Working and Living in the Community with long-term health conditions:

enabling dignity and independence

This year's conference brought together 120 third and final year students from Medicine, Pharmacy, Midwifery, Nursing, Operating Department Practice, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Speech and Language Therapy and Social Work to explore how interprofessional working can promote dignity and independence for those with long-term conditions and disabilities.

Setting the scene:

Keynote speeches were delivered in the main lecture theatre by Tom Shakespeare (Senior Lecturer in Medicine and well-known on Radio 4), Kate McGlashen (Consultant in Rehabilitation Medicine), Sarah Richardson (Lecturer in Learning Disabilities HSC) and Sarah Ford (Social Services Lead for Norfolk County Council). These presentations provided a theoretical and clinical framework for the conference activities.

Listening to real-life experiences:

Students then broke out into smaller interprofessional groups to listen to the personal experiences of those who live with long-term conditions and/or disability. With facilitation from the CIPP team, colleagues from MED, HSC, PHA and Social Services; questions, reflection and discussion was encouraged around how future professionals can improve care so that it promotes dignity and independence.

Networking lunch:

Lunchtime was an opportunity for students to network, mingle and collect leaflets from local and national organisations who provide support and benefit individuals with long-term conditions and disabilities. Students learnt about what was available for future reference in their own clinical practice.

Putting it into practice:

Students then had the opportunity in afternoon workshops to explore how persons with lived experience and professionals can work together to overcome the barriers to dignity and independence. A case vignette allowed students to implement their skills and knowledge on how to collaboratively provide high-quality, safe and compassionate care that maintains dignity and independence.

Question time:

To close the conference, students posed questions to the 'Expert Panel' that arose from their attendance at the conference. The panel consisted of Social Services professionals, Nursing professionals, Medical professionals and persons with lived experiences.

Benefits to students taking part in the Conference:

  • An opportunity to discuss interprofessional teamworking issues with those who have long-term conditions, practitioners and fellow students in a conference environment.
  • Receive a certificate of attendance to add to personal portfolios.
  • The opportunity to collaborate in designing and exhibiting a poster - and possibly winning a prize.
  • An increase in employability prospects by showing evidence of ability to learn and work with other professions and service users.
  • Preparation for future Continuing Professional Development by experiencing conference-style learning.

Conference learning objectives for students are to:

  • Develop your understanding of the perspective of service users and the social models of disability.
  • Enhance your understanding of how practitioners collaborate effectively to promote autonomy and independence for people for people by working with the service user.
  • Help you to reflect on your role as an individual and as a member of a health care team when delivering care. Working on your own practice, and through others, to develop a whole person response to service users' needs.
  • Contribute to the preparation for your transition from student to practitioner.

 

                     

Outcomes of the conference:

The conference was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative data collection. Teaching evaluation was collated using feedback forms given to all delegates, using both LIkert scales and space for delegates to comment on their experience. Questionnaires were also distributed to all students pre and post-conference to measure attitude change towards disability.

Delegate feedback:

Quotes from student delegates show the impact that the conference had:

With regards to hearing personal accounts from those with lived experience:

'Made the reasons for the things we are taught (e.g. care, compassion and dignity) real'

'Very useful. They said some things that will stick with me in my future practice'

'Emotional and thought-provoking'

'It was brilliant. It really put across how easy it is to disempower somebody. Little differences can make a huge difference'

With regards to the conference overall:

'Very well organised. Felt I learnt a great deal from people with so many different backgrounds. Being able to exchange views and information openly, was great'

'A very worthwhile conference that I believe should be attended by all health care students'

'Although I have spent considerable time working with patients both on placement and outside of my academic capacity, I have not had the opportunity to hear such frank and open dialogue from both sides of healthcare. For this I am hugely thankful to you all!'

 

 

 

.

 

 

Interprofessional student conference Interprofessional student conference

Working and Living in the Community with long-term health conditions:

enabling dignity and independence

This year's conference brought together 120 third and final year students from Medicine, Pharmacy, Midwifery, Nursing, Operating Department Practice, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Speech and Language Therapy and Social Work to explore how interprofessional working can promote dignity and independence for those with long-term conditions and disabilities.

Setting the scene:

Keynote speeches were delivered in the main lecture theatre by Tom Shakespeare (Senior Lecturer in Medicine and well-known on Radio 4), Kate McGlashen (Consultant in Rehabilitation Medicine), Sarah Richardson (Lecturer in Learning Disabilities HSC) and Sarah Ford (Social Services Lead for Norfolk County Council). These presentations provided a theoretical and clinical framework for the conference activities.

Listening to real-life experiences:

Students then broke out into smaller interprofessional groups to listen to the personal experiences of those who live with long-term conditions and/or disability. With facilitation from the CIPP team, colleagues from MED, HSC, PHA and Social Services; questions, reflection and discussion was encouraged around how future professionals can improve care so that it promotes dignity and independence.

Networking lunch:

Lunchtime was an opportunity for students to network, mingle and collect leaflets from local and national organisations who provide support and benefit individuals with long-term conditions and disabilities. Students learnt about what was available for future reference in their own clinical practice.

Putting it into practice:

Students then had the opportunity in afternoon workshops to explore how persons with lived experience and professionals can work together to overcome the barriers to dignity and independence. A case vignette allowed students to implement their skills and knowledge on how to collaboratively provide high-quality, safe and compassionate care that maintains dignity and independence.

Question time:

To close the conference, students posed questions to the 'Expert Panel' that arose from their attendance at the conference. The panel consisted of Social Services professionals, Nursing professionals, Medical professionals and persons with lived experiences.

Benefits to students taking part in the Conference:

  • An opportunity to discuss interprofessional teamworking issues with those who have long-term conditions, practitioners and fellow students in a conference environment.
  • Receive a certificate of attendance to add to personal portfolios.
  • The opportunity to collaborate in designing and exhibiting a poster - and possibly winning a prize.
  • An increase in employability prospects by showing evidence of ability to learn and work with other professions and service users.
  • Preparation for future Continuing Professional Development by experiencing conference-style learning.

Conference learning objectives for students are to:

  • Develop your understanding of the perspective of service users and the social models of disability.
  • Enhance your understanding of how practitioners collaborate effectively to promote autonomy and independence for people for people by working with the service user.
  • Help you to reflect on your role as an individual and as a member of a health care team when delivering care. Working on your own practice, and through others, to develop a whole person response to service users' needs.
  • Contribute to the preparation for your transition from student to practitioner.

 

                     

Outcomes of the conference:

The conference was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative data collection. Teaching evaluation was collated using feedback forms given to all delegates, using both LIkert scales and space for delegates to comment on their experience. Questionnaires were also distributed to all students pre and post-conference to measure attitude change towards disability.

Delegate feedback:

Quotes from student delegates show the impact that the conference had:

With regards to hearing personal accounts from those with lived experience:

'Made the reasons for the things we are taught (e.g. care, compassion and dignity) real'

'Very useful. They said some things that will stick with me in my future practice'

'Emotional and thought-provoking'

'It was brilliant. It really put across how easy it is to disempower somebody. Little differences can make a huge difference'

With regards to the conference overall:

'Very well organised. Felt I learnt a great deal from people with so many different backgrounds. Being able to exchange views and information openly, was great'

'A very worthwhile conference that I believe should be attended by all health care students'

'Although I have spent considerable time working with patients both on placement and outside of my academic capacity, I have not had the opportunity to hear such frank and open dialogue from both sides of healthcare. For this I am hugely thankful to you all!'

 

 

 

.