree result is based on the marks for all your modules in the last two years, weighted 40:60 so that more importance is attached to the fully mature work of your third year.

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Register interest   
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Year 0

Compulsory Modules (60 credits)

Code:  HUM-3006A Credits: 20

What is university learning? How does it differ to your previous experiences of learning? How does your learning style affect the way that you approach your studies? These are the sorts of questions that you will explore, and find answers to, during this module. This module will provide you with an intensive induction to higher education, equipping you with the essential skills you'll need to reach your full potential on your chosen degree programme. Through the format of weekly seminars and study groups you will focus on developing your skills in areas such as research, essay writing, delivering presentations, teamwork, revision and exam techniques. We will guide you through your learning by using a variety of different tasks. In previous years we have held class debates, followed a learning trail through the library and run interactive research sessions. As part of this module you will create an individual, personalised learning plan in which you will assess your strengths and weaknesses. This will enable you to keep track of your development over the course of this module and beyond. By completing this module, you will know how to apply the techniques and methods you have learned, and how to continue to hone your skills to become a successful Humanities student.

Code: HUM-3009A Credits: 20

This interdisciplinary module gives you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as ideology, power, and representation, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

Code: HUM-3009B Credits: 20

Following Key Concepts I, this interdisciplinary module continues to give you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as postmodernism, psychoanalysis, and nationhood, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

Optional A Modules (20 credits)

Students will be enrolled onto HUM-3007A: Cultural and Creative Industries as a default. If you wish to replace this module with a language, please choose one from the list below.
Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Code: HUM-3007A Credits: 20

The term ‘Cultural and Creative Industries’ encompasses a wide range of disciplines taught in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, including film and television, media, arts, and those related to writing, as well as intersecting with aspects of history through the heritage industry. By taking this module, you'll have the opportunity to gain an understanding of these industries that you may wish to work in. Throughout the semester, you'll critically explore a range of creative and cultural fields (television, film, media, art, heritage, publishing – among others), with a particular focus on the complex relationship between theory and practice in the context of the cultural, political, and social frameworks that underpin the work of these industries. On successful completion of the module, you’ll have developed the knowledge and a range of analytical skills that will enable you to understand and engage critically with a competitive cultural and creative industries environment and economy.

Code: Various Credits: 20

You can select from a wide range of language modules. For more information, and for a full list of available module options, please visit our Language Options page.

Optional B Modules (40 Credits)

Students can only take part II of a language module if they have taken the first part of the module in the Autumn semester.
Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Code: HUM-3001B Credits: 20

How is history used to inform the society in which we live? What is the relationship between the history we study academically at university and how history is used and consumed in contemporary society? These are some of the questions you will explore in this module. Using examples from modern history and other time periods that inform our understanding of this history as our case study, you will develop the key skills you need to critically analyse the past and the different representations we make about the past. You will develop key skills needed by the historian to analyse different primary and secondary sources, understand the importance of contextualisation and the role of the historian in shaping narratives about the past.

Code: HUM-3002B Credits: 20

This module introduces you to some of the key ideologies and 'isms' within contemporary political theory which form the focus of contemporary debates. It will encourage you to consider the role that politics plays in your life through the examination of political theory. Radical doctrines such as anarchism and fundamentalism will be discussed and evaluated alongside more traditional ideologies such as socialism, liberalism and conservatism. If you are a Foundation Year student it will have relevance to you in its critical approach to ideology.

Code: HUM-3003B Credits: 20

Do images have meaning? Why does your favourite film/ television programme/ artist matter? You will discuss these issues in Visual Cultures, as you explore what makes some things beautiful, influential, or culturally significant. The module is designed to develop your appreciation of visual cultures (with a special focus on film, television, and art), and to encourage a deeper intellectual dive into your specific visual cultures interests. Along the way you will participate in some of the key academic debates in the field of visual cultures and familiarise yourself with the tools of these disciplines, such as close textual and contextual analysis, research and essay writing, and class discussion. The module is taught using a variety of learning settings and experiences, including lectures, screenings, workshops, seminars, and tutorials. The assessment likewise aims to develop a range of your academic skills.

Code:  HUM-3004B Credits: 20

This interdisciplinary module introduces a wide range of narratives in a variety of formats, asking students to consider questions such as: What is literature? What is literary theory? How is literature influenced by its historical and cultural contexts? How can the humanities help us to make sense of literary texts? Over the course of the module, you will be introduced to key themes in literary studies, as well as examining the value of reading texts in their interdisciplinary contexts. You will develop your ability to analyse texts, engage with historical and cultural milieus of the texts your read, enhance your understanding of theoretical positions relevant to study throughout the Humanities and construct your own critical arguments.

Code:  HUM-3008B Credits: 20

The impact of rapid technological change is no more apparent than in the various areas of the media—film, television, radio, podcasting, publishing and the various uses of the World Wide Web. In this module you will gain a firm understanding of these relationships while developing your academic and practical skills. You don’t need to have any previous experience media production or any other experience of working with technology to take this module. You’ll study the use of technology in media production and distribution, learn about the impact of social media on news production and consumption, engage in critical listening and viewing alongside the analysis of film music from a technological perspective. You’ll get the chance to engage in a televised debate in the TV studio, explore citizen journalism, create podcasts to demonstrate the impact of your research in your chosen discipline and study how digital technologies and advances in the field of artificial intelligence are affecting research, media production, archiving and restoration. There’ll be opportunities for extra-curricular activities too—in the past we’ve created podcasts for the NHS and for conferences at UEA—and we’ll look at how we can be creative with storytelling.

Code: Various Credits: 20

You can select from a wide range of language modules. For more information, and for a full list of available module options, please visit our Language Options page.

 

Year 1

For Year 1 modules please see BA Philosophy modules here.

 

Year 2 

For Year 2 modules please see BA Philosophy modules here.

 

Year 3

For Year 3 modules please see BA Philosophy modules here.

 

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Entry Requirements

A Levels

CCC - for further details on how we review your application please see below

T Levels

Obtain an overall Pass including a C in the core of the T Level and a Pass in the Occupational Specialism. Acceptable pathways: Design, Surveying and Planning for Construction or Digital Production, Design and Development

BTEC

MMM

Scottish highers

BBCCC

Scottish highers advanced

DDD

Irish leaving certificate

6 subjects at H4

Access course

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 credits at Level 3. Humanities and Social Sciences pathway preferred

European Baccalaureate

60%

International Baccalaureate

28 points

GCSE offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Additional entry requirements

We welcome applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds.  If you have been out of study for the last three years and you do not have the entry grades for our three year degree, we will consider your educational and employment history, along with your personal statement and reference to gain a holistic view of your suitability for the course. You will still need to meet our GCSE English Language and Mathematics requirements.  

  

If you are currently studying your level 3 qualifications, we may be able to give you a reduced grade offer based on these circumstances:  

• You live in an area with low progression to higher education (we use Polar 4, quintile 1 & 2 data)  

• You will be 21 years of age or over at the start of the course  

• You have been in care or you are a young full time carer  

• You are studying at a school which our Outreach Team are working closely with  

 

Alternative Entry Requirements 

 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level. 

Important note

Once enrolled onto your course at UEA, your progression and continuation (which may include your eligibility for study abroad, overseas experience, placement or year in industry opportunities) is contingent on meeting the assessment requirements which are relevant to the course on which you are enrolled.

Students for whom english is a foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):  

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall (minimum 6.5 in all components) for year 0 entry  

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.  

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.  

Gap year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.  

Intakes

This course is open to UK applicants. The annual intake is in September each year.  
Course Reference Number: 4479754

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of course-related costs. 

Course Reference Number: 4479754

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.  

 

UCAS Apply is an online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.  

 

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14. 

Course Reference Number: 4479754
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
V50F
Entry Requirements
CCC
Duration (years)
4
If you have a passion for Philosophy, but for whatever reason you don’t yet have the grades required for the three-year programme, our Foundation Year will provide you with an alternative route in. You’ll undertake an exciting year of study as you prepare to progress onto your degree programme, developing your academic skills as you learn. Upon completing the year, you’ll be ready to start the BA Philosophy course, where you’ll ponder and debate the fundamental philosophical questions – about ethics, consciousness, God, and the universe – and use what you learn to tackle important current issues. Our BA Philosophy course is ranked in the top 30 for Philosophy by both 'The Complete University Guide 2022' and 'The Guardian 2021'.

Course Variants

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