Faculty of Arts and Humanities

BA INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION WITH BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (WITH A FOUNDATION YEAR)

Key details 

BA INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION WITH BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (WITH A FOUNDATION YEAR)

Start Year
2022
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
Q9NF
Entry Requirements
CCC

Assessment for Year 1

During your Foundation Year, you’ll be assessed in a variety of ways which will allow you to explore different learning styles and become familiar with the format and expectations of degree-level assessment. 

We use innovative methods to enable you to learn from your peers as well as from teaching staff. This in turn will help you to build confidence in your abilities and develop into a more independent learner. You will receive feedback on written work, allowing you to continue honing your critical thinking. 

You will also benefit from the support of one of the course lecturers as an adviser throughout your programme, receiving individual tutorials to ensure you are progressing well and are achieving your full potential. 

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Assessment for Year 2

At the end of each semester you’ll be assessed on the basis of coursework and, for some modules, presentations, projects and exams. You’ll be able to get productive feedback on draft versions of these assignments before the final deadline. 

You’ll be assessed on a wide range of coursework including group and individual presentations, essays, and oral and written case studies. The development of your intercultural competencies includes considering how you might tackle global problems. This will involve the opportunity to work with local organisations and look to make a real impact on the lives of real people. 

Within all modules you’ll be able to speak with module organisers and course directors for immediate feedback. You’ll also be taught to give constructive feedback, a vital skill for any intercultural communicator. 

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Register interest   
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Assessment for Year 3

At the end of each semester you’ll be assessed on the basis of coursework and, for some modules, presentations, projects and exams. You’ll be able to get productive feedback on draft versions of these assignments before the final deadline. 

You’ll be assessed on a wide range of coursework including group and individual presentations, essays, and oral and written case studies. The development of your intercultural competencies includes considering how you might tackle global problems. This will involve the opportunity to work with local organisations and look to make a real impact on the lives of real people. 

Within all modules you’ll be able to speak with module organisers and course directors for immediate feedback. You’ll also be taught to give constructive feedback, a vital skill for any intercultural communicator. 

Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Open Days   

Assessment for Year 4

At the end of each semester you’ll be assessed on the basis of coursework and, for some modules, presentations, projects and exams. You’ll be able to get productive feedback on draft versions of these assignments before the final deadline. 

You’ll be assessed on a wide range of coursework including group and individual presentations, essays, and oral and written case studies. The development of your intercultural competencies includes considering how you might tackle global problems. This will involve the opportunity to work with local organisations and look to make a real impact on the lives of real people. 

Within all modules you’ll be able to speak with module organisers and course directors for immediate feedback. You’ll also be taught to give constructive feedback, a vital skill for any intercultural communicator. 

Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Open Days   

Year 0 (Foundation Year)

Compulsory Modules (60 Credits)

Code HUM-3006A - (20 Credits)

What is university learning? How does it differ to your previous experiences of learning? How does your learning style affect the way that you approach your studies? These are the sorts of questions that you will explore, and find answers to, during this module. This module will provide you with an intensive induction to higher education, equipping you with the essential skills you'll need to reach your full potential on your chosen degree programme. Through the format of weekly seminars and study groups you will focus on developing your skills in areas such as research, essay writing, delivering presentations, teamwork, revision and exam techniques. We will guide you through your learning by using a variety of different tasks. In previous years we have held class debates, followed a learning trail through the library and run interactive research sessions. As part of this module you will create an individual, personalised learning plan in which you will assess your strengths and weaknesses. This will enable you to keep track of your development over the course of this module and beyond. By completing this module, you will know how to apply the techniques and methods you have learned, and how to continue to hone your skills to become a successful Humanities student.

Code HUM-3009A - (20 Credits)

This interdisciplinary module gives you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as ideology, power, and representation, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

Code HUM-3009B - (20 Credits)

Following Key Concepts I, this interdisciplinary module continues to give you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as postmodernism, psychoanalysis, and nationhood, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

Optional Modules A (0-20 Credits)

Students will be enrolled onto HUM-3007A: Creative Industries as a default. If you wish to replace this module with a language, please choose one from the list below.
Students will select 0-20 credits from the following modules:

Code HUM-3007A - (20 Credits)

The term ‘Cultural and Creative Industries’ encompasses a wide range of disciplines taught in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, including film and television, media, arts, and those related to writing, as well as intersecting with aspects of history through the heritage industry. By taking this module, you'll have the opportunity to gain an understanding of these industries that you may wish to work in. Throughout the semester, you'll critically explore a range of creative and cultural fields (television, film, media, art, heritage, publishing – among others), with a particular focus on the complex relationship between theory and practice in the context of the cultural, political, and social frameworks that underpin the work of these industries. On successful completion of the module, you’ll have developed the knowledge and a range of analytical skills that will enable you to understand and engage critically with a competitive cultural and creative industries environment and economy.

Code : Various - (20 Credits)

You can select from a wide range of language modules. For more information, and for a full list of available module options, please visit our Language Options page

Optional Modules B (0-40 Credits)

Students can only take part II of a language module if they have taken the first part of the module in the Autumn semester.
Students will select 0-40 credits from the following modules:

Code HUM-3001B - (20 Credits)

How is history used to inform the society in which we live? What is the relationship between the history we study academically at university and how history is used and consumed in contemporary society? These are some of the questions you will explore in this module. Using examples from modern history and other time periods that inform our understanding of this history as our case study, you will develop the key skills you need to critically analyse the past and the different representations we make about the past. You will develop key skills needed by the historian to analyse different primary and secondary sources, understand the importance of contextualisation and the role of the historian in shaping narratives about the past.

Code HUM-3002B - (20 Credits)

This module introduces you to some of the key ideologies and 'isms' within contemporary political theory which form the focus of contemporary debates. It will encourage you to consider the role that politics plays in your life through the examination of political theory. Radical doctrines such as anarchism and fundamentalism will be discussed and evaluated alongside more traditional ideologies such as socialism, liberalism and conservatism. If you are a Foundation Year student it will have relevance to you in its critical approach to ideology.

Code HUM-3003B - (20 Credits)

Do images have meaning? Why does your favourite film/ television programme/ artist matter? You will discuss these issues in Visual Cultures, as you explore what makes some things beautiful, influential, or culturally significant. The module is designed to develop your appreciation of visual cultures (with a special focus on film, television, and art), and to encourage a deeper intellectual dive into your specific visual cultures interests. Along the way you will participate in some of the key academic debates in the field of visual cultures and familiarise yourself with the tools of these disciplines, such as close textual and contextual analysis, research and essay writing, and class discussion. The module is taught using a variety of learning settings and experiences, including lectures, screenings, workshops, seminars, and tutorials. The assessment likewise aims to develop a range of your academic skills.

Code HUM-3004B - (20 Credits)

This interdisciplinary module introduces a wide range of narratives in a variety of formats, asking students to consider questions such as: What is literature? What is literary theory? How is literature influenced by its historical and cultural contexts? How can the humanities help us to make sense of literary texts? Over the course of the module, you will be introduced to key themes in literary studies, as well as examining the value of reading texts in their interdisciplinary contexts. You will develop your ability to analyse texts, engage with historical and cultural milieus of the texts your read, enhance your understanding of theoretical positions relevant to study throughout the Humanities and construct your own critical arguments.

Code HUM-3008B - (20 Credits)

The impact of rapid technological change is no more apparent than in the various areas of the media—film, television, radio, podcasting, publishing and the various uses of the World Wide Web. In this module you will gain a firm understanding of these relationships while developing your academic and practical skills. You don’t need to have any previous experience media production or any other experience of working with technology to take this module. You’ll study the use of technology in media production and distribution, learn about the impact of social media on news production and consumption, engage in critical listening and viewing alongside the analysis of film music from a technological perspective. You’ll get the chance to engage in a televised debate in the TV studio, explore citizen journalism, create podcasts to demonstrate the impact of your research in your chosen discipline and study how digital technologies and advances in the field of artificial intelligence are affecting research, media production, archiving and restoration. There’ll be opportunities for extra-curricular activities too—in the past we’ve created podcasts for the NHS and for conferences at UEA—and we’ll look at how we can be creative with storytelling.

Code : Various - (20 Credits)

You can select from a wide range of language modules. For more information, and for a full list of available module options, please visit our Language Options page

 

Year 1

Compulsory Modules (80 Credits)

Code NBS-4106A - (20 Credits)

This module helps you to explore the dynamic and ever-changing world of business and provides insights into the managerial role. Understanding the Business Environment explores key environmental drivers and the basic functions of organisations. It is designed to provide essential core knowledge for Year 1 Business students on how organisations are managed in response to changes in the business environment and what is the role of its functional divisions in implementing strategic responses. In addition, the module also explores some of the current issues faced by organisations such as sustainability, corporate social responsibility and internationalisation. Core business theory is introduced in lectures and applied practically with the use of examples in seminars. By the end of this module you will be able to understand and apply key business concepts and a range of analytical tools to explore the business environment. Introduction to Business facilitates study skills development that is essential across all three years of the undergraduate degree by developing academic writing, presentation, team working and communication skills effectively.

Code PPLC4001A - (20 Credits)

You'll be introduced to key themes in the study of language, culture, and intercultural communication. You will, from the first semester of your course, get insights into fields of study such as translation, communication, or cultures of the countries of the degree languages that are taught in the School. You will also become familiar with important academic skills, such as essay writing and referencing, which you will be using throughout your degree. In the 'Language and Culture Workshops,' you will acquire transferable skills in the domain of entreprise and engagement; you will be encouraged to work on your own project in groups and get involved in all aspects of project realisation, such as planning, organisation, presentation, leadership, team work, and decision-making. The workshops are particularly envisaged as a platform for enhancing your employability prospects. A second piece of assessment will allow you to reflect on themes introduced in the lectures and start building critical awareness of issues of language and communication studies.

Code PPLC4012B - (20 Credits)

What does interpersonal communication actually involve? We will learn that interpersonal communication requires specific intercultural competences, especially when communicating with others who have different sets of assumptions that may lead to misunderstanding, even if the same language is used. This module will equip you with ways of thinking about issues such as language, (non) verbal communication, identity, intercultural interpersonal relationships and intercultural transitions. You will also learn that interpersonal communication involves a high level of self-awareness and critical understanding of issues surrounding the concept of identity. Through lectures and seminars, you will delve deeply into how you present yourself to others who are perceived to be different to you. On successful completion of the module, you will have developed greater self-awareness and sensitivity to intercultural understanding so that you are a more effective interpersonal communicator in international or multicultural settings, such as the year abroad, overseas work, global organisations, multinational companies, foreign volunteering placements, etc. The module is delivered in the English language and you don’t need to speak a foreign language to take it.

Code PPLC4002B - (20 Credits)

This module will provide an introduction to how we begin to analyse different languages and cultures. You will explore different theories and approaches, such as sociolinguistics, anthropology, and cultural theory, to develop your critical and analytical skills, and develop your knowledge ready for the second year of your degree. This module will be accessed via coursework. This module will provide an introduction to how we begin to analyse different languages and cultures. You will explore different theories and approaches, such as sociolinguistics, anthropology, and cultural theory, to develop your critical and analytical skills, and develop your knowledge ready for the second year of your degree. This module will be accessed via coursework. This module will provide an introduction to how we begin to analyse different languages and cultures. You will explore different theories and approaches, such as sociolinguistics, anthropology, and cultural theory, to develop your critical and analytical skills, and develop your knowledge ready for the second year of your degree. This module will be accessed via coursework.

Optional Modules A (0-40 Credits)

Students will select 0-40 credits from the following modules:

Code DEV-4008B - (20 Credits)

This module will critically explore changing trends in humanitarian communication by both the international news media and international development actors, such as Non-Governmental Organisations. This will include a critical review of media representations of development in the Global South and the role and responsibility of journalists reporting about humanitarian crises and poverty. We will also explore conventional strategies of humanitarian communication, such as ‘pornography of poverty’, as well as more contemporary issues such as the role of celebrities, social media and the rise of ‘post-humanitarian’ communication. With case studies ranging from Live Aid to Kony 2012, you will be introduced to key concepts and theoretical approaches cutting across a range of disciplines. This module also contains an integral practical skills component. Speakers from leading NGOs and experienced practitioners will share their insights about the everyday complexities of humanitarian communication and a number of workshops will focus on a relevant hands-on skills such blogging and the basics of development photography.

Code PPLM4001B - (20 Credits)

Trump’s Tweets, Corbyn’s “fans”, and personalised campaign messages sent by algorithms…political communication has changed drastically in the last five years. Pundits and some scholars warn of serious dangers to democracy. What are the tricks of the trade in modern political communication and how different are they from those of the past? How does one now succeed to get across a message and gain support? Should we be worried about the implications for political discourse and decision-making? This module will enable you to critically assess the role of communication in national and international politics and help you understand the dynamics among political actors, media and citizens in opinion formation and decision-making. This is a professional practice module in which you will gain skills relevant to the conduct of political communications and to many other work environments, as well as experience working in a team on a task that requires critical thinking and collaborative strategizing. This module is ideal for anyone interested in working in politics, diplomacy, journalism, marketing, or for advocacy or activist civil society groups. Ideas about the power of communications and the ways that various political actors use that power are at the heart of this module. You’ll examine how these actors use the media in political communications. Lectures and readings will cover media effects, how political communication has changed with changes in media technology, branding and celebrity in politics, and soft power with political communication at the international level, as well as the tools used by various political actors, such as political parties or civic movements. Lectures are interactive, using an audience response system and open discussion. Seminar activities include practical tasks as well as ones to enhance understanding of the readings. The first assessed work is a group project in which you will play the role of junior analysts in a communications consultancy and you will work together to assess the political communications of a real political actor, your “client”, producing a report and presentation that includes recommendations for improvement. The second is an essay that gives you the chance to develop your ability to analyse and synthesise. By the end of this module you will be able to identify and describe the actors and their interests in a given political communications contexts, as well as formulate and articulate clear arguments about the relationships between political actors and the media in relation to power and agency. You will have gained experience in a simulated work scenario that will give you skills transferable across a number of professions as you will have delivered analysis and recommendations in a professional-style presentation and report. You will also be able evaluate political communications’ role in an international context, something increasingly necessary in the ever more globalized world both for political and corporate actors.

Code AMAM4010A - (20 Credits)

You will explore the many ways television has been examined, explored, understood, and used. You will focus particularly on the specifics of the medium; that is, how television is different from (and, in some ways, similar to) other media such as film, radio, and the internet. Each week will focus on a particular idea which is seen as central to the examination of television. The medium will be explored as an industry, as a range of texts, and as a social activity.

Code LDCL4021B - (20 Credits)

How has English crossed geographical, linguistic and social borders? What are the legacies of these movements for the literature we read and the ways we speak? In Writing Across Borders, you’ll study the emergence of modern English from a multilingual medieval society and its colonial expansion to Ireland, Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. You’ll investigate the histories of translation, religious mission, education, violence, exploitation and political control that have given rise to the global reach of English as a means of cultural exchange. The module will focus on examples of writers who have responded critically and creatively to these histories, asking how they have used distinctive forms of English to articulate their experience and understanding of their world. It will provide you with a conceptual vocabulary to describe different forms of language such as register, dialect and creole, which you’ll apply to analysis of a range of literary texts that may include songs, religious works, translations, travel writing, plays, novels and poems. You’ll engage with a variety of perspectives on established debates about speech communities, the status of ‘standard’ English and the relation between language and broader narratives of identity. You’ll be encouraged to think about the hybridity of English and the ways that the language you use, read and hear expresses histories and social differences.

Code AMAM4033B - (20 Credits)

This module introduces you to a range of influential thinkers whose work has shaped Media Studies. It will provide you with the foundational knowledge you need to progress with confidence onto more specialist modules in your second and third year. You will compare and contrast how different scholars have tried to explain the role of the media in creating communities, in reproducing social inequalities, but also in driving social change. You will discuss whether we need to study media audiences, media content or media industries in order to understand media power. The module will help you develop your own voice as a researcher and writer. You will learn how to effectively compare and contrast complex theoretical arguments and how to place your own argument within the context of academic debate. You will have opportunity to apply your knowledge of media theories to a small piece of media research and to express your research ideas not only through writing, but also through a creative media project.

Code PPLP4061A - (20 Credits)

This introductory module is designed to invite you into philosophical enquiry by engaging in a conversation with some of the most famous philosophers of the past. We start with a classic work by Plato, from the birth of philosophy in Classical Greece, and we finish with a classic work from medieval or modern philosophy that has been of major significance. In between, we typically focus on one other text, usually a famous work by Aristotle. The texts you study are in English. You will learn to do philosophy in dialogue with thinkers whose ideas and arguments are not just brilliant ‘for their time’, but brilliant for our time and for all time. You will come away thinking differently about many things that you had never properly asked about before. The module is suitable for those with no prior knowledge of philosophy. You should come with an open mind, or willing to open your mind.

Code PPLP4062A  - (20 Credits)

What is the meaning of life? This burning question is at the heart of philosophy. We will explore the ways in which philosophy can help us tackle it. We will investigate a diverse range of philosophical perspectives from different areas of philosophy each of which interprets the question in a slightly different way. We will look at the work of philosophers such as Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Patricia Churchland, Leibniz, Christine Korsgaard, Daniel Dennett, Martha Nussbaum, Confucius, Elizabeth Barnes, Immanuel Kant, Christine Swanton, Epicurus. We'll grapple with ideas that inform our understanding of ourselves and our place in the world. What, if anything, is ultimately of value in life? Is freedom to affect your future important, and do you have that freedom? Could you have a meaningful life in an artificial reality? Is there a reason you exist? Should you radically change the way you are living? What should be done about existential threats such as Climate Change? The module provides a firm foundation for your further studies, as these issues are at the heart of philosophy and also at the foundation of related disciplines, such as politics and economics.

Code PPLP4063B- (20 Credits)

What am I? What kind of world am I in? How can I know about it? How should I live my life? In this module, you’ll grapple with fundamental philosophical questions that have great personal significance for each of us. You’ll focus on perspectives from the history of modern philosophy (ca. 1650 to 1950). You’ll get to debate the ideas of key thinkers, which might include Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, as well as other less well-known figures. This module will be suitable for you with or without prior experience of philosophy, and whether or not you are studying philosophy as part of your degree. It is a useful accompaniment to work in early modern history and English literature.

Code PPLP4066A- (20 Credits)

This module examines a number of philosophical issues that arise in contemporary applied scenarios. These may include important ethical and social dilemmas that confront medical professionals, policy makers, and the general public. We will be discussing theoretical differences between general philosophical accounts of morality and justice, and analyzing their practical implications in debates about issues such as genetic engineering, human experimentation and human enhancement, resource allocation, race-based medicine, disability and well-being. This module will enable students to identify and analyse different philosophical approaches to selected issues in areas of applied philosophy, such as bioethics and science and technology studies. Students will gain insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments, and develop skills that will enable them to think clearly about philosophical and ethical questions in their future careers, leadership roles, and as members of society.

Code PPLT4001A (20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the main concepts and areas of Translation Studies. Translation Studies is the field of study that deals with the theory, description, and application of translation. The skills of translation are becoming more important and desirable than ever in an ever globalising world. With the increase in multiculturalism and multilingualism, societies are demanding effective, efficient, and empathetic communication between languages and cultures.

Code PPLT4001A (20 Credits)

This module introduces you to a few important and interesting writers and thinkers whose ideas have been so influential that they have become part of, and have even transformed, our society, culture and politics. As you read their work, learning how to make sense of it and arguing about it with others, you will come to think more deeply about the workings and politics of contemporary society and culture: the forces that shape it and the contradictions that define it. You will pay special attention to the three fundamental values that have shaped modern society and politics since the French Revolution: liberty, equality and fraternity. This will underpin your studies on other modules (in Political Science, International Relations, Media, History and Literature) and provide you with a strong basis upon which to develop your knowledge in Levels 2 and 3.

Options Range B (0-40 Credits) 

Students may not select modules in more than one subsidiary language over the course of their degree.
Students will select 0-40 credits from the following modules:

Code: Various -  (20 Credits)

You can select from a wide range of language modules. For more information, and for a full list of available module options, please visit our Language Options page.

 

Year 2

Compulsory Modules (40 Credits)

Code PPLC5168A - (20 Credits)

Have you ever thought about what you could do to improve the world? This module will help you find answers to this question. We will explore how you can become a more informed and engaged global citizen by developing your intercultural and citizenship competences. You will develop the knowledge, critical understanding, values and attitudes that can be mobilised and deployed in a broad range of fields involving intercultural communication. The seminars will be highly interactive and the assessment will involve practical projects. A distinctive feature of this module is the practical understanding and application of concepts to specific intercultural issues and global challenges in critically reflective teaching sessions. The teaching will offer a balance between practice and theory and classroom sessions will include group work activities and public lectures. Through this module you will enhance your opportunities to gain employment where intercultural communication to real-life contexts is required. By the end of this module you will have developed the ability to employ effective and persuasive arguments in the formulation of solutions to real global challenges. The module will be delivered in English and you don’t need to speak a foreign language to take it.

Code PPLC5172B - (20 Credits)

Interested in how and why countries communicate? Want to know more about what happens when communication between countries goes wrong? Are global companies behaving like sovereign nations? Since humans evolved a sense of identity, group belonging, and hierarchy, our relationships with our neighbours have been constantly changing as we compete over resources and space. We will explore intercultural ‘incidents’ between different countries, socio-cultural groups and global organisations and will introduce you to ways that we can analyse how the different perceptions of these ‘incidents’ are reflected in the media. You’ll gain a firm grounding in global communication, and analytical methods and concepts. You’ll begin the module by exploring fundamentals of global communication and how we can start to analyse media sources, using a range of case studies and real world examples. You’ll then delve deeper, discussing key topics such as diplomacy, propaganda, censorship, laws, and the evolution of global companies as legal entities and political persuaders. By looking at the different ways countries, Ambassadors, political leaders and countries communicate, you’ll really approach the subject of intercultural communication from a Global perspective. You’ll learn through a mixture of seminars and self-directed study. You’ll be assessed though a piece of course work and a group project. You will have to deliver a formative presentation. On successful completion of the module, you’ll have established your analytical knowledge and skills needed to support more advanced modules on Discourse Analysis. You’ll develop your research, writing, group work and presentation skills. And you’ll explore global issues of concern and really get to grips with how media sources can different when discussing the same incident.

Optional Modulese A (20 Credits)

If you wish to take NBS-5120A or NBS-6122B in Year 3, you must take NBS-4105B from this option range. If you wish to take PPLA5030B LCS Semester Abroad Module, you must take NBS-4929A.
Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Code NBS-4105B - (20 Credits)

This module is a general introduction and foundational grounding to Marketing. It is concerned with marketing functions of an organisation and seeks to develop awareness and understanding of marketing as an integrated and business activity. It focuses on the theoretical frameworks which underpin an organisation's responses to market demand. Additionally, it considers examples of marketing strategy and planning for a variety of organisational contexts to provide an industry perspective to theory. It is suitable for all UEA students and is a stand-alone module.

Code NBS-4929A - (20 Credits)

What is an organisation? What do we mean by management? How do you lead and manage people? In this module, you will have the opportunity to explore these questions and many more in the fascinating area of management and organisations. You will consider the social world of business and management and what it means in theory and in practice. You will learn about leading, managing and organising people in work settings and why that is critical to organisational effectiveness. You will also reflect on how you work in teams yourself. On successful completion of the module, you will have discovered key insights into the way that organisations exist in practice, and have the knowledge to understand them at a conceptual level. You will also have had opportunities for self-reflection and personal learning.

Optional Modules B (60 Credits)

Students may not select modules in more than one subsidiary language over the course of their degree.
Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Code DEV-5015A - (20 Credits)

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media – both ‘old’ and ‘new’ - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? You will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of ‘Communication for Development’ (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, press freedom, media literacy, media and conflict and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to International Development students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

Code AMAS5024B - (20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce students to strategies and techniques for analysing photographs and, more specifically, uses the visual record to study and illuminate the history of the USA. Viewed here as sites of historical evidence, photographic portraits, family albums, anthropological illustrations, lynching postcards, advertisements, food packaging, fashion photos are just some of the pictures that will be "read" and evaluated. Students will explore how visual texts can contribute to an understanding of nationhood, class, race, sexuality and identity in the USA, with an emphasis on the nineteenth century. Opening sessions will focus on ways of "reading" visual texts. [No previous experience of working with images is necessary]. Most of the semester will be devoted to analysing how photographic images both reflect and contribute to constructions of American identities and culture.

Code HIS-5050B - (20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the history and theory of propaganda, and its role in society. You’ll consider what constitutes and defines propaganda. Focusing on the 20th century, we examine propaganda in a range of political settings, both totalitarian and democratic, in the local context of the relationships of power and communications. The module is structured chronologically, starting with the development of propaganda during World War I and finishing with a consideration of propaganda in the 21st century.

Code HUM-5011B- (20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the practical and theoretical study of digital media. By exploring the historical and contemporary aspects of various media, including text, audio-visual, you will consider how the digital turn has affected media production and consumption. You will also gain awareness of the technologies which underpin digital media, the interfaces for delivering media online, and the cultural and social aspects of digitisation. By the end of the module, you will be able to evaluate digital media in their contemporary and historical contexts, and understand the principles which influence the digital remediation of media forms. You will gain hands-on experience of turning analogue materials into digital media, drawing on sessions based in UEA’s archives, and use these creations to explore cutting edge digital approaches to media texts. These practical sessions will introduce students to: digitisation of text and images; digital asset management and metadata creation; image processing; digitisation of audio-visual media. Each of these sessions will serve to illuminate particular theoretical issues, including media archiving, reproduction and restoration, and the problems associated with ephemerality and preservation in the digital age.

Code LDCC5013A - (20 Credits)

What kinds of writing skills produce great journalism? This question is essential to creating powerful journalism and it’s a central concern of this module. The Writing of Journalism enables you to develop a critical awareness of the skills and structures involved in creating effective journalism. You’ll consider a range of journalistic forms and find out how best to nurture and develop your own writing. You'll have the opportunity to explore the ways in which journalistic writing works – its contexts, its demands, and its inventiveness. This will enable us to approach journalism as a discourse with its own conventions, practices, and ideologies. This module is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. As such, it involves discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. In addition to writing your own journalism, you will examine journalistic writing and critical work concerning the craft, in order to probe and challenge your own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of this writing form. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this module aims to engage you as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, you’ll gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen your own work, and gain the discursive flexibility which will allow you to navigate the writing of journalism today.

Code HUM-5004B - (20 Credits)

This module will provide you with the opportunity work within a creative/cultural/charity/ heritage/media or other appropriate organisation in order to apply the skills you are developing through your degree to the working world and to develop your knowledge of employment sectors within which you may wish to work in the future. The module emphasises industry experience, sector awareness and personal development through a structured reflective learning experience. Having sourced and secured your own placement (with support from Careers Central), you work within your host organisation undertaking tasks that will help you to gain a better understanding of professional practices within your chosen sector. Taught sessions enable you to acquire knowledge of both the industries in which you are placed as well as focusing on personal and professional development germane to the sector. Your assessment tasks will provide you with an opportunity to critically reflect on the creative and cultural sector in which you have worked as well as providing opportunities to undertake presentations, gather evidence, and articulate your newly acquired skills and experiences

Code PPLA5030B - (60 Credits)

Students often say that spending a semester abroad expands their horizons and improves their career prospects. You will be able to judge this claim for yourself by completing this module. You will experience a different educational culture and develop new perspectives on learning. Assessed formatively and summatively by the host university and on successful completion of the semester abroad, you will have developed the knowledge and skills to study in a foreign academic environment with more confidence. Assessment will be in the foreign institution and you might be assessed via different methods depending on the institution you attend. You must take responsibility for registering for a full time course of study at your host university. Failure to enrol full time could result in ineligibility to return to UEA. You need to do this in consultation with your UEA Study Abroad Coordinator. Further details of the paperwork you will need to complete are available from the Study Abroad Office. You must select appropriate modules at the host university in consultation with your UEA Study Abroad Coordinator. You must take full responsibility for having your learning agreement approved and signed by your Study Abroad Academic Coordinator. You must submit your learning agreement to the Study Abroad office (studyabroad@uea.ac.uk) within the first week of your semester abroad. Extenuating Circumstances: Factors (personal or medical) that are affecting your ability to maintain your academic performance abroad should be brought to the attention of your host university and your UEA Adviser who will provide guidance on the options open to you. Guidance can also be sought from the Arts Hub. Interrupting your studies If, for any reason, you need to withdraw from your host university, you must notify UEA Study Abroad Office and your Study Abroad Academic Coordinator immediately. You will then need to apply for permission from UEA to take a break in your studies. You will be liable for payment of fees in accordance with the published cut-off dates: https://portal.uea.ac.uk/planningoffice/tuition-fees. Students will be required to pay back any scholarship or funding received, as well as any outstanding debts incurred at the Semester Abroad institution (such as accommodation).

Code PPLF5175A - (20 Credits)

Today, French is still spoken on all five continents. Whether you are interested in language, culture, history, or politics of the French-speaking world, this module is perfect to expand your awareness of those aspects beyond the Hexagon. You'll study the origins of the Francophonie and discuss the relevance of the organisation. Studying the variety of contexts and societies in the French-speaking world today will allow you not only to contrast situations but also to understand important challenges and the role and impact of policies at different levels, from local administration to international relations. You will discuss issues of postcolonialism, study key events and personalities and explore many important cultural aspects. You will analyse a range of material, in English, that will include newspaper and magazine articles, television, and radio programmes and will also learn from academic journals on the topics. At the end of this module, you will have a broader understanding of the cultural, historical, economic, linguistic, and geopolitical links between France, its overseas territories and the rest of the French-speaking world. Teaching and assessment will be in English.

Code PPLI5044A - (20 Credits)

Who rules the EU? What does it do concretely for EU citizens? How democratic is it? How serious are the challenges it is currently facing, from the reform of its economic governance to Brexit? To explore these questions, and more, you'll examine the development, structure, nature and functions of the European Union. You'll look at the history and theories of European integration from the 1940s to the present day. You'll explore the institutions and processes which run the EU, and demystify its main policies. The aim of the module is not only to ensure that you understand the ‘nuts and bolts’ of what the EU is and how it works. You'll also examine critically and articulate contending arguments on key issues such as the role of the member-states in the European system of governance; the EU's democratic credentials; the causes and consequences of Brexit; or the influence of the EU in the world. The EU is an integral part of its member states' structures of governance and it influences their domestic political, social and cultural life, as well as EU neighbouring countries. Understanding how the European Union works is important in many jobs at local, national or international levels in the public, private and third (community and voluntary) sectors. This module is recommended if you intend to progress to the 'European Studies with Brussels Internship’ module in Year 3.

Code PPLI5156A- (20 Credits)

Latin America is a fascinating region that spans two continents and encompasses hugely divergent geographies. With vast economic, cultural, racial, environmental and political inequalities, Latin America is the birthplace of radical ideas about social justice, development, sustainability, and participatory democracy. The world has much to learn from the experiences and knowledge of its diverse populations. This module offers an overview of Latin America from a decolonial perspective. You’ll study the conquest and colonisation of the region from the viewpoints of those who suffer its political, socioeconomic, and environmental consequences today. You’ll then study the dynamic ways in which Latin American peoples have used the media and popular cultural forms to assert competing ideas in the region, and to tell their own stories. You’ll focus on topics such as Indigenous rights, racism and racial theory, migration and forced displacement, religion and spirituality, US-relations and the ‘war on drugs’, LGBTQ rights, and key social/cultural movements.

Code PPLI5161B - (20 Credits)

What if I told you that the West was no longer the power centre of the world’s economy? Could Pax Sinica provincialize the UK as political economic power settles over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta? What would Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich List have to say about global transformations underway in the global political economy? And, as Susan Strange famously put it: cui bono: Who benefits from all these transformations? Multinational corporations, nation states, financial sector, exporting economies, citizens? You’ll investigate the accumulation of wealth, movement of capital, centres of power, flows of globalisation, patterns of trade, and the ubiquity of finance in a world being transformed by innovation where emerging powers challenge the status quo of North Atlantic powerhouses.

Code PPLJ5012B - (20 Credits)

In this module, you’ll analyse contemporary Japanese society using topical issues in Japan and deepen your understanding of the country and people. All lectures are conducted in English. Throughout the module, you’ll learn about various topical issues such as family, gender and education, uncover the roots behind these and develop your findings and ideas into a discussion. You’ll use various materials including academic articles and digital resources including online news articles and audio-visual materials. Through not only reading the news but also considering the stories in depth and the reasons behind the issues happening in Japan, you’ll develop and improve your research and analytical skills. You’ll also be able to discern and compare similarities and differences between Japanese culture and society and your own country.

Code PPLJ5147A - (20 Credits)

Japanese popular culture is now a global phenomenon. To understand how this came about, you will study the topic in terms of theories of social, economical, and historical analysis. You will learn about various cultural forms and practices, including manga/anime, media, art, and music in Japan as seen from different perspectives. You will also discuss and critically analyse the role of Japanese popular culture within and outside Japan. Your seminars will consist of three main parts: lectures, original audio/video materials, and group discussion or activities. Your contribution to weekly discussion/activities is essential. Lectures, reading materials, and assessments will all be in English. On successful completion of this module, you will have a good understanding of the main genres of Japanese popular culture, and be able to further explore your own interests, academically, in any form of Japanese popular culture.

Code PPLL5170A - (20 Credits)

Do accents define us? Do we need to change how we speak depending on who we are speaking to? Is language sexist? These are key questions to consider when think about sociolinguistics, the study of language and society. After all, Language is a powerful thing, an aspect of human behaviour that both defines and reflects the cultural norms of different societies. Our aim is to provide an introduction to sociolinguistics and throughout the module you will discover a wealth of different approaches to analysing language in relations to many different social variables, such as class, gender or social distance. You’ll gain a firm grounding in sociolinguistic frameworks, methods and concepts, and also learn how to communicate linguistic ideas, principles and theories by written, oral and visual means. You’ll begin with an overview of the field of sociolinguistics and key social variables. You’ll then delve deeper, uncovering core concepts such as dialectology, Code-switching, genderlects, language policy, multilingualism, and interpersonal dynamics. By looking at the different methods and types of evidence used by sociolinguists, you’ll become proficient in the different ways of working in this fascinating subject. Learning will be through a mixture of seminars and self-directed study. Seminars will include practical opportunities to practice your skills in linguistic analysis. You’ll be assessed though coursework (100%), but will present your research for your coursework during the module as part of the formative assessment. The module is open to anyone interested in learning more about sociolinguistics, and you do not need to be studying a language to take this module – just have an interest in language and how we use it. On successful completion of the module, you’ll have the knowledge and skills to take your understanding of language and society, and how we communication and interpret this communication, and apply it to many different areas of study. You’ll develop your research, writing and presentation skills. And you’ll be able to communicate your ideas more effectively, putting your thinking to the test by sharing it with others.

Code PPLL5175A - (20 Credits)

Have you thought about becoming a language teacher? Do you know what that means? Would you like to give it a try? This is an introduction to second language teaching and learning, where you will explore theoretical and practical approaches to language learning. You will learn what teaching a foreign language means through different methodologies and practical approaches, as well as understanding the peculiarities of both language and culture in second language acquisition, emphasizing factors like context, motivation, first language or individual characteristics. Participation will be in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of second language learning and teaching. You will be able to observe real language classrooms and deliver language teaching in real contexts, and also gain a greater understanding of what theoretical and practical aspects of teaching and learning are essential in foreign languages.

Code PPLM5002A - (20 Credits)

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. You will examine both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media and sociology, politics and cultural studies, you will explore the relationship between feminist theory and activism.

Code PPLM5003B - (20 Credits)

What role do media and communication play in processes of globalisation? How is an ever more global media creating cultural change? In this module you will explore the cultural implications of global media and culture by investigating audience practices and media representations. It begins by introducing the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation, before examining how these work in practice. Indicative topics include the power of global branding, global celebrity culture, global publics and local audiences, transnational cultures, and representations of migration.

Code PPLM5005B - (20 Credits)

How should we deal with the dissemination of 'fake news'? What role do algorithms play in the media we consume, and is it concerning? What kind of government intervention is there in media markets and in cultural life and how does this get decided? This module will enable you to understand the dynamics and issues of media and cultural policy and how various levels of governance are involved in regulating media cultural sectors. The module will start by introducing you to public policy and policy making processes, covering multi-level governance, multi-stakeholderism, and the policy cycle. It will then enhance your understanding though deep dives into current issues in media and cultural policy, such as audiovisual media policy, arts institutions, net neutrality, harmful content on platforms, sports and premium content rights, urban regeneration through culture, evolving models of (self/co-)regulation. The module will draw on examples from across the globe and at various level including local, regional, national and supra-national policy making, with special efforts made to integrate ones from non-Western contexts. You will have the opportunity to work on real policy issues and practice professional skills in simulations and assessment activities. This module is for anyone interested in media and culture or in public policy in general. It covers topics that touch our daily lives so would be useful to anyone concerned about the shape of our society.

Code PPLM5042B - (20 Credits)

How do the media shape how we see ourselves? Or indeed how others see us? In a world of social media, self-branding and the increasing importance of mediated forms of identity, on this module you will explore critical ways of thinking about the relationship between culture, media and the self. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module asks you to use research methods from autoethnography to content analysis to explore both their own identities and the way in which identities more broadly are formulated through contemporary media culture. Through discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, you will critically reflect upon the relationship between media culture and social power and consider how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, you should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption. Assessment is by group presentation and independent research project.

Code PPLM5053A - (20 Credits)

For better or worse, digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide you with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media.

Code PPLT5026B - (20 Credits)

What factors need to be born in mind when creating subtitles? What tools are used to create these texts? This module provides first-hand experience of subtitling and dubbing of film clips and documentaries, which will provide you with first hand, practical, experience of this important media technique. You’ll become familiar with software used for interlingual and intralingual subtitling and dubbing at professional level, studying the linguistic and technical constraints for the creation of audio-visual texts. You’ll undertake practical exercises involving cueing, text compression and segmentation, respecting time and space constraints and that will teach you how to conform the conventions of good practice. You’ll explore, analyse and assess different types of technological tools used for audio-visual translation at professional and amateur levels, using selected film/TV series/documentary extracts in several languages. Practical activities are used creating challenges posed by the interplay of audio, image and text. Studying this module will provide you with the necessary skills for the creation of subtitles at a professional level, giving you practical experience of using professional software. Taught together with Level 6. Assessment commensurate with level. This module is not suitable for year 2 students of Japanese Ab Initio or Post GCSE because of the challenging nature of the assessment tasks (comprehension and translation of authentic Japanese video clip extracts). Should you wish to explore media accessibility tools, 'Technological Tools for Media Accessibility' (Level 5) is available. Please note that final year Japanese degree students are welcome to join the equivalent module at Level 6 'Technological Tools for Subtitling and Dubbing'.

Code PPLT5176A - (20 Credits)

What tools are used for audiences with sensory impairments, both visual and/or hearing to help them access films, documentaries, TV series, etc? This module provides first-hand experience of the technical tools used to create this type of audio-visual text. You will learn the specific requirements and theoretical characteristics and become aware of the grammatical and syntactical features of the language used for subtitling for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (SDH) and audio description (AD). You’ll explore and become skilled in the use of software used for media accessibility: professional subtitling software is used for pre-recorded subtitles as well as software for live subtitles (voice recognition). You’ll develop subtitling and audio description skills in a variety of registers and styles, translating programs from various sources (films, corporate videos, documentaries) and covering a broad range of specialised genres and media issues. The module is taught and all activities as part of the module are carried out in English. In addition, reflection on the practice of media accessibility in other languages will be encouraged and used as a key element for discussion in the module. The study of this module will provide you with the necessary skills for the creation of subtitles at professional level. Taught together with Level 6. Assessment commensurate with level.

Code: Various -  (20 Credits)

You can select from a wide range of language modules. For more information, and for a full list of available module options, please visit our Language Options page.

 

Year 3

Compulsory Modules (40 Credits)

Code PPLC6138A - (20 Credits)

Do you want to become an efficient intercultural communicator in Business settings? This module will allow you to develop your intercultural competence in the workplace in order to become an efficient intercultural communicator. You will be taught several strategies to acquire intercultural competence, especially in business contexts and the workplace. You will apply theoretical approaches to intercultural communication in order to understand how to be successful in communication across cultures, and to solve intercultural conflicts in Business contexts. You will take part in classroom-based activities in pairs and small groups with students from other cultures. You will analyse case studies in which cultural clashes impact on different areas of business and management, such as marketing, human relations, and international negotiations. You will develop intercultural competence in different business and work-related contexts. You will be able to build intercultural understanding, the promotion of international business exchanges, and the facilitation of cross-cultural adaptation. You may also get some insight in how to develop cultural consultancy for businesses. You will be assessed at the end of the module by an essay.

Code PPLC6004B - (20 Credits)

Do you want to become an efficient intercultural communicator in Business settings? This module will allow you to develop your intercultural competence in the workplace in order to become an efficient intercultural communicator. You will be taught several strategies to acquire intercultural competence, especially in business contexts and the workplace. You will apply theoretical approaches to intercultural communication in order to understand how to be successful in communication across cultures, and to solve intercultural conf

Optional Modules A (20 Credits)

If you wish to take NBS-5120A or NBS-6122B, you must have previously taken NBS-4105B.
Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Code NBS-5111B - (20 Credits)

How do we know what is morally right and wrong in business? What new and complex ethical issues are raised by the globalisation of business? Questions like these are central to this module.    In this module you will learn about the nature, applications and consequences of ethics in business. You’ll discover why individuals sometimes make unethical business decisions. You will learn to use theoretical tools that help you to identify and analyse key ethical problems associated with business practice. You will also gain knowledge of practical approaches for managing business ethics in organisations. This module is ideal for those with an interest in corporate responsibility and sustainability.    You will begin with an overview of what business ethics is and why it is important. You will go on to master the major ethical theories and concepts that form the core of business ethics. You’ll then build on these foundations to explore important business ethics issues – examples could include whistleblowing, environmental sustainability, corporate influence and/or others. You will discover how to use ethical theories to gain an in-depth understanding of whether, and to what extent, such issues are ethically problematic. You will also gain hands-on experience of applying ethical theories to business scenarios through a range of activities (e.g. role play, small group exercises, case study). You will learn through a combination of interactive lectures and seminars, and independent study. You’ll be assessed through coursework and an exam.    By successfully completing this module you will have new knowledge and skills that increase your ethical awareness and enable you to communicate your ideas clearly and systematically based on evidence. You’ll also be equipped with theoretical tools that will help you to identify and analyse ethical problems and make ethically justifiable decisions.

Code NBS-5120A - (20 Credits)

How do businesses go about getting their messages across to their customers? This module will explain how modern organisations plan their communications with the people that matter to them.    You will discover the range of activities and tools which is available to marketing managers from traditional advertising and public relations (PR) to the more up-to-date product placement and social media. You’ll look at the issues that arise in planning, implementing and managing Integrated Marketing Communications - IMC - campaign. These include print and broadcast advertising, PR, sponsorship, product placement, sales promotion, experiential and event-marketing as well as direct and digital marketing.

Code NBS-5131A - (20 Credits)

In today’s global, rapidly changing knowledge-based economy, learning and experimenting with employable and creative skills is one of the smartest investments that one can make for their future career. The overall aim of the module is to encourage students to develop key employability skills that will stand them in good stead for a future career. The module will put the student right in the centre of their own learning and engagement with an array of developmental activities designed to develop themselves and their future careers. Students will find opportunities to practice skills such as communication, leadership, creativity, design thinking, and problem solving relevant to the expectations of graduate employers. The module also involves the development of practical employable skills including preparing CV, writing a cover letter, and preparing for job interviews. The module draws from an interdisciplinary perspective to understand career success, self-making and personal branding.  It will build on foundational concepts and skills in career development from across disciplines, including psychology, business, design thinking, entrepreneurship, and employability.  It is designed as a learning environment and a management trainee program that focuses on the development of knowledge and skills for students interested in distinctive career success in a rapidly changing world. A core belief underlying our approach, demonstrated in interactive sessions, stems from the Chinese proverb, “Tell me and I forget. Show me and I remember. Involve me and I understand.” Students will have intensive brainstorming sessions, professional development workshops and training programs to develop and apply professional skills for their careers.

Code NBS-6122B - (20 Credits)

NB: This module will not be available to students until the academic year 2022-23.  The module focuses on brand management. It takes a very pragmatic approach, showing through numerous case studies how organisations launch brands, establish and maintain brand equity, and how they manage brands over time and geographic boundaries.   To develop a knowledge and understanding of brand management, students study the factors and strategies that contribute to building brand equity. The lectures will be supported by a series of seminar sessions which allow students to experience the practical application of the module syllabus and to test their understanding of the relevant theories. This module is particularly useful for students aiming at careers in marketing, advertising or market research. 

Optional Modules B (60 Credits)

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Code AMAM6102A - (20 Credits)

This is a 20-credit module, available to visiting/exchange students. Within this module you will explore the concept of Japanese cinema in relation to national, transnational and global discourses and seek to reframe discussions of modern and past Japanese filmmaking. We will examine a variety of Japanese films and the ways in which they interact with the history, techniques and culture of Japan. We will also consider the social and commercial nature of Japanese filmmaking, including the ways in which Japanese films circulate the globe.

Code EDUB6002B - (20 Credits)

You will critically consider the relationship between media and education, considering what effect the media has in shaping knowledge, what role education plays in supporting media narratives, and how media and education influence cultural and social issues. You will draw upon current social and cultural issues and explore how these issues are shaped and discussed through the intersecting narratives of media and education. You will consider and reflect on current topics that may include issues around gender, sexuality, religion, youth, class, and sport.

Code HUM-6006A - (20 Credits)

The transnational movement of bodies, images, and capital has transformed modern conceptualisations of gender and sexuality. Sexual practices, identities, and subcultural formations have been altered through processes of migration and globalisation, as well as by the advent of new media technologies and the wide-reaching circulation of categories such as gay, lesbian, and transgender. In this context, this module aims to situate categories of gender and sexual difference within specific cultural and political contexts, and investigate non-normative gender and sexual formations in relation to emerging discourses on race and class and to anti-colonial theories of modernity and global capitalism. At the centre of the module sit questions such as: How have queer subjects been incorporated into nationalist projects and consumer culture? How has the liberal framework of human rights reshaped the struggles of queer movements outside the West? In what ways have transnational discourses on multiculturalism reshaped notions of queer community and belonging in global cities and in postcolonial metropolitan spaces? What role have media technologies and various forms of visual culture played in the reconstitution of gender and sexual identities and of representations of queer desire, affect, and kinship? Addressing these questions from an interdisciplinary perspective, and drawing on case studies from different geographical regions and from different disciplinary fields, the overall aim of the module is to explore the varied ways local histories and geographies interact with the forces of political, economic, and cultural globalisation, focusing especially on the experiences of sexual minorities in the Global South and of queer diasporas in the Global North.

Code PPLC6003B - (20 Credits)

This is your opportunity to undertake research on a specialist subject of your own choosing. You will work closely with your supervisor to identify a topic that you wish to research. The topic can relate to any topic or issue in the general areas of language, culture, society, business, history, politics, communication, and so on. You will be able to demonstrate the ability to create a piece of independent work produced over an extended period, receiving constructive and thought-provoking feedback from your supervisor. The dissertation (written in English) provides an excellent opportunity to work independently and so take a positive and active role in your learning. The module runs in a slightly different way to usual, you will only have a few formal seminars, covering subjects such as how to reference, plagiarism, structure arguments, etc. But you will be expected to meet regularly with your assigned supervisor and spend the majority of your time researching your chosen subject. By the end of this module you will have produced an extended piece of writing (5,000-6,000 words), divided into chapters/sections. By completing the dissertation, you will be able to demonstrate independent research skills and project management skills, key skills needed for life after University or for postgraduate education, like a Master’s degree.

Code PPLI6070A - (20 Credits)

This module will introduce important themes in the American relationship with East Asia, at a time when the Pacific region has assumed great importance. There will be a particular focus on the important historical periods in the American relationship with China and Japan. An understanding of elements of the trajectory of these relationships will be provided by taking a selection of historical subjects for analysis. While this will address the knowledge of history, and of long-term themes, the latter part of the module will consider contemporary political issues. This will require an understanding of the interaction of the United States with Asia, and China and Japan in particular. This module is a 20-credit coursework-only version of POWER OVER THE PACIFIC: THE AMERICAN RELATIONSHIP WITH ASIA and is available only to Visiting, Exchange and Non-HUM Students.

Code PPLJ6012A - (20 Credits)

Japanese popular culture is now a global phenomenon. To understand how this came about, you will study the topic in terms of theories of social, economical, and historical analysis. You will learn about various cultural forms and practices, including manga/anime, media, art, and music in Japan as seen from different perspectives. You will also discuss and critically analyse the role of Japanese popular culture within and outside of Japan. Your seminars will consist of three main parts: lectures, original audio/video materials, and group discussion or activities. Your contribution to weekly discussion/activities is essential. Lectures, reading materials, and assessments will all be in English. On successful completion of this module, you will have a good understanding of the main genres of Japanese popular culture, and be able to further explore your own interests, academically, in any form of Japanese popular culture.

Code PPLL6011A - (20 Credits)

Have you ever wondered why politicians say that 'immigration is a problem' rather than 'immigrants are a problem'. Can there be unbiased news reporting in this era of ‘fake news’? Why am I addressing you as 'you' rather than 'the students' here? In this module you will explore some of these questions and how the language and images that make up our interactions (in ‘texts’) are interrelated and context-related. We will explore the powerful expressive means by which agency, responsibility and blame are attributed to or removed from key players in the language of media, advertising and politics. We will see how the representation of events affects and is affected by ideology and socio-cultural assumptions and by the power relationship between individuals and social groups. Essentially, this module is for those who are curious about the practical impact of expressive choices in everyday written and oral communication and wish to find out more about the creative but also manipulative power of language in context (discourse). By the end of this module, you will have learnt how particular linguistic and visual patterns may be used to report, persuade or direct people to do things or believe things. You will have acquired the skill to critically assess and challenge others’ perspectives, attitudes and values but also consider more critically how you may produce or change your language to achieve your desired aims, from increasing the cohesion of your writing to producing a more engaging website. In other words, you can learn skills that help you to choose your own words carefully! These skills will better enable you to deal with the challenges of communication in the world today and are highly valuable skills in any work environment. In the seminars, you will be encouraged to apply the new analytical tools presented in the lecture and you will be able to select your own material for analysis for formative exercises and the final assignment so that it relates to your studies and interests.

Code PPLL6019B - (20 Credits)

What do we actually do when we engage in ‘conversation’? How do we create meanings without actually saying what we mean? Why does how we say something matter more than what we say? In this module we will address these questions and explore how linguistic meaning, in any language, works on a number of levels so that speakers are able to communicate much more than what they say in their words. You’ll consider the extent to which language expression is influenced by social, cultural and psychological factors and why communication problems may arise even when speakers think they are speaking ‘the same language’. We’ll discuss the ways in which relationships of power, solidarity and intimacy may be shaped by particular uses of language in everyday interactions and how humour or irony may be generated when speakers break conventional patterns of communication. By the end of this module you’ll have a clear understanding of how verbal and non-verbal expressions combine to convey a variety of meanings in different contexts: professional as well as personal. You’ll have learnt to appreciate how the way we talk is influenced by our need to be valued and respected but also why speech may be manipulative and undermining. Classes will include group discussions of examples collected by you each week so that you can immediately appreciate how concepts apply in practice. In your final assignment you’ll build on this understanding and analyse a verbal interaction of your choice (such as a celebrity interview, a chat show dialogue or an e-mail exchange) to identify how meanings are exchanged in that specific context.

Code PPLL6144B - (20 Credits)

Have you thought about becoming a language teacher? Do you know what that means? Would you like to give it a try? This is an introductory module to second language teaching and learning, where you will explore theoretical and practical approaches to language learning. You will learn what teaching a foreign language means through different methodologies and practical approaches, as well as understanding the peculiarities of both language and culture in second language acquisition, emphasizing factors like context, motivation, first language or individual characteristics. Participation will be in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of second language learning and teaching. You will be able to observe real language classrooms and deliver language teaching in real contexts, and also gain a greater understanding of what theoretical and practical aspects of teaching and learning are essential in foreign languages. Note: Taught together with Level 5. Assessment commensurate with level.

Code PPLT6027B - (20 Credits)

What factors need to be born in mind when creating subtitles? What tools are used to create these texts? This module provides first-hand experience of subtitling and dubbing of film clips and documentaries, which will provide you with first hand, practical, experience of this important media technique. You’ll become familiar with software used for interlingual and intralingual subtitling and dubbing at professional level, studying the linguistic and technical constraints for the creation of audio-visual texts. You’ll undertake practical exercises involving cueing, text compression and segmentation, respecting time and space constraints and that will teach you how to conform the conventions of good practice. You’ll explore, analyse and assess different types of technological tools used for audio-visual translation at professional and amateur levels, using selected film/TV series/documentary extracts in several languages. Practical activities are used creating challenges posed by the interplay of audio, image and text. Studying this module will provide you with the necessary skills for the creation of subtitles at a professional level, giving you practical experience of using professional software. Taught together with Level 5. Assessment commensurate with level.

Code PPLT6032A - (20 Credits)

Have you thought about how communication works when we need to get our message across in more than one language, or to reach more than one culture? For a start, we need to be aware of how people from different cultures might communicate in different ways, and also how our different languages might help or hinder us to do that. Whether you’re a student of language, communication or any subject where you might have an interest in issues associated with the globalisation of communication and the media, then this module will be relevant to you. We will consider a range of materials (texts and their translations, multilingual publications and packaging, film subtitles, dubbed soundtracks, IT-mediated text) to explore issues involved in the transposition and translation of (spoken and written) text into other media and other languages across different genres. Practical tasks give you insights into the full breadth of issues and processes involved in successfully moving messages between cultures. We aim to bring together students and staff from different linguistic backgrounds, and you are encouraged to extend your thinking to other languages you may know and to share examples with the wider group. You will be taught, and assessed, in English, but you will need receptive knowledge of one other language in addition to English in order to benefit from this module.

Code PPLT6145A - (20 Credits)

What tools are used for audiences with sensory impairments, both visual and/or hearing to help them access films, documentaries, TV series, etc? This module provides first-hand experience of the technical tools used to create this type of audio-visual text. You will learn the specific requirements and theoretical characteristics and become aware of the grammatical and syntactical features of the language used for subtitling for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (SDH) and audio description (AD). You’ll explore and become skilled in the use of software used for media accessibility: professional subtitling software is used for pre-recorded subtitles as well as software for live subtitles (voice recognition). You’ll develop subtitling and audio description skills in a variety of registers and styles, translating programs from various sources (films, corporate videos, documentaries) and covering a broad range of specialised genres and media issues. The module is taught and all activities as part of the module are carried out in English. In addition, reflection on the practice of media accessibility in other languages will be encouraged and used as a key element for discussion in the module. The study of this module will provide you with the necessary skills for the creation of subtitles at professional level. Taught together with Level 5. Assessment commensurate with level.

Code PPLX6073B - (20 Credits)

This module looks at the political implications of the rise of multicultural societies in Europe and North America since the end of World War II. (Canada is given consideration because of its importance to these debates both as a practical model as well as a source of influential theorists.) The aim is to introduce students to a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives on multiculturalism and facilitate critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches in the face of competing political discourses such as nationalism and alternative forms of liberalism. Theorists under examination will include; Parekh, Kymlicka, Levy, Taylor and Modood as well as major liberal alternative views; Barry, Rawls and Raz. Among the module themes the following will be addressed; group differentiated rights; institutional racism, Islamophobia, recognition vs toleration and cultural offence. The module will also look at divergent policies adopted within European states (eg: France and Germany) and give attention to the attempts to operationalize multiculturalism in the UK in particular via the Parekh Report.

 

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Entry Requirements

A Levels

CCC - for further details on how we review your application please see below

T Levels

Obtain an overall Pass including a C in the core of the T Level and a Pass in the Occupational Specialism. Acceptable pathways: Design, Surveying and Planning for Construction or Digital Production, Design and Development or Education and Childcare

BTEC

MMM

Scottish highers

BBCCC

Scottish highers advanced

DDD

Irish leaving certificate

6 subjects at H4

Access course

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 credits at Level 3. Humanities and Social Sciences pathway preferred

European Baccalaureate

60%

International Baccalaureate

28 points

GCSE offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Additional entry requirements

We welcome applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds.  If you have been out of study for the last three years and you do not have the entry grades for our three year degree, we will consider your educational and employment history, along with your personal statement and reference to gain a holistic view of your suitability for the course. You will still need to meet our GCSE English Language and Mathematics requirements.  

  

If you are currently studying your level 3 qualifications, we may be able to give you a reduced grade offer based on these circumstances:  

• You live in an area with low progression to higher education (we use Polar 4, quintile 1 & 2 data)  

• You will be 21 years of age or over at the start of the course  

• You have been in care or you are a young full time carer  

• You are studying at a school which our Outreach Team are working closely with  

 

Alternative Entry Requirements 

 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.  

Important note

Once enrolled onto your course at UEA, your progression and continuation (which may include your eligibility for study abroad, overseas experience, placement or year in industry opportunities) is contingent on meeting the assessment requirements which are relevant to the course on which you are enrolled.

Students for whom english is a foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):  

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall (minimum 6.5 in all components) for year 0 entry 

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.  

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.  

Gap year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.  

Intakes

This course is open to UK applicants. The annual intake is in September each year.  
Course Reference Number: 4479638

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Reference Number: 4479638

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.  

 

UCAS Apply is an online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.  

 

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14.  

Course Reference Number: 4479638
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
Q9NF
Entry Requirements
CCC
Offering an alternative route onto our BA Intercultural Communication with Business Management, the Foundation Year course will equip you with everything you need for undergraduate study. You’ll acquire a range of key academic skills, and be given a smooth transition into university life. Once you’ve completed the year, you’ll be ready to progress onto the first year of your degree, where you’ll study how global companies manage their diverse workforces, develop your understanding of business, marketing and intercultural communication, and discover how important global communication and intercultural awareness are for individuals and businesses today. Our BA Intercultural Communication with Business Management is ranked in the top 30 for Business and Management Studies by 'The Complete University Guide 2022', and in the top 30 for Business, Management and Marketing by 'The Guardian 2021'.
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Faculty of Arts and Humanities
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