International Development

MA MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Key details 

MA MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Start Year
2022
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Master of Arts
Duration (years)
1

Assessment for Year 1

You’ll be assessed using a variety of methods, including presentations, essays, and an optional dissertation. Further assessment methods will differ depending on the optional modules you choose. 

You’ll receive oral feedback on your arguments and ideas during seminars, which helps you develop skills in articulating an argument verbally. 

You’ll also be encouraged to prepare essay plans or outlines in advance of essay deadlines, and to discuss these with the relevant lecturer during their office hours or by email. In addition, you’ll typically receive oral and/or written feedback on an initial coursework assignment well in advance of your deadline for the main coursework assignment. 

Finally, the dissertation enables you to develop specific research skills such as conducting research using primary and secondary data, researching specific topics and questions, thinking critically, and linking theoretical concepts to practical issues. 

If you have additional needs due to disabilities such as sensory impairment or learning difficulties such as dyslexia please talk to our Student Support Services about how we can help. 

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Year 1

Compulsory Modules (40 Credits)

Code: DEV-7044A  Credits: 20
The overarching aim of this module is to enable students to understand how theories and methods within media studies can contribute to a better understanding of the role of media in social change. This module provides an advanced, interdisciplinary overview of key issues and debates in media studies – with a particular focus on how they relate to international affairs. You will examine how media influences audiences and, more broadly, shapes society, as well as reviewing debates about media power. This will include discussion of the role of media in influencing government policy and public attitudes towards overseas aid. You will consider how media coverage of global issues is produced and circulated, and what shapes these processes. Finally, within this module, you will be introduced to relevant research methods for critically analysing media content and be guided through critical readings of key research in this area.

Code: DEV-7030A  Credits: 20
The media play an increasingly important role in international development - from promoting mass mobilisation and participation to facilitating the flow of information locally, nationally and internationally. Media are also central to encouraging charitable donations, promoting democracy and human rights, and delivering public health messages during emergencies. You’ll gain a critical introduction to the broad range of issues relevant to the relationship between media and development. You’ll explore the fields of development communication, media development and media representations of development. This module is accessible to students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

 

Options Range A

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Code: DEV-7056X  Credits: 60
Production of a short (8000-12000 words) dissertation on an approved topic.

Code: DEV-7057X  Credits: 60
This module gives you an opportunity to identify, apply for and do an internship or work placement, worth 60 credits, as an integral part of your Masters programme. You would take this module in the summer semester as an alternative to the Dissertation module, and it is open to most MA /MSc programmes. The placements are for a period of 8-10 weeks between May and, preferably, the end of July. In recent years, students have done placements across a range of United Nations institutions, in specialist consultancy and research Organisations, and non-governmental organisations both in the UK and across the world. You are responsible for finding a suitable placement but will be given a range of support from International Development which includes giving the students access to the International Development internship host data base compiled over nearly a decade; advice on identifying appropriate placements; advice on CV design, fund-raising (where necessary), health and safety, ethical considerations etc.; facilitate communication between student and potential host, in some cases acting as a mediator. Whilst we cannot guarantee a placement we are confident that most students who take this module and apply themselves to identifying an internship, will be successful. The module is assessed by the production of an Analytical Report based on the internship which allows you to reflect both on the content of the placement, and the personal expense of undertaking this work.

 

Options Range B

Autumn Semester Recommended Options. Students must select a total of 20 credits from Option Ranges B and C.
Students will select 0-20 credits from the following modules:

Code: DEV-7001A  Credits: 20
You will explore different theoretical ideas and debates about development, and place these in their historical and political contexts. You will critically assess the various ways in which development has been conceptualised, from the end of the Second World War to the present day. You will cover topics including modernisation theory; dependency theory; the role of the state; neo-liberalism and the Washington Consensus, neo-institutionalism and the post-Washington Consensus; poverty and basic needs; human development and capabilities; equity and justice; rights and empowerment; and sustainable development. A key point of the module is to show how ideas in development emerge and how they shape policies and practice in development in the present day.

Code: DEV-7002A  Credits: 20
The aim of the module is for you to gain an understanding of current debates on the principles and theories linking education to development in a range of social contexts. The module will introduce you to theories of education and development including international and comparative education. These are examined in relation to the broader challenges of development. Topics in the module may include: theories of human development and capabilities, human capital and rights based approaches, theories of equity, social justice and inclusive education. You will examine schooling in contexts of chronic poverty, models of schooling and de-schooling, formal and non-formal education, the challenges of linguistic and cultural diversity, inclusive education and disability, gender inequalities, and the education of nomads and other migratory groups.

Code: DEV-7003A  Credits: 20
The aim of this unit is to provide you with a solid grounding in gender analysis of development, and to enable you to understand the link between gender and key debates within development studies such as poverty, violence, religion and the role of men in gender and development. The module introduces and explains the range of ideas, debates and tools, which are the foundations of gender analysis, within a discussion of key issues in gender analysis of development: the nature of the household and kinship, gender roles, power and empowerment, and environmental change. The unit stands alone as a foundation for gender analysis of development, it also builds the necessary basis for the more applied units which follow in the spring semester, and for dissertations based on gender topics. If you are writing your dissertation on a gender topic you will need to have completed this module.

Code: DEV-7005A  Credits: 20
The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: • Development research & research ethics • Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews • The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods • Participatory and action research • Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are shown based on tools such as Excel, SPSS and STATA.

Code: DEV-7020A  Credits: 20
Poverty and hunger remain key developmental challenges, driving poor health and ill-being on the one hand and conflict and violence on the other. This is the central question addressed by this module. In this module, you will explore different approaches to understanding rural livelihoods. You will be equipped with the tools and frameworks to critically assess different strategies for livelihoods-building and their implications for poverty and inequality, including those of class and gender, at the micro-level. Starting with an understanding of key concepts of poverty, food security, gender, capabilities, capitals and entitlements, you will apply these to a host of contexts and programmes through seminar discussions. This will enable a deeper understanding of the interconnections between the wider policy context, the social structure that shapes entitlements, the assets available to groups and individuals and their livelihood strategies. You will also explore the links between the rural and urban, and the changes over time. You will have an opportunity to experience some of the dilemmas confronting the rural poor through an experiential game.

Code: DEV-7021A  Credits: 20
Effective social development and policy are based on sound conceptual foundations, and this module focuses on the conceptual tools that underpin policy relevant social analysis. You will develop skills to analyse social contexts which influence interventions and social change (‘development’), using concepts from sociology, anthropology and political analysis. There is an old development adage that ‘if you give a man a fish you feed him for a day, but if you give him a fishing rod you feed him for a lifetime’. Think about social theory and concepts as a fishing rod! The module is about social concepts and theory, but we always apply these concepts to practical social development issues and interventions. You will apply your knowledge and understanding of social concepts to important international development issues, for example (and these can vary each year) the social analysis of HIV, the social analysis of poverty & micro-credit interventions, or the social analysis of conflict and peace.

Code: DEV-7023A  Credits: 20
“Good governance” and durable democracy are key items on the international development agenda. However, despite their prominence in the development discourse, it remains contested not only how to achieve these political development goals, but also how to define them in the first place. The aim of Governance, Democracy and Development is to critically assess the possible definitions, contested causes and arguable consequences of “good governance” and democracy. Key topics to be discussed in the module include how to define and measure democracy and “good governance”, explanations for the emergence of democracy, theories on the survival of democracy and dictatorship, local forms of governance and democracy, aid and governance, trust and cooperation, the effects of democracy and dictatorship on prospects of economic development, and key challenges to democracy in the 21st century. Throughout the module, you will be expected to assess the strengths and limitations of central concepts and theories from the academic debate by applying them to relevant empirical evidence, such as political regime trends in Turkey or the economic effects of recent elections in Kenya.

Code: DEV-7028A  Credits: 20
Globalisation refers to the increasingly interconnected nature of social life on our planet. It has been described as ‘the most important change in human history’. You will critically examine a number of key debates about globalisation: about what is driving the process, and about what impacts it is having – for example, on economic development, poverty and inequality, conflict, and the environment. This module takes an inter-disciplinary approach, presenting different conceptual frameworks within which contemporary globalisation is analysed.

Code: DEV-7038A  Credits: 20
This module provides you with an introduction to the theory and practice of impact evaluation. The focus will be on issues around evidence-based policy making, approaches to wellbeing, and their practical application in terms of evaluating the effect of development interventions on the quality of people’s lives. The first part discusses the notion of evidence-based policy, introduces the students to the area of evaluation and reviews the role of programme theory in evaluation. The second part addresses the theory of welfare, with particular reference to poverty, inequality, and multi-dimensional ill-being as well as cost effectiveness. The third part considers policy and evaluation in practice looking at a range of sectors and contexts.

 

Options Range C

Autumn Semester other. Students must select a total of 20 credits from Option Ranges B and C.
Students will select 0-20 credits from the following modules:

Code: PPLM7000A  Credits: 20
Digital technologies are often hyped as revolutionising society. You will be introduced to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives. The module is divided into three blocks: the first introduces the theoretical debates surrounding digital media; the second discusses how our everyday interpersonal relations are affected by digital media; the third addresses the impact of digital technology on media and politics. Topics covered include: the network society; social networking and virtual communities, surveillance, digital journalism and online activism.

Code: PPLM7004A  Credits: 20
This module is intended to provide you with an introduction to the key study skills in media and cultural studies. It will be particularly useful if you are unfamiliar with the British university system and its expectations. You will apply theoretical and methodological approaches to contemporary media texts and discuss recent scholarship on changes in the global media and cultural landscape.

Code: PPLM7014A  Credits: 20
The rise of cultural and media studies, themselves shaped by the changing character of systems of communication and entertainment, has prompted detailed consideration of the power of cultural and media forms, whether as sites of oppression and manipulation or of expression and resistance. Such concerns have served to challenge (as has feminism, for example) traditional accounts of human action and traditional definitions of the political realm. This MA module provides an introduction to, and an exploration of, the issues and debates that shape the study of Media and Cultural Politics. The first part of the module is devoted to understanding the ideas behind the development of cultural politics and the politics of media. The second part explores particular issues that arise from these fields and draws upon the research interests of those teaching these sessions

 

Options Range D

Spring Semester Recommended Options. Students must select a total of 60 credits from Option Ranges D and G.
Students will select 0-60 credits from the following modules:

Code: DEV-7000B  Credits: 20
The objective of Contemporary World Development is to examine key debates around development objectives, processes and agencies. While issues discussed here are of contemporary significance, references will be made to the historical contexts in which these debates have arisen. Concerns central to development policy making will be reviewed through theoretically grounded critical perspectives. Topics covered include the Millennium Development Goals, donors and aid politics, state and NGOs, and poverty.

Code: DEV-7004B  Credits: 20
Around three-quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas and within most developing countries the gap between the rural poor and better off urban residents continues to widen. The lives of the rural poor can be greatly influenced by policies in areas such as agriculture, land, social protection, natural resources, health, education and trade. This module reviews important policies and issues in these and other areas. It also guides students to critically analyse policy choices within specific contexts. Rural Policies & Politics recognises the importance of looking at rural policies with consideration of particular socio-economic and political contexts, as well as in relation to larger-scale trends that are affecting rural areas including globalisation, urbanisation, de-agrarianisation, and rapid technological change.

Code: DEV-7011B  Credits: 20
The aim of this module is to help you understand and critically examine, policy-making processes and specific policies for educational development. You will discover the relationships between policy and practice in a range of international, national and local development contexts. Through this module you will explore different approaches to policy development and familiarise yourself with dominant global policy agendas in education - asking who makes or influences policy, and considering policies as socially situated documents, practices and processes. The module introduces you to educational policy-making to address a range of development challenges and how related strategies are enacted in practice; drawing on policy theory and ethnographic and school-based research, as well as practical sessions to critique policy-related writing, examine models of educational quality and curricula, and explore issues of school-related gender based violence.

Code: DEV-7015B  Credits: 20
The number of violent intrastate conflicts has outweighed the number of violent interstate conflicts for more than five decades. Yet it was only with the end of the Cold War that academics and policy-makers started paying more attention to the possible causes and consequences of large-scale intrastate violence. Today, questions of effective conflict management, especially of large-scale civil wars, are among the top priorities of international development agencies. The aim of the Conflict, Civil Wars and Peace module is to critically assess the possible causes and consequences of violent intrastate conflicts as well as their implications for the wider development agenda. Key topics to be discussed in the module include causes, dynamics and consequences of different types of violent conflict, strategies and causes of terrorism, the role of gender during and after violent intrastate conflicts, the (contested) relationship(s) between natural resource wealth and civil wars, institutional approaches to conflict management, the rationale and possible effects of third-party intervention in civil wars, and post-conflict reconstruction efforts, including state- and peace-building as well as transitional justice. Throughout the module, you will be expected to assess the strengths and limitations of central concepts and theories from the academic debate by applying them to relevant empirical evidence, such as the role of gender during the Rwandan genocide in 1994 or the performance of Bosnia and Herzegovina's post-civil war power-sharing arrangement.

Code: DEV-7022B  Credits: 20
How can sustainable development be achieved in a way that both protects the environment whilst pursuing development that is fair and equitable? Often those who benefit least from development projects are most vulnerable to the costs of development, such as pollution of rivers and loss of land, yet they have little say in development decisions. This module introduces you to important tools and frameworks used by researchers, government agencies, businesses and non-governmental organisations for managing environmental and natural resources for sustainable development. You will learn to critique and apply a range of the most widely used tools. Examples that are covered in this module include climate vulnerability assessment, livelihoods analysis, Environmental Impact Assessment, participatory decision making and scenarios methods. The module places an emphasis on putting concepts and tools into practice and understanding how environmental assessments influence management actions. The module includes lectures and seminars; including a series of ‘competency skills’ based seminars which will provide an opportunity to experience and develop some of the key skills that are used widely in the environment and development sectors (e.g. writing a government policy brief, or an Expression of Interest for tender). For this module, both individual and team working will be important. You will gain confidence and skills in applying and critiquing the leading tools and frameworks used by sustainable development professionals.

Code: DEV-7024B  Credits: 20
This module equips you with the knowledge and skills to understand and explore relations between social policies, practice and key actors in addressing various forms of difference and diversity, with a particular focus on gender. You will develop analytical and conceptual skills to critically assess social policies - including gender - and social development at the international, national and institutional levels. This module considers current issues of gender and a range of intersecting inequalities (e.g. disability, migrant status) with reference to addressing social exclusion and deficit modes of development. The module has both theoretical and more practical components, and you will have the opportunity to explore frameworks, case studies and implementation challenges through linked sessions.

Code: DEV-7033B  Credits: 20
This course seeks to provide students with a solid understanding of political ecology theory and to enable them to apply this theory for analyzing environment and development problems. After a brief introduction to key theoretical concepts in political ecology, students review key contributions to major policy fields in environment and development. They do this in a series of reading seminars, covering agriculture and biotechnology, climate change, conservation, fisheries, forestry, water management and other fields. The course ends with a workshop on the role of policy in political ecology.

Code: DEV-7036B  Credits: 20
The main aim of the module is to prepare students for carrying out qualitative data collection and analysis following various approaches and techniques. It will provide you with the skills to use a number of different social science research methods to collect and analyse data. It will also give a basic understanding of how to link research questions and methods and of research design more generally, as well as data analysis, data management, and producing a piece of written work from the data.

Code: DEV-7037B  Credits: 20
This module will provide you with a comprehensive overview of the most important methods of impact evaluation. For that purpose, it will provide you with instruction in and hands-on experiences of the main quantitative and qualitative impact evaluation methods, with an emphasis on the quantitative.

Code: DEV-7045B  Credits: 20
The aim of this module is to understand how forces operating at the global scale affect food and agriculture. These forces include trends in farming and trade, environmental change, policy developments, and social movements. Food security is a central theme: we explore different ways food security is defined, and how it is contested internationally, considering global institutions like FAO, interest groups, and diverse policy agendas (e.g. food sufficiency, nutrition, sustainability). The module considers a range of issues currently affecting food and farming systems: environmental change, changing diets (more meat, processed foods), `post-production' concerns with food safety or farming’s impact on ecosystems, global agribusiness, agricultural innovation systems, and global-scale changes in food prices. Students will gain critical understanding of debates around these issues and of how different policy actors engage with them. These actors include firms, public R&D institutions, farmers' movements, and major donors and philanthropic organizations. An abiding concern is understanding impacts for the poor and vulnerable, particularly smallholder farmers, but also consumers in the North and South, and those involved in value chains. The module will help students develop a critical and inter-disciplinary understanding of key international policy debates that have relevance to agriculture.

Code: DEV-7047B  Credits: 20
This module provides an analysis of the way in which global production is organized and the roles played by the state, business and civil society and the relations between them. It focuses on key business actors such as transnational and looks in depth at issues of resource extraction in developing countries. Various aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility including relations with local communities and workers, as well as the impacts on the environment and human rights, are discussed.

Code: DEV-7051B  Credits: 20
This module critically examines international/national climate change governance, policy and societal impacts from and responses to climate change and climate change policy. The first half of the semester will discuss the history and politics of the international climate change negotiations and then critically examine the way the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change operates. You’ll look in detail at several items under negotiation with significant implications for developing countries and we will discuss global carbon markets. The second half of the semester will turn to the interface of climate change and society. It will discuss participatory governance and urban responses to climate change as well as critically examining ethical/justice related debates, the role of energy demand and lifestyle in tackling climate change. The seminars will be interactive and enable you to understand the international negotiating process and ways to engage positively with climate change.

 

Options Range G

Spring Semester other. Students must select a total of 60 credits from Option Ranges D and G.
Students will select 0-60 credits from the following modules:

Code: AMAM7009B  Credits: 20
You will learn about the relationship between feminisms and the cultural history of (primarily) US and UK television from second wave feminism to the present. Your module charts the dialogue between feminism and television in Anglophone contexts from the 1970s through to the 2010s, focussing on flashpoint moments for feminism (e.g. the women’s liberation movement; millennial postfeminism; the global financial crisis) and touchstone texts (e.g. The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Prime Suspect, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Sex and the City, Girls, Scandal) that have resonated particularly strongly with female audiences (e.g. soap operas; lifestyle TV; women centred dramas), struck a chord with feminist concerns (e.g. work/life balance, sexual freedoms, empowerment, the politics of relationships/singlehood/friendship), and generated foundational criticism by feminist television scholars. It will be structured chronologically, and topics may include feminism and female audiences; action heroines on television; the figure of the female detective; women’s work; intersectional identities (queerness, post-racial discourse, masculinities) and recessionary culture.

Code: AMAM7011B  Credits: 20
'Hollywood' as an industry, cultural institution and maker of films has dominated the global cinematic imagination for decades. On this module, we investigate the history, production cultures and texts made by the US film industry from its classic period to contemporary filmmaking. This will include analysing Hollywood from a range of perspectives, which may include things like studio filmmaking, independent filmmaking, genre filmmaking and the blockbuster. In doing so we will discover the multiplicity of cinemas at work within the concept of Hollywood.

Code: DEV-7017B  Credits: 20
You will examine a selection of topics in applied development economics that are important for government policy – chosen from areas such as international trade, foreign investment, government taxation and spending, labour markets and employment, agriculture, finance, business regulation, energy and climate change. You will look at the economic theory relevant to each topic, and how government policies have worked in practice.

Code: DEV-7029B  Credits: 20
​​​​This module will provide you with an understanding of macroeconomic theory and policy in developing countries. This will include an evaluation of alternative theories of economic growth and their policy implications, and an analysis of the macroeconomic effects of external shocks. By the end of the module, you will have a good understanding of modern theories of economic growth and open economy macroeconomics, and be able to apply those theories to economic policy issues in developing countries.

Code: PPLC7007B  Credits: 20
Do you wish to pursue a career in international management and relations, multilingual business, or international development? Are you interested in becoming a more effective communicator in other professions such as translation, interpreting, education, and cultural mediation? In this module we will explore the issues fundamental to intercultural communication (IC) in practical contexts. You will examine the different ways of thinking about effective communication in a variety of work/organisation-based environments. During the seminars/lecture series, invited practitioners will introduce you to how IC operates in specific organisations, including government agencies or in multilingual business management. On completion of this module, you will have developed the linguistic skills, cultural competence, and critical thinking required for the production of an extended research project in intercultural communication. You will also have acquired a sense of how cultural assumptions may influence communication with others from different backgrounds, and developed a greater willingness to enter into dialogue with the values prevalent in cultures other than your own.

Code: PPLX7005B  Credits: 20
This module enables students to develop an advanced understanding of the theory and practice of public affairs, interest intermediation, and the strategies used by interest, advocacy groups and others to influence the political process. As well as covering the main debates in the academic literature, it draws directly on the experience of practitioners and offers unique insights into this under-studied area of politics.

Code: PPLX7007B  Credits: 20
What is free speech? What counts as censorship? What does a plausible free speech principle look like? What deeper values can justify the adoption of such a principle? Is free speech special compared to other freedoms? And to what extent is free speech enhanced or threatened by the Internet? You will critically examine liberal defences of free speech based on values of autonomy, truth discovery, and democracy. And you will explore potential limits of free speech in relation to pornography and hate speech. Contemporary debates around forms of censorship will also be examined including the phenomena of no-platforming, social media content codes, and public shaming. You will examine these pressing issues of political theory, constitutional law, democracy, and Internet regulation by comparing and contrasting the conditions of, and cultural attitudes towards, free speech in China, the UK, and the US. You will also examine human rights instruments protecting free speech as well as key legal cases that have constrained it. The approach will be multidisciplinary drawing on politics, philosophy, sociology, and law. The format will be a weekly two-hour workshop comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussion, practical exercises, textual reading, short videos, and essay writing mini-sessions. The assessment comprises formative feedback on an essay plan and two summative essays.

 

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Entry Requirements

Degree classification

UK 2.1 or equivalent

Degree subject

Social Sciences, preferably media or development

Additional entry requirements

Applicants should normally have a good undergraduate degree from a recognised higher education institution. The University will also take into account the employment experience of applicants where relevant.

Relevant work experience is desirable.

If you do not meet the academic requirements for this course, you may be able to study one of the International Graduate Diploma programmes offered by our partner INTO UEA. These programmes guarantee progression to selected masters degrees if students achieve the appropriate grade. For more details please click here:

International Graduate Diploma in International Development

Students for whom english is a foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.0 (minimum 5.5 in only two components with 6.0 in the others)

  • PTE (Pearson): 64 (minimum 59 in only two components with 64 in the others)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the English requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA run pre-sessional English courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Intakes

This course is open to UK, EU and International applicants. The annual intake for this course is in September each year.
Course Reference Number: 4478126

Fees and Funding

Tuition fees for the Academic Year 2022/23 are: 

  • UK Students: £9,000 (full time) 

  • International Students: £18,500 (full time) 

If you choose to study part-time, the fee per annum will be half the annual fee for that year, or a pro-rata fee for the module credit you are taking (only available for Home students). 

We estimate living expenses at £1,023 per month. 

Further Information on tuition fees can be found here

 

Scholarships and Bursaries 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates. 

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of additional course-related costs.

Course Reference Number: 4478126

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

To apply please use our online application form.

FURTHER INFORMATION

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

Course Reference Number: 4478126
Key details
Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Master of Arts
Duration (years)
1
Explore the complex relationship between the worlds of media, communication and international development on this fascinating degree. You’ll examine how media can be used to change behaviours and policies, why media freedom matters and how it can be promoted, and how charities and other development organisations communicate with the public about famine, poverty, migration, and other global issues
Schools
International Development
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