Biography

Nicholas Grant is a Lecturer in American Studies. He joined UEA in 2013 after completing his doctoral research at the University of Leeds. His research and teaching engages with the fields of African American and black international history.

All Publications

Grant, N.

(2017)

Winning Our Freedoms Together: African Americans and Apartheid, 1945-1960,

University of North Carolina Press

ISBN 978-1-4696-3528-6, 978-1-4696-3527-9

UEA Repository

(Book)

(Published)


Grant, N.

(2016)

Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941–1960 by Carol Anderson (Cambridge University Press, 2014), 372pp.,

in Radical Americas

1

(1)

pp. 79-84

Full Text

(Book/Film/Article review)

(Published)


Grant, N.

(2016)

The National Council of Negro Women and South Africa: Black Internationalism, Motherhood, and the Cold War,

in Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International

5

(1)

pp. 59-87

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Grant, N.

(2014)

Shawn LeighAlexander, An Army of Lions: The Civil Rights Struggle before the NAACP. Politics and Culture in Modern America (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012, $49.95). Pp. 408. isbn978 0 8122 4375 8,

in Journal of American Studies

48

(1)

article no. E3

Full Text

(Book/Film/Article review)

(Published)


Grant, N.

(2014)

Crossing the Black Atlantic: The Global Antiapartheid Movement and the Racial Politics of the Cold War,

in Radical History Review

2014

(119)

pp. 72-93

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Grant, N.

(2013)

Review of Digital Harlem: Everyday Life 1915-1930,

in Reviews in History

article no. 1456

(Book/Film/Article review)

(Published)


Grant, N.

(2012)

Robert TrentVinson, The Americans Are Coming! Dreams of African American Liberation in Segregationist South Africa (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2012, $26.36). Pp. 236. isbn978 0 8214 1986 1,

in Journal of American Studies

46

(4)

article no. E80

pp. 2

Full Text

(Book/Film/Article review)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

My research examines the transnational political and cultural forces that have shaped race relations in the United States. My first monograph, Winning Our Freedoms Together: African Americans and Apartheid, 1945-1960, was published as part of the University of North Carolina Press' Justice, Power and Politics series in November 2017. Rooted in research in archives in the US and South Africa, the manuscript draws on previously untapped sources, including government records, newspapers, correspondence, magazines, film, novels and musical performances, to provide a transnational account of the development of anti-apartheid activism between the United States and South Africa.

I'm currently working on two new research projects. The first will assess how technology shapes debates about race and citizenship during the Cold war. I am particulalry interested in how African Americans defined their citizenship claims through their ability to access new technologies of travel. In addition to this, I am also in the early stages of working on a project that examines African American engagements with Africa in the 1970s.

I welcome research students interested in the history of race and black activism in the U.S., African diaspora and Africa. 

I also serve as the co-editor of the new open-access Radical Americas journal published through UCL Press.

PUBLICATIONS

BOOKS:

Winning Our Freedoms Together: African Americans and Apartheid, 1945-1960. University of North Carolina Press, (2017).

PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLES:

Forthcoming: "The Negro Digest: Race, Exceptionalism and the Second World War," Journal of American Studies (Spring, 2018).

“The National Council of Negro Women and South Africa: Black Internationalism, Motherhood and the Cold War”, Palimpsest: A Journal of Women, Gender and the Black International (Spring, 2016). Runner-up 2017 Arthur Miller Essay Prize, British Association of American Studies. 

“Crossing the Black Atlantic: The Global Anti-Apartheid Movement and the Racial Politics of the Early Cold War”. Radical History Review Special Issue on The Global Antiapartheid Era: 1946-1994 (Spring, 2014).

REVIEWS, COMMENTARY AND OTHER WRITING:

Book Review. The Revolution Has Come: Black Power, Gender, and the Black Panther Party in Oakland. By Robyn C. Spencer. Radical Americas Journal. (Summer, 2017).

‘‘Impact’ as a Second Project?’, Second Project Roundtable, Journal of American Studies, (2017).

Book Review. Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960. By Carol Anderson. Radical America Journal. (Winter, 2016).

‘Teaching America: African Americans and Anticolonialism’. U.S. Studies Online. British Association of American Studies, (16th September 2015).

‘The Global Anti-Apartheid Movement, 1946-1994’, Imperial & Global Forum, University of Exeter, (15th July 2014).

Book Review. An Army of Lions: The Civil Rights Struggle Before the NAACP. By Shawn Leigh Alexander. Journal of American Studies. (February, 2014).

Website Review. Digital Harlem: Everyday Life 1915-1930. Reviews in History. Institute for Historical Research, London (29th August 2013).

Book Review. The Americans Are Coming!: Dreams of African American Liberation in Segregationist South Africa. By Robert Tent Vinson. Journal of American Studies. November, 2012.

Biographical Entry. Lilian Masediba Ngoyi Biography, Women’s History Network Blog. Black History Month, (17th October 2010).

Engagement Work

I am involved in a number of public engagement and schools projects and was awarded the ‘UEA Community Engagement Award’ for this work in 2014. I secured funding to run two small exhibitions at the Norwich Millennium Library for Black History Month in 2013 and 2014 on the British Anti-Apartheid Movement. I am also committed to Widening Participation and deliver a short course on ‘Cold War Civil Rights’ as part of the ‘Raising Aspirations’ programme at Bsix College in Hackney. Finally, I also co-organise an annual VI Form Conference on Civil Rights that addresses some of the key historiographical debates that have transformed our historical understanding of the black freedom struggle in the United States.

Teaching Interests

I have developed the following research-led modules for the American Studies and American History courses at UEA:   
  • Black Freedom Struggles: The Civil Rights Movement
  • African Americans and Empire
  • American Radicals
  • Thinking Through American History I