Faculty of Arts and Humanities

BA HISTORY OF ART (WITH A FOUNDATION YEAR)

Key details 

BA HISTORY OF ART (WITH A FOUNDATION YEAR)

Start Year
2022
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
V35F
Entry Requirements
CCC
Duration (years)
4

Assessment for Year 1

During your Foundation Year, you’ll be assessed in a variety of ways, which will allow you to explore different learning styles and become familiar with the format and expectations of degree-level assessment. 

We use innovative methods to enable you to learn from your peers as well as from teaching staff. This in turn will help you to build confidence in your abilities and develop into a more independent learner. You will receive feedback on your written work, allowing you to continue honing your critical thinking.  

You will also benefit from the support of one of the course lecturers as an adviser throughout your programme, receiving individual tutorials to ensure you are progressing well and are achieving your full potential. 

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Assessment for Year 2

You won’t sit any formal examinations. Instead, in each year you’ll be assessed on written coursework, usually in the form of essays, presentations, critiques, posters, exhibition catalogues to name only a few.

Our assessment methods have been developed to measure your skills, but also to aid your learning. Your final assessment is your dissertation, a piece of independent research that you will carry out in the third year.

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Register interest   
Open Days   

Assessment for Year 3

You won’t sit any formal examinations. Instead, in each year you’ll be assessed on written coursework, usually in the form of essays, presentations, critiques, posters, exhibition catalogues to name only a few.

Our assessment methods have been developed to measure your skills, but also to aid your learning. Your final assessment is your dissertation, a piece of independent research that you will carry out in the third year. 

Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Open Days   

Assessment for Year 4

You won’t sit any formal examinations. Instead, in each year you’ll be assessed on written coursework, usually in the form of essays, presentations, critiques, posters, exhibition catalogues to name only a few. Our assessment methods have been developed to measure your skills, but also to aid your learning. Your final assessment is your dissertation, a piece of independent research that you will carry out in the third year.   
Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Open Days   

 

Year 0

Compulsory Modules (80 credits)

Code:  HUM-3006A Credits:20

What is university learning? How does it differ to your previous experiences of learning? How does your learning style affect the way that you approach your studies? These are the sorts of questions that you will explore, and find answers to, during this module. This module will provide you with an intensive induction to higher education, equipping you with the essential skills you'll need to reach your full potential on your chosen degree programme. Through the format of weekly seminars and study groups you will focus on developing your skills in areas such as research, essay writing, delivering presentations, teamwork, revision and exam techniques. We will guide you through your learning by using a variety of different tasks. In previous years we have held class debates, followed a learning trail through the library and run interactive research sessions. As part of this module you will create an individual, personalised learning plan in which you will assess your strengths and weaknesses. This will enable you to keep track of your development over the course of this module and beyond. By completing this module, you will know how to apply the techniques and methods you have learned, and how to continue to hone your skills to become a successful Humanities student.

Code:  HUM-3003B Credits: 20

Do images have meaning? Why does your favourite film/ television programme/ artist matter? You will discuss these issues in Visual Cultures, as you explore what makes some things beautiful, influential, or culturally significant. The module is designed to develop your appreciation of visual cultures (with a special focus on film, television, and art), and to encourage a deeper intellectual dive into your specific visual cultures interests. Along the way you will participate in some of the key academic debates in the field of visual cultures and familiarise yourself with the tools of these disciplines, such as close textual and contextual analysis, research and essay writing, and class discussion. The module is taught using a variety of learning settings and experiences, including lectures, screenings, workshops, seminars, and tutorials. The assessment likewise aims to develop a range of your academic skills.

Code: HUM-3009A Credits: 20

This interdisciplinary module gives you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as ideology, power, and representation, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

Code:  HUM-3009B Credits: 20

Following Key Concepts I, this interdisciplinary module continues to give you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as postmodernism, psychoanalysis, and nationhood, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

Optional A Modules (20 credits)

Students will be enrolled onto HUM-3007A: Cultural and Creative Industries as a default. If you wish to replace this module with a language, please choose one from the list below.
Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Code:  HUM-3007A Credits:20

The term ‘Cultural and Creative Industries’ encompasses a wide range of disciplines taught in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, including film and television, media, arts, and those related to writing, as well as intersecting with aspects of history through the heritage industry. By taking this module, you'll have the opportunity to gain an understanding of these industries that you may wish to work in. Throughout the semester, you'll critically explore a range of creative and cultural fields (television, film, media, art, heritage, publishing – among others), with a particular focus on the complex relationship between theory and practice in the context of the cultural, political, and social frameworks that underpin the work of these industries. On successful completion of the module, you’ll have developed the knowledge and a range of analytical skills that will enable you to understand and engage critically with a competitive cultural and creative industries environment and economy.

Code: PPLB4013A  Credits:20

Bonjour, comment ça va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you’ll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You’ll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We’ll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You’ll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets…). You’ll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you’ll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You’ll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, if you have studied French abroad, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test.

Code: PPLB4029A Credits: 20

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. You will master the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. You are introduced to basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

Code: PPLB4031A Credits: 20

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

Code: PPLB4043A Credits: 20

Winston Churchill once said that ‘Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma’. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This is a beginners’ course in Russian assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In the first week you’ll acquaint yourself with the Russian alphabet (it’s not that different) and learn to read Russian. At the end of the course you’ll know all the basics of Russian grammar, will be able to read simple texts and to use your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You’ll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You’ll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds beginners’ level when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher’s discretion). Please contact us if you’re unsure.

Code:  PPLB4022A - Credits: 20

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it´s the right time to enrol to Beginners´ Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

Code: PPLB4018A - Credits: 20

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners’ course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

Code: PPLB4036A  - Credits: 20

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have little or NO prior experience of Greek, then this module is for you. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Meeting people. Food and drink : eating with friends Shopping for food and drink Shopping for clothes Writing postcards/notes. Please note that your current level of Greek should not exceed the level of this course.

Code: PPLB4040A - Credits: 20

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners’ course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you’ll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You’ll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher’s discretion.

Optional B Modules (20 credits)

Students can only take part II of a language module if they have taken the first part of the module in the Autumn semester.
Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Code:  HUM-3001B Credits: 20

How is history used to inform the society in which we live? What is the relationship between the history we study academically at university and how history is used and consumed in contemporary society? These are some of the questions you will explore in this module. Using examples from modern history and other time periods that inform our understanding of this history as our case study, you will develop the key skills you need to critically analyse the past and the different representations we make about the past. You will develop key skills needed by the historian to analyse different primary and secondary sources, understand the importance of contextualisation and the role of the historian in shaping narratives about the past.

Code: HUM-3002B Credits: 20

This module introduces you to some of the key ideologies and 'isms' within contemporary political theory which form the focus of contemporary debates. It will encourage you to consider the role that politics plays in your life through the examination of political theory. Radical doctrines such as anarchism and fundamentalism will be discussed and evaluated alongside more traditional ideologies such as socialism, liberalism and conservatism. If you are a Foundation Year student it will have relevance to you in its critical approach to ideology.

Code: HUM-3004B Credits: 20

This interdisciplinary module introduces a wide range of narratives in a variety of formats, asking students to consider questions such as: What is literature? What is literary theory? How is literature influenced by its historical and cultural contexts? How can the humanities help us to make sense of literary texts? Over the course of the module, you will be introduced to key themes in literary studies, as well as examining the value of reading texts in their interdisciplinary contexts. You will develop your ability to analyse texts, engage with historical and cultural milieus of the texts your read, enhance your understanding of theoretical positions relevant to study throughout the Humanities and construct your own critical arguments.

Code: HUM-3008B Credits: 20

The impact of rapid technological change is no more apparent than in the various areas of the media—film, television, radio, podcasting, publishing and the various uses of the World Wide Web. In this module you will gain a firm understanding of these relationships while developing your academic and practical skills. You don’t need to have any previous experience media production or any other experience of working with technology to take this module. You’ll study the use of technology in media production and distribution, learn about the impact of social media on news production and consumption, engage in critical listening and viewing alongside the analysis of film music from a technological perspective. You’ll get the chance to engage in a televised debate in the TV studio, explore citizen journalism, create podcasts to demonstrate the impact of your research in your chosen discipline and study how digital technologies and advances in the field of artificial intelligence are affecting research, media production, archiving and restoration. There’ll be opportunities for extra-curricular activities too—in the past we’ve created podcasts for the NHS and for conferences at UEA—and we’ll look at how we can be creative with storytelling.

Code PPLB4015B - (20 Credits)

Bonjour, comment ça va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you’ll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You’ll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We’ll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You’ll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets…). You’ll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you’ll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You’ll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, if you have studied French abroad, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test.

Code:  PPLB4019B Credits: 20

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners’ course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

Code PPLB4030B - (20 Credits)

Have you ever taken any basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this well spoken language after taking Beginners´ Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners´ Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? Thanks to this module, you will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You will get the personal feedback on every single of your efforts. You'll take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You'll also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module is probably not appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure).

Code PPLB4024B - (20 Credits)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it´s the right time to enrol to Beginners´ Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

Code: PPLB4030B Credits: 20

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

Code:  PPLB4032B Credits: 20

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. Your will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

Code PPLB4033B - (20 Credits)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire q wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

Code: PPLB4044B Credits: 20

Winston Churchill once said that ‘Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma’. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? Before enrolling on this course you’ll need to be acquainted with the Russian alphabet, able to read and write in Russian, and to know a few initial items of grammar and vocabulary (skills that will be learnt in the Beginners' Russian I module). At the end of the course you’ll know all the basics of Russian grammar, you’ll be able to read more complex texts and you’ll have improved your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You’ll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You’ll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds the beginners’ level specified above when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher’s discretion). Please contact us if you’re unsure.

Code PPLB4037B - (20 Credits)

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You’ll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience, i.e. Beginners Greek I) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You’ll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You’ll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You’ll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you’ll be able to converse/read and write on the following topics: 1. Information gathering 2. Travel 3. Accommodation 4. Meeting people and talking about the past, holidays etc. 5. Offering hospitality (informal/formal) 6. Initiating/receiving phone calls/phone messages (social/business) 8. Writing letters (informal/formal) Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher’s discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

Code PPLB4045B - (20 Credits)

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

Code PPLB4047B - (20 Credits)

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning you will achieve within this module. Our beginners’ course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

 

Year 1

Compulsory Modules ( 120 credits)

Code:  AMAA4002A Credits: 20

Making works of art – from objects to performances, bodies to buildings – involves a range of materials, activities and ideas. On this module, you’ll learn about the physical and technical properties of different materials as well as their social, economic and symbolic significance. You’ll hear from a range of experts in a series of lectures by our staff in Art History and World Art Studies. You will gain a wider perspective on how people at different times, in different cultures, have designed, crafted and created works of art - challenging narrow ideas about what (and who) an artist is. You will also develop the skills you need to write effective essays at university.

Code:  AMAA4004B Credits: 20

Most works of art – whether objects, buildings, or performances – are designed to serve a set of purposes. How their forms and functions relate may be straightforward and practical, or complex and elusive. Through a range of case studies, presented in lectures by our staff in Art History and World Art Studies, you will examine the connections between the uses, meanings, and appearances of art, culture, space, and landscape. You will also consider how these connections may change over time, especially in the context of cross-cultural contact. The opportunity to analyze texts on your own and in discussion groups will help you understand different points of view and construct an argument supported by evidence.

Code: AMAA4007A Credits: 20

In this module, you will discover the art and architecture that makes up our department’s home in the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts (SCVA). Designed by Lord Norman Foster and opened in 1978, this building and the Robert and Lisa Sainsbury Collection have shaped the study of Art History and World Art Studies at UEA. Through readings, group discussions, and the close study of objects in the SCVA, you will be encouraged to challenge assumptions and preconceptions about different kinds of art – from around the world, and from prehistory to the 20th century. This module will also develop your abilities in library research and academic referencing.

Code: AMAA4001A Credits: 20

This module introduces you to the study of art history. You will discover what makes art history distinct as an academic discipline. By learning about the themes art historians have explored over time, and some of the methods they use to study art, you will start to understand the subject better – and to appreciate how it fits into your degree. As a seminar, this module also gives you the chance to experience the small-group discussions that are central to our teaching.
 

Code: AMAA4009B Credits: 20

This module will introduce you to some of the key concepts underpinning art galleries and museums. You’ll learn about the history of museums and their impact on society. You’ll consider how museums and galleries today use not only their displays but also a range of activities to attract, educate, and inspire visitors. By visiting museums and galleries in Norwich as part of this module – including the Castle Museum and Art Gallery and the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts – you’ll gain a real-world perspective on museums today. You will also have a chance to study galleries and museums from around the world.
 

Code: AMAA4025B Credits: 20

How do you represent a person? On this module, you will explore the genre of portraiture as it has been practiced by visual artists from the ancient world to the present day. You will develop the skill of visual analysis as you consider issues such as 'likeness'; the face; the self-portrait; portraiture as the embodiment of political, social and aesthetic power; the ways in which portraiture has variously reinforced and challenged concepts of class, race and gender; the photographic portrait, and the role of portraiture in contemporary art and culture. You will also continue to develop your writing skills, as we analyze works of art alongside histories and concepts of the individual self – perhaps the supreme artefact of all.

 

Year 2

Compulsory Modules ( 40 credits)

Students wishing to enrol on the 60 credit Semester Abroad modules AMAA5002A (Autumn) or AMAA5003B (Spring), must first seek approval from the Study Abroad Office and AMA-ART Course Director.

Code:  AMAA5089A Credits: 20

Your main objective in this module will be to develop your critical skills as they pertain to thinking, reading, writing and looking. To enable this, the module will fall into two main sections. In the first section, you’ll focus on one particular methodology – object biographies – used in archaeology, anthropology, museum studies and art history. You’ll examine this methodology in detail, breaking it down into its component sections. You’ll then consider its strengths and its weaknesses, as we subject it to a thorough critical evaluation. In the second half of the module, you will study a range of theories and methodologies used in the study of material culture. In this part of the module, you will focus more broadly on what critical thinking is, both in general and within each of the four disciplines taught in the Department of Art History and World Art Studies. You’ll be taught through a combination of two weekly lectures and one discussion seminar. The lectures will offer you an introduction to the relevant topic, and will end with an opportunity to discuss/debate the issues raised. During the discussion seminars, you’ll consider key issues raised in preceding lectures and the weekly class readings which accompany them.

Code: AMAA5090B Credits: 20

Art is a resource which can be used both positively and critically to affect the contemporary world around us. It may be exploited, most obviously for its economic value, but also for broader social or political gain. You will explore these different uses of art by addressing the factors that condition our contemporary reception of art works and visual culture. You will begin by examining some of the key methodologies for interpreting art’s contemporary functions, including its capacity to create contemporary identities and world-views. You will then turn to focus on the museum and gallery as spaces for these contemporary issues to emerge, before considering the same ideas at work in more quotidian ways. And, finally, you will conclude with a reflection on your own position as art historians, anthropologists, and archeologists working with art in the contemporary world.

Optional A Modules ( 40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Code: AMAA5009A Credits: 20

We live our lives surrounded by material objects. In many ways, our lives are dictated by the consumption of goods. How then, should we understand our relation to materiality? In this module, you'll learn about contemporary archaeological and anthropological perspectives in the study of material culture. Questions that come up include: why the Summer Solstice is celebrated at Stonehenge; how houses differ across cultures; why we give each other gifts and wrap them; and how clothing gives us identity? Studying human-object relations from a range of perspectives, this module equips you to understand the role of materiality in your life and to think in nuanced ways on our consumer society.

Code: AMAA5086A Credits: 20

Born, bathed, dressed, worshipped, sexed, cut, bruised, ripped, split, buried: the human body offer historians a gateway onto understanding the cultures of the past. On this course you will examine several groups of objects from the visual culture of medieval Europe and the Middle East through this contemporary theoretical lens, building up a body of medieval artistic practice piece by bodily piece, and examining how the techniques and society of the medieval craftsman at once idolised and distorted the medieval body's forms. In previous years this course has also featured a study trip to museums and galleries in London to meet with curators and handle objects.

Code AMAA5102A Credits 20

You will examine how contemporary artists have explored the way in which contemporary galleries and museums function. Since the 1960s artists have adopted the museum as both subject and medium in their artworks. These seminars will examine how such projects impact on our idea of what galleries and museums are, how they operate, and what role they have in public life today. Throughout, key ideas regarding aesthetics, politics, memory, and audience participation will be approached by way of specific artworks and exhibitions. These sessions will be supplemented by workshops exploring art criticism, as well as a study trip to London.

Code AMAA5108A  Credits 20

“Art photography” is an unstable concept. Institutionally it often acts more as an interim placeholder born from practical necessity rather than denoting a negotiated theoretical relationship between a specific mode of practice and particular set of materials. For example: it may or may not involve a photographer; it may or may not involve a camera; it may or may not have any discernible aesthetic quality; it may or may not have any intelligible subject matter or material form. This module offers a thematic examination of artists who work to capitalize on the paradoxical nature of “art photography” and subvert our expectations of what a photograph is and how we use photography to understand and construct our ideas about place, history, and identity.

Optional B Modules (40 credits)

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Code AMAA5093B Credits 20

Positioned at the hub of trade routes which spanned out across the known world, the city of Venice was a major commercial and political power during the medieval, renaissance, and early modern periods. It also grew to be one of Europe's most important centres of artistic production, with Venetian painters, sculptors, glassmakers, and architects channelling their city's diverse multiculturalism into a vast range of influential artworks. You will examine the development of art and architecture in the city from its earliest foundations through to the present day, tracing the aesthetic and urban history of what its inhabitants came to call 'La Serenissima,' the most serene city on earth. In previous years this module has featured a study trip to Venice.

Code AMAA5098B Credits 20

Using a range of case studies from the Mediterranean World, this module introduces students to some of the most significant themes and debates in the archaeology of the Mediterranean and archaeology more generally. Case studies will be drawn from a range of time periods and will address ‘the big themes’ in archaeology, such as cultural transmission, cultural development, societal collapse, trade and exchange, conflict, migration, empire and expansion, the emergence of urban societies, climate and society and ritual and religion. Often more than one theme will be included in a case study and the aim will be to understand how they relate to each other. For example, how does conflict or climate change contribute to migration or societal collapse?

Code: AMAA5103B Credits: 20

You will explore the rich history of art made after 1945, with a particular emphasis upon the problem of the relationship between the idea of art's autonomy and claims for its capacity to engage directly with social and political conditions. You will be introduced to key tendencies in art and a wide variety of artistic media made since 1945, with a (non-exclusive) focus upon Europe and North America.

Code:  AMAA5109B Credits: 20

This module examines how Black artists have expressed their experience of the modern world in art. The module situates the making of Black Consciousness in the Black Atlantic, that space of cultural exchanges between Africa, the Americas and Europe as it emerged in the context of the slave trade. In this module you’ll learn how Black artists articulated their membership of modernity in the Harlem Renaissance in 1920s New York, Black Paris in the interwar period, the decolonization movement, African nationalism and Pan-Africanism, and the Black Power movement in the 1960s. You will learn how diasporic artists articulate their remembrance of slavery and engage with the intersections of race and gender in representations of Black subjectivity today. You will look at the work of Feral Benga, Seydou Keïta, Malick Sidibé, the Dakar School, the Zaria Art Society, Faith Ringgold, David Hammons, Emory Douglas, Adrian Piper, Keith Piper, Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Carrie Mae Weems, Sonia Boyce, Fred Wilson, Yinka Shonibare, Chris Ofili, El Anatsui, Sammy Baloji, Kara Walker, Lubaina Himid, and Zanele Muholi.

Code:  HUM-5004B Credits: 20

This module will provide you with the opportunity work within a creative/cultural/charity/ heritage/media or other appropriate organisation in order to apply the skills you are developing through your degree to the working world and to develop your knowledge of employment sectors within which you may wish to work in the future. The module emphasises industry experience, sector awareness and personal development through a structured reflective learning experience. Having sourced and secured your own placement (with support from Careers Central), you work within your host organisation undertaking tasks that will help you to gain a better understanding of professional practices within your chosen sector. Taught sessions enable you to acquire knowledge of both the industries in which you are placed as well as focusing on personal and professional development germane to the sector. Your assessment tasks will provide you with an opportunity to critically reflect on the creative and cultural sector in which you have worked as well as providing opportunities to undertake presentations, gather evidence, and articulate your newly acquired skills and experiences.

Code:  AMAS5024B  Credits: 20

This module aims to introduce students to strategies and techniques for analysing photographs and, more specifically, uses the visual record to study and illuminate the history of the USA. Viewed here as sites of historical evidence, photographic portraits, family albums, anthropological illustrations, lynching postcards, advertisements, food packaging, fashion photos are just some of the pictures that will be "read" and evaluated. Students will explore how visual texts can contribute to an understanding of nationhood, class, race, sexuality and identity in the USA, with an emphasis on the nineteenth century. Opening sessions will focus on ways of "reading" visual texts. [No previous experience of working with images is necessary]. Most of the semester will be devoted to analysing how photographic images both reflect and contribute to constructions of American identities and culture.

 

Year 3

Compulsory Modules ( 30 credits)

Code: AMAA6112B Credits: 30

On this module you will undertake a research project on a topic related to your specialised interests, in consultation with an appropriate member of ART Faculty, leading to a 9,000 word dissertation.
 

Optional A Modules ( 60 credits)

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Code: AMAA6121A Credits: 30

Mapping helps us to conceive of abstract concepts in tangible visual form. Be it geographical notions of the globe and the heavens, or more complex outlines of the body, the mind, time, even history, a map helps to bound and give features to otherwise inexplicable space and knowledge. This course uses historical maps and modern theories of cartography as the jumping-off point for an in-depth investigation of the visual and imaginative cultures of Europe and the Middle East from the prehistoric and classical eras through to the Middle Ages and Renaissance. In previous years this course has also featured a study trip to museums and galleries in London to meet with curators and handle objects.

Code: AMAA6126A Credits:30

This module explores a variety of practical and conceptual considerations in Gallery and Museum Studies by focusing on specific aspects of these institutional structures: from building, housing and caring for collections, to curating shows and exhibitions, and producing texts and writing criticism. You will develop your engagement with the practice of conceiving, designing and mounting exhibitions, exploring both the conceptual demands of putting on a successful show and the practical considerations involved in doing so. Finally we consider the role of interpretation and learning in galleries and museums practice, thinking also about how texts of various sorts operate in exhibitions and collections displays. The module has previously involved a study trip to London or Cambridge.

Optional B Modules ( 30 credits)

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Code: AMAA6142B Credits: 30

Recent movements such as #RhodesMustFall and #BlackLivesMatter have connected activists across Africa, Europe and the Americas around issues of race and representation. This paper will explore the development of racial formations across Atlantic Worlds through the medium of Visual Culture - images and artworks depicting racialised bodies circulating since Portuguese voyages in the wider Atlantic during the fifteenth century. Broadly chronological, the paper will develop multiple perspectives on Atlantic histories, considering African, European and American made images in a range of media, from performance, painting and sculpture to print media, photography and film, ending with the contemporary circulations of digital images through social media.

Code:HIS-6098B Credits: 30

‘The mother of our own’: that was how nineteenth-century historian Jacob Burckhardt described the culture of the Renaissance in Italy. Without a doubt the Italian Renaissance remains one of the most celebrated movements in European cultural history, a byword for ‘genius’, with a place in public consciousness so dominant for so long as to be intimidating, and surely ripe for questioning. For, to our modern eyes, the Italian Renaissance can look distinctly strange. Humanists saw in the reform of the language they spoke and wrote the path to a reform of society. Painting (but also architecture, sculpture, and even metalworking) sought to attain the status of literature, and all these arts grappled with the competing urges to emulate antiquity and imitate nature. Scholars and even priests sought to get closer to the One through the esoteric philosophy that they believed had come to them from Ancient Egypt and could even be found in hieroglyphs. Citizens and statesmen reconsidered their fate as soldiers and courtiers, as the Italian peninsula became the battlefield of Europe at the same time as it influenced the entire continent. Cities alternately incorporated and rejected communities of Greeks, black Africans, and Jews. Meanwhile, writers sought to understand and explain the contemporary political problems they faced through the study and writing of history. Students will grapple with this fascinating and contradictory period (c. 1425 – c. 1550) through the treatises and histories of Machiavelli and Guicciardini, the poetry of Poliziano, Ariosto, and Vittoria Colonna, the (auto-)biographies of Vasari and Cellini, and the works of artists including Titian, Leonardo, and Michelangelo.

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Entry Requirements

A Levels

CCC - for further details on how we review your application please see below

T Levels

Obtain an overall Pass including a C in the core of the T Level and a Pass in the Occupational Specialism. Acceptable pathways: Design, Surveying and Planning for Construction or Digital Production, Design and Development or Education and Childcare

BTEC

MMM

Scottish highers

BBCCC

Scottish highers advanced

DDD

Irish leaving certificate

6 subjects at H4

Access course

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 credits at Level 3. Humanities and Social Sciences pathway preferred

European Baccalaureate

60%

International Baccalaureate

28 points

GCSE offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Additional entry requirements

We welcome applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds.  If you have been out of study for the last three years and you do not have the entry grades for our three year degree, we will consider your educational and employment history, along with your personal statement and reference to gain a holistic view of your suitability for the course. You will still need to meet our GCSE English Language and Mathematics requirements.  

  

If you are currently studying your level 3 qualifications, we may be able to give you a reduced grade offer based on these circumstances:  

• You live in an area with low progression to higher education (we use Polar 4, quintile 1 & 2 data)  

• You will be 21 years of age or over at the start of the course  

• You have been in care or you are a young full time carer  

• You are studying at a school which our Outreach Team are working closely with  

 

Alternative Entry Requirements 

 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.  

Important note

Once enrolled onto your course at UEA, your progression and continuation (which may include your eligibility for study abroad, overseas experience, placement or year in industry opportunities) is contingent on meeting the assessment requirements which are relevant to the course on which you are enrolled.

Students for whom english is a foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):  

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall (minimum 6.5 in all components) for year 0 entry 

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.  

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.  

Gap year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.  

Intakes

This course is open to UK applicants. The annual intake is in September each year.  

Course Reference Number: 4479742

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Reference Number: 4479742

How to Apply

  Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.  

 

UCAS Apply is an online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.  

 

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14.  

Course Reference Number: 4479742
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
V35F
Entry Requirements
CCC
Duration (years)
4
Gain the skills you need to excel on a degree in History of Art with our Foundation Year pathway. Majoring in your chosen subject, you’ll be given a thorough grounding in studying humanities at undergraduate level, and be given a smooth transition into university life. Successfully complete this year and you’ll be ready to progress onto your degree, where you’ll study a broad range of art from across an incredible range of periods and cultures. You’ll explore the forms and meanings of artworks through close engagement and under the guidance of our expert teaching staff. Our BA History of Art with a Foundation Year is ranked in the top 20 for History of Art by 'The Guardian 2021', and for History of Art, Architecture and Design by 'The Complete University Guide 2022'.
Schools
Faculty of Arts and Humanities
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