Art, Media and American Studies

BA (Hons) FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION

Key details 

BA (HONS) FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION

Start Year
2022
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
W6P3
Entry Requirements
BBB or ABC
Duration (years)
3

Assessment for Year 1

You’ll be assessed via both individual assignments and group projects. Your production modules will have an emphasis on creative practice assignments and you’ll hone your skills of critical analysis in your modules on the history and theory of film and television. You will have the option in some theoretical modules to be assessed through creative practice: you might be required to produce a script of your own to explore questions of film history. All of your assessments will help strengthen your creative and critical thinking and give you skills that are attractive to future employers. 

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Assessment for Year 2

You’ll be assessed via both individual assignments and group projects. Your production modules will have an emphasis on creative practice assignments and you’ll hone your skills of critical analysis in your modules on the history and theory of film and television. You will have the option in some theoretical modules to be assessed through creative practice: you might be required to produce a script of your own to explore questions of film history. All of your assessments will help strengthen your creative and critical thinking and give you skills that are attractive to future employers. 

Beginners' Language Modules

You can select from a wide range of language modules. For more information, and for a full list of available module options, please visit our Language Options page.

Clearing and Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Open Days   

Assessment for Year 3

You’ll be assessed via both individual assignments and group projects. Your production modules will have an emphasis on creative practice assignments and you’ll hone your skills of critical analysis in your modules on the history and theory of film and television. You will have the option in some theoretical modules to be assessed through creative practice: you might be required to produce a script of your own to explore questions of film history. All of your assessments will help strengthen your creative and critical thinking and give you skills that are attractive to future employers. 

Clearing and Admissions Live Chat   
Register interest   
Open Days   

Year 1

Compulsory Modules

AMAM4009A    (20 Credits)
The analysis of film form underpins film studies as a discipline, informing aesthetic, theoretical and historical modes of inquiry. You will be introduced to the analysis of film form and film style. It encompasses approaches to the fundamental formal elements of mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing and sound. You will also build on these elements of film form to address systems of and approaches to film style including narrative and narration, genre, realism, continuity and classicism, modernism and experimentation. You will also learn how questions of film style are integral to the analysis of representation, for example in relation to modernity, gender and race.

AMAM4010A    (20 Credits)
You will explore the many ways television has been examined, explored, understood, and used. You will focus particularly on the specifics of the medium; that is, how television is different from (and, in some ways, similar to) other media such as film, radio, and the internet. Each week will focus on a particular idea which is seen as central to the examination of television. The medium will be explored as an industry, as a range of texts, and as a social activity.

AMAP4001A    (20 Credits)
This module introduces students to television studio production, using the resources of the campus television studio. You will learn basic skills of both live and recorded studio production (including directing, vision and sound mixing, camera-work, lighting, floor management and editing), using practice-based training. You will produce a short television programme, researching the appropriate genre characteristics, style and narrative to create the final work. The live broadcast will be accompanied by written reports that critically analyse and evaluate the production process and the finished product.

AMAP4036B    (20 Credits)
The module provides you with the basic concepts and methods necessary to devise and execute a critical-creative project. Students employ both research and creative production methods to examine the interrelationship between theory and creative practice. Coursework will explore methods of using research to inform production, which, in turn, will deepen our understanding of theory. To close the critical-creative ‘loop’, we will develop the habit of critical reflection. Over time, this will hasten your development in both critical and creative areas. Students will look at various methodologies in the area, including research-led-practice and practice-as-research, before producing their own creative work. In the process, you will be shown how to position your creative work in a clear intellectual context; devise the research questions that are practical and realistic; and develop research methods necessary to address these questions. Students work in teams to produce research material that will inform one of a range of creative projects (e.g. short video or audio projects) in liaison with the module leader, followed by critical reflections.

AMAP4037B    (20 Credits)
This module will introduce students to writing across a variety of media forms. The work will aim to provide the critical-creative perspective and basic writing skills necessary to produce the media projects that form the practical portion of this course. Indicative areas may include: writing for documentary and factual; dramatic scriptwriting; podcasting, and magazine-format shows. Students will learn the dramaturgy and important tropes in writing for dramatic and fact-based media, exploring the defining conventions in each form. Students will learn to analyse scripts, reflect on the key values that define a form, and apply those lessons in their own scripts. Students will learn to read and analyse professional scripts and to use professional script formats and formatting in their own work. Students will write a series of formative exercises that explore various media forms. Summative assessments will include a portfolio of short exercises, and an original work.

AMAP4038B    (20 Credits)
Film is frequently described as a ‘director’s medium’, while simultaneously defined as a ‘collaborative effort’. How is that possible? How do the director, cinematographer, designer and editor work together to create the suspense, romance, or comedy that we expect from our favourite films? What does the film director actually do? What are the choices that see one director lauded as an ‘auteur’ while another is derided as a ‘hack’? Why does a cinematographer choose the specific lighting, framing and camera style for a scene? How does the director work with a script and coax performances out of the actors? What prompts the editor to use one camera angle, rather than another? This module attempts to answer these questions, as it introduces you to the practical application of film and television grammar and explores the fundamental questions of cinematic and televisual storytelling. A series of filmmaking exercises give you the chance to experiment with elements of camera and blocking, the use of sound, and multiple editing options. Other exercises look at script as a dramatic text and introduce basic techniques of working with actors. The final project asks you to work with professional script material to produce a video scene study. The module encourages students to understand the choices and decision-making processes involved in filmmaking, and the pros and cons involved in any creative decision.

 

Year 2

Compulsory Modules

AMAP5026A    (20 Credits)
The module provides an intensive introduction to the business of film and television; including the development, financing, production, distribution and exploitation of films and television drama programmes. It is based around a detailed understanding of the film and television value chain, showing how different businesses and creative people work together to create and exploit programmes. It will also cover the process by which scripts or TV programme ideas are written and developed. Emphasis will be placed on UK, European and American Independent film models; and the difference between the independent model and the US studio model. It will examine the effect of Netflix and the rise of digital streaming. It includes a wide range of recent case studies and real-life examples, with companies from Pixar to Working Title. Issues raised will include the impact of new technologies; changing business models; the conflict between commerce and art; entrepreneurship and managing creative people; and the complex and difficult relationships between writers, directors, producers, executives, financiers, and distributors. It is a practical forward-looking course about current and future business practise, which will be a valuable foundation for anyone interested in working in the media, film or television sectors. It will also be valuable to anyone studying film and television programmes and culture, so that they can fully understand the financial and business context in which programmes are created. By the end of the module you will know how films and TV programmes get dreamt up, how they get developed, and how they get financed and distributed. You will learn how the industry actually works.

 

Optional A Modules (20 Credits)

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

AMAM5030A    (20 Credits)
This module explores aspects of film theory as it has developed over the last hundred years or so. It encompasses topics including responses to cinema by filmmaker theorists such as Sergei Eisenstein and influential formulations of and debates about realism and film aesthetics associated with writers and critics such as André Bazin, Siegfried Kracauer, Rudolf Arnheim and Bela Bálázs. You’ll study the impact of structuralism, theories of genre, narrative and models of film language; feminist film theory and its emphasis on psychoanalysis; theories of race and representation; cognitive theory; emerging eco-critical approaches; post-structuralist and post-modern film theory. You’ll be taught by lecture, screening and seminar. You’ll work with primary texts - both films and theoretical writings - and have the opportunity to explore in their written work the ways in which film theories can be applied to film texts.

AMAM5047A    (20 Credits)
This module explores some of the key ways in which television has been theorised, conceptualised and debated. You are offered insight into how the discipline of Television Studies has developed, as well as how television itself has developed - in terms of social roles, political functions and aesthetic form. The medium will be explored as a textual entity, a social activity (i.e. the focus on audiences and viewing), and a political agent (ideology and power). Part of our intention is to focus on how the specificities of television have been understood.

 

Optional B Modules (20-60 Credits)

Students will select 20-60 credits from the following modules:

AMAM5041B    (20 Credits)

This module allows students to work on a specialist area in Film, TV or Media Studies under the guidance of a member of staff with relevant expertise. The module enables students to develop and extended their knowledge and understanding of the contexts, approaches, practices, theories and debates connected with a specific topic or field of study. The module also develops students to develop their critical and analytical skills. The module can allow staff and students to explore a particular area of interest in depth and can therefore permit opportunities for the interrelationship between teaching and research. In addition, the module has a key role in public-facing, outreach and widening participation work: it allows staff-led groups of students to gain accreditation for specific projects such as, for example, being involved in cultural activities such as festivals, academic projects such as symposia, schools outreach activities, practice projects such as radio station broadcasts, heritage or charity-sector initiatives and other commissioned projects. Assessment of the module reflects group and individual learning activity. It is a module that can effectively support interdisciplinary work. Despite the diversity of potential content, the module adheres to a uniform structure: 1. Contexts: The social, political, cultural and/or theoretical backdrop to the subject under investigation. 2. Approaches: Introduction and analysis of a range of methodologies and theoretical and/or creative applications to demonstrate the potential approaches that can be used in the subject. 3. Practice or Theory Project: The student's practical or theoretical work within the topic.

AMAM5060B    (20 Credits)
Cinematography is the craft of motion picture photography, comprising numerous visual elements – light and lighting, frame composition and shot size, camera placement and perspective, focus and depth of field, ‘look’, exposure, and camera movement. This module will explore how the Cinematographer brings together all these elements to capture a scene that interprets the Director’s vision.

AMAP5001A    (20 Credits)
Why do certain directors always get good performances from their actors? What makes one performance seem real or truthful, while another seems fake? How do directors work with actors? What do we say to them? How does an actor think? This module will explore the basics of dramatic performance, looking the dramaturgy, language and techniques that form the fundamentals of any dramatic scene. We will investigate the interplay of structure and character development. We will look at scene structure and learn to use the development of dramatic action to inform the character movement, camera position and lens choices. The module is aimed at students who would like to develop their skills in directing drama for film and television.

AMAP5001B    (20 Credits)
Students will create work in a variety of television formats. Readings will explore the key conventions and tropes from each form, followed by creative exercises that will apply theory in production. The first half of term will explore a range of contemporary television forms, with students producing a number of short video and/or scripting exercises. In the second half of term students will write or direct their own short television pieces, while working as crew on projects produced by the other members of their production groups.

AMAP5002B    (20 Credits)
What does genre mean to a filmmaker? What are the writing and directing challenges presented by different genres? How does a filmmaker express their own creative style amid the pattern of codes, styles, tones, and conventions that define a genre? This module will offer writers and directors the opportunity to explore genre from critical and creative perspectives, creating a series of video and/or screenplay exercises, as well as critical reflections. Seminars will be creative workshops, with students developing and presenting video or writing exercises based on specific genres. This will be a genuine WORKshop, with a fast turnaround offering the down-and- dirty repetitions necessary to develop new directing and writing skills. The low-risk/high-experience approach will allow students to quickly deepen their creative understanding of genre. It is recommended that students attend Film Genres AMAM5033A which will offer a solid understanding of the key historical, theoretical, and critical issues.

AMAP5045A    (20 Credits)
This module will introduce you to key issues in documentary history, theory and practice. You will engage with definitional and generic debates; historical forms and founders; different modes of documentary; ethical issues; and social and political uses. We will draw upon a range of national and media contexts and give you the opportunity to engage with a range of theories, archival materials, documentary styles and ethical debates within your written and practical work. At the end of module you will produce a documentary shaped by the traditions and theories you have studied, employing a range of archive film and television footage sourced from the East Anglian Film Archive.

AMAP5051A    (20 Credits)
For much of the twentieth century, the screenplay was synonymous with Hollywood, the Studio System, and “The Movies”: films as brash and bold as booming American power, written by screenwriting giants, such as Preston Sturges, Herman J. Mankiewicz, Billy Wilder, Anita Loos and Paddy Chayfsky. But much of what we love about more recent American film-making has been the work of writers outside the mainstream: John Cassavetes, Joan Micklin Silver, Charlie Kaufman, Spike Lee, Nora Ephron, Quentin Tarantino, and the like. Throughout, American screenwriting has produced work as dynamic and expansive as the nation itself. In this module you will move through the high points of American scriptwriting, using scripts, texts, and creative pastiche to develop an understanding of the form. Your work may be assessed through a mix of creative and critical work, writing exercises and a complete short script. In broadly the first half of the semester you will use pastiche and other techniques to develop basic screenwriting skills. The remainder of the term will be devoted to developing and workshopping an original script. You will be introduced to the basic dramaturgy of cinematic storytelling, screenwriting form and format, and skills in pitching and story development. This module will therefore help you develop your creative capacity, your communication skills, and will help broaden your commercial awareness.

AMAP5052B    (20 Credits)
Writing the American Screenplay: Hollywood and Beyond For much of the twentieth century, the screenplay was synonymous with Hollywood, the Studio System, and “The Movies”; films as brash and bold as booming American power, written by screenwriting giants, such as Preston Sturges, Herman J. Mankiewicz, Billy Wilder, Anita Loos and Paddy Chayfsky. But much of what we love about more recent American film-making has been the work of writers outside the mainstream: John Cassavetes, Joan Micklin Silver, Charlie Kaufman, Spike Lee, Nora Ephron, Quentin Tarantino, and the like. Throughout, American screenwriting has produced work as dynamic and expansive as the nation itself. In this module you will move through the high points of American scriptwriting, using scripts, texts, and creative pastiche to develop an understanding of the form. Your work may be assessed through a mix of creative and critical work, writing exercises and a complete short script. In broadly the first half of the semester you will use pastiche and other techniques to develop basic screenwriting skills. The remainder of the term will be devoted to developing and workshopping an original script. You will be introduced to the basic dramaturgy of cinematic storytelling, screenwriting form and format, and skills in pitching and story development. This module will therefore help you develop your creative capacity, your communication skills, and will help broaden your commercial awareness. Students who achieve a mark of 68%+ either in this module or Adaptation and Transmedia Storytelling are eligible to enrol on Creative Writing: Scriptwriting in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing at Level 6.

AMAP5123A    (20 Credits)
Film is frequently described as a ‘director’s medium’, while simultaneously defined as a ‘collaborative effort’. How is that possible? How do the director, cinematographer, designer and editor work together to create the suspense, romance, or comedy that we expect from our favourite films? What does the film director actually do? What are the choices that see one director lauded as an ‘auteur’ and another derided as a ‘hack’? Why does a cinematographer choose the specific lighting, framing and camera style for a scene? How does the director work with a script and coax performances out of the actors? What prompts the editor to use one angle, rather than another? This module attempts to answer these questions, as it introduces you to the practical application of film and television grammar and explores the fundamental questions of cinematic and televisual storytelling. A series of filmmaking exercises give you the chance to experiment with elements of camera and blocking, the use of sound, and multiple editing options. Other exercises look at script as a dramatic text and introduce basic techniques of working with actors. The final project asks you to work with professional script material to produce a video scene study. The module encourages students to understand the choices and decision-making processes involved in filmmaking, and the pros and cons involved in any creative decision.

AMAP5125B    (20 Credits)
Film is frequently described as a ‘director’s medium’, while simultaneously defined as a ‘collaborative effort’. How is that possible? How do the director, cinematographer, designer and editor work together to create the suspense, romance, or comedy that we expect from our favourite films? What does the film director actually do? What are the choices that see one director lauded as an ‘auteur’ and another derided as a ‘hack’? Why does a cinematographer choose the specific lighting, framing and camera style for a scene? How does the director work with a script and coax performances out of the actors? What prompts the editor to use one angle, rather than another? This module attempts to answer these questions, as it introduces you to the practical application of film and television grammar and explores the fundamental questions of cinematic and televisual storytelling. A series of filmmaking exercises give you the chance to experiment with elements of camera and blocking, the use of sound, and multiple editing options. Other exercises look at script as a dramatic text and introduce basic techniques of working with actors. The final project asks you to work with professional script material to produce a video scene study. The module encourages students to understand the choices and decision-making processes involved in filmmaking, and the pros and cons involved in any creative decision.

AMAP5126A    (20 Credits)
This module introduces students to television studio production, using the resources of the campus television studio. You will learn basic skills of both live and recorded studio production (including directing, vision and sound mixing, camera-work, lighting, floor management and editing), using practice-based training. You will produce a short television programme, researching the appropriate genre characteristics, style and narrative to create the final work. The live broadcast will be accompanied by written reports that critically analyse and evaluate the production process and the finished product. PLEASE NOTE - This module needs a minimum of 12 students enrolled to run; if that enrolment is not met, the module may be withdrawn.

AMAP5127B    (20 Credits)
This module introduces you to television studio production, using the resources of the campus television studio. You will learn basic skills of both live and recorded studio production (including directing, vision and sound mixing, camera-work, lighting, floor management and editing), using practice-based training. You will produce a short television programme, researching the appropriate genre characteristics, style and narrative to create the final work. The live broadcast will be accompanied by written reports analysing and evaluating the production process and the finished product. PLEASE NOTE - This module needs a minimum of 12 students enrolled to run; if that enrolment is not met, the module may be withdrawn.

LDCC5002A    (20 Credits)
Scriptwriting develops your ability to create and understand dramatic texts, through exercises in writing drama and the analysis of a range of plays and/or film scripts. In this module you’ll explore differing forms and styles and your work will receive feedback from both the tutor and your peers. Your first assignment will be a portfolio of shorter pieces, and then you’ll write a play, radio drama or screenplay of up to 20 minutes length. The course is hands-on, inspiring and practical, and you’ll be writing every week. You’ll be invited to specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/television after you are allocated a place. Scriptwriting and Performance students take this module and the Spring module Creative Writing: Scriptwriting (Spr) as compulsory modules. Students on other programmes may take either the Autumn module or the Spring module, but not both and must have achieved a mark of 68%+ (or equivalent for Visiting students) in a previous Creative Writing module. All other students should enrol on Creative Writing: Introduction (Aut) or Creative Writing: Introduction (Spring).

LDCC5008B    (20 Credits)
Scriptwriting develops your ability to create and understand dramatic texts, through exercises in writing drama and the analysis of a range of plays and/or film scripts. In this module you’ll explore differing forms and styles and your work will receive feedback from both the tutor and your peers. Your first assignment will be a portfolio of shorter pieces, and then you’ll write a play, radio drama or screenplay of up to 20 minutes length. The course is hands-on, inspiring and practical, and you’ll be writing every week. You’ll be invited to specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/television after you are allocated a place. Scriptwriting and Performance students take this module and the Spring module Creative Writing: Scriptwriting (Spr) as compulsory modules. Students on other programmes may take either the Autumn module or the Spring module, but not both and must have achieved a mark of 68%+ (or equivalent for Visiting students) in a previous Creative Writing module. All other students should enrol on Creative Writing: Introduction (Aut) or Creative Writing: Introduction (Spring).

 

Optional C Modules (20-60 Credits)

Students will select 20-60 credits from the following modules:

AMAL5082B    (20 Credits)
Module Description A large number of films and television programmes are adapted from literary sources, and often produce powerful responses from viewers and critics. This module explores the phenomenon of American literature on screen, comparing the adapted screen versions with their literary originals to consider how and why the decision to adapt is taken, and what effect is achieved. This module provides the tools to critically assess and interpret how American literature adapted for the screen approaches key issues in American culture such as race, gender, class, identity, and power. We will also explore the intersectional nature of systemic structures such as settler colonialism, patriarchy, capitalism, organised religion, etc. Additionally, this module will consider the ways that screen adaptation appropriates literary texts, and assess the political and economic dimensions of such appropriations. Literary genres covered will include autobiography and the novel, including the graphic novel, with examples ranging from the 19th to the 21st centuries; screen media will include both film and television adaptations. Students will be encouraged to explore the connections and the differences between the uses of specific media, and to think through how and why adaptation works in a range of critical and often tense American cultural contexts. Students will also consider narrative and narration, characterisation, voice, point of view, style, and audience. The module is team taught by a wide variety of American Studies specialists, and our approach is firmly interdisciplinary and intersectional; students will be encouraged to take similarly diverse critical approaches. Weekly seminars will explore a range of texts and films from the 19th to 21st centuries, and students will be expected to devise their own essay topics from the interests they develop across the module.

AMAM5030A    (20 Credits)
This module explores aspects of film theory as it has developed over the last hundred years or so. It encompasses topics including responses to cinema by filmmaker theorists such as Sergei Eisenstein and influential formulations of and debates about realism and film aesthetics associated with writers and critics such as André Bazin, Siegfried Kracauer, Rudolf Arnheim and Bela Bálázs. You’ll study the impact of structuralism, theories of genre, narrative and models of film language; feminist film theory and its emphasis on psychoanalysis; theories of race and representation; cognitive theory; emerging eco-critical approaches; post-structuralist and post-modern film theory. You’ll be taught by lecture, screening and seminar. You’ll work with primary texts - both films and theoretical writings - and have the opportunity to explore in their written work the ways in which film theories can be applied to film texts.

AMAM5042B    (20 Credits)
Is there really 'no business like show business'? This module will develop your understanding of how silent-era, classical and post-classical Hollywood has developed as an industry, balancing the twin demands of creativity and commerce. Our aim is to encourage you to analyse how Hollywood works as an industry, the kind of films it produces, and the ways in which they are consumed by domestic and global audiences. You will engage with a variety of Hollywood films and be introduced to a range of theories and approaches for analysing how they are produced and consumed.

AMAM5047A    (20 Credits)
This module explores some of the key ways in which television has been theorised, conceptualised and debated. You are offered insight into how the discipline of Television Studies has developed, as well as how television itself has developed - in terms of social roles, political functions and aesthetic form. The medium will be explored as a textual entity, a social activity (i.e. the focus on audiences and viewing), and a political agent (ideology and power). Part of our intention is to focus on how the specificities of television have been understood.

AMAM5053B    (20 Credits)
This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the history and structure of the cinema industries, practices and people of Latin America. Combining film and cultural studies modes of inquiry this module will examine different approaches to film style and theme in this region, as well as looking at the social and cultural role of cinema and its importance as an area of economic and political activity. Covering a range of relevant theories and concepts, the module will provide students with a critical understanding of the key issues at stake in how films are made, circulated and received by audiences, both within relevant national borders and beyond. An indicative weekly outline is as follows: • History and socio-cultural context of Latin America (including legacies of colonialism and religion; what/where is ‘Latin America’ ) • National cinema theories and perspectives • Genres in Latin American cinema • ‘New’ Latin American cinema and ‘Third Cinema’ theory of the 1950s and ‘60s • Indigenous filmmaking and representations of indigeneity • Gender in Latin American cinema • Representations of economic deprivation in Latin American cinema • Censorship and government regulation • Role of co-productions, film festivals and awards (including issues to consider around the reception of sub-titled films) • Focus: Perú (Barrow) • Focus: México and/or Colombia (Aveyard) The proposed weekly structure for the module is as follows: • 2 hour film screening • 1 hour lecture • 1 hour seminar

AMAM5061B    (20 Credits)
Children’s television is dynamic, diverse and often controversial. In this module, we examine how television has constructed childhood and how children have, in their turn, shaped television. One of the particular challenges with children’s television is that it is usually made by adults for children. As society has shifted over time, therefore, children’s television programming becomes caught up in debates about who and what children are; about how (much) they should watch; and, about what they should (not) be allowed to see. Because childhood is a highly debated cultural and social category, there is a large and growing body of scholarship on the topic of children’s television. We use these theoretical and methodological maps to investigate the past and present of children’s television, including things like: cultural studies, media ethnography, genre studies, gender studies and production studies. We look at a range of topics that may include: Saturday Morning Television, children’s variety shows, animation, children’s broadcasting, children’s satellite channels, censorship, consumerism, pressure groups and gender.

AMAM5064A    (20 Credits)
This module seeks to provide you with an understanding of the ways in which audiences engage with media. It will introduce some of the key research on, and theoretical debates about the relationship that exists between audiences, texts and technologies of production, distribution and reception, covering work on encoding and decoding, through studies of the social activities of television consumption, to research on marketing, critical reception and beyond. It will also introduce some of the methodological issues involved in the actual practice of doing audience studies. In this way, the module will not only encourage students to learn about the study of film and television audiences, but also equip them with the tools necessary to undertake their own studies.

AMAP5003B    (20 Credits)
This course will explore how professionals ‘read’. Much of the film and television industry spends their day reading, editing and developing scripts and this module will look at that process. The module will be a practical exploration of industry practice, dramaturgy, and the arcane art of writing ‘coverage’ and story notes. We will look at the screenplay development ‘business’ in writings by Peter Bloore and Ian Thompson. We will look at dramaturgy with readings from Aristotle to John Yorke and Steve Waters. And we will look at examples of studio coverage, explore the Black List, and look at the stand-out contemporary scripts. And we will write coverage. Lots of coverage. Students will learn to rapidly read, evaluate, and write up scripts. This is an education in itself, providing a useful skill for anyone interested in writing, directing, or producing and development. And it makes an outstanding entry-level skill for anyone hoping to move into film and television. Students can emerge from the module with coverage samples to add to their CV

AMAS5049B    (20 Credits)
How do we know what is real and what is fake? Previous generations, we are told, could reliably turn to “the news”—but is that really true? From the very beginning, American news was always synonymous with low scandal, scurrilous rumour, and fakery. And yet, there is no doubt that there have been crucial moments when journalists and journalism have gone beyond merely reporting events, to shape the public imagination. “The news” has always manipulated as much as informed its audiences, and in this module you will learn about how this in turn has shaped American life. In learning about the history of journalism and its cultural impact in America in the wider global context, you will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the art of journalism, both critically and in practice. You will engage with questions surrounding print, broadcast and digital media—looking back to the past, reflecting on the present, and looking forward into the future of journalism. You will consider the ways in which marginalised peoples have sought to assert their voices through news media, by seizing the means by which our public understanding of reality is produced. The work will involve critical readings, engagement with primary source materials, seminar discussions, presentations, and critical writing with creative practice. You will have the opportunity to refine your communication skills, and especially the art of writing in different modes for different audiences.

AMAS5053B    (20 Credits)

The plaque at the entrance of Disneyland Park, opened in 1955, reads, ‘Here you leave today and enter the world of yesterday, tomorrow and fantasy’ Escapism is and always has been a key Disney approach, but by being absorbed in nostalgia, and fantastic imaginings of worlds to come, what happens to the political present, and what are the effects of its exclusion? Disney has had a long, successful, and influential career over the 20th century and into the 21st, and whilst it has moved with the times, often spearheading the changes in terms of technology, its choice of story-lines, and its underlying, and largely conservative views on American life and morality have too often been problematic. This is especially true in terms of those it chooses to represent in its productions, and the nature of this representation. Throughout its history, Disney has been significantly racist, homophobic, misogynistic and imperialistic in its world views. Much has changed in the last 20 years, but it still maintains a sense of a largely apolitical idealized America. On this module you will explore Disney from multiple approaches, employing historical, political, and cultural analysis to explore Disney’s Dream America, and to see the extent these dreams really do come true.

HUM-5007A    (20 Credits)
How do notions of gender and sexuality shape culture, and how are in turn our understanding and experiences of gender and sexuality shaped by cultural production? How important are other times, places and identifications – associated with class, race, ethnicity – to these understandings and experiences? And to what extent can a film, an image, a testimony, or a place capture such complexity? Addressing these questions from an interdisciplinary approach, the aim of the module is to explore the ways in which gender and sexuality are constituted through a broad array of experiences, practices, and cultural products. The module focuses on issues raised in classical and contemporary research in history, politics, media, cultural studies and visual cultures such as: representation and cultural production; subjectivity; identity; identification; bodies and embodiment; performance and performativity; among others. Overall, by exploring theory in conjunction with queer cultural production that explores questions of power, identity, and desire across different racial, national, and cultural landscapes, the module aims to problematise how gender and sexuality are not stable identities or classifications but are instead processes involving normalisations, hierarchies and relations of domination that can be challenged, troubled and/or queered.

HUM-5008B    (20 Credits)
This module offers students the opportunity to develop a comprehensive understanding of the cultural, political, and economic contexts of the videogames industry, and the techniques and principles used in game design. The module will give an overview of the key academic debates from video game history from production to reception, considering the current state of the industry, issues of representation in games, and study of games culture within a broader context. The module will provide students with the opportunity to play and critique a variety of games hardware and software. In addition, the module provides an understanding of hardware platforms and software tools used in the creation of videogames, making use of UEA's Media Suite to offer a practice-based component to aid in the understanding of the principles behind games development. Students will be able to learn entry level games design practices. No previous experience of coding or games development is required to undertake the module, just an interest in the subject.

HUM-5011B    (20 Credits)
This module introduces you to the practical and theoretical study of digital media. By exploring the historical and contemporary aspects of various media, including text, audio-visual, you will consider how the digital turn has affected media production and consumption. You will also gain awareness of the technologies which underpin digital media, the interfaces for delivering media online, and the cultural and social aspects of digitisation. By the end of the module, you will be able to evaluate digital media in their contemporary and historical contexts, and understand the principles which influence the digital remediation of media forms. You will gain hands-on experience of turning analogue materials into digital media, drawing on sessions based in UEA’s archives, and use these creations to explore cutting edge digital approaches to media texts. These practical sessions will introduce students to: digitisation of text and images; digital asset management and metadata creation; image processing; digitisation of audio-visual media. Each of these sessions will serve to illuminate particular theoretical issues, including media archiving, reproduction and restoration, and the problems associated with ephemerality and preservation in the digital age.

 

Optional D Modules (0-20 Credits)

Students will select 0-20 credits from the following modules:

HUM-5004B    (20 Credits)
This module will provide you with the opportunity work within a creative/cultural/charity/ heritage/media or other appropriate organisation in order to apply the skills you are developing through your degree to the working world and to develop your knowledge of employment sectors within which you may wish to work in the future. The module emphasises industry experience, sector awareness and personal development through a structured reflective learning experience. Having sourced and secured your own placement (with support from Careers Central), you work within your host organisation undertaking tasks that will help you to gain a better understanding of professional practices within your chosen sector. Taught sessions enable you to acquire knowledge of both the industries in which you are placed as well as focusing on personal and professional development germane to the sector. Your assessment tasks will provide you with an opportunity to critically reflect on the creative and cultural sector in which you have worked as well as providing opportunities to undertake presentations, gather evidence, and articulate your newly acquired skills and experiences.

PPLB4   (20 Credits)

There are a broad range of Beginners’ Language Modules for you to choose from. To explore all our available Level 4 modules, please visit our Language Options page. 

PPLB5   (20 Credits)

There are a broad range of Beginners’ Language Modules for you to choose from. To explore all our available Level 5 modules, please visit our Language Options page. 

 

Year 3

Compulsory Modules

AMAP6001B    (30 Credits)
Students will produce an independent critical-creative project that draws on the skills and methodologies learned in the Film and Television Production course. The project will include both creative and critical elements, comprising a research essay that clearly informs the creative work. The creative piece may reflect or respond to the critical research (as research-led-practice), or it may generate its own research (practice-as-research.) The module requires independent research and production, valuable skills necessary for postgraduate research and professional practice in film and television. Project format, research topics, and creative works will be negotiated with a supervisor, who will provide guidance and feedback in a limited number of tutorials. Students producing video (and other recorded forms) may use volunteer crew and actors, but they are expected to fill the key creative roles as writer, director, and editor, and be present for all production.

 

Optional A Modules (30-60 Credits)

Students will select 30-60 credits from the following modules:

AMAM6115A    (30 Credits)
Today more films are made from adaptations than wholly original screenplays. All scriptwriters preparing for work in the business today should therefore be aware of the process and nature of script adaptation. You will explore the practice of scriptwriting, dramaturgy and story structure; and explore key theories of adaptation, from the earliest ideas of ‘fidelity’ to the source, to later approaches emphasising intertextuality, and the movement of narratives across media. You will examine a series of different examples of narrative adaptation across literary and media contexts.

LDCC6105B    (30 Credits)
This module will enable you to explore the theory and practice of writing for stage, screen and radio through the work of produced writers, secondary reading and your own writing. You’ll study 4 key texts for stage, film, TV and radio. This module is exclusive to English Literature with Creative Writing students (and for other students who have achieved a mark of 68%+ in a previous Creative Writing module or Adaptation and Transmedia Storytelling or Writing the American Script).

 

Optional B Modules (30-60 Credits)

Students will select 30-60 credits from the following modules:

AMAA6016B    (30 Credits)
Since the 1960s the proliferation of artists working with film and video has resulted in screen-based installations becoming a common feature of most contemporary art exhibitions. Surveying the activity of a diverse range of film and video makers this module will explore how artists have sought to develop a critical mode of practice that distinguishes their work from commercial forms of cinema and television. With a particular focus on European and American film and video artists, this module will examine in detail how their work relates to established histories of avant-garde cinema and experimental film making. Through direct engagement with film and video artworks this module will investigate how artists have sought to challenge and subvert our viewing habits and in turn question our psychological and social relationship to the moving image. Artists discussed include: Andy Warhol, Maya Deren, Barbara Rubin, Carolee Schneemann, Stan Brakhage, Nam June Paik, Joan Jonas, Bruce Nauman, Bill Viola, Tacita Dean, John Akomfrah and Steve McQueen.

AMAM6012B    (30 Credits)
How has British cinema developed through the 21st century? What has it learned from the successes and failures of its own past? By focusing on British film and British film culture from the 1960s to the present day, this module will give you new and different perspectives on the modern British film industry, and the films it produces. You'll get a grounding in the important movements, directors, genre, cycles and stars within the last 6 decades of British film. You'll learn how to examine and analyse those people, films, and movements within a cultural and industrial context, considering the social, technological, artistic and ideological motivations underpinning the creation of 'British' film. Central to this will be your exploration of how 21st century British cinema understands and exploits its own history, from Ealing Studios and Hammer Horror to claims of the 'boom and bust' economic cycle of British production.

AMAM6025A    (30 Credits)
This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the structure and workings of the independent and local screen sector in the UK. The module will look at different approaches to distribution and public exhibition of screen content and audience development, including commercial exhibition, community cinema and film festivals. Covering a range of relevant theories and concepts, the module will provide students with a critical understanding of the key issues at stake in how screen content is circulated and accessed by audiences. Key themes will include the influence of industry regulation (by government and industry), impacts of public funding, professional work practices, content diversity and social inclusion. The module will incorporate significant contributions from industry professionals that I have been working with as part of the Rural Cinema Impact Project. A number of these partners have confirmed their willingness to be part of the teaching programme in 2019/20 including Sarah-Jane Meredith, Audience Fund Manager British Film Institute; Robert Livingston, Director Regional Screen Scotland; Christoph Warrack, CEO and Founder, Open Cinema (a national network of film clubs for excluded or marginalised people); Michael Pierce, CEO and Founder Scalarama (national film festival for independent and cult cinema); and Duncan Carson, Marketing and Communication Manager Independent Cinema Office (national body for promoting independent cinema in the UK). It is proposed to involve the students in this module in the organisation and hosting of a short film festival in Norfolk. Access to venues and audiences will be provided through Creative Arts East (CAE), a long term partner in the Rural Cinema Impact Project. CAE has over 50 screening venues across Norfolk, many which are relatively close to Norwich and the UEA campus.

AMAM6062B    (30 Credits)
This module offers an overview of critical and theoretical approaches to gender and genre in film and television, focusing particularly on North American media, over the last decade. The module is taught by seminar, tutorial and screening and the topics explored may include: the articulation and development of postfeminism in film and television; popular and independent film; feminism and authorship; media responses to the political and cultural contexts of postfeminism; responses to the recession; race and the limits of feminist representation; motherhood and fatherhood; representations of queerness.

AMAM6086B    (30 Credits)
What is it like working in the media industries? What are the key opportunities and challenges which face aspiring and established media professionals? In engaging with such questions, this module offers you the opportunity to gain an understanding of the industries in which you may well wish to work. Throughout the module you will engage with academic research and other writing, both historical and contemporary in nature, to provide you with an understanding of the potential to find pleasure, fulfilment (and a steady income), as well as pressure, frustration and precariousness in media work. As well as developing skills in communicating ideas, principles and theories, you will conduct your own research into the nature and conditions of media work. To help you understand media work, we reflect on changes in the nature of work itself in modern societies, considering historical and recent developments in working cultures and questions of work-life balance. Following this, you will gain insights into work in the media and creative industries through an engagement with academic research, policy developments and the accounts of media workers themselves (across sectors such as film, television, music, magazines, advertising and digital media). We also look at questions about the extent to which it is feasible to do ‘good work’ and produce challenging, innovative, ground breaking, thoughtful or just genuinely entertaining media products in a seemingly ever competitive and commercial media landscape. Having developed a grasp of some of the key dynamics at play in creative labouring, you’ll put this knowledge into practice by carrying out and reflecting upon your own research into the challenges and opportunities bound up with media work. The module will not only provide you with a range of valuable insights into the realities of media work but will also help you develop skills in conducting research, organising and communicating your ideas and weighing your own arguments against those of others.

AMAM6121A    (30 Credits)
Science Fiction films and television series have provided a significant focus for addressing social, cultural and political issues. You will look at the historical development of the genre, with an emphasis on situating examples of films and television programs within their historical and cultural context. The module also concentrates on issues surrounding human identity, as played out in this genre. A range of films and series episodes from both the US and UK will be screened and various clips will also be discussed in seminar.

AMAM6124A    (30 Credits)
How have new technology and media start-ups changed the world? What is the effect of leadership on creativity and innovation in media business today? Managing creativity and innovation are increasingly important for all companies in the current fast-changing business landscape. Digital disruption and new business models have made a huge impact on many businesses, including the media. The aims of this module are to introduce a theoretical and practical understanding of the nature of entrepreneurship and start-up culture; managing and motivating creative people; and the leadership strategies used by organisations to encourage different types of innovation, with a focus on media companies.

AMAM6133B    (30 Credits)
This module looks at a range of print, broadcast and online alternative media in the USA and Britain from largely the 1960s counterculture onwards. This includes pirate radio, underground press, guerrilla television, fanzines, subvertising, video activism, Indymedia, community media. It maps the history and development of alternative media, explores connections and tensions with technological innovations, the cultural politics of alternative media, the relationship with and impact on mainstream media forms, and assesses the significance of alternative media for social change. There is an emphasis on historical and cultural material theorised through aspects of media, subculture and social movements.

AMAM6144B    (30 Credits)
In this module you will investigate a range of changing audience practices and cultures in the twenty-first century. You will be introduced to some of the key research on, and theoretical debates around, audience practices in relation to changes in distribution, technology and evolving forms of engagement. You will also study social practices and fan cultures surrounding new technologies, transmedia storytelling, branding, steamed media, event cinema, theme park attractions and other participatory cultures. Investigating Audiences will enable you to expand your critical and analytical skills, and also to develop your abilities as an audience researcher. You will evaluate and assess published academic writing on audience research methodologies, which will then enable you to exercise critical judgement in the design of your own empirical research project.

AMAS6059B    (30 Credits)
Why do people draw their life stories in comics form? How can trauma be represented in words and pictures? What does it mean to bear witness to horrific events graphically? Throughout this module, you’ll study the recent phenomenon of reality-based American comics, which stand in sharp contrast to the form’s common association with superheroes and the fantastic. In addition to discovering comics’ powerful potential for representing real-life events in engaging and disturbing ways, you’ll learn to analyse both form and content, and will develop a critical vocabulary for reading, thinking, and writing about comics. You’ll read comics that tell a wide variety of stories anchored in real life, and from many different genres, such as autobiography, memoir, investigative journalism, and war reportage. Throughout, you’ll learn to pay special attention to issues of representation, spectatorship, and the position of the artist in relation to the events depicted. You’ll also study a variety of critical and theoretical material that puts these comics-specific issues in conversation with more general concerns about the ethics of representing the real world in diverse written or visual forms. You’ll learn through seminars and independent study, and will be assessed through coursework including a final essay. At the end of the module, you’ll be able to read reality-based as well as other comics in a transformative way, and will have gained a deep understanding of how this vibrant and upcoming cultural form creates new opportunities for representing the increasingly complex personal and geopolitical realities of the world in the twenty-first century.

 


IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring and review of modules. Where this activity leads to significant change to a programme and modules, the University will endeavour to consult with affected students. The University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff. Availability of optional modules may be restricted owing to timetabling, lack of demand, or limited places. Where this is the case, you will be asked to make alternative module choices and you will be supported during this process.

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Entry Requirements

A Levels

BBB or ABC or BBC with an A in the Extended Project

T Levels

No acceptable pathways for 2022 entry

BTEC

DDM excluding BTEC Public Services, BTEC Uniformed Services and BTEC Business Administration

Scottish highers

AABBB

Scottish highers advanced

CCC

Irish leaving certificate

2 subjects at H2, 4 subjects at H3

Access course

Access to Humanities & Social Sciences pathway. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3

European Baccalaureate

70%

International Baccalaureate

31 Points

GCSE offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE

Additional entry requirements

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes.

INTO UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree: 

 

Alternative Entry Requirements 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level. 

Important note

Once enrolled onto your course at UEA, your progression and continuation (which may include your eligibility for study abroad, overseas experience, placement or year in industry opportunities) is contingent on meeting the assessment requirements which are relevant to the course on which you are enrolled.

Students for whom english is a foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.0 overall (minimum 5.5 in all components) 

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

 

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study: 

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.  

Gap year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.  

Intakes

This course is open to UK and International applicants. The annual intake is in September each year.  

Course Reference Number: 4479790

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

See our Tuition Fees page for further information. 

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Course related costs

View our information about Additional Course Fees. 

Course Reference Number: 4479790

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS number for the University of East Anglia is E14.

Course Reference Number: 4479790
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts
UCAS course code
W6P3
Entry Requirements
BBB or ABC
Duration (years)
3
With an emphasis on production, this course develops your creative work through the exploration of critical studies in film and television history and theory. You will produce your own film and television content and will gain experience of writing for different media.
Schools
Art, Media and American Studies
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