International Development

BA (Hons) INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT WITH ANTHROPOLOGY WITH A PLACEMENT YEAR

Key details 

BA (HONS) INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT WITH ANTHROPOLOGY WITH A PLACEMENT YEAR

Start Year
2022
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
L96P
Entry Requirements
ABB
Duration (years)
4

Assessment for Year 1

In year 1, you’ll take a variety of assessments including essays, exams and presentations. Exactly what assessments you undertake will depend on the optional modules you select. In your first year and throughout your degree, you’ll get feedback on your assessments to help you develop your skills and improve your work.   

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Assessment for Year 2

In year 2, you’ll continue to undertake a variety of assessments, the exact mix of which will depend on the optional modules you choose. 

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Assessment for Year 3

During your placement year, you will not take any assessments at UEA.

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Assessment for Year 4

In year 4, you’ll have the option to write a dissertation, alongside taking other assessments. The dissertation is a large project that assesses a student’s ability to conduct independent research. The dissertation is optional and you can choose to take other modules with other assessments should you wish. 

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Year 1

Compulsory Modules (80 Credits)

DEV-4003A    (20 Credits)
Students on this module will learn how to think critically about complex global problems such as poverty, inequality, climate change, food security and conflict. Students will also study crucial development issues such as environmental sustainability, gender equality and democracy. We will address three 'Big Questions: How do we ensure peace and security? Can industrial development be sustainable? Why do global living standards vary so wildly? This module adopts an interdisciplinary approach, enabling students to learn about these issues from a diverse array of perspectives.

DEV-4004A    (20 Credits)
This module will introduce students to a range of key concepts and perspectives in the study of global development, such as human development, neo-liberalism and de-colonisation. Students will learn how these different ideas have contributed to – and critiqued - development policy and practice. Students will also be encouraged to compare these different perspectives, and to think critically about how well they explain global inequalities and the complex social, cultural, economic, and political processes which produce them.

DEV-4005A    (20 Credits)
We will explore the many ways that people work together to imagine and shape billions of diverse futures on our one shared planet. The module critically analyses the different institutions involved in tackling, but also producing, poverty, environmental destruction, and injustice around the world. These include states, social movements, civil society organisations and the private sector. We will explore the interests and motivations of these different actors as well as their strategies and tactics. It will also show how these actors relate to each other, both at the level of policy and practice, in a range of case studies

DEV-4005B  (20 Credits)

This is the first part of a two year course that covers basic principles in social anthropology, and uses them to understand society and processes of social change in developing countries. The SAID1 module provides an introduction to anthropological theory to advance student’s knowledge of socio-cultural issues and disciplinary themes such as adaptation and the environment, human evolution, colonialism, witchcraft and magic, religion, kinship and marriage, class and hierarchy, exchange, rituals, myths and ceremonies. The module’s main aim is to promote an understanding of key figures and debates in social theory and show how these can be applied to development issues and policies. The lectures and seminars are accompanied by a weekly film series in which ethnographic films addressing key anthropological debates are shown and discussed.

 

Optional A Modules (40 Credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

DEV-4001B    (20 Credits)
This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The module has an integrated biophysical core and deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4003B    (20 Credits)
The module introduces you to key development economics theories and empirical evidence. Topics include the economics of poverty and inequality, economic growth, the balance between states and markets, agriculture and internal migration, population growth, health, human capital, the environment, international trade, and development aid. All of these are discussed within the context of development.

DEV-4008B    (20 Credits)
This module will critically explore changing trends in humanitarian communication by both the international news media and international development actors, such as Non-Governmental Organisations. This will include a critical review of media representations of development in the Global South and the role and responsibility of journalists reporting about humanitarian crises and poverty. We will also explore conventional strategies of humanitarian communication, such as ‘pornography of poverty’, as well as more contemporary issues such as the role of celebrities, social media and the rise of ‘post-humanitarian’ communication. With case studies ranging from Live Aid to Kony 2012, you will be introduced to key concepts and theoretical approaches cutting across a range of disciplines. This module also contains an integral practical skills component. Speakers from leading NGOs and experienced practitioners will share their insights about the everyday complexities of humanitarian communication and a number of workshops will focus on a relevant hands-on skills such blogging and the basics of development photography.

DEV-4009B    (20 Credits)
This module provides an introduction to political concepts and frameworks that are central to the study of international development. Through studying theoretical approaches you will gain the foundations required to critically evaluate contemporary development debates and development policy and practice.

DEV-4012B    (20 Credits)
Introduction to International Global Development Management will give you key management, leadership and business skills enabling you to make a stronger career contribution to development through helping more people overcome injustice and poverty. Organisational boundaries continue to change and it is less about the type of organisation that delivers development policy and activities and more about the leadership and management skills that enable you to deliver success. This module has a practical focus drawing heavily upon real world contemporary examples.

DEV-4011B    (20 Credits)
This module introduces geographical approaches to the key processes of change that shape our world and its societies. You will examine how people and places are connected and transformed as a result of processes such as colonialism, globalisation, industrialisation, migration, urbanisation and development, and explore how differences and inequalities emerge. A central theme will be why space matters, as people’s lives are influenced by the places that surround them - both near and far - and as they in turn change those places. You will explore these issues through a range of contemporary geographical topics, from sweatshops to climate change, through which you will be introduced to core geographical concepts, ideas and approaches, emphasising on critical thinking and practice. You will discover key methods for geographical research, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and will include field-based practical work in the local area.

 

Year 2

Compulsory Modules (40 Credits)

DEV-5008A     (20 Credits)

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development.

DEV-5025B    (20 Credits)

The core of this module is that you learn how to conduct your own ethnographic research. You will develop your own project throughout the semester, by collecting ethnographic data, analysing it, and writing your own ethnography. The module is structured in two parts. In part 1 (weeks 1-5) we will provide you with all the practical tools needed to collect ethnographic data. We will also consider the ethics of ethnographic research. You are expected to start conducting your ethnographic research during this part. In Part II (weeks 6-12) we will show you how to analyse and interpret your findings; in short, how to write ethnographically. There will be a chance for feedback every week.

 

Optional A Modules (40-80 Credits)

Students will select 40-80 credits from the following modules:

DEV-5001B    (20 Credits)

This module addresses governance challenges arising from natural resource policy and practice, in situations where different stakeholders have competing interests, values and visions. In particular, the module will focus on the governance of biodiversity conservation and agriculture, mainly concentrating on the global South. Students will be encouraged to explore and analyse contested policies and practices using a range of analytical frameworks relating to ecosystem services, human wellbeing and environmental justice. Teaching will involve lectures, seminars and field visits and students will all pursue a case study of natural resource conflict.

DEV-5002A    (20 Credits)

Throughout the study of International Development, as in all areas of the social and natural sciences, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other modules, to become critical readers of published quantitative data analysis and to manage, analyse and interpret quantitative evidence themselves. The module deals with research design, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and multiple regression.

DEV-5002A   (20 Credits)

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in the social sciences. It will provide you with the skills you need to conduct research both within and beyond the university context, including your dissertation and future careers. The module will introduce students to a range of qualitative, quantitative and spatial methods that social scientists use in research including research design, data collection and data analysis skills. The module is taught using lecture-based classes and workshops. The module is organised based on three research methods that use different approaches to data collection, analysis and presentation. The qualitative method focuses on analysing and presenting qualitative data. The quantitative method focuses on building statistical skills to analyse secondary survey data as well as interpreting quantitative research findings. The GIS method focuses on data visualisation skills, mapping skills and basic GIS analysis.

DEV-5005B  (20 Credits)

This is a regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5006A    (20 Credits)

This module builds on the issues and themes introduced in NR1, with the focus moving to rural livelihoods and household production systems across the landscape. Its themes will be continued in NR3 in the spring. Through deepening their understanding of technical and social aspects of natural resource management, students will be better equipped for later work on applied issues, such as management and conservation, which benefit from inter-disciplinary approaches. This module links closely with the summer Field Course, and with the module on Resource Development and Conservation in DEV3. This module is a requirement for BSc. students and those following the NR stream in DEV and in the joint DEV/ENV BSc. (EGID)

DEV-5006B  (20 Credits)

Sub-Saharan Africa Development aims to provide students with a historical, political, social and economic analysis of key issues relating to development in Sub-Saharan Africa. Students will develop a historically grounded understanding of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa through a critical engagement with a range of scholarship from political science, sociology, anthropology, education and economics. Through an exploration of issues such as colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the state in Africa, reasons for Africa’s poor economic performance and aid effectiveness, conflict and ethnicity, migration and urban development students will develop understandings of the dynamics and agendas of change.

DEV-5007A    (20 Credits)

What role does media and communication play in promoting positive social change? How can communication help to mobilise citizens, change policies, modify behaviours, promote human rights and support democracy? Equally, how can we prevent communication technologies from being used to promote hate speech and violence? This module will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the fields of ‘Media Development’ and ‘Communication for Development’. Key topics covered are likely to include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, press freedom, digital development and media imperialism. This module is designed to be accessible to Global Development (DEV) students, who have not studied the media before, and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying global development.

DEV-5007B  (20 Credits)

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5009A (20 Credits)

The module is about the distinctive challenges that face low and middle income countries in providing quality education for all. We also consider sources of inequalities in the education systems of the Global North, aiming for a worldwide awareness of the issues affecting equity in education.

DEV-5016A    (20 Credits)

You’ll be introduced to the basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomic theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets and households are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. In addition to conventional microeconomic principles, insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered.

DEV-5017B    (20 Credits)

The module will introduce you to the main macroeconomic issues of development. You will cover long-run macroeconomics, with a particular focus on economic growth, and short-run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. The module combines theory and evidence, relating theoretical arguments to recent macroeconomic phenomena. You will look at specific topics including the government budget and fiscal policy, inflation and monetary policy, trade and the balance of payments, exchange rates and capital flows, and the relationships between gender, institutions, and capital (physical, human and natural) and economic growth.

DEV-5019A    (20 Credits)

This module will develop your theoretical and empirical understanding of how social environments in different places affect people’s health or ill-health. You will look at health problems and their socio-economic causes at a global, national and sub-national level, examining both communicable diseas (e.g. HIV, covid-19) and non-communicable diseases (e.g. diabetes, stroke), and using case studies from both the Global South and Global North. You will develop knowledge about how ill-health and health inequalities are linked to socio-economic inequalities, poverty and marginalisation. You will be able to apply this knowledge to questions of health policy and interventions designed to improve health. A key conceptual framework for this module is the social determinants of health (SDH). This includes analysis of the risk environment for ill-health, influenced by deeper social structures (such as gender or class inequalities, or poor governance) in a particular setting, how people make a living (their livelihoods), and the nature of health policy and the health services available to people. We are therefore also interested in the interventions which can help deal with risk environments, to make people less susceptible to disease and less vulnerable when they become ill. You will learn how some places have achieved good health. The module is inter-disciplinary, drawing on theories and evidence from disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, public health and development studies, and to a lesser extent economics, demography and epidemiology. It also provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill-health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. Case studies from different places and of different diseases are used to illustrate the social determinants of health, including infectious diseases (such as HIV, malaria, Ebola) and non-communicable diseases.

DEV-5019B    (20 Credits)

This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors’ intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. Although open to all students it is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5026B    (20 Credits)

What is uneven development and why should we care about it? How did uneven development emerge and what can we do about it? This module focuses on the ways in which geographers have engaged with such questions from different perspectives, focusing on political-economic, environmental, and social concerns. We explore how economic geographers (and geographical economists) have sought to explain the spatiality and unevenness of economic activity, examining the evidence for “natural advantage” and contrasting arguments. We engage with geographical work on urban restructuring and environmental governance – which posit uneven development as a product of capitalism – and consider the influence of Marxist theory on geographical thought. We also explore how both ordinary people and civil society have tried to address, contest, and resist spatial difference and forms of inequality. Throughout the module, questions of place, space, nature, and scale surface (and overlap) – demonstrating the disciplinary strength of geographic scholarship for the analysis of uneven development.

DEV-5020A  (20 Credits)

This interdisciplinary module will begin by exploring the various approaches to understanding gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The module then applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: gender analysis of economic growth, divisions of labour and incomes, land and property rights, environmental change, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence and religion.

 

Optional B Modules (0-40 Credits)

Students must not take more than 20 credits of Level 4 modules in their 2nd year.
Students will select 0-40 credits from the following modules:

AMAA5009A  (20 Credits)

We live our lives surrounded by material objects. In many ways, our lives are dictated by the consumption of goods. How then, should we understand our relation to materiality? In this module, you'll learn about contemporary archaeological and anthropological perspectives in the study of material culture. Questions that come up include: why the Summer Solstice is celebrated at Stonehenge; how houses differ across cultures; why we give each other gifts and wrap them; and how clothing gives us identity? Studying human-object relations from a range of perspectives, this module equips you to understand the role of materiality in your life and to think in nuanced ways on our consumer society.

AMAA5089A  (20 Credits)

Your main objective in this module will be to develop your critical skills as they pertain to thinking, reading, writing and looking. To enable this, the module will fall into two main sections. In the first section, you’ll focus on one particular methodology – object biographies – used in archaeology, anthropology, museum studies and art history. You’ll examine this methodology in detail, breaking it down into its component sections. You’ll then consider its strengths and its weaknesses, as we subject it to a thorough critical evaluation. In the second half of the module, you will study a range of theories and methodologies used in the study of material culture. In this part of the module, you will focus more broadly on what critical thinking is, both in general and within each of the four disciplines taught in the Department of Art History and World Art Studies. You’ll be taught through a combination of two weekly lectures and one discussion seminar. The lectures will offer you an introduction to the relevant topic, and will end with an opportunity to discuss/debate the issues raised. During the discussion seminars, you’ll consider key issues raised in preceding lectures and the weekly class readings which accompany them.

HIS-5048B  (20 Credits)

We will look at the modern history of the Middle East, primarily concerning the political history of the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. Our aim is to encourage you to think critically about historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/imperialism, the role of culture and identity, and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

SOL-5002A  (20 Credits)

This module will explore the sociological concept of ‘family’ and how this is understood within a life course discourse. Specifically, this will examine how notions of ‘family’ have changed markedly from post war Britain. We will discuss the importance of the ‘family’ as a sociological construct and as an institution over which the Government relies greatly, but has very little direct control. We will examine how time has changed the structure of the family. We will examine the role that marriage/civil partnerships play in family life, and consider how the state understands single parent families, ‘blended families’, Lesbian and gay families, and families that foster/adopt. One of the key theses affecting all families is ‘transitions’ and this will be explored as a concept through the life course. We will also consider the role that family plays for older adults during their later years, and the impact that this has on the state’s role. We will look at gender and the family, and ethnicity and family in modern Britain. Finally, we will consider ‘intimacy’ within family life, particularly in relation to relationships, sex and notions of ‘belonging’, as well as violence and abuse.

SOL-5003A  (20 Credits)

This module gives students the opportunity to explore some of the key factors through which personal and social diversity and oppression may be experienced, including race and ethnicity, gender and disability, and other protected characteristics. We will reflect on these dimensions through the lens of our own lives and experiences and gain confidence in managing our own opinions and emotions in professional contexts. We will also explore a number of contemporary social contexts in which some of these equality and diversity issues have clashed and examine some of the political and social responses to these.

SOL-5006B  (20 Credits)

This module examines offending and justice for female offenders compared to male offenders. Specific topic areas will vary but are likely to cover pathways into offending, the complex relationship between offending and victimisation for women and girls, offenses committed by women and girls—ranging from status offenses (e.g. running away from home) to theft and shoplifting, against the person crimes and participation in gangs—experiences within the criminal justice system and, finally, desistance from offending. Theoretical perspectives drawn upon will include sociology, feminist criminology, and intersectionality, particularly the interplay between gender, age, class, socioeconomic status, race, and sexual orientation. Theoretical approaches and research will be covered alongside examples from popular media, film, current events, and case studies.

SOL-5007B  (20 Credits)

Social policy traditionally focuses on the ‘five giants’ of welfare: poverty, health, housing, education and unemployment. This module will consider these and enable students to explore key concepts and sociological theories that underpin the analysis and practice of social policy. In addition, students will be asked to analyse a number of current social problems in their societal context, such as: social justice and inequality; needs and rights; vulnerability; citizenship as well as substantive issues such as migration, demography and labour markets. Students will be asked to consider how and why services do or do not meet the needs of specific groups, such as children, disabled people, women, older people, or members of minority ethnic groups, and the role that social policy can play in addressing this.

PPLB4  (20 Credits)

There are a broad range of Beginners’ Language Modules for you to choose from. To explore all our available Level 4 modules, please visit our Language Options page. 

PPLB5  (20 Credits)

There are a broad range of Beginners’ Language Modules for you to choose from. To explore all our available Level 5 modules, please visit our Language Options page. 

 

Year 3 

Compulsory Modules (120 Credits)

DEV-5022Y  (120 Credits)

Students will typically spend between 9-12 months in a full-time placement, to get working experience and strengthen their employability skills in an area of their choice. Students are expected to find work placement but staff within the School and the Careers Service will support and assist in searching, applying for, and getting a placement. Furthermore support is provided whilst students are on placement and on their return to complete the last (fourth) year of study.

 

Year 4

Compulsory Modules (20 Credits)

DEV-6008Y  (20 Credits)

The aim is to offer students an advanced anthropology module which builds on students’ engagement with development issues, to consider some of the enduring puzzles of social change, to deliver in-depth understanding of particular themes, and to support students in intensive small group development of their anthropological skills, in order to understand social change and contribute to development theory and practice. We use teaching methods based on small group work of seminars and tutorials, in order to develop skills for independent scholarship, appropriate for 3rd year DEV students.

 

Optional A Modules (100 Credits)

Students must not take more than 20 credits of Level 5 modules in their final year.

Students will select 100 credits from the following modules:

AMAA5009A  (20 Credits)

We live our lives surrounded by material objects. In many ways, our lives are dictated by the consumption of goods. How then, should we understand our relation to materiality? In this module, you'll learn about contemporary archaeological and anthropological perspectives in the study of material culture. Questions that come up include: why the Summer Solstice is celebrated at Stonehenge; how houses differ across cultures; why we give each other gifts and wrap them; and how clothing gives us identity? Studying human-object relations from a range of perspectives, this module equips you to understand the role of materiality in your life and to think in nuanced ways on our consumer society.

AMAA5089A  (20 Credits)

Your main objective in this module will be to develop your critical skills as they pertain to thinking, reading, writing and looking. To enable this, the module will fall into two main sections. In the first section, you’ll focus on one particular methodology – object biographies – used in archaeology, anthropology, museum studies and art history. You’ll examine this methodology in detail, breaking it down into its component sections. You’ll then consider its strengths and its weaknesses, as we subject it to a thorough critical evaluation. In the second half of the module, you will study a range of theories and methodologies used in the study of material culture. In this part of the module, you will focus more broadly on what critical thinking is, both in general and within each of the four disciplines taught in the Department of Art History and World Art Studies. You’ll be taught through a combination of two weekly lectures and one discussion seminar. The lectures will offer you an introduction to the relevant topic, and will end with an opportunity to discuss/debate the issues raised. During the discussion seminars, you’ll consider key issues raised in preceding lectures and the weekly class readings which accompany them.

DEV-5005B  (20 Credits)

This is a regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5006B  (20 Credits)

Sub-Saharan Africa Development aims to provide students with a historical, political, social and economic analysis of key issues relating to development in Sub-Saharan Africa. Students will develop a historically grounded understanding of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa through a critical engagement with a range of scholarship from political science, sociology, anthropology, education and economics. Through an exploration of issues such as colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the state in Africa, reasons for Africa’s poor economic performance and aid effectiveness, conflict and ethnicity, migration and urban development students will develop understandings of the dynamics and agendas of change.

DEV-5007B  (20 Credits)

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5009A (20 Credits)

The module is about the distinctive challenges that face low and middle income countries in providing quality education for all. We also consider sources of inequalities in the education systems of the Global North, aiming for a worldwide awareness of the issues affecting equity in education.

DEV-5019B  (20 Credits)

This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors’ intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. Although open to all students it is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5020A  (20 Credits)

This interdisciplinary module will begin by exploring the various approaches to understanding gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The module then applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: gender analysis of economic growth, divisions of labour and incomes, land and property rights, environmental change, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence and religion.

DEV-6001B  (20 Credits)

This module is about social movements. It is organised around five key themes, which are also the five main axes of inequality globally. They are: gender/patriarchy, racism, labour/class, climate change and social reproduction. There are two weeks on each theme. The first addresses the forms of inequality relating to each theme and also the structural constraints that impede change. The second week focuses on forms of action taken by social movements, and asks the key questions: under what conditions do things change, which strategies work where, and how can increases in equality be sustained?

DEV-6002B  (20 Credits)

This module is about sustainability as an environmental justice concern. It approaches sustainability from a political ecology perspective, paying attention to the transformative politics involved in building a safer and more just planet. It looks at just transformations for sustainability from different sides/topics (e.g. conservation, food sovereignty, water, urban and rural areas, indigenous territories) but also in terms of concepts and processes, e.g. planetary boundaries, global (and cognitive) justice, transitions, transformations, alternatives, resistance movements, equity, etc. The course is taught using student experiences and observations. A typical session therefore might involve asking questions around planetary boundaries and asking how students are living within these boundaries. This would involve some theory but also on-line research and group work and dynamics.

DEV-6003A  (20 Credits)

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of Wars & Humanitarian Crises is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; and strategies and challenges of peace-building.

DEV-6005A  (20 Credits)

This module will provide you with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. You are expected to fund your own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The School has a database of projects to assist you with your project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (June) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). You are expected to work for a minimum of two months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing about the placement, and an essay related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6006B  (20 Credits)

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and this module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Economics of Development 3. Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, aid and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-6007Y  (20 Credits)

The dissertation will provide you with an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with your supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing you to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to you in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. Please note, the dissertation is restricted to International Development and Environmental Geography & International Development students.

DEV-6012B  (20 Credits)

This module offers you the opportunity to explore how development ideas and aims are reflected in contemporary development practice, focusing on project design and management . The module content is geared towards giving you tools with which to approach designing and working in and on development projects We explore the history of different approaches to aid enterprises, and how they have been shaped by different geo-political and ideological forces. You will learn core tools common in the sector, such as the difference between a log frame and a theory of change, how to create both, and how they may be useful to defining your endeavours. You will work in a team to develop your own project, with a justification of the need, an evidence-based approach and a strong analysis of the social and political context in which it is going to operate. This will also need a communications strategy and a fully costed budget, all of which you will be supported to learn how to do. However we will also encourage you to think critically about these processes, looking at how these tools have been developed and why, and being aware of their limitations and benefits.

DEV-6014A  (20 Credits)

This module will address different forms of migration (e.g. internal, international, circular, return, seasonal, irregular) and reasons why people migrate (e.g. economic, political, social and environmental), and will critically explore the different ways in which these are related to development and change in societies of origin and destination. We will start by exploring migration from a historical perspective, and addressing different theoretical approaches with a multidisciplinary angle (including different methods of researching migration – both quantitative and qualitative), as well as regional differences and heterogeneity in migration trends and patterns across the globe. We will then look at key issues in migration studies including: types of migrants; networks and community organisations that link home and host societies; migrants’ integration into the host society; the impact of climate change on people’s movement; policies, citizenship and human rights; and the refugee crisis. Within these topics, we will also discuss inequalities across population subgroups (e.g. by age, gender, education and ethnicity) in terms of migration opportunities, access, networks and integration. These topics will be discussed through the analysis of case studies in various parts of the world and the participation of local community practitioners or migrants themselves in one or more seminar sessions. The module will also include one visit to a local museum to learn about the long and complex history of migration to Norfolk from the museum curators. With this comprehensive approach to migration this module will move beyond a narrow and casual view of the relationship between migration and development, and contribute to understanding the myriad ways in which global forces influence people’s movements, and how these movements, in turn, have historically been transforming societies and communities.

DEV-6017A  (20 Credits)

The dissertation will provide you with an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with your supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing you to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to you in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. Please note, the dissertation is restricted to International Development and Environmental Geography & International Development students.

HIS-5048B  (20 Credits)

We will look at the modern history of the Middle East, primarily concerning the political history of the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. Our aim is to encourage you to think critically about historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/imperialism, the role of culture and identity, and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

PPLB5  (20 Credits)

There are a broad range of Beginners’ Language Modules for you to choose from. To explore all our available Level 5 modules, please visit our Language Options page. 

SOL-5002A  (20 Credits)

This module will explore the sociological concept of ‘family’ and how this is understood within a life course discourse. Specifically, this will examine how notions of ‘family’ have changed markedly from post war Britain. We will discuss the importance of the ‘family’ as a sociological construct and as an institution over which the Government relies greatly, but has very little direct control. We will examine how time has changed the structure of the family. We will examine the role that marriage/civil partnerships play in family life, and consider how the state understands single parent families, ‘blended families’, Lesbian and gay families, and families that foster/adopt. One of the key theses affecting all families is ‘transitions’ and this will be explored as a concept through the life course. We will also consider the role that family plays for older adults during their later years, and the impact that this has on the state’s role. We will look at gender and the family, and ethnicity and family in modern Britain. Finally, we will consider ‘intimacy’ within family life, particularly in relation to relationships, sex and notions of ‘belonging’, as well as violence and abuse.

SOL-5003A  (20 Credits)

This module gives students the opportunity to explore some of the key factors through which personal and social diversity and oppression may be experienced, including race and ethnicity, gender and disability, and other protected characteristics. We will reflect on these dimensions through the lens of our own lives and experiences and gain confidence in managing our own opinions and emotions in professional contexts. We will also explore a number of contemporary social contexts in which some of these equality and diversity issues have clashed and examine some of the political and social responses to these.

SOL-5006B  (20 Credits)

This module examines offending and justice for female offenders compared to male offenders. Specific topic areas will vary but are likely to cover pathways into offending, the complex relationship between offending and victimisation for women and girls, offenses committed by women and girls—ranging from status offenses (e.g. running away from home) to theft and shoplifting, against the person crimes and participation in gangs—experiences within the criminal justice system and, finally, desistance from offending. Theoretical perspectives drawn upon will include sociology, feminist criminology, and intersectionality, particularly the interplay between gender, age, class, socioeconomic status, race, and sexual orientation. Theoretical approaches and research will be covered alongside examples from popular media, film, current events, and case studies.

SOL-5007B  (20 Credits)

Social policy traditionally focuses on the ‘five giants’ of welfare: poverty, health, housing, education and unemployment. This module will consider these and enable students to explore key concepts and sociological theories that underpin the analysis and practice of social policy. In addition, students will be asked to analyse a number of current social problems in their societal context, such as: social justice and inequality; needs and rights; vulnerability; citizenship as well as substantive issues such as migration, demography and labour markets. Students will be asked to consider how and why services do or do not meet the needs of specific groups, such as children, disabled people, women, older people, or members of minority ethnic groups, and the role that social policy can play in addressing this.

 


IMPORTANT INFORMATION
Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring and review of modules. Where this activity leads to significant change to a programme and modules, the University will endeavour to consult with affected students. The University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff. Availability of optional modules may be restricted owing to timetabling, lack of demand, or limited places. Where this is the case, you will be asked to make alternative module choices and you will be supported during this process.

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Entry Requirements

A Levels

ABB or BBB with an A in the Extended Project

T Levels

No acceptable pathways for 2022 entry.

BTEC

DDM excluding BTEC Public Services, Uniformed Services and Business Administration

Scottish highers

AAABB

Scottish highers advanced

BCC

Irish leaving certificate

3 subjects at H2, 3 subjects at H3

Access course

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3

European Baccalaureate

75%

International Baccalaureate

32 points

GCSE offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE. 

Additional entry requirements

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes such as:

BA Geography and International Development with a Foundation Year  

BA International Development with a Foundation Year  

 

INTO UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA  

If you do not meet the academic and/or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:  

International Foundation in Pharmacy Health and Life Science (for Year 1 entry to UEA) 

International Foundation in Mathematics and Actuarial Sciences (for Year 1 entry to UEA) 

International Foundation in Physical Sciences and Engineering (for Year 1 entry to UEA) 

International Foundation in Business Economics Society and Culture  (for Year 1 entry to UEA) 

International Foundation in Humanities and Law (for Year 1 entry to UEA) 

 

Alternative Entry Requirements 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.  

Important note

Once enrolled onto your course at UEA, your progression and continuation (which may include your eligibility for study abroad, overseas experience, placement or year in industry opportunities) is contingent on meeting the assessment requirements which are relevant to the course on which you are enrolled.

Students for whom english is a foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):  

  • IELTS: 6.0 overall (minimum 5.5 in all components) for year 1 entry 

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.  

 

INTO University of East Anglia   

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:  

  

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.  

Gap year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.  

Intakes

This course is open to UK and International applicants. The annual intake is in September each year.  
Course Reference Number: 4479378

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

See our Tuition Fees page for further information. 

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Course related costs

View our information about Additional Course Fees. 

Course Reference Number: 4479378

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.  

 

UCAS Apply is an online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.  

 

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14. 

Course Reference Number: 4479378
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
L96P
Entry Requirements
ABB
Duration (years)
4
On this course, you’ll discover how international development affects social change, and learn how people live and interact within different societies around the world. You’ll focus on applying anthropological theories and methods to study the impact of development on economic and cultural transformation, but also draw on insights from other social science disciplines on this flexible degree. You’ll be able to pursue your own research interests, and graduate ready for a variety of exciting careers in development and beyond. The placement year offered as a component of this course allows you the opportunity to experience what your future career could be like. Join us at UEA and learn how to tackle the biggest challenges facing the world today.
Schools
International Development
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