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UCAS Course Code

CFG0

Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Bachelor of Science

School of Study

Natural Sciences

Course Organiser

Dr. Stephen Ashworth


“Natural Sciences offered the flexibility to allow me to pursue a variety of subjects. I wasn’t able to make a choice about which area of science I wanted to study so it was ideal to postpone that decision for another year. As it turned out, the subjects I thought I’d end up liking turned out to be very different at university and I discovered new ones that I enjoyed.”

- Graham Walkden, Natural Sciences Student

The Natural Sciences programme is ideal if you wish to combine study in more than one area of science whilst retaining a larger degree of flexibility than joint degrees allow. You will study modules from a minimum of two main disciplines, with the opportunity to study specialist topics as your degree programme develops.

By studying Natural Sciences you will be able to appreciate complex concepts from across contemporary science. An example of this could be examining the biological complexities of how a virus spreads through a population, alongside the computational techniques necessary to predict and illustrate it.

You will experience what is required of a competent scientist; from the deliberation needed to design an experiment, including consideration of the results, to the excitement of discovering something new.

Course Structure

This three year course gives you an opportunity to build on your existing scientific knowledge, and possibly discover new avenues of scientific study available at university level. In the second and third year, you will have the chance to choose from a diverse range of scientific modules from science schools across the faculty; from Artificial Intelligence to Quantum Mechanics and Symmetry.

The degree programme is made up of optional modules from across the Faculty of Science. In your final year of study, you will engage in a substantial research project that will reflect your own scientific interests.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods are used across the different modules available to Natural Sciences students, ranging from 100% coursework to 100% examination. Coursework assessment methods include course tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, field exercises, field notebooks, literature reviews, essays and seminar presentations. Skills-based modules are assessed by 100% coursework. The final year project involves a substantial piece of written research work, which counts for 40% of your final year mark.


UniStats Information

Choosing to study at UEA means joining some of the most satisfied students in the UK and being taught by world-leading scientists and researchers.

As one of our students you will:

  • Take part in a stimulating ‘research-led’ teaching programme
  • Be taught at the cutting-edge of your subject
  • Have the opportunity to undertake original interdisciplinary scientific research
  • Develop excellent practical skills through a combination laboratory work, workshops and field courses.

We offer a broad range of degrees to choose from. The BSc Natural Sciences is taught within the Faculty of Science at UEA, a strongly integrated and innovative science cluster comprising Schools of:

  • Biological Sciences 
  • Chemistry
  • Computing Sciences
  • Environmental Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Pharmacy

Beyond the Faculty, we also maintain excellent relationships with the John Innes Centre, Sainsbury Laboratory, the Institute of Food Research based on the Norwich Research Park, the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and UEA’s School of Medicine.

Our Faculty is nationally and internationally renowned for its world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, all departments were rated as having world-leading research and 84% of our research outputs were assessed as being world-leading or internationally excellent and 90% of our impact classified as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Employability

With a third of our students going on to pursue higher degrees, the remaining two-thirds have an exceptional employment rate, with 100% of our graduates who are available for work in employment or study within six months of leaving.

With a Degree in Natural Sciences you will be in an excellent position to pursue higher degrees such as Master’s or PhDs.  

You will have access to a broad range of subjects through this degree programme, allowing you to follow a career in a particular scientific sector, or gain a more general scientific skill set.

The skills you will gain are recognised as extremely valuable to employers.

Student Experience

Your experience of studying Natural Sciences at UEA will be unique, in that the modules you study are based on your own interests. Your personal academic advisor will help you tailor your choices from across the sciences, helping you create a degree that ignites your passion and crosses conventional boundaries. We also offer you a high level of academic and pastoral care.

The University as a whole has a huge amount to offer. In 2013 we ranked in the Top 3 for Student Experience in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey.

Throughout your studies, you will be able to access the wealth of activities and opportunities that the campus has on offer and join one of the most satisfied student bodies in the UK.

Teaching Excellence and Facilities

Whatever choices you make, you will benefit from being taught in science departments where the research and teaching is considered internationally excellent.

You will learn from scientists who are at the forefront of their field, and who will share their latest results with you in lectures, seminars, fieldwork or practical classes.

Our award-winning campus offers a broad range of facilities, including state-of-the-art laboratories.

Year

Students are required to select modules appropriate to the Natural Sciences programme which they have selected, and their choice is subject to approval by their Adviser. Students are required to take at least 80 credits each from two of the following major subjects by the end of their final year: Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Sciences, Mathematics and Physics.

Option A Study (100 credits)

Students will select 100 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ASTROPHYSICS

This 20-credit module gives an overview of astrophysics through lectures and workshops. Assessment will involve some coursework and a coursetest. The module assumes previous study of either A level physics or an equivalent course. Topics covered will include some history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology.

NAT-4001A

20

BIODIVERSITY

An introduction to the evolution of the major groups of microorganisms, plants and animals. The module considers structural, physiological and life-cycle characteristics of these organisms. It charts the development of life on land and interprets evolutionary responses to changing environments. Students on this module are strongly advised to also take BIO-4008Y or BIO-4010Y.

BIO-4001A

20

BONDING, STRUCTURE and PERIODICITY

The first six lectures of this module are integrated with CHE-4101Y. The first half of the module brings together fundamental concepts associated with the bonding and structure of inorganic and organic materials, including atomic structure, electron configurations, ionic and covalent bonding, and intermolecular forces. The second half of the module builds on the bonding and structural ideas to explain the structure of the Periodic Table. Trends, comparisons and contrasts will be drawn between the elements of the s/p block metals, non-metals and the transition metals.

CHE-4301Y

20

CALCULUS AND MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS

This module is incompatible with MTHB4006Y and ENV-4002Y. (a) Complex numbers. (b) Differentiation and integration. Taylor and MacLaurin series. Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (c) First order, second order constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reduction of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (d) Vectors. (e) Line integrals. Multiple integrals, including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (f) Euler type and general linear ODEs. Phase plane, direction fields, limit cycles, period doubling and chaos. (g) Divergence, gradient and curl of a vector field. Scalar potential and path independence of line integral. Divergence and Stokes' theorems.

MTHA4005Y

40

CALCULUS AND PROBABILITY

THIS MODULE IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH MTHA4001Y and ENV-4002Y. (a) Complex numbers. (b) Differentiation and integration. Taylor and MacLaurin series. Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (c) First order, second order constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reductions of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (d) Vectors. (e) Line integrals. Multiple integrals including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (f) Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory. Students must have A-level Mathematics Grade 'B' or above or equivalent.

MTHB4006Y

40

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (A)

This 20 credit module comprises laboratory and related IT experiments/ modules relating to aspects of the core chemistry lecture modules.

CHE-4001Y

20

CHEMISTRY OF CARBON-BASED COMPOUNDS

Compatible with CHE-4301Y, or a free-standing module with workload greater than average for 20 credits. The first six lectures of this module are integrated with CHE-4301Y. The module then introduces bonding and hybridisation, conjugation and aromaticity, mechanism and functional groups; principles which are elucidated in topics: electrophilic substitution and addition, organometallic nucleophiles, polar multiple bonds, enolate, Claisen, and Mannich reactions, the Strecker synthesis, stereochemistry (enantiomers and diastereoisomers), SN1/SN2 and E1/E2 reactions, and epoxidation / 1,2-addition to alkenes. Finally, organic synthesis (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, ethers, amines, ketones, carboxylic acids) and the identification of organic structures by spectroscopy are described.

CHE-4101Y

20

ENERGETICS AND SPECTROSCOPY

This module considers the way in which chemical systems, in the form of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, are described in terms of their energetics and dynamics. Topics include simple phase equilibria, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics in a chemical context, electrochemical cells, and acid base and redox equilibria. The module also includes a series of lectures on the principles of spectroscopy applied to chemical systems, i.e. how light interacts with matter.

CHE-4201Y

20

ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS AND MECHANICS

RESERVED FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS. This module utilises the mathematical concepts from the Maths for Scientists module in an engineering context, before complementing the material with practical mechanics to solve real-world problems. Over the first semester students are introduced to the vocational necessity of estimation in the absence of accurate data through a team-based competition , as well as the practical geometry and numerical methods which can be used when analytical techniques fail. This is supplemented by practical exercises in graphical presentation and data analysis which will contribute to the coursework element of the module. Teaching then concentrates on mechanics in the second semester, encompassing Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics and conservation laws before a final exam.

ENG-4004Y

20

ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES AND LAWS

To take this module you will need the equivalent of Maths A level grade B. This 20-credit module consolidates several distinct topics - all of which will be essential during the later stages of the course. During the first semester, students investigate how to harness the properties of modern materials within an engineering context through lab work whilst developing an appreciation of structural behaviour through examination of solid and lattice structures. Semester 2 focuses on thermodynamics, integrating the study of heat transfer, fluid flow and hydraulics into coursework and a final exam worth 70% of the module. The formative assessment is a laboratory report to prepare students for the summative report.

ENG-4002Y

20

EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY

This module introduces the main ideas in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology and ecology. It concentrates on outlining concepts as well as describing examples. Specific topics to be covered include the genetical basis of evolution by natural selection, systematics and phylogeny, the adaptive interpretation of animal sexual and social behaviour, ecological processes and population biology.

BIO-4002B

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - COLLECTION AND COMPARISON

History of forensic science, forensic collection and recovery methods, anti-contamination precautions, microscopy, glass refractive index, introduction to pattern recognition including footwear; introduction to Drugs analysis; forensic statistics and QA chain of custody issues. The second half Introduces the student to the fundamentals of DNA and biotechnology essential for an understanding of forensics technologies. Topics covered include: nucleic acid/chromosome structure, replication, mutation and repair; concepts of genetic inheritance; DNA manipulation and visualisation; DNA sequencing; DNA fingerprinting. Teaching and learning methods: lectures, practicals and mentor groups (pbl). Presentation of a case study.

CHE-4701Y

20

FOUNDATIONS FOR CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Through a series of lectures, tutorials and practicals, this year-long module aims to provide the basic knowledge of general chemistry (including aspects of inorganic and organic), physico-chemistry and biochemistry essential for the understanding of system-related mechanisms in physiology and a wider context of life sciences.

BIO-4009Y

20

FUNDAMENTALS OF CELL BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

The module aims to provide an introduction to the basic aspects of biochemistry and cell biology. Basic biochemical processes will be explored, as well as catalysis and enzymology. There will be an introduction to the nature of the living cell, its membranes, and organelles, how cells communicate and also how they are visualised.

BIO-4004B

20

FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

The module aims to provide an introduction to the basic aspects of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics. The module explores the fundamental properties of macromolecules, DNA structure, synthesis and replication, as well as the structure and function of proteins. The genetic code, genes and their expression will be covered as well as the rapidly expanding area of molecular biology. The module also covers chromosome structure, mechanisms of heredity, medical genetics and cytogenetics.

BIO-4003A

20

GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

This module will provide an introduction and orientation regarding geographical thought, methods and concepts. The module will begin with an overview of the history and development of the discipline. This will lead on to discussion of core concepts such as space, place, scale, systems, landscape, nature, globalization and risk. Students will also be introduced to the methods and different types of evidence used by geographers (e.g. texts, archival data, maps, imagery and field observations). Students will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the diversity of approaches to the generation of geographical knowledge and understanding and the capacity to communicate geographical ideas, principles, and theories effectively and fluently by written, oral and visual means. This module is assessed by a combination of both formative and summative oral presentations and written work.

ENV-4010Y

20

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES

What are the most pressing environmental challenges facing the world today? How do we understand these problems through cutting-edge environmental science research? What are the possibilities for building sustainable solutions to address them in policy and society? In this module you will tackle these questions by taking an interdisciplinary approach to consider challenges relating to climate change, biodiversity, water resources, natural hazards, and technological risks. In doing so you will gain an insight into environmental science research 'in action' and develop essential academic study skills needed to explore these issues. Please note that ENV students, BIO Ecology students, NAT SCI students and SCI Foundation Year students can request a space on this module. Please note that NAT SCI and SCI Foundation Year students wishing to select this module must obtain a signature from their advisor confirming they will meet the marking requirements (which will be to mark the independent essay component of the module assessments). The advisor must confirm agreement in writing to env_ug.hub@uea.ac.uk).

ENV-4001A

20

LINEAR ALGEBRA

Linear equations and matrices (including geometric aspects); Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Diagonalization. Vector spaces and linear transformations.

MTHA4002Y

20

MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING, MECHANICS AND MODELLING

STUDENTS FROM YEARS 2 OUTSIDE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS CAN TAKE THIS MODULE IF THEY HAVE TAKEN BEFORE MTHA4005Y OR MTHB4006Y OR ENV-4002Y AND THEY HAVE NOT TAKEN MTHB4007B. The first part of the module is about how to approach mathematical problems (both pure and applied) and write mathematics. It aims to promote accurate writing, reading and thinking about mathematics, and to improve students' confidence and abilities to tackle unfamiliar problems. The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. This module is reserved for students registered in the School of Mathematics or registered on the Natural Sciences programme.

MTHA4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING A

The module is designed to provide students who have not studied A level Mathematics with sufficient understanding of basic algebra to give them confidence to embark on the study of computing fundamentals. Various topics in discrete and continuous mathematics which are fundamental to Computer Science will be introduced.

CMP-4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING B

This module is designed for students with an A level (or equivalent) in Mathematics. For these students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. In addition 3D Vectors are introduced and complex numbers are studied.

CMP-4005Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4003Y. This module in designed for students with A2 or AS level mathematics. It covers differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers, and statistical methods. In addition to the theoretical background, there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for students across the Faculty of Science, that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The modules that follow at Level 2 are Mathematics for Scientists B and C. This module is assessed by formative assessments and coursework / examination.

ENV-4002Y

20

NUMERICAL SKILLS FOR SCIENTISTS

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4002Y This module is about revising GCSE level mathematics and learning how to apply these skills to solving applied environmental science problems. It is designed for students who have not studied mathematics at AS or equivalent level and will cover essential mathematics (algebra, indices and scientific notation, manipulating and solving equations, units, accuracy and errors, reading graphs, logs, exponentials, trigonometrical functions, concept of rate of change, and an introduction to calculus). It will also cover the most important statistical methods that you will need during the rest of your career in ENV, including ways of summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. An important part of this module is applying these numerical skills to environmental problems. This module is assessed by formative assessment and coursetest / examination.

ENV-4003Y

20

PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN THE BIOMOLECULAR SCIENCES

This year-long module is delivered through a combination of lectures and small group teaching (seminars). The lecture programme will provide an introduction to the physical principles that underpin our understanding of the biological systems including thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry and spectroscopy. Students will prepare in advance for fortnightly seminars that focus on problem solving and data analysis in the biomolecular sciences. Topics will include: the building blocks of life, DNA biochemistry, protein structure, membrane biology, spectroscopy, chemical and enzyme kinetics and bioenergetics and metabolism. During the module additional training will be provided in how to access scientific material and use it critically in essays, reports and presentations. Students must have AS Level Chemistry or equivalent. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO YEAR 1 STUDENTS. THIS MODULE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR VISITING/EXCHANGE STUDENTS.

BIO-4007Y

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM I

IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE ENV-4008B THIS MODULE CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4008B. This course is divided into two parts and introduces students to the Earth as a chemical and physical system. This version of the course is designed for students with essentially no chemistry background knowledge and therefore includes a component of basic chemistry. Students with A level, a good AS level or whole year of foundation level chemistry should take ENV-4008B Physical and Chemical Processes in the Earth System II. The first part of the course focuses upon basic chemical principles and then to environmental chemistry particularly chemical processes in the atmosphere, freshwater, seawater, soils, sediments and rocks. The natural system and its anthropogenic perturbation will be considered. The module includes laboratory practicals. The second part of the course focuses on the physical processes occurring in the atmosphere and the oceans with an emphasis on the links between the two. This will include the following topics: radiation from the Sun and its effect on the Earth, structure and circulation of the atmosphere, ocean currents and the thermohaline circulation, the hydrostatic equation and pressure forces, stability, air masses and fronts, the Coriolis force and geostrophy, the effect of the wind on the ocean, and the hydrological cycle. Background reading will help on concepts such as pressure, density, buoyancy and the Coriolis force. Students should be prepared for the use of basic mathematics and physics in this course. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4007B

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM II

IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE ENV-4007B THIS MODULE CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4007B. This course is divided into two parts and introduces students to the Earth as a chemical and physical system. This course is designed for students with chemistry background knowledge. Students without A level, a good AS level or a whole year of foundation level chemistry should take ENV-4007B Physical and Chemical Processes in the Earth System I. The first part of the course focuses upon environmental chemistry particularly chemical processes in the atmosphere, freshwater, seawater, soils, sediments and rocks. The natural system and its anthropogenic perturbation will be considered. The module includes laboratory practicals. The second part of the course focuses on the physical processes occurring in the atmosphere and the oceans with an emphasis on the links between the two. This will include the following topics: radiation from the Sun and its effect on the Earth, structure and circulation of the atmosphere, ocean currents and the thermohaline circulation, the hydrostatic equation and pressure forces, stability, air masses and fronts, the Coriolis force and geostrophy, the effect of the wind on the ocean, and the hydrological cycle. Background reading will help on concepts such as pressure, density, buoyancy and the Coriolis force. Students should be prepared for the use of basic mathematics and physics in this course. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4008B

20

PHYSICS OF MUSIC

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music. We begin by developing some of the essential physics of wave motion and defining sound measurement terms. This equips us to analyse the physics of stringed instruments (bowed, plucked and struck), woodwind instruments, brass instruments, percussion instruments and the acoustics of singing. We also look at tuning systems, human hearing, and the physics of sound in rooms. Lab-classes include an introduction to MATLAB to enable you to record and analyse the sound of your own instrument, which constitutes the coursework. A-level standard of mathematics is preferred, but anyone without this level who is prepared to work a little to enhance their understanding of mathematics in one or two areas will be able to take this module.

NAT-4003A

20

PRACTICAL and QUANTITATIVE SKILLS IN CHEMISTRY

Laboratory-based module exposing the students to experimental and computational aspects of different areas of chemistry: organic, inorganic, analytical and physical. The experiments and simulations exemplify the content of lectures in other modules and provide practical chemistry skills. Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts will be introduced. Statistics as applied to experimental chemistry. Error propagation in physical chemistry. Physical principles through applied mathematics.

CHE-4601Y

20

PROBABILITY AND MECHANICS

STUDENTS FROM YEARS 2 OUTSIDE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS CAN TAKE THIS MODULE IF THEY HAVE TAKEN BEFORE MTHA4005Y OR MTHB4006Y OR ENV-4002Y AND THEY HAVE NOT TAKEN MTHA4001Y NOR MTHA4004Y. (a) Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability. (b) The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. Students must have A-level Mathematics Grade 'B' or above or equivalent.

MTHB4007B

20

PROGRAMMING 1

The purpose of the module is to give the student a solid grounding in the essential features of object-oriented computer programming using the Java programming language. The module is designed to meet the needs of a student who has not previously studied programming, although it is recognised that many will in fact have done so in some measure. On completing this module the student should be capable of developing, testing and documenting simple but non-trivial object-oriented programs, and of using the appropriate technical terminology in discussing these programs.

CMP-4008Y

20

PROGRAMMING FOR APPLICATIONS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of second level CMP modules, including CMPC2M11 and CMPC2G04.

CMP-4009B

20

REAL ANALYSIS

Sequences and series, tests for convergence. Limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, Fundamental Theorem.

MTHA4003Y

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

This year long module introduces a range of transferable skills, tools and data resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences. The aim is to provide a broad understanding of the research process by undertaking different activities that involve i) formulating research questions, ii) collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, iii) collating and evaluating information and iv) presenting results. The module will include the use of digital mapping technologies (such as geographical information systems) and a 6 day residential field course held during the Easter break. This module is assessed by formative assessments and coursework.

ENV-4004Y

20

SETS, NUMBERS AND PROBABILITY

Basic set-theoretic notation, functions. Proof by induction, arithmetic, rationals and irrationals, the Euclidean algorithm. Styles of proof. Elementary set theory. Modular arithmetic, equivalence relations. Countability. Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory.

MTHA4001Y

20

SKILLS FOR CHEMISTS

This module will include: Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; Statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; Error propagation in physical chemistry and Physical principles through applied mathematics. Aims of this module are to bring students' understanding of mathematical ideas and physics to a sufficient level to study core physical chemistry in later stages

CHE-4050Y

20

SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY

This module comprises a broadly-based series of lectures on science, particularly chemistry, coupled with written activities based upon them. The twin objectives are to provide a contextual backdrop to the more focussed studies in other concurrent and subsequent modules, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information. The topics in semester 1 will be used as a basis for assignments and exercises which will help to develop students' team-working and presentational skills.

CHE-4090Y

20

SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIETY AND BIODIVERSITY

Striking a balance between societal development, economic growth and environmental protection has proven difficult and controversial. The terms 'sustainability' and 'sustainable development' have been coined to enable development achieving these three areas. Yet the contested and ambiguous nature of these concepts has hampered their implementation. The first half of this module considers sustainability in theory and practice by examining the relationships between environment and society, through the contributions of a variety of social science disciplines. The second half of this module explores sustainability from an ecological perspective, introducing a range of concepts relevant to the structure and functioning of the biosphere and topics ranging from landscape and population ecology, to behavioural, physiological, molecular, genetic and chemical ecology. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4006B

20

TOPICS IN PHYSICS

The material covered will expand on some of the topics from the 'A' level syllabus, such as optics and electromagnetism. It will also cover some modern physics such as special relativity. Topics include molecular motion, the electrical properties of matter, intermolecular forces and their role in determining bulk properties of matter, and an introduction to nanoscience and nanotechnology.

CHE-4801Y

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. This module explores energy, mechanics, physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour#from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. Plate Tectonics is studied to explain Earth's physiographic features#such as mountain belts and volcanoes#and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. We also explore geological time#the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet and introduce geological materials, resources and hazards. This module is assessed by coursework and examination.

ENV-4005A

20

Option B Study

Students will select 0 credits from the following modules:

A further 20 credits may be chosen from Options Range A above, or by taking a module from other schools (such as those listed below) which will require the approval of the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

A WORLD AT WAR

This module will consider the history of the Second World War from 1939 to 1945, looking at the decisive battles that settled its outcome. It interprets 'battle' in the widest sense and it will look at 'classic' land, sea and air encounters - from the fall of France to midway, Stalingrad and D Day - and also at the other critical battles such as the battle of production, the Home Front and the technological battle, from Enigma to the atomic bomb

HIS-6003A

30

AFTERLIVES OF EMPIRE: RACE, 'DEVELOPMENT' AND POLITICAL ACTIVISM IN THE POSTCOLONIAL WORLD, 1956-PRESENT

Leading historical research is currently challenging the notion that the mechanics, expertise and ideologies of British imperialism simply ceased in the early 1960s. With decolonization, the British state's involvement in the economic and social life of newly independent states often intensified rather than weakened. This module will track the transformations and persistence of imperial forms in what was once Britain's empire. We will track the creation of Britain's Institute of Race Relations, funded by American, British and South African businesses, and its influence on understandings of the 'colour problem' in postwar Britain. We will uncover the application of colonial knowledge and economic expertise within British 'development' work in Cold War Africa. And we will look to the profound significance of the imperial legacy within political activist and community organising circles throughout this period and especially in the 1970s, in the context for instance of the African Asian refugee crises and newly formed British anti-racist groups. The module will be split into three thematic cores: (1) constructions of race and its discontents, (2) 'development' as an emergent field of academic study in the Cold War period and as a political and economic tool and (3) contestation and activism surrounding Britain's continued responsibilities/influence within postcolonial states. These themes will, of course, consistently highlight the significance of Cold War tensions and American geopolitical power. The themes will structure the teaching and provide students with a framework within which to make comparisons, think globally and across national boundaries.

HIS-6065A

30

AGE OF CHARLEMAGNE

This module explores how Frankish and Byzantine rulers in the eighth century#queens as well as kings#sought the security and salvation of their peoples though sustained investment in aggressive war and ambitious campaigns of spiritual renewal and how their power, ideals, and virtues constrasts with those of other rulers in the eighth century, from Pictland to 'Abbasid Baghdad.

HIS-6071Y

60

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

This module offers a critical introduction to understanding America's role in the world. It provides historical and political analyses of U.S. foreign relations, looking at the themes and traditions that have shaped America's increasing influence in global affairs during the twentieth century up to the present day. From the war of 1898 to the conflicts of the early twenty-first century, it examines how and why the U.S. relationship to the world has changed. Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? In discussing foreign relations, the course analyses political and diplomatic elites, but also, the role of foreign actors and private organisations, from religious groups to citizen organisations to NGOs, in defining America in the world. It also engages with important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, modernization, and the 'cultural turn' - and connects these to emerging trends in the fields of American Studies and international relations.

HIS-5053A

20

ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND, C. 500-1066

This module surveys the history of the English from their arrival in Britain in the fifth century until the end of the eleventh century and the conquest of England by the Normans. We shall cover topics such as the conversion of the English in the seventh century; the domination of England by Mercia in the eighth century; the Viking invasions and the reign of Alfred the Great; the emergence of Wessex as the dominant force in Britain in the tenth century; the conquest of England by the Danes in the eleventh century; and the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

HIS-5005A

20

APPEASEMENT AND WAR: BRITAIN AND THE DICTATORS, 1935-1945

The decade from 1935 to 1945 was one of the most tumultuous in global history. The expansionist powers of Germany, Italy and Japan were the focus of Britain's peacetime diplomacy and wartime strategy. In the years before 1939, those resurgent powers worked systematically to undermine and overturn the post-Great War peace settlement. The British National Government of Baldwin and Chamberlain struggled to deal with those threats against a backdrop of profound domestic difficulties. The policy of 'appeasement' adopted by those governments remains hugely controversial, and the subject of vigorous debate between historians. After 1939, Britain's decision to defend its guarantee to Poland plunged it into a global war, which eventually ended in victory as part of an international 'Grand Alliance', but under a very different wartime coalition led by Churchill. In the autumn semester, this module will explore the foreign policies adopted by the National Government, from Baldwin's victory in the 1935 election to the outbreak of war in September 1939. It will assess why and how these policies were adopted, the wider political and economic context within which policy was made, and the national and international consequences. In the spring semester, the module will consider Britain's wartime role in the context of grand strategy and international politics. In addition to considering topics such as Churchill's 'finest hour', we will spend some time examining the operation of the Grand Alliance and the series of wartime conferences between Britain and its allies. The decisions made in this period would have profound consequences for Britain thereafter. Throughout its course, the module will explore the rich historiography available to us, and examine its complexities. It will draw upon a wide range of primary documentation, which will provide the basis of debate and discussion.

HIS-6072Y

60

APPLIED METHODS FOR IMPACT EVALUATION

This module aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the most important methods of impact evaluation. For that purpose, it provides instruction in and hands on experiences of the main quantitative and qualitative impact evaluation methods, with an emphasis on the quantitative.

DEV-M096

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This is the first part of a beginners' course in Arabic assuming no prior knowledge of the language. The module aims to develop the ability to use Arabic effectively in everyday practical situations with speakers of Arabic both in the UK and overseas. Alternative and additional slots may be available, depending on enrolment.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (LCSS4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year LCS students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (LCSS4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year LCS students. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent)

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module LCSS4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to LCS students. This module has three contact hours per week. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent)

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4023B

20

BRITAIN AT WAR AND OTHER MODERN MYTHS

This module invites students to critically analyse popular understandings of the recent past in modern Britain. You will investigate the political uses of certain histories, shifts in meaning over time and preoccupations with the past in British politics and culture. Students will have the opportunity to examine why particular events in modern British history#such as the Second World War#have become so central to British national identity. In the first semester, we will focus on individual experiences and collective memories of the First and Second World Wars. We will look to popular poetry and public policies which worked to make sense of the horrors and sacrifices of modern warfare. You will have the opportunity to analyse a wide range of source material, including film and television, oral testimonies, diaries, state memorials and political speeches. In the second semester, we turn, firstly, to the contested memory of the British Empire, to memories of colonial violence and to the making of a 'post-imperial' Britain. Lastly, we will consider myths of a youth revolt in 1960s Britain as well as modern nostalgia for Britain's 'lost' traditional society. In the second semester, also, you will be trained in oral history techniques and have the chance to contribute to a collective oral history project on UEA and student protest in the 1960s.

HIS-6036Y

60

BRITISH INTELLIGENCE IN THE 20TH CENTURY - MYTH AND REALITY

The study of intelligence history has seen considerable growth over the last 20 years, as a result of new archival evidence and above all a growing realisation that intelligence has for long been the "missing dimension" in historical interpretation of 20th century diplomacy, defence policy and strategy and in the operational history of two world wars. A consideration of the impact of intelligence assessment, its acceptance (or rejection) and its proponents has well known areas of historical analysis, particularly in the period from the 1930s to the Cold War. The aim of this module is to examine the current historiography of this "missing dimension" and assess its impact in the interpretation of British strategic and defence policy and to some extent, in internal and imperial security as well as considering popular and fictional interpretations of the intelligence service.

HIS-6009B

30

BRITISH INTELLIGENCE IN THE 20TH CENTURY - MYTH AND REALITY

The study of intelligence history has seen considerable growth over the last 20 years, as a result of new archival evidence and above all a growing realisation that intelligence has for long been the "missing dimension" in historical interpretation of 20th century diplomacy, defence policy and strategy and in the operational history of two world wars. A consideration of the impact of intelligence assessment, its acceptance (or rejection) and its proponents has well known areas of historical analysis, particularly in the period from the 1930s to the Cold War. The aim of this module is to examine the current historiography of this "missing dimension" and assess its impact in the interpretation of British strategic and defence policy and to some extent, in internal and imperial security as well as considering popular and fictional interpretations of the intelligence service.

HIS-6010A

30

CHAMBERLAIN, CHURCHILL AND APPEASEMENT, 1935-1940

Britain's response to the aggression of the fascist powers in the inter-war period has been the subject of fierce debate for decades, and is still hotly disputed between historians. This module examines British foreign policy in the era of 'appeasement'. It will focus on the period between 1935 and 1940, analysing a range of primary source material in detail. It will explore the role of key policy-makers, their critics, and the domestic context in which policy was constructed.

HIS-6011A

30

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT I: SCIENCE, IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION

This module introduces students to the phenomenon of climate change, interconnections between climate change and development and theory and practice for adapting to climate change, in the context of developing countries. The first part of the module covers key aspects of climate change science necessary for a basic understanding of the causes of climate change, future projections of climate change and key impacts as well as methods for assessing these. The second part of the module focuses on adaptation to climate change by introducing the concepts of adaptation, vulnerability and resilience. National and sectoral policy making for adapting to climate change is then explored with reference to case studies. Finally the interconnections between disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation are explored. Seminars explore climate science and adaptation topics.

DEV-M103

20

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT II: GOVERNANCE, POLICY AND SOCIETY

This module critically examines international/national climate change governance and policy and societal impacts from and responses to climate change and climate change policy. The first half of the semester (Section A) will discuss the history and politics of the international climate change negotiations and then critically examine the way the climate regime (UNFCCC) operates. The following three lectures will look in detail at two items under negotiation with significant implications for developing countries. Finally we will discuss global carbon markets. The second half of the semester (Section B) will turn to the interface of climate change and society. It will start by discussing urban responses to climate change before critically examining geoengineering and other ethical/justice related debates before examining the role of energy demand and lifestyle in tackling climate change and ending with a session on conflict and human security implications from climate change. The seminars will be interactive and enable students to better understand the international negotiating process and ways to engage positively with climate change.

DEV-M118

20

COLD WAR IN EUROPE

This module will combine analysis of grand strategies and Cold War flashpoints with consideration of counter-culture and civilian resistance in Soviet-controlled Europe, and the circumstances which led to the peaceful end of the Cold War in 1989.

HIS-6034Y

60

COMMUNISM AND NATIONALISM IN YUGOSLAVIA

This module will look at the creation of the Communist state of Yugoslavia after the Second World War. We shall examine the course of the war and the bitter fighting between fascists, nationalists and communists which resulted in the eventual victory of the partisans led by Tito. After 1945, he and his followers built a state which survived until 1991. With the demise of Communism, Yugoslavia fragmented into new nations. In some cases this transition was largely peaceful, but the wars for independence in Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo gave rise to the bloodiest fighting in Europe for decades. We shall look at the role of individuals and ideas, including the career of key figures such as Milosevic and end by assessing at the international community's response to the crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia at the Hague Tribunal.

HIS-6032Y

60

CONCEPTUALISING SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH

This module provides students at school and faculty level with a generic introduction to social science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of social science research, research design, the nature of quantitative and qualitative research methodology, and examines the process and skills needed for social science research. The module is the core module for DEV's 3 MRes programmes: MRes International Development; MRes Development Practice and MRes Social Science Research (Faculty-wide). The module focuses on social science research in terms of design and methodology and complements other modules being offered in DEV and other schools on social science research methods and tools.

DEV-M087

20

CONFLICT GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

Thi is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA Conflict Governance and International Development.

DEV-M054

20

CONFLICT, PEACE AND SECURITY

The aim of CPS is to promote an understanding of the driving forces behind armed conflicts, including civil wars, riots, and communal conflicts, which have become a major obstacle to development. It situates these within the global political economy, particularly within the neo-liberal politics of the last few decades, as well as within concepts of post-colonial state building. Security is conceptualised broadly as not just national/international security but also as the right to security of individuals, including women and children, as well as civilian men. Gender is an important analytical lens here, used not as a proxy for women but as a vitally important component of global militarism, particularly as regards the part played by hegemonic masculinist concepts and ways in which masculinisms play out in specific conflict settings. Peace is conceptualised not just as the situation that breaks out after the signing of a peace treaty but also in relation to post-conflict levels of direct and structural violence that affect individuals and groups of citizens, including women and children at the domestic as well as other levels. Humanitarian agendas are discussed along with their effects on conflict as well as the politics of the UN, and conflicts arising out of competition over natural resources. Students who have taken this module should be able to situate the causes of conflict within the global political economy and understand how conflicts relate to the wider regional and international contexts.

DEV-M052

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

RDC aims to use recent research and practical experience in the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis of critical challenges in resource development and conservation in the developing world. Specifically, themes such as the relation between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control are examined through discussions of theory and the use of case studies, in order to develop an understanding of their natural and social science, and policy dimensions. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-3D12

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

RDC aims to use recent research and practical experience in the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis of critical challenges in resource development and conservation in the developing world. Specifically, themes such as the relation between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control are examined through discussions of theory and the use of case studies, in order to develop an understanding of their natural and social science, and policy dimensions. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-6005B

20

CONTEMPORARY WORLD DEVELOPMENT

This module is guided by the premise that theoretical perspectives about development are shaped by historical contexts and conditions that shape them. These contexts critically influence the issues and processes that are identified as the key concerns of development. They also impact upon the nature of the agency that is chosen to offer solutions to these concerns. Contemporary World Development explores how key development perspectives inform the most important issues in development today and different kinds of agency.

DEV-M002

20

CONTESTING THE PAST: REPRESENTATION AND MEMORY

Historical representation and memory is constantly constructed and reconstructed. This module examines the role of documentaries and feature films in this process, exploring the close interplay and tensions between history, memory, the past and present. Feature films, in particular, have a powerful capacity to reconstruct historical narratives and understanding. Their visual vividness provides a magical simulation of the past. Indeed, in the case of medieval and early modern history, they provide a prime media through which popular understanding of these historical times is conveyed and shaped. Moreover, documentaries and feature films alike often contaminate collective memories of contemporaries and eyewitnesses of specific events, creating further challenges to historians in their pursuit to reconstruct the past. Students will examine what role films play in the process of national memory-work in popular culture and commemoration of historical events as well as how film as a medium can help but also hinder conveying historical understanding. They will also be able to discuss the work of documentary film makers and the practical challenges and responsibilities that come with it: interviewing eyewitnesses and the perils of oral history, organising and constructing a historical narrative, tensions between documentary as an art form and as a medium to transmit knowledge.

HIS-6063A

30

DEATH IN THE MIDDLE AGES

In medieval England, death and what lay beyond it were constantly visible out of the corner of the eye. Large portions of the landscape were given over to the dead: there were barrows, haunted by the ancient pagan dead; cemeteries for the Christian dead; and lonely hermitages, whose occupants spoke with the dead. 'King Death', shown as a skeleton with spear or bow, would strike down the living at any age. And if prayers were not said for them, their ghosts would wander forth from the grave to terrify their neighbours. Vivid images of what happened to the dead were painted and carved over the archways of churches, haunting the living every Sunday and dancing before their mind's eye in their dreams. Visions of the dead were not uncommon, and sometimes they made such demands on the living that the latter spent their lives serving them. This module examines beliefs about death and the otherworld in medieval England; how medieval people prepared for death; how ghosts and the 'undead' irrupted into their world; the role of those who served the dead or acted as mediators between the dead and the living; demons, the evil dead and saints (the holy dead); and how death was represented in medieval art. There will be a trip to see tombs and wall paintings.

HIS-6052B

30

DEATH, BODY AND DISEASE: THEMES IN MEDICAL and SOCIAL HISTORY

This module focuses upon the theory and practice of medicine in the context of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century social history. Topics include healing and science; concepts of 'orthodox' and 'alternative' medicine; interpretations of epidemic disease; the sufferer's agenda; minds, brains and bodies; and changing perceptions of death. We will consider contemporary texts and key contributions to the historiographical literature. It is expected that you will have some background in level 2 medical history course modules.

HIS-6008A

30

DEATH, THE BODY AND DISEASE: FROM GALEN TO THE NHS

Documents and a wide range of visual material from contemporary sources are used to examine the theory and practice of medicine in English and European society from the early modern period to the recent past. Topics include: changing perceptions of death, disease and the body; medicine and religion; the impact of medical ideas upon literary and political thought; the emergence of a healing profession; and women as healers and patients. We also examine the changing function of institutional care; concepts of 'orthodox' and 'alternative' medicine; the dissemination of medical knowledge and the rise of questioning of scientific medicine.

HIS-6029Y

60

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-3D40

20

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-6009B

20

DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES

The objective of this module is to explore different theoretical ideas and debates about development, and place these in their historical and political contexts. We will critically assess the various ways in which development has been conceptualized, from the end of the Second World War to the present day. Topics covered will include modernisation theory; dependency theory; the role of the state; neo-liberalism and the Washington Consensus, neo-institutionalism and the post-Washington Consensus; poverty and basic needs; human development and capabilities; equity and justice; rights and empowerment; and sustainable development. A key point of the module is to show how ideas in development emerge and how they shape policies and practice in development in the present day.

DEV-M003

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

This module provides students with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. Students are expected to fund their own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The school has a database of projects to assist students with their project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (July) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). As a 20 credit module students are expected to work for a minimum of 2 months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing (750 words) about the placement;, and an essay of 2500 words related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6004A

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

No Description

DEV-3C35

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK PLACEMENT

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON THE FOLLOWING ROUTES ONLY; Media and International Develpment, Clmate Change and International Development and Environment and International Development. This module is offered as an alternative to the 40 credit dissertation module (DEV-M04X) that all MA/MSc students in DEV currently take. Whilst an academic dissertation will benefit most master's students, for others there may be more benefit to be gained from an appropriate, challenging work experience placement that is then linked to theory and reflected on critically in a report. Students will be responsible for finding a suitable placement but will be given a range of support from DEV which includes: giving the students access to the DEV internship host data base compiled over nearly a decade; advice on identifying appropriate placements; advice on CV design, fund-raising (where necessary), health and safety, ethical considerations etc.; facilitate communication between student and potential host, in some cases acting as a mediator. Whilst we cannot guarantee a placement we are confident that most students who take this module and apply themselves to identifying an internship, will be successful. If there are any students who cannot find a suitable internship then they will automatically transfer to the standard dissertation module.

DEV-M06X

40

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-3D2Y

40

DISSERTATION

Production of a short (8000-12000) dissertation on an approved topic.

DEV-M04X

40

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6007Y

40

DISSERTATION IN HISTORY

This module offers students the opportunity to submit a dissertation of 9,000 words on a topic approved by the School.

HIS-6022Y

30

DISSERTATION PREPARATION

This module consists of both generic training sessions for all students as well as course-specific exercises and training. A key requirement of the module is for students to make an oral presentation in the Spring semester, to be attended by all MA students, after which they will submit their formal dissertation proposal. The module is assessed on a pass/fail basis.

HIS-M22Y

0

EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module focuses on the geographical area covered by the Carolingian Empire - that is, the modern territorial units of France, Germany, Italy, and the Benelux countries. It begins in the late sixth century with the Merovingian dynasty and ends with the reform of the Papacy and the first crusade at the end of the 11th century.

HIS-5008A

20

ECONOMETRIC METHODS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this introductory module is to expose students to basic econometric theory and provide them with sufficient knowledge and practical skill for competent use of econometrics in empirical research. The module also enables students to understand and interpret econometric research results. By the end of the module students acquire sufficient knowledge and skill to apply multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data to a wide range of macro- and micro-economic problems of development. In addition to lectures, the module includes computer workshops on Stata (widely used econometrics software) and seminars.

DEV-M067

20

ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4003B This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in EC1. It provides a solid grounding in intermediate principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, and their application to developing countries. The first part of the module introduces the student to basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomics theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. Insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered. The second part of the module covers the main macroeconomics and issues of development. This includes long run economics with a particular focus on economic growth, and short run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. This will include recent macroeconomic phenomena such as the global economic crisis and the current debates on climate change.

DEV-5012Y

40

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND PRACTICE FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is to enable students to understand current debates on education and development and their implications for international and national education strategies. Students will critically examine education policy documents (including web-based literature), investigate policy development processes and develop the ability to locate global, national and local levels policies and practices within a range of discourses and theoretical frameworks. These processes will be investigated in relation to particular policy agendas including access and quality, educational governance, social justice and school choice, as well as areas such as education and conflict, poverty and marginalisation, gender and HIV and AIDS.

DEV-M046

20

EDWARDIAN BRITAIN

This module will examine the 'crisis of Liberal England' which has dominated modern discussion of this period. Themes will include the rise of new liberalism, the tariff reform controversy, women's suffrage, health and social welfare, the land question, national efficiency and Home Rule for Ireland.

HIS-6062A

30

ENERGY, ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

This course deals with the energy history of Europe over the past three centuries and the impact of transformations in the scale and form of energy consumption on economic growth, social and cultural life and environmental change. It will examine debates about the reality of resource limits on the economy; the causes of the Industrial Revolution and modern growth; the changing impact of energy use on the landscape; social and cultural shifts associated with energy transitions; how and why energy transitions have occurred in the past; and long-term patterns of the relationships between energy systems and environmental problems.

HIS-M012

20

ENGLAND AND THE CONTINENT IN THE MIDDLE AGES

This team-taught compulsory module runs over the course of two semesters. In this module the following themes and topics may be covered according to the needs and interests of those participating in the programme of study: Society, 970-1066; Domesday Book; Letter Collections; Historical Writing; Charters; the Royal Household; Royal Record Keeping; Urban Communities 1200-1500; Rural Communities 1200-1500; Monasticism; the Church; Canon Law; Magna Carta. Teaching is mainly through the medium of the seminar; weekly preparation is, therefore, a requirement of the course.

HIS-M17Y

60

ENGLISH PALEOGRAPHY

This module is essential for all historians and archaeologists who wish to be able to read the handwriting of the period that they are researching! This can be demanding, but also fun.

HIS-MA37

10

EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to provide a basic introduction into quantitative and qualitative research methods; introduce key concepts in maths and statistics relevant to the study of international development; and to provide a foundation in the key academic skills expected at university including essay planning and writing, reading and thinking critically, using UEA Library services and computing systems and developing effective oral communication and teamwork skills. The unit will be taught through lectures, practical workshops and computer-based lab sessions.

DEV-4002A

20

FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-3C11

20

FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-6001A

20

FIELDWORK IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY

The field course builds on the landscape archaeology units to provide forty hours of practical instruction in the field. The field course runs for one week in June, concentrating on the recording and analysis of archaeological earthworks, buildings and historic landscapes. Assessment will take the form of a short report and an extended project.

HIS-6023Y

30

FORENSIC LINGUISTICS AND TRANSLATION

This module is focused on theoretical and practical aspects of the interplay between language and other language-driven activities such as translation and memory in special circumstances of witnessing, experiencing or judging crime and providing expert linguistic testimony and language services such as translating and interpreting. It contextualises the consequences of this relationship within an interactive environment, namely forensic, psycholinguistic and cross-cultural contexts of language use. Another dimension of the course is an emphatic cross-linguistic approach, whereby we assume the latest linguistic typological perspective and discuss the effects of language differences on the kind of information habitually provided in or omitted from reports in one language and translation.

PPL-MA05

20

FROM AGINCOURT TO BOSWORTH: ENGLAND IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES

Through a close examination of the lives and reigns of four very different monarchs this unit investigates the workings of kingship and high politics in one of the most turbulent periods of English History (1415-1485). New interpretations of the Wars of the Roses, as well as original source material, will be studied.

HIS-5009B

20

FROM THE ZENITH OF IMPERIAL PRESTIGE TO THE NADIR OF BRITISH POWER: THE BRITISH EMPIRE 1919-1956

This module explores developments within the British Empire between the high noon of Empire following the settlement of the First World War to the Suez Crisis of 1956. It will examine the various challenges posed to the British imperial system from the growth of resistance and nationalism in India and the Middle East during the inter war period to the important role played by imperial questions in relations between Britain and the United States (the 'Special Relationship'). Alongside the perceived internal threats to the Empire this module will consider Britain's responses to wartime US criticism of the British Empire and the redefinition of British Imperial policy, the roles planned for the Empire in securing Britain's economic and strategic interests, the scope for Anglo-American co-operation in the Cold War and possible sources of friction between the two powers, culminating in their disagreement over policy in the Middle East at the time of the Suez Crisis.

HIS-M25Y

30

FROM THE ZENITH OF IMPERIAL PRESTIGE TO THE NADIR OF BRITISH POWER: THE BRITISH EMPIRE 1919-1956

This module explores developments within the British Empire between the high noon of Empire following the settlement of the First World War to the Suez Crisis of 1956. It will examine the various challenges posed to the British imperial system from the growth of resistance and nationalism in India and the Middle East during the inter war period to the important role played by imperial questions in relations between Britain and the United States (the 'Special Relationship'). Alongside the perceived internal threats to the Empire this module will consider Britain's responses to wartime US criticism of the British Empire and the redefinition of British Imperial policy, the roles planned for the Empire in securing Britain's economic and strategic interests, the scope for Anglo-American co-operation in the Cold War and possible sources of friction between the two powers, culminating in their disagreement over policy in the Middle East at the time of the Suez Crisis.

HIS-M32Y

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAND 2 anthropology modulewhere disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GENDER CONCEPTS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aims of this module are to provide students with a solid understanding of both the theoretical perspectives and concepts that have underpinned the field of gender and development; and to enable students to understand the link between gender and key debates within development studies such as poverty, violence, religion and the role of men in gender and development. The module begins by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, as they have evolved in recent decades. It then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analysis. The second part of the module applies these concepts in examining a selection of important and policy relevant debates: the nature of the household and kinship, gender roles, power and empowerment, poverty, violence, masculinities, religion and the gendered nature of institutions. The module builds the foundation for the more applied units which follow, and whilst it touches on policy implications as they arise, it does not focus on gender policy as such.

DEV-M015

20

GENDER DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

This module explores relations between social policies (defined broadly) and various forms of identity and difference. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries and pays particular attention to gender issues, although other aspects of diversity (such as ethnicity, disability and age) are also addressed explicitly. The module has both theoretical and more practical components, including sessions on gender planning and mainstreaming analysis. This module has a limit of 40 students.

DEV-M066

20

GEOGRAPHIES OF DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4007B This module explores the place of development in geographical thinking. It begins by looking at intellectual foundations of the geographies of development, beginning with post-war modernism theory and proceeding through neo-Marxist and post-modern approaches to the understanding uneven development and distributional inequities. Following this explicit theorising about geography and development, the module proceeds to explore implicit view as observed in changing development practices in policy debates and discourses and in representations of development in film and print media. finally, the module explores how thinking about geography of development is changing and in particular, how this change is associated with process of economic, political and cultural globalisation including changing patterns of natural resource exploitation and trade and changing relationships between citizens, the state and civil society.

DEV-5010A

20

GEORGIAN REBELLIONS

Compared to the tumultuous seventeenth century, the eighteenth century has long been viewed as a period of unusual political stability in England. But the veneer of order - exemplified by Georgian architecture, the celebration of science and the rule of law - masked undercurrents of resentment, especially outside of England and Wales in Scotland, Ireland and the rest of the British Empire. This module will examine several case studies, including the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745, the Jamaican maroon wars, the Stono Rebellion, Pontiac's War, the American Revolution, and the Irish Rebellion of 1798. We will consider, from the perspective of the discontented, what these violent outbursts tell us about the structure of power in Britain and its empire, and, from the perspective of the government's forces in the suppression of these disturbances, what ideological and legal restraints limited the deployment of military force. Embedded within both of these issues was the question of membership within the political community, and by examining these crises the module will investigate the status of various people including Scottish Highlanders, slaves, maroons, American Indians, colonists and the Irish within the Georgian political system. Analysing a combination of primary sources and scholarly texts, the students will address issues including: 1) The viability of "British" nationality following the Act of Union of 1707 2) The development of an unwritten "imperial constitution" and its implications for colonists, American Indians, and slaves 3) The origins of the American Revolution and its meaning in a British-imperial context 4) The relationship between law and the "rules of war" within Britain and across the empire At the end of the semester, the students will have a detailed historical understanding of several rebellions and the American Revolution; a sound knowledge of the scholarly debates surrounding eighteenth-century British politics and the empire; an ability to utilise and critically evaluate textual evidence in the context of historical work.

HIS-6064A

30

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Macroeconomics of Development (DEV-2D52). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-3D22

20

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Macroeconomics of Development (DEV-2D52). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-6006B

20

GLOBALISATION, BUSINESS AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an understanding of the economic, social and environmental impacts of globalisation. It focuses on the role of business, particularly corporate social responsibility, and the changing role of the state in promoting economic development.

DEV-M110

20

GLOBALISED AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS

The aim of this module is to understand how food security is affected by policies, environmental processes, and actions that occur at the international level. Food security is a central theme, and how it is constructed and contested at international level, involving global institutions, interest groups, and diverse policy agendas. This exploration does not confine itself exclusively to production, but also considers other areas of concern, including: global environmental change, dietary shifts, 'post-production' concerns with food quality or ecosystem integrity, agribusiness, public versus private agricultural innovation, intellectual property rights, and strategies for technological development. Students will gain critical understanding of these debates and how different policy actors engage with them at both the local and the global level. These actors include firms, public RandD institutions, civil society, farmers' movements, consumers' groups, and major donors and philanthropic organizations. The module will help students develop a critical and inter-disciplinary understanding of key international policy debates that have relevance to agriculture. Additionally, students will gain a better understanding of how trends in globalised agriculture affect poor people, particularly smallholder farmers, but also consumers and those involved in value chains.

DEV-M106

20

GOVERNANCE DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT

The concepts of governance and democracy hold very different meanings for distinct political trends. Thus, on the one hand democracy is cited as the only way for citizens to have meaningful input into their government, while on the other it is seen as empty of most substantial content consisting mainly of relatively meaningless formal components such as multi-party elections, a vehicle for enabling globalisation. Similarly, there are multiple ways of conceptualising governance. Recently, 'good governance' has become a development buzzword that now occupies a central place in development thinking, policy-making and practice. But what does good governance mean and why has it become so important for development? How are democracy and governance related to the state and how are they affected by global governance? What does it mean to be a citizen, whether of a state or globally and how does gender, in the form of masculinisms, affect the way all these are conceptualised? These are some of the key issues and questions that this module will try to address. Students who have taken this course should understand the historical roots of democracy and the political aims behind the governance agenda. They will also have gained theoretical perspectives, analytical tools, and basic information that can help them evaluate wider debates about political development, democracy, and governance.

DEV-M065

20

HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a broad introduction to health issues in a context of development. It reviews different cultural understandings of health, and relationships between health, socio-economic change, livelihoods and poverty. The module also examines health policies of particular relevance to developing countries. While the module looks at health issues in general, it pays particular attention to links between HIV/AIDS and development.

DEV-M070

20

HENRY VIII: THE MAKING OF A TYRANT?

The reign of Henry VIII was a major turning point in British history, and 'bluff King Hal' continues to horrify and fascinate us in equal measure. This special subject uses the preoccupations, ambitions, and character of Henry VIII as a route into the political, religious and cultural changes of this tumultuous period. Starting with the acclaimed young king, his Spanish bride, Katherine of Aragon, and his consummate minister, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, the course works chronologically and thematically through to the declining years of Henry VIII's reign, when a paranoid, obese and cruel monarch presided over an irrevocably changed religious and political landscape. It examines in detail the divorce crisis, the establishment of the Church of England, the Henrician Reformation, the politics and factionalism of the Court, war and foreign policy, magnificence, and opposition to the king, and engages with the intense historiographical debates on all these issues. The module considers some of the most colourful personalities in British history - Wolsey, More, Boleyn, Cromwell, and Cranmer - as well as structures, and the falls of Anne Boleyn and Thomas Cromwell are given particular attention. Finally, the module draws on material culture, art history, literature, film, and even dress, as well as relying on the more usual documentary sources, such as the State Papers. Above all, we will try to answer: did Henry VIII really become a tyrant?

HIS-6035Y

60

HERITAGE AND PUBLIC HISTORY

Public history is history in the public sphere, whether in museums and galleries, heritage sites and historic houses, radio and television broadcasting, film, popular history books, or public policy within government. The central challenge and task of public history is making history relevant and accessible to its audience of people outside academia, whilst adhering to an academically credible historical method. This module explores the theory and practice of public history in the heritage sector. The module considers questions such as, how is the past used? What is authenticity? Who 'owns' historic sites? The module also offers the opportunity for undergraduates to work on a heritage project with a local heritage partner - the nature of this project varies each year depending on the availability of such partnership opportunities. PLEASE NOTE: The availability of places with partners this year means that the module will be limited to twelve undergraduate places. All students on the module will be required to engage in preparatory reading and writing over the course of the summer break.

HIS-5026A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH I

This course is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH II

This course may be taken as a self-standing module or as a continuation of Higher Advanced English I. It is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are native or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5044B

20

IMPERIAL RUSSIAN AND SOVIET HISTORY, 1861-1945

This module examines some of the main themes in Russian history between the Emancipation of the Serfs and the outbreak of the Second World War. We will look at the nature of industrialisation and the peasant economy, the autocracy and its fall in 1917, the revolutionary movement and the nationalities question. We will then examine how the Revolution of 1917 changed the state and the ways in which the Communists attempted to change society before 1929. We conclude by examining the country during the era of the five year plans and the impact of the Stalinist system on the Soviet Union before the outbreak of world war.

HIS-5019A

20

IMPERIALISTS, PASHAS and REVOLUTIONARIES: IRAQ, 1914-2003

This module explores the eventful and troubled history of modern Iraq. Taking its starting point in the nineteenth century, when Iraq was part of the grand Ottoman Empire that covered much of the Middle East, the module explores how ancient Mesopotamia came under British tutelage following the Great War and how it subsequently experienced a turbulent history as various political actors sought to wrest control of the newly established state. The module pays special attention to key moments when the course of Iraq's history changed, such as wars, military coups and revolutions, but also periods in between when society returned to some sort of normality. Particular focus is on the rise of political ideologies, in particular Arab nationalism, and its local counterpart, Iraqi nationalism - but also other ideologies such as socialism, communism and Ba#thism. Saddam Hussein's domination of the country (1979-2003) is also an important element of the module.

HIS-6069Y

60

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROJECT

In this module, students will conduct and write up their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD8X

60

INTELLECTUALS AND US FOREIGN POLICY, 1880-2012

This module examines the ideas and influence of nine American foreign policy "intellectuals," beginning with Alfred Mahan and concluding with Paul Wolfowitz. Why did each "intellectual" strike a particular chord at a particular time? Do individuals matter in the history of US foreign policy? How, and with what consequences, were these ideas translated into policy? This module will explore the origins of key US foreign policy concepts such as isolationism, internationalism, containment and "pre-emptive defence." Aims of the Module #To introduce students to nine particular strains of US foreign policy ideology. #To encourage students to engage critically with the primary output of these "intellectuals" and to identify their strengths and weaknesses. #To stimulate students to consider whether these ideas have been manifested in policy, and to trace their impact. #To encourage students to develop their own foreign policy philosophy.

HIS-6074B

30

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level. The module is made up of three elements, each taught for one hour per week: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is not available to students with AS or A-Level French. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

A continuation of Intermediate French I. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module consists of three contact hours per week.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent)

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent)

PPLB5034B

20

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY

This module provides an understanding of the economics of international trade and investment and their implications for development. It analyses the impacts of international trade, foreign investment and technology transfer on developing countries and evaluates the effects of national trade and investment policies and international economic agreements and institutions. It covers both trade theory and more applied topics such as the impact of trade on labour and the environment.

DEV-M056

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES-EXAMINATION

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Relations and Development Studies.

DEV-M048

20

INTRODUCING PPL

PPL-4030Y

0

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4032B

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT FIELDWORK

This module will help prepare students for development fieldwork and focus on practical and ethical issues. Topics covered will include understanding the local context and culture, working with marginalised, vulnerable and privileged groups, negotiating access to field sites and power relations. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD3X

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development,human geography and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress.

DEV-4001A

40

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress. This module is reserved for students on BSc(Hons) Environmental Geography and International Development.

DEV-4006A

20

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY MODERN STUDIES

This module introduces key themes in early modern history: witchcraft, gender, rebellion, religious conflict, the reformation, warfare, state formation and other key aspects of the period 1500-1750.

HIS-4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module introduces students to the main macro- and micro-economic issues of development. It lays the foundations for the modules Microeconomics of Development and Macroeconomics of Development. The main theories of development will be reviewed. Central issues related to poverty, human capital development, the environment, globalisation, balance of payments and financial systems will also be covered.

DEV-4003B

20

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is for students to understand current debates on the principles and theories linking education to development in a range of social contexts. The module will introduce students to theories of education and development including international and comparative education. These are examined in relation to the broader challenges of development. Topics in the module may include: theories of human development and capabilities, human capital and rights based approaches, theories of equity, social justice and inclusive education. We will examine schooling in contexts of chronic poverty, models of schooling and de-schooling, formal and non-formal education, the challenges of linguistic and cultural diversity, inclusive education and disability, gender inequalities, and the education of nomads and other migratory groups.

DEV-M007

20

INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

This module is designed to provide an introduction to medieval history both for first year historians and students from other schools. It surveys the history of medieval Europe, including England, from c.1000 to c1300, and also examines some archaeology, literature, art, and architecture from the period. The module also aims to introduce students to a range of primary sources, including some of the physical remains to be found in East Anglia.

HIS-4001A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN HISTORY

This module provides a wide-ranging introduction to the political, social and economic transformation of Britain and Europe from the late eighteenth century to the First World War. Among the themes it considers are industrialisation and its impact; revolution and reform; nationalism and imperialism; gender and society; great power relations; the impact of war and the collapse of the old Europe in 1917-18.

HIS-4003A

20

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS

This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The course has an integrated biophysical core and also deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4004B

20

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS

The module will provide an overview of different research methods and how they can be applied within the context of development practice. Among other things, it will cover the following topics: interviewing, mixed methods approaches, participatory research methods and basic statistical analysis. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD2Y

20

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH (MRES DP)

This module provides students with a generic introduction to Social Science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of Social Science research, research design and the nature of quantitative and qualitative research methodology. It also examines the skills needed for Social Science research. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD1Y

20

ISOLATION TO WORLD WAR: BRITAIN AND THE ORIGINS OF WWI

This module examines the development of British foreign policy between 1880 and 1914. In the first semester we will undertake a detailed examination of Salisbury's foreign policy and the debate surrounding Britain's international 'isolation' up to the conclusion of the French entente. The second semester will see us examining the cause of British foreign policy under Sir Edward Grey until the outbreak of war in August 1914.

HIS-6030Y

60

LATER MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module examines the political, cultural and social history of later medieval Europe (circa 1100-1500) with a particular focus on France and Italy. The topics addressed include the formation of cities, the position of the papacy, lay piety, and the role of women.

HIS-5006B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

LATIN AND PALEOGRAPHY

A good command of basic Latin and Latin palaeography are fundamental tools for the aspiring medievalist. The basic Medieval Latin element of this module is suitable for complete beginners, but more advanced tuition is available for students with a prior knowledge of the language. The palaeography element concentrates on the reading and interpretation of a range of original Latin sources from the late 11th to the early 16th century.

HIS-M02Y

30

LATIN FOR HISTORIANS

This module provides an introduction to the linguistic skills in medieval Latin which enable students to read administrative documents such as charters, accounts, court rolls, etc. It is particularly suited for those who intend proceeding to postgraduate study in aspects of the past, such as medieval history, which require a reading knowledge of Latin. This course is not intended for students who have already studied Latin to A level or equivalent.

HIS-5004B

20

MA IN EARLY MODERN HISTORY DISSERTATION

80-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Early Modern History in the School of History.

HIS-M03X

80

MA IN EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT - EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Education and Development.

DEV-M036

20

MA IN GENDER ANALYSIS IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Gender Analysis in International Development.

DEV-M034

20

MA IN GLOBALISATION BUSINESS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA Globalisation Business and Sustainable Development: Exam.

DEV-M114

20

MA IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Development.

DEV-M112

20

MA IN INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Social Development.

DEV-M038

20

MA IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY DISSERTATION

70-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Landscape History in the School of History.

HIS-M01X

70

MA IN MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Media and International Development.

DEV-M084

20

MA IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Medieval History in the School of History.

HIS-M02X

90

MA IN MODERN BRITISH HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Modern British History in the School of History.

HIS-M04X

90

MA IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Modern European History in the School of History.

HIS-M05X

90

MA IN RURAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Rural Development.

DEV-M030

20

MACROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

Why are some countries richer than others? The objective of the module is to provide a rigorous analysis of economic growth issues and examine macroeconomic models that describe determinants of long-term growth and income. We will study the role of capital accumulation, initial income, population growth, education, technological progress, and institutions in determining different patterns of economic development. Theory and data analysis will jointly help explain why some countries embark on divergent development paths.

DEV-M076

20

MADNESS AND MEDICINE

This module considers the practice of medicine in Britain from the eighteenth century to the establishment of the NHS. Themes include the impact of science and professions, the organisation and control aspects of medical and hospital services and healthcare as seen by sufferers and patients.

HIS-6005B

30

MASTER IN RESEARCH DISSERTATION

15,000 to 20,000 words on an approved topic.

DEV-M05X

80

MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

In this module students will be working in the university and in the local community to design, implement and evaluate their own 'live' media and development project. This module is taught and facilitated by lecturers from DEV and by a team of professionals from a media and development organisation, called New Media Networks (NMN). NMN is a creative industries company that works in the UK and internationally for lasting social change. Students will also be working with staff (and possibly volunteers) from the local organisations we collaborate with.

DEV-M099

20

MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the analysis of the different approaches to development communication and the wider relationships between media and development.

DEV-M082

20

MEDIA AND SOCIETY

This module is intended to provide all students studying media related postgraduate degrees with a broad, current and inter-disciplinary understanding of the media today. Our guiding philosophy is that in order properly to understand the media, whether as a lawyer, economist, development studies professional, media studies specialist or political scientist, it is essential to have a wide-ranging and multi-disciplinary understanding of the modern media. What we shall be doing over the year, therefore, is to look at the structure of media today in the UK and globally. We will consider, from several different academic perspectives, how media content is constructed, what shapes content and how content may be controlled and even censored. We will also look at the media industry, examining how it is currently organised and managed, what factors influence its current organisation and consider how it might develop. We will examine how media affects peoples and societies, particularly with the rise of social media, and review the debates about media influence and power. Finally, we will seek to draw together key aspects of modern media.

DEV-M105

20

MEDICINE AND GENDER

This module offers a broad historical treatment of gender issues in medicine, examining women as providers and recipients of healthcare from Ancient Greece to the NHS. Topics for study include the female body, obstetrics and gynaecology, the female healer and the medical profession, women, witchcraft and popular healing, scientific medicine and professionalisation, nurses, nursing and reform, and women's health.

HIS-5016A

20

MEDICINE AND SOCIETY BEFORE THE 17TH CENTURY

This module examines the theory and practice of medicine at all levels of English society during the medieval and early modern periods, and assesses the impact of medical ideas upon religious, literary and political thought. Topics include: the emergence of a healing profession and its attempts to secure a monopoly of practice; the role of women as both patients and practitioners; theories about the spread of disease and necessary measures for public health; medicine and the Church;and attitudes to mortality. Edited versions of original documents are used.

HIS-5014A

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014B

20

MICROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module provides the building blocks for microeconomic analysis of development. Topics include: #Poverty, inequality and welfare #Agricultural household production #Intra- household allocation #Risk, uncertainty and insurance #Markets and Institutions: credit #Markets and institutions: labour #Human capital : education, health and nutrition #Public goods, collective action #Institutions, transaction costs #Policy reforms #Household surveys and their analysis. The module consists of lectures, seminars and workshops. Students are assessed by essay and exam.

DEV-M057

20

MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990

This module introduces students to German history in the twentieth century which was characterised by various radical regime changes and territorial alterations. Topics include German world policy and nationalism in the late imperial period; imperialism and expansionism during the First World War; the challenges of modernity in the Weimar Republic; the rise of Hitler and the formation of the Nazi empire in Europe; the post-war division of Germany and the legacy of the Third Reich; the nature of the GDR dictatorship and the problem of West German terrorism; as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification. Special attention will be given to questions of nationalism and national identity, issues of history and memory, and Germany's role in Europe and the world. On completion of this unit, students will have developed a solid understanding of one of the most dramatic periods of German history when the country oscillated between the two extremes of war and repression, on the one hand, and the return to peace and democracy, on the other.

HIS-5018A

20

MODERN ITALY, 1860-1945

This module studies the social, political and economic history of Italy from its unification in 1860 until the end of the Second World War. It will begin by looking at the process of unification, the difficulties encountered in governing the new nation-state and the problems of uneven social and economic modernisation. The module then focuses on the First World War and the rise of Fascism after 1918, before assessing the nature of Mussolini's regime and the reasons for its downfall.

HIS-5021B

20

MODERNITY IN RUSSIA

The module will explore the revolutionary period and beyond in Russia, concentrating on the way in which Russian culture and society moved towards modernity. Drawing on the wide range of materials, including images, films and imaginative literature, the module will explore the pioneering aspects of Russia's modernist culture and society, as well as discussing the problems that Russia faced in fully embracing the modern age. The module will be taught by a weekly seminar.

HIS-M09Y

60

MSC IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Climate Change and International Development.

DEV-M086

20

MSC IN DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Development Economics.

DEV-M116

20

MSC IN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Environment and International Development.

DEV-M042

20

MSC IN IMPACT EVALUATION FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Impact Evaluation for International Development.

DEV-M108

20

MSC IN WATER SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Water Security and International Development.

DEV-M104

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN: THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

This module deals with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the start of the Cold War.

HIS-5017B

20

NAPOLEONIC EUROPE

This module examines the impact of Napoleonic rule on Europe. Beginning with an examination of the foundations of the French Empire, the unit goes on to examine different aspects of Napoleonic rule: social and economic change; culture and ideology; warfare and the state; collaboration and resistance. It will look comparatively at the experience of France, Italy, Germany and Spain under Napoleon, before assessing the reasons for the downfall of the Napoleonic regime. Material used will include memoirs, literature and other contemporary documents.

HIS-6015A

30

NATIONALISM AND VIOLENCE IN 20TH-CENTURY EUROPE

Students will study and reflect on the problem of nationalism and violence in modern European history. Topics to be discussed include: the Armenian Genocide, the Irish Question, the Holocaust, the legacy of the Second World War, multinationalism and ethnic cleansing in the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, the French-Algerian problem, the nature and limitations of 'European identity', and the relationship between sport and nationalism. The module will involve the discussion of relevant theoretical literature and be taught as a reading group with close reference to original texts, focussing particularly on memoirs and the exploration of their value as historical sources. The seminars will run in alternate weeks over the autumn and spring semesters. Students will make a 15-minute seminar presentation (20% of the mark) and submit an essay of 4-5,000 words.

HIS-M29Y

30

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE STUDENTS MUST TAKE DEV-4004B. This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in NR1, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, stability, change and degradation, etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management in NR systems. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. a number of different conceptual frameworks such as legal pluralism, value chains, capabilities and rights- centred perspectives are introduced and used to explore particular aspects of resource management issues. Specific natural resource management, biotechnology, renewable energy and biodiversity the module also develops students understanding of experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5013Y

40

NATURE AND SOCIETY

Ideas about nature have always lain at the heart of how we think people should behave and society should be organised. Equally, we have long measured our human virtues against how we have treated nature, and where we belong in it. This course traces those two issues as they have shaped the society and culture of Europeans and their descendants overseas from the early modern age until the birth of modern environmentalism in the 1960s. We will examine changing beliefs about the place of God and humanity in the natural world; how people have imagined themselves shaped by or shaping climate, and tested themselves against nature in polar exploration, local recreation and mountaineering; how we have responded to the problems of modern society, such as air and water pollution, species extinction, and resource exhaustion; how nature has been central to the arts, from the romantic poets to landscape painters and the modern avant-garde, and the arts to our imagination of nature; how nature and land have been major themes of to nationalism and identity; and how scientific knowledge transformed not just our idea of nature, but ourselves.

HIS-6058B

30

NEW WORLDS: THE EUROPEAN COLONIAL EXPANSION FROM COLUMBUS TO ABOLITIONISM

This module looks at the European colonial enterprise in America and Asia. Starting from the explorations in the Mediterranean we will then look at the expansion of European powers across the Atlantic and the Indian oceans: Columbus and the discovery of America, the first colonies of New England, the creation of trading posts in India and East Asia, and the missionary campaigns in China and Japan. Drawing on selected extracts from travel writings and ethnographic descriptions of previously unknown places and people, we will focus on the protagonists of these explorations - conquerors, adventurers, merchants and settlers - and their interaction with and exploitation of non-European people and cultures, and we will finally conclude by considering the debates which developed around these themes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

HIS-5044B

20

NORMAN AND PLANTAGENET ENGLAND, 1066-1307

This module follows the history of England from the Norman Conquest of 1066 down to the death of Edward 1 in 1307. The aim of this module is to look at the political, ecclesiastical, social and intellectual history of England in this period and to place English history in the wider context of European history in the Middle Ages.

HIS-5007B

20

OLIVER CROMWELL

After forty years of relative obscurity, Oliver Cromwell emerged as a leader in the parliamentary opposition to the king during the English Revolution and became the most powerful man in Britain. This course will explore the life and legacies of Cromwell and provide a point of entry into political, religious and social change in early modern England from the long Reformation to the Restoration. Cromwell has remained one of the most divisive figures in British history from the early modern period until the present. His reputation will soon be reinterpreted with the publication of a new edition of his writings and speeches. This will represent the most extensive and scholarly treatment of Cromwellian sources to date. Students on this module will have unique access to samples from this edition prior to publication. Drawing from a wide range of primary sources, including samples from the new edition, this module will enter into Cromwell's puritan mental world and seek to understand his personal and national aspirations. It will build on this to explore Cromwell's conquest of Ireland and Scotland and his ambitious plans to undermine Spanish power in the Atlantic. Finally, the course will consider Cromwell's controversial reception by contemporaries and his diverse representations in popular culture, film and history. This module introduces students to a close and critical reading of primary and secondary sources. The coursework is specifically designed to enable students to progressively build toward a longer piece of writing that reflects a firm grasp of the secondary literature and engages with primary sources to mount a compelling thesis. The overall aim is to equip students with the skills to engage in independent research and to produce a sustained piece of writing. Another pedagogical aim will be to engage the students directly with the editorial process. This will be done by inviting them to evaluate sample documents from the latest Cromwell edition and to complete a mock exercise in annotating and commenting upon the sample material (autumn document analysis). Students will also be encouraged to develop oral communication and engagement in seminars by delivering an oral presentation. This will be done by the student's oral delivery of his or her second document analysis to the seminar, followed by questions and further discussion.

HIS-6068Y

60

OLIVER CROMWELL AND THE PURITAN WORLD

After forty years of relative obscurity, Oliver Cromwell emerged as a leader in the parliamentary opposition to the king during the English Revolution and became the most powerful man in Britain. This module will explore the life and times of Cromwell and provide a point of entry into political, religious and social change in early modern England from the long Reformation to the Restoration. It will draw from a host of primary sources to enter into Cromwell's puritan mental world and seek to understand his personal and national aspirations. It will build on this to explore Cromwell's conquest of Ireland and Scotland and his ambitious plans to undermine Spanish power in the Atlantic. Finally, the module will consider Cromwell's controversial reception by contemporaries and his diverse representations in popular culture, film and history.

HIS-6016A

30

OVERSEAS STUDY UNIT

This overseas based module is designed to enable students to undertake courses of study approved by the School and organised in association with overseas institutions of learning. The assessment is based on a 2500 word essay on a subject to be agreed with the OSU convenor. The subject will normally be thematically linked to the content of the course of study overseas. Students will also have to pass local exams and complete and pass other forms of local assessments at their host university. The work burden should be equivalent to a 20 credit module at UEA, i.e. around 4-8 hours a week. THIS IS RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6002A

20

OVERSEAS STUDY UNIT

This overseas based module is designed to enable students to undertake courses of study approved by the School and organised in association with overseas institutions of learning. The assessment is based on a 2500 word essay on a subject to be agreed with the OSU convenor. The subject will normally be thematically linked to the content of the course of study overseas. Students will also have to pass local exams and complete and pass other forms of local assessments at their host university. The work burden should be equivalent to a 20 credit module at UEA, i.e. around 4-8 hours a week. THIS IS RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-3C23

20

PAST ENVIRONMENTS: THEORY AND PRACTICE IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY

This year-long module examines the nature of past environments from prehistory to the present. It will focus on the theory and practice of Landscape History and examine a series of semi-natural environments, such as woodland, fieldscapes and parkland. It will also look at the impact of man-made structures - such as fortifications - on the landscape.

HIS-M11Y

60

PEOPLE AND PLACE

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4007B. This module analyses two key questions about people, place and space: how and why people's health varies in different development settings; and the links between development processes and people's migration. The ways that migration affects health are also examined. The module begins by analysing global patterns of health and development, including risk levels of non-communicable diseases across many parts of the world, the global institutions involved in the governance of health and migration, and broad patterns of health inequality. The second part of the module provides and understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. The geography and risk environments for health is then examined: how social relations (related to class, occupation, gender, ethnicity, colonial history), operating across different spaces, generate susceptibility to health risks in particular places. The examples of HIV and TB are used to illustrate the ways social processes cerate risk environments. The module also looks at places where good health has been achieved and why. The third part of the module develops understanding of the factors driving migration, such as labour relations, conflict or climate change and how these population movements influence men and women, risk environments and their health and well-being?

DEV-5011B

20

PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBALISATION

The module is designed to provide a broad overview of the debates on globalisation and its implications for developing countries. It is taught from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives and considers a range of views and critiques. It addresses key issues such as the impact of globalisation on poverty and inequality, the role of the state, and conflict and security, as well as addressing the resistance to globalisation and the rise of global social movements.

DEV-M071

20

PLAGUE AND DISEASE IN THE MEDIEVAL CITY

Plague and Disease in the Medieval City is an interdisciplinary module which examines the health and illnesses of the urban population in England and Northern Europe during the later Middle Ages. By using the unparalleled riches of Norwich's medieval buildings and landscape, students will investigate standards of living alongside patterns of disease and the relative effectiveness of both individual and corporate actions in halting the spread of plague within the medieval city. Supplementary iconographical, archaeological and documentary evidence from other cities, including Coventry, Winchester, York, London and Paris, will also be used. We will examine the main influences upon the developments within medicine and its practice from the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries. The impact of medical theory on urban politics and planning is also considered, as is the close connection between the Church and medicine, notably through the medium of religious iconography. The module will conclude by assessing the influences upon and developments within medicine and its practice which took place between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries and look at whether any of these were reflected in the changes which took place in Norwich during the same period. *THIS MODULE IS FOR INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY*

HIS-5001S

20

POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This course seeks to provide students with a solid understanding of political ecology theory and to enable them to apply this theory for analyzing environment and development problems. After a brief introduction to key theoretical concepts in political ecology, students review key contributions to major policy fields in environment and development. They do this in a series of reading seminars, covering agriculture and biotechnology, climate change, conservation, fisheries, forestry, water management and other fields. The course ends with a workshop on the role of policy in political ecology.

DEV-M090

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

"This political analysis for development module focuses on core principles in politics and their application to development analysis, covering topics that include power and resistance, states and nations, citizenship and participation, identities and multiculturalism, democratic and authoritarian regimes, and elections and the use of force. The various topics will be taught with intensive reference to theory but integrated with empirical material, both historical and contemporary in nature. It is taught through a combination of lectures, facilitated reading groups, video sessions and student-led seminars."

DEV-5008B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN LANGUAGE 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLB4020A

20

PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module introduces geographical approaches to the key processes of change that shape our world and its societies. You will examine how people and places are connected and transformed as a result of processes such as colonialism, globalisation, industrialisation, migration, urbanisation and development, and explore how differences and inequalities emerge. A central theme will be why space matters, as people's lives are influenced by the places that surround them - both near and far - and as they in turn change those places. These issues will be explored through a range of contemporary geographical topics, from sweatshops to climate change, through which you will be introduced to core geographical concepts, ideas and approaches, emphasising on critical thinking and practice. The module will also cover key methods for geographical research, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and will include field-based practical work in the local area.

DEV-4007B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module will introduce students to the history of propaganda. It will ask students to consider what constitutes propaganda, and to understand the techniques of propaganda, as well as its purposes and effectiveness. It will consider the issue across the twentieth century and will do so by looking at the issue of propaganda in dictatorial regimes, such as Nazi Germany (and fascism more widely), as well as the communist dictatorships. It will also look at the role of propaganda in the Western democracies, looking especially at the issue of the British Empire and the Cold War. It will also look at the role of propaganda in radical politics and protest movements, such as the environmental movement. In doing so it will provide students with an understanding of important historical and ethical debates.

HIS-5050B

20

PUBLIC POLICY AND WELFARE

This module explores relations between public policies (defined broadly) and processes of social and political change. The course has both theoretical and more practical components. Reflecting on the politics of public policy and the unevenness of the state in the developing world the course provides a framework for thinking about social change and public welfare. As well as the role of state institutions, there is also a discussion of the role played by NGOs and other civil society actors in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. Issues covered include HIVAids and public policy in Africa, and state poverty reduction programmes in South Asia.

DEV-3D38

20

PUBLIC POLICY AND WELFARE

This module explores relations between public policies (defined broadly) and processes of social and political change. The course has both theoretical and more practical components. Reflecting on the politics of public policy and the unevenness of the state in the developing world the course provides a framework for thinking about social change and public welfare. As well as the role of state institutions, there is also a discussion of the role played by NGOs and other civil society actors in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. Issues covered include HIVAids and public policy in Africa, and state poverty reduction programmes in South Asia.

DEV-6008B

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other units, ii) to become critical readers of Published quantitative data analysis and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with sampling approaches, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and linear regression.

DEV-5002A

20

QUEENS, COURTESANS AND COMMONERS: WOMEN AND GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the issue of gender in European history, between 1500 and 1750. Using a variety of written and visual sources, and including a comparative element, it focuses on the following themes: definitions of femininity and masculinity; life-cycles; family, kinship, and marriage; social exclusion, charity and the welfare state; law, crime, and order; witchcraft and magic; honour, sex, and sexual identities; work; learning and the arts; material culture; the impact of European expansions.

HIS-5022A

20

REDCOATS': BRITISH MILITARY POWER IN THE AGE OF THE FIRST GLOBAL WARS, 1754-1783

This module concerns the experience of the British army in the period of the Seven Years War and American War of Independence. It will examine the organisation and conduct of war in both Europe and America from a British perspective and discuss how the British army coped with the demands of conducting operations in the era of the first truly 'global' wars.

HIS-6007A

30

REFORMATION TO REVOLUTION

This module examines three centuries of European history connecting two unprecedented revolutionary epochs: the Reformation of the sixteenth century and the American and French revolutions at the end of the early modern era. We will look at key themes and movements in these centuries, including the politics of the Reformation; the Mediterranean work of the Ottomans and Habsburg Spain; the Dutch Golden Age; the great political and religious struggles of the seventeenth century, including wars in the British Isles, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Baltic; the Russia of the Romanov czars and Peter the Great; the growth of centralised states and absolutism in France, Prussia and Austria; the Enlightenment; the rise of the Atlantic economies; and the challenge to the Old Regime from revolutionary politics.

HIS-5025A

20

RENAISSANCE ITALY

This module looks at social, religious and gender norms, and the way in which the institutions of state and church sought to order the lives of men and women in Italy. Providing background knowledge on the period (c.1500-1650), the module focuses on: social, religious, and gender norms; informal community rules and rituals; broken marriages, infanticide, and sexual violence; poor and vagrants; public brothels and women 'in danger'; male and female religious in civic life; forms of religious conversion; customs and costumes; cross-dressing; images of ethnicity.

HIS-6024A

30

RENAISSANCE WORLDS

This module examines the Renaissance in its European and global dimensions. Drawing on a vast array of written and visual sources the module will focus on some of the most debated themes in the history of this period: high politics, popular politics and seditious speeches; the ideals and practices of the Renaissance courts; civility, the culture of display and consumption; warfare; sex and violence; knowledge, travelling and the exploration of the world.

HIS-6055A

30

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In RMSA we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 1

In this module, students will conduct an organisational and policy analysis for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD4Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 2

In this module, students will design and pilot their own research instruments for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD5Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 3

In this module, students will develop a detailed research proposal for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD6Y

20

RESEARCH SKILLS WORKSHOP: DESIGN AND WRITING

RSW:DW will focus on identifying research questions; scoping existing knowledge and finding literature; critical reading and writing; editing and planning arguments; comparing conceptual approaches and preliminary thinking about theory-data linkages.

DEV-M091

10

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS

The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: # Development research and research ethics # Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews # The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods # Participatory and action research # Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are taught using SPSS.

DEV-M027

20

ROBIN HOOD: THE MEDIEVAL OUTLAW IN HISTORY AND LEGEND

The English medieval kingdom was extremely hierarchical. It was a society in which resistance to authority by the vast majority of society was discouraged by the widespread use of mutilation and execution. Yet it was also a society which applauded that resistance. All sorts of levels of society, from the highest in the land (such as the king's sons) to the lowest, indulged in rebellion, but it was the outlaw who captured the popular imagination. Encapsulated in the tales of Robin Hood, the outlaw is loyal, courageous, as well as being clever enough to outsmart the authorities. And the authorities, of course, are disloyal, stupid, and cowardly and use the cover of the law to behave corruptly. And so long as the outlaw commits his crimes for a noble purpose, he remains a hero of the people. The unit will examine the wider subject of resistance to royal authority by men who become outlaws and their portrayal in popular legend from the Norman Conquest of England to the modern age with its focus being the outlaw, for whom the name Robin Hood has become an archetype, as, indeed, it did in the later middle ages, as outlaws took on the name pseudonym for their own criminal activities.

HIS-6053B

30

RSW: ELABORATING RESEARCH DESIGN

This module continues from where RSW1 leaves off. It provides students with the skills to complete their procedural paper, particularly focusing on methodology and moving further on theory-data linkages towards the construction of a conceptual framework.

DEV-M092

10

RURAL ENGLAND 1660 TO 1900

This module will encourage you to consider broad questions in relation to life in rural England and, specifically, as it related to individuals in England between 1660-1900. Topics to be covered will include changes in land use and technology; landowners: affluence and decline; rural crime; housing - types and conditions; family life; childhood; education; poverty and health care.

HIS-5038B

20

RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND AGRARIAN CHANGE

Rural Livelihoods and Agrarian Change is a core module for all MAARD and MAGAID students and is an option for all other masters students. It is an inter-disciplinary module that uses a social relations perspective to understand how people make a living in contexts of poverty and vulnerability. It aims to provide an overview of rural livelihoods and approaches to their analysis as well as a critical assessment of the implications of gender relations and poverty, for livelihood building. The interconnections between the wider context within which livelihoods are built, including national policies and the character of specific locations, the social structure and rules that determine entitlements, the assets or resources available to individuals and groups, and their livelihood strategies, will be examined. The links between rural and urban, farm and non-farm for the livelihoods of rural people, over time, will also be explored.

DEV-M061

20

RURAL POLICIES and POLITICS

Around three-quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas and the gap between poor and rich continues to widen. The fate of the rural poor can be greatly influenced by policies in areas such as agriculture, land, social protection, natural resources, health, education and trade. This module reviews key policies and issues in these and other areas. It also guides students to critically analyse policy choices within specific contexts. Rural Policies recognises the importance of looking at rural policies with consideration of particular socio-economic contexts and in relation to larger-scale trends that are affecting rural areas: globalisation, urbanisation, de-agrarianisation, rural-urban linkages, conflict, HIV/AIDS and decentralisation. At the same time, it is based on the premise that rural areas require particular policies because of the distinct conditions characterizing them.

DEV-M016

20

RUSSIA IN REVOLUTION 1905-1921

This module will look at the upheavals in Russia between 1905 and the introduction of a limited Parliament, and continue by examining the First World War and the downfall of the Romanov monarchy. We will then study the year 1917 in some detail and discuss the causes of the Bolshevik seizure of power. The Civil War and the reasons of the Communist victory will be analysed. The module will place the Russian Revolutions in their historical, political and geographical context and will consider the impact that these events had in the history of the twentieth century.

HIS-6004B

30

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (AUTUMN SEMSTER)

X05 This module offers HIS students on the V100 programme the opportunity to spend the Autumn semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5031A

60

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (SPRING SEMSTER)

X04 This module offers HIS students on the V100 programme the opportunity to spend the Spring semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5030B

60

SEX and DRUGS and ROCK N ROLL? SIXTIES BRITAIN

Few decades in the modern period have proved as polarising as the 1960s. From 'swinging' London and the student protests of 1968 to the consequences of an allegedly 'permissive' society, the social, cultural and political implications of the decade reverberate into the present. We will cover the political impact of social and cultural trends such as: affluence and consumer culture; youth, pop music and subcultures; the counter-culture, pop-art; film, theatre, television and censorship; the 'New Left' and the birth of cultural studies; changing sexual behaviour and the 'permissive' moment; the politics of 'race' and immigration; education, social mobility and the 'new' universities; slum clearance, suburbanisation and the rise of the tower block. While focusing on Britain, key global themes will be unpacked and their local significance explored: cultures of the cold-war; decolonisation anti-colonial struggles; anti-nuclear and anti-Vietnam protests; the civil rights movement; the rise of 'second wave' feminism and gay liberation; structuralism and post-modernity. Through the analysis of autobiographical accounts and oral histories and contemporary books, films, music, television shows, sociological surveys, archival sources, official publications and material culture students will be encouraged to come to their own conclusions about this tumultuous decade.

HIS-6057Y

60

SKILLS IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM

This module takes place in the Spring Semester and is taught through a combination of practical group sessions and independent tasks. The main focus of the course is the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Landscape History and there is a strong emphasis on the practical application of GIS in examining Britain's historic landscape. This 20-credit module is ONLY available to students on the Environmental Sciences and Humanities course.

HIS-M006

20

SKILLS IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

This module takes place in the Spring Semester and is taught through a combination of practical group sessions and independent tasks. The main focus of the course is the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Landscape History and there is a strong emphasis on the practical application of GIS in examining Britain's historic landscape.

HIS-M002

30

SLAVERY AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1619-1807

This module will investigate how and why a relatively small number of colonists from England - a nation that prided itself as being free from slavery - adopted a way of life thoroughly dependant on slave labour. By the late eighteenth century, slavery influenced the lives of British people everywhere, and this circumstance helped inspire Britain's drive to outlaw the slave trade and consign slavery itself to history. Analysing a combination of primary sources and scholarly texts, the students will address a variety of issues related to slavery in the British Empire, including: 1) The contribution of slave labour to economic development in Britain and its empire; 2) The influence of slavery on political ideology in Britain, the British colonies, and the early United States; 3) The role of Africans in shaping and supplying the slave trade; 4) The intimate influence of slavery on the lives all those directly involved in the practice, including slaveholders and the enslaved, women, men, and children; 5) The complex politics that led to the official abolition of Britain's slave trade in 1807.

HIS-6059B

30

SOCIAL ANALYSIS FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Over the last few years, social development has become a leading focus in international development policy. Most international agencies and many of the larger NGOs have their own departments or divisions of social development. This module offers a detailed theoretical analysis of key concepts issues in social development, such as power relations, social capital, social exclusion, participatory development and different understandings of poverty. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries.

DEV-M063

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1

This is the first part of a two-year integrated course that covers basic principles from the social sciences, and uses them to think critically about processes of social change in developing countries. SAID1 provides an introduction to social analysis and is framed by the study of social anthropology. Concepts and methods are explained through the use of indepth case studies which from a range of developing country contexts. Issues covered in the course include: kinship, religion, violence, labour, politics and resistance. As well as introducing students to classical anthropological texts the course engages with the work of anthropologists looking at issues of contemporary development and change.

DEV-4005B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or ART-4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

SOCIETY, POLITICS AND CULTURE IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND

This year-long module covers a wide range of issues in the social and cultural history of England, c.1500-1750. Weekly two-hour classes are spread over both semesters and examine issues such as methodology and interpretation in social and cultural history; the nature of early modernity; senses of place, belonging and local identity; custom and popular memory; social relations and social conflict; crime, the law and legal culture; magic and popular religion; witchcraft; gender relations and gender identities; literacy, print and oral culture; and senses of the self. Assessment is based upon two 5,000 word essays, focussing on a question that has been tailored to the specific needs and interests of the student.

HIS-M04Y

60

SOURCES FOR LANDSCAPE HISTORY

This is a specialist preparatory exercise, examining sources for landscape history, ranging from historical documents through to field evidence and maps. There will be a strong practical element to this component, with an emphasis on how landscape historians use their sources.

HIS-M001

10

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

STALIN AND STALINISM: THE USSR 1924-1953

This special subject will examine the Stalin era in the context of other 20th-century dictatorships. There will be a particular focus on: Stalin's rise to power; Stalin's revolution; terror and its impact on Soviet society; war and dictatorship; decline and fall - Stalin and destalinization.

HIS-6031Y

60

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investiages the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR TRANSLATORS

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to computer-based tools, technologies and methodologies used in the translation industry, and to examine critically the strengths and weaknesses of such tools. All students learn to use the main market-leading applications (MemoQ, SDL Trados, Systran and others as appropriate); at least five tools will be covered each year. Individual or small-group exploration of a range of further tools is also supported, in response to student interests and needs. A 'learning by doing' approach is central to the module. Students learn to be confident explorers and adopters of translation technologies, so they can master new tools they need in future. As far as possible, learning replicates 'real-world' use of the technology and prepares those attending to join the industry in a range of roles on completion of their studies. To this end, students are expected to participate in collaborative team translation projects, to share in communicating best practice to their class colleagues, and to build a portfolio of their own translations during the module.

PPL-MT13

20

THE 'GOLDEN' TWENTIES: WEIMAR CULTURE AND THE SPIRIT OF MODERNITY

This module focuses on one of the most exciting and fascinating decades in German history. The Weimar Republic has become legendary for its intense creativity during a time of socio-economic crisis and political upheaval. It was a period when art and unrest flourished side by side, an age characterised by a new rhythm of life and filled by visionaries and bohemians, making Germany the incomparable centre of European cultural and intellectual life. Few places in the world were so inventive and exhilarating, but also so decadent and despairing. Beyond the glamour and glory of cabarets and department stores, gaudy jazz bands and gay bars, architectural innovation and cinematographic experimentation, there was also extreme poverty and an escalation of prostitution, youth delinquency, and political violence. This course attempts to capture this ambivalence of Weimar culture and society between glitter and doom, promise and tragedy.

HIS-6066A

30

THE AGE OF EXTREMES: EUROPE 1918 - 2001

This module examines the dramatic history of Europe during the twentieth century in its global context. It will consider the century's turbulent swings between war and peace before discussing the economic revolutions that engulfed the globe. The complex interactions between humans and the natural environment will form a central part of the module, before discussion of the ideological fissures that divided Europe for much of the twentieth century. The concluding section will consider the development of popular social movements and how they have shaped Europe.

HIS-4006B

20

THE AMERICAS 1492-1820

This module examines the history of North and South America and the Caribbean from 1492 to 1820, focusing on encounters between indigenous peoples, and on people of African heritage and settlers of European descent. We will examine a variety of primary sources in order to study such diverse subjects as race relations, missionary activity, the development of slavery, changing gender relations, economic development, and patterns of imperial administration and self-government. These will be studied using Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, English, and French colonial settings. Aims include: to contrast and compare different patterns of colonization in early Spanish and English America; to look at the development of different ideas of colonial societies; to assess the impact of the revolutions throughout the Americas.

HIS-6073Y

60

THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1857-1956

This module surveys the history of the British Empire from the mid-nineteenth century to the Suez Crisis, seeking to explain the Empire's growth and the early stages of its contraction. It examines the nature and impact of British colonial rule, at the political, economic and social/cultural levels, addressing the development of the 'settler' colonies/Dominions, the special significance of India and the implications of the 'New Imperialism'. Problems to be considered include theories of 'development' and 'collaboration', the growth of resistance and nationalism, and Britain's responses to these, and the impacts of the two World Wars and the Cold War on Britain's Imperial system.

HIS-5013B

20

THE CLASSICS AND THE CONTROVERSIES: EARLY MODERN HISTORY READING GROUP

This module introduces students to some key texts encompassing different approaches to early modern history, and engages them in broad debates with the wider community of early modernists about developments in the field. Each seminar will be held fortnightly and be based around the preparation of a text that everyone has read. Seminar participants (including staff) will be expected to make one short introductory presentation on the text as the basis for in-depth discussion about the text itself, and the issues raised by it. Texts may include authors such as Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Natalie Zemon Davis, and Michel Foucault, E P Thompson, and Keith Thomas covering a wide range of the social, cultural, political and economic history of Europe and the wider world. Students will be supplied with copies of all of the readings as well as a supplementary reading list on key themes and debates in early modern history. The aim is not only to introduce students to a broad range of theoretical perspectives and approaches to early modern history, but also to assist in developing skills of close reading, discussion, presentation, listening, and the application of different theoretical perspectives. Students will also acquire a broad knowledge of historiographical approaches to early modern history, although it is not a module in historiography. The module will be led by Drs Warde and Evangelisti, but other staff members in the School and postgraduate students may also contribute to help engage students in a wider current of debate surrounding key themes in early modern history. Assessment will be by means of a 4-5,000-word essay at the end of the Spring Semester, which may take the form of: (a) a detailed analysis of one core text; (b) a discussion of one or more of the core texts within the wider historiography of the field; or (c) a comparative discussion of the approaches embodied in different texts.

HIS-M03Y

30

THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This module analyses the emergence, development and end of the Cold War. In doing so it examines political, ideological and legal aspects of conflict between and within states, issues of sovereignty, nuclear strategy and arms control, as well as peacekeeping, disarmament and non-violent resistance. Alongside political developments, themes such as everyday life, culture, sport and the existence of alternatives during the Cold War era will also be considered.

HIS-5024B

20

THE CONQUEST OF AMERICA

This module examines the discovery of the New World, and the Spanish and Portuguese conquest of America. Through the letters of Columbus, Cortes, and other written and visual narratives of the time, we shall study the impact of the Conquest on both European and native American societies, and the long-lasting effects that the circulation of people, goods, and ideas, had on Western cultures.

HIS-6038Y

60

THE CRUSADES

This module will consider the history of the Crusades and the Crusader States from 1095 to 1291, covering a broad range of themes, religious , military and social, and taking into consideration the relations between Christians and Moslems in the Holy Land. Particular attention will be paid to primary sources, which are abundant and available in English translation.

HIS-6001A

30

THE DEVIL'S BROOD: THE ANGEVIN KINGS OF ENGLAND (1154-1225)

This Special Subject focuses on the lives and actions of three of the most charismatic kings of the English. It begins by an examination of the creator of the Angevin dynasty, Henry fitz Empress, who, by the time he was twenty-one, dominated more than half of France as well as being king of the English. On the continent, Henry was a successful military commander; in England, he was the creator of the English common law and a centralising administration. And it was of him that St Bernard is supposed to have declared 'he came from the Devil and he will go to the Devil'. His son and successor, Richard the Lionheart, was one of the greatest knights of his age as well as being a crusader and successful military commander who seemingly placed the Angevin Empire on a solid footing. After these two great makers of empire, the third ruler of the dynasty almost brought the whole edifice crashing down. King John lost the continental lands, and by the time of his death his lands were being ravaged by a foreign prince, his barons were in revolt having gathered themselves behind a document we know as Magna Carta, and his dynasty on the verge of extinction. This Special Subject has at its core the story of the creation and near destruction of this dynasty; and seeks further to examine the politics, culture, and society of the lands over which the Angevin dynasty held sway. This was an age of profound intellectual, religious, and political change, and this Special Subject will be set within this wider context. Students will be expected to become conversant with the primary sources in translation and to be aware of current historiographical debates. Teaching will be through student-centred seminars. Students will be expected to do weekly gobbets both as a way of becoming familiar with the sources and as preparation for the examination.

HIS-6027Y

60

THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR: WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS

This module explores female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. It will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes. It will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5029B

20

THE ENGLISH CIVIL WARS

This module looks at the causes, course and significance at what, in terms of relative population loss was probably the single most devastating conflict in English history; the civil wars of 1642-6, 1648 and 1651. In those years, families, villages and towns were divided by political allegiances and military mobilisation. Hundreds of thousands died, not just from warfare, but also from the spread of infectious disease, siege and the disruption of food supplies. In the rest of the British Isles, suffering was even more profound. The execution of the King in 1649, intended to bring an end to the wars, divided the country ever more deeply. By the late 1640s, radical social groups had emerged who questioned the very basis of authority in Early Modern Society, and made arguments for democracy and for the redistribution of land and power. Karl Marx thought that English revolution marked the beginnings of capitalism. Was he right? Focussing on ordinary men and women as well as upon important generals, politicians and monarchs, this module examines the following issues: the causes of the civil war; the reign of Charles I; the start of the warfare in Ireland and Scotland; the outbreak of the English Civil war; the course of the war; popular allegiances - why did ordinary people fight?; the Levellers, Diggers and Ranters; the crisis of 1647-9; the trial and execution of Charles I; gender, women and revolution; the experience of warfare; print and popular political gossip; the failure of the English Republic and the Restoration of Charles II. Particular use will be made of the primary source extracts and web resources.

HIS-5028B

20

THE ENGLISH IN AMERICA 1607-1692

This module explores the colonization of America by seventeenth-century English people. The memory of the Mayflower Pilgrims has obscured the fact that the first three generations remained English, unaware of the political and cultural distinctiveness to come. We will therefore be concerned with 'the repatriation of early American history'. We shall examine settlers' lives from the foundation of Jamestown in 1607, through the creation of Massachusetts in the 1630s, to the wars and rebellions of 1670-90. Not confined to New England, this module looks at a range of colonial experiences from Maine to the Caribbean, especially the mentalities of people moving between old and new worlds.

HIS-6033Y

60

THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1066 TO 1600: BUILT AND SEMI-NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS

This module will examine the development of the English countryside from late Saxon times into the eighteenth century. Topics covered will include woods and wood-pastures, enclosure, walls and hedges, the archaeology of churches and vernacular houses. There will be a substantial practical component to the module, involving the analysis of buildings, hedges and woods and other semi-natural environments.

HIS-5003B

20

THE FIRST WORLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This reading-intensive module explores the impact of the First World War on European and non-European states, societies, and cultures. It aims to broaden and deepen the students' knowledge by introducing some of the lesser known aspects of the conflict, such as the campaigns on the Eastern front, in Africa, or the Middle East. Students will investigate the role and perception of colonial troops in the European theatre of war and examine the war efforts of such countries as Italy, Serbia, the Ottoman Empire, and Australia. Further topics to be discussed include alliance politics and the role of neutral states, psychological effects of 'industrialised slaughter', atrocities against non-combatant civilians, captivity and occupation, state propaganda and the spiritual mobilisation of intellectuals, as well as processes of social change with regard to home and family life, ethnicity and class. The module will draw on a wide range of primary sources, including poems, paintings, and film. In their coursework, students will have the opportunity to study more specific issues, such as naval and aerial warfare, British military strategy, civil-military relations in democratic and autocratic states, medical innovations, the war experiences of children, or questions of memory and commemoration.

HIS-6051B

30

THE GREAT POWERS AND THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN

This module will look at the Eastern Mediterranean as a centre of Great Power rivalry through a series of case studies, stretching from the late eighteenth to the later twentieth century. It will consider such issues as the region’s impact on wider international politics and the impact on the region of Great Powers’ involvement in its affairs. In doing so, the module will examine key aspects of diplomacy, economic rivalries, the role of sea power, the origins and conduct of wars, and attempts at conflict resolution. Extensive use will be made of primary sources.

HIS-6054A

30

THE HISTORY OF NORWICH

This module will focus on the development of towns and cities in England from the Norman Conquest until the present day. We will use Norwich as our main case study, but will also draw on other comparative examples around England, such as London, York, Exeter or Leeds, to place Norwich within its wider context. This module will combine social, political and economic history with a detailed consideration of the built environment of the city; key buildings, open spaces and street patterns. There will be regular field trips into Norwich to explore historic buildings, collections and landscapes.

HIS-5040A

20

THE HOLOCAUST IN HISTORY

In the last twenty years there has been a sustained and remarkable growth of historical and public interest in the 'Holocaust'. The proliferation of academic work on all aspects of the history of the Holocaust, accompanied more recently by a burgeoning scholarship on genocide in general, has been matched by an enormous output of 'private' and 'public' history, from memoirs and recollections by 'survivors' to films and documentaries, websites of all kinds and the official commemoration of the Holocaust in museums, exhibitions and days of remembrance. The Holocaust has thus been transformed from a specialised branch field of historical enquiry into a contemporary cultural phenomenon. This module encourages you to reflect critically on this phenomenon by setting the history of the Holocaust into its wider context. This will involve study of: the history of the persecution of the Jews since the Middle Ages; the changing nature of antisemitism in Europe over the centuries; the emergence of a racial-political antisemitism at the end of the 19th century; the impact of the First World War on attitudes to minorities and on the propensity for more violent assertions of nationhood; Nazi practices of isolation, Aryanisation, deportation and ghettoisation; the German war of racial annihilation in the East and the implementation of the 'Final Solution'; the experience, motivations and psychology of the 'ordinary' perpetrator; the testimony of those who survived the Holocaust; the relationship of the Holocaust to other genocides; the challenges of representing and teaching the Holocaust. The module will therefore enable you to reflect more widely on what history is, how we do it, and why we do it; on the methods one can use, the questions one can ask, the variety of sources one can tackle and why history matters.

HIS-4005B

20

THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION - THE MAKING OF MODERN BRITAIN 1500-1700

In the two hundred years following 1700, the British economy and population entered a sustained and unprecedented phase of growth. The economic, demographic, social and cultural changes that ensued were so far reaching, that by 1850, commentators were agreed that an 'industrial revolution' had taken place. This module seeks to illuminate the many facets of this transformation, and to explore the extensive historiography surrounding them. This module introduces students both to the economic processes which underpinned industrialisation, and to many ways in which Britons of all social levels ranks experienced and thought about their changing world.

HIS-6025A

30

THE MAKING OF MODERN BRITAIN, 1851-1951

This core module will enable you to examine a tumultuous period in which Britain was transformed, both at home and in its worldwide role. In the mid-nineteenth century it had become the global hegemon, buoyed by industrial revolution and drawing on British power overseas. By the late nineteenth century, it was already being challenged; two cataclysmic world wars left its power draining away. Or did it? Alternating between Britain within its borders and its role beyond them, this module will allow you to explore a range of topics, questions and approaches to illuminate the period. The module is team-taught by a group of historians who represent one of the largest concentrations of expertise in this period in a British university, with specialisms including foreign and imperial policy, economic and social history, gender history and a range of other interests. They will draw upon primary material from their own research as the basis for seminar discussion, while the topics of your written work will be defined by you.

HIS-M31Y

60

THE MAKING OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1450 TO 1950

This Special Subject deals with the development of the English landscape from c.1450 to 1950. We will focus on agricultural change in the period up to 1870, before moving on to consider the landscape and architecture of the English country house and landed estates. We will discuss developments in architectural design, spatial planning and the changing appearance of parks and gardens during this period, as well as discussing the social and political ideologies that underpin these developments. We will also consider the development of the rural landscape in the period after 1870; the decline of the great estates, the effects of the agricultural depression and the impact of war and suburbanisation. Finally, we will discuss changing attitudes towards the conservation and preservation of the countryside. There will be a number of field trips during the year.

HIS-6026Y

60

THE NORMAN CONQUEST

In the first semester, we shall examine the Old English and Norman states before 1066. In the second semester the module will focus on the Conquest and the colonisation of the Kingdom of England. Particular attention will be given to the processes by which England was brought under Norman rule, both in the ecclesiastical and secular spheres. The module will be taught through original sources in translation.

HIS-6037Y

60

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

This module will examine the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Saxon period. We will examine the field archaeology of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, discuss in some detail the landscapes of Roman Britain, and assess the nature of the Roman/Saxon transition. We will then investigate the development of territorial organisation, field systems and settlement patterns during the Saxon and Medieval periods. The module provides an introduction to archaeological theory and methods, as well as giving a broad overview of the development of society, economy and environment in the period up to c.1300.

HIS-5002A

20

THE PAPACY, CHRISTIANITY AND THE STATE, 1050-1300

In these centuries the pope became the most influential figure in Europe. He could depose emperors, mobilise vast armies to fight on crusade, and intervene in disputes in far-away realms. This module explores the origins of papal power and its impact on emerging nations in the west.

HIS-5048A

20

THE RISE AND FALL OF BRITISH POWER

This module examines Britain's expansion and decline as a great power, from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the 1950s. It considers the foundations of British power, the emergence of rivals, Britain's relationship with the European powers and the USA, and the impact of two World Wars and Cold War. It investigates the reasons for Britain's changing fortunes, as it moved from guarding the balance of power to losing its empire.

HIS-5011A

20

THE THIRD REICH

This module studies the history of the Third Reich from an international and comparative perspective through the extensive use of primary sources. It examines the origins and the rise of National Socialism, the seizure and consolidation of power, the nature and political structure of the dictatorship, and the transformation of German society under Nazi rule, but there is a particular focus on foreign policy and the impact of the regime's policies on Europe and the world. Aspects covered include Nazi Germany's relationship with other autocracies and right-wing forces in Europe, German geopolitical thought and the role of the Foreign Office, the formation and administration of the Nazi empire, issues of collaboration and resistance in occupied territories, combat motivation and war crimes of ordinary soldiers, the importance of non-German perpetrators of the Holocaust, the German home front and the effects of Allied aerial bombings, the various plans for a post-war Europe, and the problem of ethnic cleansing both before and after 1945.

HIS-6028Y

60

TOOLS AND SKILLS IN ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to introduce a range of tools and frameworks used by researchers, government agencies, businesses and NGOs to inform and develop their environmental management strategies in a sustainable development context. Students will gain familiarity with the most important available approaches and an understanding of the key assumptions and ideas in environment-development research, monitoring and management systems. The module is taught through workshops and practical sessions, lectures and field or study visits within Norfolk. There is an emphasis on putting concepts into practice and understanding how environmental assessments guide management actions. Both individual and team projects will be important. Tools and frameworks covered may include environmental and social impact assessments, survey techniques for land, water or biodiversity, GIS and modelling of social-ecological systems, sustainable livelihoods analysis and integrated conservation and development.

DEV-M064

20

TRANSLATION IN CONTEXT

This module explores the issues fundamental to translation as process and product in practical contexts, examines theories of equivalence and textual structure in different language-cultures, and applies theory to specialised practice (e.g. commercial, legal, technical, political).

PPL-MA14

20

TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND

This module seeks to identify patterns of continuity and change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with a view to defining the early modern period in practice. Through an examination of both political and constitutional history from the top down, and social and cultural history from the bottom up, it seeks to understand the period dynamically, in terms of new and often troubled relationships which were formed between governors and governed. Topics include: Tudor monarchy, the Protestant Reformation, the social order, popular religion and literacy, riot and rebellion, the Stuart state, the civil wars, crime and the law, women and gender.

HIS-5010A

20

TUDOR REBELLIONS

This module looks at the nature of rebellions, riot and popular politics in Tudor England. The early part of the module proceeds in a chronological format; and after that, we analyse rebellion in more thematic terms, individual sessions look at: late medieval rebellion; early Tudor rebellion; The Pilgrimage of Grace of 1536; the 1549 rebellions Kett's rebellion, popular rebellion in the 1580s and 1590os; gender and ritual; seditious speech; popular culture; Shakespeare, drama and popular protest; food and enclosure rioting. A lot of use is made of extracts of primary material . After we have studied Kett's Rebellion of 1549, there will be a fieldtrip to examine key sites in Norwich associated with those events. This may possibly end in one of the oldest pubs in Britain; the Adam and Eve.

HIS-6018B

30

TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN, 1914 TO THE PRESENT

This module examines the themes of conflict and consensus in Britain from the Great War to the present day, both through the study of political life and also by assessing the impact of economic, social and cultural change. There are opportunities to re-evaluate issues such as the impact of war on society, "landmark" General Elections such as those of 1945 and 1979, the nature and durability of consensus politics in the 1950s, or Britain's role in the contemporary world.

HIS-5023A

20

TWENTIETH-CENTURY SPORT HISTORY

This module explores key themes and topics in the history of twentieth century sport, from the founding of the modern Olympic Games in Athens in 1896 to the impact which the collapse of socialism had upon sport at the end of the century. Sport's interaction with empire, nationalism, fascism , socialism and capitalism will be considered, demonstrating that the political history and international relations of the century are deeply entwined with sport. A range of examples are examined, from Franco's Spain to the superpower competition of the Cold War. As an aspect of social history, issues of gender, race and disability are inseparable from this topic, as are the harnessing and exploitation of sport as a means of war or reconciliation at various periods throughout the century.

HIS-6006B

30

TYRANNY AND REVOLUTION: THE AGE OF RICHARD II

This module explores the 'Age of Richard II' (1377-99) as revealed in an exceptionally-rich corpus of primary sources. Richard's was a tumultuous reign. To many contemporaries it seemed as if the world was turning upside down as those who traditionally wielded power in English society - the king, the church and the aristocracy - faced unprecedented challenges to their authority. Through weekly seminar discussions, members of the class will learn to assess the significance of the reign based on a close reading of selected texts. Two sources in particular will provide the documentary spine of the course: the 'Parliament Rolls of medieval England' (recently re-edited in translation and freely available online) and the great chronicle of Thomas Walsingham, a monk of St Albans and perhaps England's foremost chronicler of the period. We will also explore a range of other records and narratives as well as the verse of some of England's most famous medieval poets, many of whom (notably Geoffrey Chaucer) were closely connected to the court of Richard II. The module falls into two parts. Part 1 investigates the political developments from the dying days of Edward III through the Peasant's revolt (1381) to Richard II's final years of 'tyranny' (1397-9). Part two adopts a thematic approach. Topics here include parliament, political society, heresy, the Hundred Years War, chivalry and courtliness. We conclude by examining the revolution of 1399, which resulted in Richard's deposition and death.

HIS-6021A

30

UNDERSTANDING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This module provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the analysis and understanding of issues of environmental change, and of the relationships between environment and development. Students will have a critical understanding of social constructions of cause and effect relationships in environment and development issues, including a critical understanding of scientific assessments. They will be able to link these understandings to topics encountered in other courses, and to develop their own perspectives on environment and development issues. In particular they should understand the somewhat different perspectives in 'less developed countries' on environment and development issues. The course consists of weekly workshops and seminar sessions, which include videos and discussions oriented around core issues and readings. Assessment is based on coursework and written examination.

DEV-M051

20

UTOPIAS AND DYSTOPIAS

"As one form of government must be allowed more perfect than another....why may we not enquire what is the most perfect of all?...This subject is surely the most worthy of curiosity of any that the wit of man can possibly devise." David Hume "A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at..." Oscar Wilde Utopian visions, ridiculed in past ages as impossible dreams, such as votes for women and universal healthcare provision, have often eventually proved prophetic, informing highly-valued societal institutions in later epochs. Yet utopian thinking can also have dangers particularly where experiments seeking to realise elevated political goals become justifications for totalitarianism and persecution. Both before and since the appearance of Thomas Moore's tale of the fantastic customers of an imaginary island called Utopia (1516), writers have imagined better worlds that their followers have sought to make real. This course seeks to understand different perspectives on the utopian tradition, examining various examples in some of its multiple forms - novels, films, folklore, experimental communities and political blueprints. Using lectures, trips, workshops and discussions, 'utopian' solutions to problems such as eliminating crime, gender inequalities, environmental destruction, and political/societal conflict will be analysed. As well as 'positive' visions the course also focuses on dystopian works such as Brave New World and 1984 and considers the significance of anti-utopian thought for political understanding.

PPL-2002S

20

VICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN BRITAIN

The module will cover the main themes in British history between 1848 and the eve of the First World War. Starting with the Great Exhibition of 1851, it will examine themes such as religion and the impact of Darwin; the emergence of 'democracy' and political parties in the age of Gladstone and Disraeli; the critics of Victorian and Edwardian society; the Irish question and the domestic impact of Empire; the rise of labour and the 'crises' of Liberalism and Conservatism; the monarchy under Queen Victoria and Edward VII; the women's suffrage movement; the decline of the aristocracy and the nature of Edwardian patriotism as Britain faced the prospect of war.

HIS-5052B

20

VICTORIAN UNDERWORLDS

This module introduces students to the darker side of life in Victorian Britain. Though this was undoubtedly a period of economic prosperity, not everyone shared in the gains. In this module we shall look at those who, for reasons of poverty or 'deviance' were confined to the margins. Topics will include the poor, the criminal and insane, prostitution, drink, child-workers, the workhouse, the London Irish, homosexuality and the Oscar Wilde case. By looking at the margins and the misfits, we will seek to gain a deeper understanding of British society in the nineteenth century.

HIS-6012B

30

VISUAL(ISING) HISTORY

The importance of visual and material sources as historical evidence, as witnesses to history, has long been recognised by historians. Relics, buildings, maps, paintings, photographs, and films are all visual and material sources from which historians can elicit meaning. Paintings, photographs, films, in particular, promise to give us unique access to the ideological, physical and emotional content of a specific historic moment. They are text to be analysed. But visual evidence also challenges us to consider where we as historians draw the line between the mediated and unmediated 'truth' of the past. History is never static. It is always an interpretation of the past that changes. The module will introduce students to the analysis and interpretation of a wide range of visual and material evidence. Furthermore, students will examine the manifold ways in which audiovisual historical representation in form of documentaries and feature films shape and reshape our collective memory and understanding of the past from the medieval to the contemporary. The seminars at UEA will be accompanied by film screenings, sessions held in conjunction with CinemaPlus (Media Education Partnership for Norfolk) at Cinema City, seminars at the East Anglian Film Archive and a field trip to the permanent Holocaust exhibition at the Imperial War Museum, London. THIS MODULE IS FOR STUDENTS ON THE 'FILM and HISTORY' COURSE ONLY

HIS-4007B

20

WARS, HUMANITARIAN CRISES AND AID

This module will provide an overview of complex emergencies across the globe (conflicts, natural disasters), their causes, their impacts on human security and the multiple challenges they pose to the aid community. It will combine approaches 'from below' (drivers of political violence and state failures) with global perspectives on security, the politicisation of aid and the ethical debates surrounding humanitarian intervention.

DEV-3C29

20

WARS, HUMANITARIAN CRISES AND AID

This module will provide an overview of complex emergencies across the globe (conflicts, natural disasters), their causes, their impacts on human security and the multiple challenges they pose to the aid community. It will combine approaches 'from below' (drivers of political violence and state failures) with global perspectives on security, the politicisation of aid and the ethical debates surrounding humanitarian intervention.

DEV-6003A

20

WATER SECURITY FOR DEVELOPMENT - THEORY AND CONCEPTS

The aim of 'Water Security Theory and Concepts' is to investigate the theory and conceptual frameworks that underpin research and policy work on 'water security'. The module explores the background to rising concerns regarding the protection and use of water, and outlines key issues and interests relevant to its current treatment in research and in practice. It examines the differences between water security and water resources security, and moreover, investigates the connections between water security with food, climate or energy security, and international, state and individual concerns regarding military security.

DEV-M101

20

WATER SECURITY FOR DEVELOPMENT - TOOLS AND POLICY

The aim of 'Water Security Tools and Policy' is to investigate and provide a working familiarity with established and cutting-edge analytical, decision-making, and development tools (such as water footprinting or climate impacts assessment) for effective water security policy. It will utilise case study material, physical models, computer exercises and material brought or sourced by students to audit the water security of a system of interest (e.g. city, region, country, irrigation scheme). The students will record and assess the factors that affect water security such as laws and legal frameworks; water supply and demand volumes; institutions for managing water; climate change science and models; climate risks and adaptation; and future projections regarding societal change. Actions to address security will be discussed and formulated.

DEV-M102

20

WE ARE NOT AMUSED: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF QUEEN VICTORIA

This special subject focuses on the life and times of Britain's longest serving monarch, Queen Victoria. The module starts by exploring Queen Victoria's public and private life. It will examine in detail her political and diplomatic influence, and her experiences as a wife and mother. Drawing on a wide and expansive range of primary sources, including Queen Victoria's own journals and letters, we will seek to piece together the personality and ideology of the woman who ruled Britain for 63 years. Using Queen Victoria's reign as a backdrop, the module will also consider a number of the key political, social and cultural changes Britain witnessed in the nineteenth century. Seminar topics will include: Queenship; Constitutional Monarch; Imperialism; Religion; Womanhood; Patriotism; and Republicanism. The module will conclude by examining the perceptions of Queen Victoria and her reign in the twentieth and twenty-first century.

HIS-6070Y

60

WEALTH AND WELFARE IN EDWARDIAN BRITAIN

This module will provide a detailed investigation of Edwardian Britain, a period associated with both lavish lifestyles of the wealthy but also a new concern with the condition of the poor. Themes will include the debate on the physical deterioration of the British race, following the Boer war; the impact of social investigators such as Charles Booth; Conservative, Liberal and Labour approaches to social policies and the emergence of a 'welfare state'; the costs and benefits of the British empire; the 'Indian Summer' of the aristocracy and the land question; monarchy and welfare; Edwardian town planning and architecture.

HIS-6067B

30

WELFARE AND EVALUATION IN DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of Impact Evaluation. For that purpose, the first part intends to address the theory of welfare, with particular reference to poverty, inequality and multi-dimensional ill-being. The second part of the module intends to provide an introduction the theories and practices of evidence based policy making, and the third part to cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis.

DEV-M097

20

WITCHCRAFT, MAGIC AND BELIEF IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the history of early modern Europe through the history of witchcraft, witch-beliefs, and especially witchcraft prosecutions after 1500. Through learned demonology and folk traditions, we explore the development of the idea of the witch, and see how during the turbulent era of the Reformation this thinking translated into legal trials and, occasionally some savage witch-panics. We look in detail at subjects such as gender, fear and anxiety, state building, and scepticism, ranging across early modern Britain, continental Europe and colonial America.

HIS-4004B

20

WORKING IN THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT

This module will provide students with the opportunity to undertake a work placement with an employer working in the historic environment sector. A number of placements based on specific projects will be arranged with host organisations, and students will choose their placement from these options. Every student will be expected to attend an informal interview with their host organisation prior to starting their placement. Alternatively, a student may arrange their own work placement but this must be approved in advance by the module organisers. Past placements have been hosted by the National Trust, Norfolk Historic Environment Service, Suffolk County Council and the Peak District National Park Authority. Placements must be undertaken between June and December, and will be followed up by a series of practical seminars in the spring semester. A list of provisional placements and projects will be available in Spring 2012. Please note that enrolment on this module will only be confirmed after a short interview with the module organisers.

HIS-6013Y

30

YEAR ABROAD

A compulsory year abroad for students taking one or more honours language(s). Satisfactory completion of the year abroad, as defined by the School Board, is necessary for registration in the following year.

PPL-2X0Y

120

YOUTH IN MODERN EUROPE

The importance of youth as a driving force for social change has been recognised by many historians. Young people were often at the forefront wherever revolutions took place, wars were fought and tensions in society erupted. However, the historical study of youth is still a relatively young discipline. The module uses 'youth' as a prism to study key themes in 20th century European history, such as the experience of war, life under dictatorship and the longue duree of social change. We shall examine the diverse experience of youth in Western and Eastern Europe during war and peace times, including the Communist and Nazi state-sponsored youth systems, and also the way in which generational experience and conflicts became underlying forces for social and political change. The module employs a strong comparative approach and countries studied include France, Britain, the Soviet Union, West and East Germany, Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia. The seminars will be accompanied by several film screenings.

HIS-6014B

30

Students should complete at least 80 credits in each of their two major subjects by the end of Year 3. At least 60 credits of the modules taken in Year 2 should be at Level 2.

Option A Study (100 credits)

Students will select 100 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ALGEBRA

(a) Group theory: basic concepts and examples. Cosets, Lagrange's theorem. Normal subgroups and quotient groups. First isomorphism theorem. Quotient spaces in linear algebra. (b) Rings, elementary properties and examples of commutative rings. Ideals, quotient rings. Polynomial rings and construction of finite fields. Unique Factorization in rings. Applications in linear algebra.

MTHA5003Y

20

ANALYSIS

(a) Continuity, differentiation, uniform convergence, power series and how they represent functions for both real and complex variables. (b) Topology of the complex plane, holomorphic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy and Laurent theorems, residue calculus.

MTHA5001Y

20

APPLIED STATISTICS A

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE AND BUSINESS STATISTICS STUDENTS SHOULD TAKE CMPC2S12, APPLIED STATISTICS B, DUE TO THE DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS OF THEIR COURSE. This is a module designed to give students the opportunity to apply statistical methods in realistic situations. While no advanced knowledge of probability and statistics is required, we expect students to have some background in probability and statistics before taking this module. The aim is to introduce students to R statistical language and to cover Regression, Analysis of Variance and Survival analysis. Other topics from a list including: Extremes and quartiles, Bootstrap methods and their application, Sample surveys, Simulations, Subjective statistics, Forecasting and Clustering methods, may be offered to cover the interests of those in the class.

CMP-5017B

20

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

An analysis of how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. There is an important practical component to this module that includes laboratory work and three field visits. The first piece of course work involves statistical analysis of class data. The module can be taken alongside hydrology or geochemical modules and also fits well with other ecology modules. Pre-requisite requirements: An A-level in a biological subject, a biologically biased access course or any 1st year ecology module in ENV or BIO. Students must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data.

ENV-5001A

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

This module studies the organization of both the system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of both hardware and software components is emphasized throughout, and the central concepts of the module are reinforced by practical work in the laboratory.

CMP-5013A

20

ASTROPHYSICS

This 20-credit module gives an overview of astrophysics through lectures and workshops. Assessment will involve some coursework and a coursetest. The module assumes previous study of either A level physics or an equivalent course. Topics covered will include some history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology.

NAT-4001A

20

ASTROPHYSICS WITH ADVANCED TOPICS

This 20 credit module gives an overview of astrophysics through lectures and workshops. Assessment will involve some coursework and a coursetest. The module assumes previous study of either A level physics or an equivalent course. Topics covered will include some history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology. Some of these topics will be taken to a more advanced level. The more advanced topics will include workshop examples and coursetest questions at level 2 standard.

NAT-5001A

20

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE

Atmospheric chemistry and global change are in the news: stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, greenhouse gases, and global scale air pollution are seen as some of the most significant environmental problems of our age. Chemical composition and transformations underlie these issues, and drive many important atmospheric processes. This module covers the fundamental chemical principles and underlying physical processes in the atmosphere from the stratosphere to the surface, and considers the role of chemistry in current issues of atmospheric chemical change through a series of lectures, problem solving classes, seminars, experimental and computing labs as well as a field trip to UEA's own atmospheric observatory in Weybourne/North Norfolk. A solid background in chemistry is recommended (e.g., AS-level or equivalent). ENV-6020B is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here.

ENV-5015A

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

In this module, the interrelationships between animal behaviour, ecology and evolution will be explored. Students will examine how behaviour has evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles will provide the theoretical framework, within which the module will seek to explain the ultimate function of animal behaviours. Concepts and examples will be developed through the lecture series, exploring behaviours in the context of altruism, optimality, foraging, and particularly reproduction, the key currency of evolutionary success. In parallel with the lectures, students will design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, collecting original data to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE BIO-4004B This module builds on the principles of biochemistry and cell biology taught in BIO-4004B. Selected topics in intermediary metabolism are covered in greater depth, especially in relation to aspects relevant to disease and ageing in mammalian physiology. In turn this leads to a discussion of the roles of specific proteins and their involvement in cellular reactions, protein synthesis and breakdown, bioenergetics and signalling processes. The recent contributions of structural biology to cellular biochemistry are acknowledged in both the lecture series and associated practical classes, whilst ATP utilization is illustrated by consideration of the active transport of molecules across membranes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

BIO-5002A

20

BIODIVERSITY

An introduction to the evolution of the major groups of microorganisms, plants and animals. The module considers structural, physiological and life-cycle characteristics of these organisms. It charts the development of life on land and interprets evolutionary responses to changing environments. Students on this module are strongly advised to also take BIO-4008Y or BIO-4010Y.

BIO-4001A

20

BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO ANY STUDENT THAT SATISFIES THE PRE-REQUISITE REQUIREMENTS. Alternative pre-requisites are BIO-4001A and BIO-4002B, or BIO-4003A and BIO-4004B. This module will provide an opportunity to discuss various aspects of biology in society. Students will be able to critically analyse the way biological sciences issues are represented in popular literature and the media and an idea of the current 'hot topics' in biological ethics. Specific topics to be covered will involve aspects of contemporary biological science that have important ethical considerations for society, such as GM crops, DNA databases, designer babies, stem cell research etc. Being able to understand the difference between scientific fact and scientific fiction is not always straightforward. What was once viewed as science fiction has sometimes become a scientific fact or scientific reality as our scientific knowledge and technology has increased exponentially. Conversely, science fiction can sometimes be portrayed inaccurately as scientific fact. Students will research relevant scientific literature and discover the degree of scientific accuracy represented within the genre of science fiction.

BIO-5012Y

20

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE BIO-4007Y OR CHE-4201Y. This module explores the structural, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of biological systems and the methodologies used to define them. Using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry, these topics will be discussed within three major themes: 1) Binding, activation and transfer in biological systems, 2) Enzyme catalysis, and 3) Macromolecular size, shape and structure determination. The concluding lectures will explore protein disorder, folding and structure to illustrate how biophysicists integrate concepts and methods from each of these themes when addressing a specific research topic.

CHE-5601Y

20

BONDING, STRUCTURE and PERIODICITY

The first six lectures of this module are integrated with CHE-4101Y. The first half of the module brings together fundamental concepts associated with the bonding and structure of inorganic and organic materials, including atomic structure, electron configurations, ionic and covalent bonding, and intermolecular forces. The second half of the module builds on the bonding and structural ideas to explain the structure of the Periodic Table. Trends, comparisons and contrasts will be drawn between the elements of the s/p block metals, non-metals and the transition metals.

CHE-4301Y

20

CALCULUS AND MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS

This module is incompatible with MTHB4006Y and ENV-4002Y. (a) Complex numbers. (b) Differentiation and integration. Taylor and MacLaurin series. Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (c) First order, second order constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reduction of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (d) Vectors. (e) Line integrals. Multiple integrals, including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (f) Euler type and general linear ODEs. Phase plane, direction fields, limit cycles, period doubling and chaos. (g) Divergence, gradient and curl of a vector field. Scalar potential and path independence of line integral. Divergence and Stokes' theorems.

MTHA4005Y

40

CALCULUS AND PROBABILITY

THIS MODULE IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH MTHA4001Y and ENV-4002Y. (a) Complex numbers. (b) Differentiation and integration. Taylor and MacLaurin series. Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (c) First order, second order constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reductions of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (d) Vectors. (e) Line integrals. Multiple integrals including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (f) Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory. Students must have A-level Mathematics Grade 'B' or above or equivalent.

MTHB4006Y

40

CELL BIOLOGY

This module explores the molecular organisation of cells and the regulation of dynamic cellular changes, with some emphasis on medical cell biology. Dynamic properties of cell membranes, cell signalling, growth factor function and aspects of cancer biology and immunology. Regulation of the internal cell environment (nuclear organisation and information flow, cell growth, division and motility), the relationship of the cell to its extracellular matrix and the determination of cell phenotype. Aspects of cell death, the ageing process, developmental biology, mechanisms of tissue renewal and repair. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B or BIO-5009A.

BIO-5005B

20

CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Covers the major processes that set the chemical composition of the oceans, the distribution of nutrient, and carbon, the distribution of life in the oceans and the interaction of the oceans and atmosphere. Elements of physical oceanography and ocean circulation, of geochemistry, marine biology and global change science are covered.

ENV-5019A

20

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (A)

This 20 credit module comprises laboratory and related IT experiments/ modules relating to aspects of the core chemistry lecture modules.

CHE-4001Y

20

CHEMISTRY OF CARBON-BASED COMPOUNDS

Compatible with CHE-4301Y, or a free-standing module with workload greater than average for 20 credits. The first six lectures of this module are integrated with CHE-4301Y. The module then introduces bonding and hybridisation, conjugation and aromaticity, mechanism and functional groups; principles which are elucidated in topics: electrophilic substitution and addition, organometallic nucleophiles, polar multiple bonds, enolate, Claisen, and Mannich reactions, the Strecker synthesis, stereochemistry (enantiomers and diastereoisomers), SN1/SN2 and E1/E2 reactions, and epoxidation / 1,2-addition to alkenes. Finally, organic synthesis (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, ethers, amines, ketones, carboxylic acids) and the identification of organic structures by spectroscopy are described.

CHE-4101Y

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills in the scientific and social scientific analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from natural sciences, science studies, and economics and politics. It first offers a historical perspective on how global climate change developed as a scientific and social object of inquiry. The course then gives grounding in climate and society relations, economic principles and the political science and governance of climate hazards, energy and greenhouse gas emissions. This module replaces ENV-2A69.

ENV-5003A

20

COMBINATORICS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5016B

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

The module will introduce the main concepts in community, ecosystem and macro-ecology - patterns and processes related to species richness; diversity; stability; succession; primary and secondary productivity and energy flows. We will then examine how these concepts aid our understanding of the functioning of terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

BIO-5014B

20

DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

This is a compulsory module for all computing students and provides the necessary foundation in data and storage structures for all computing streams. In addition, the module emphasises systematic algorithm design and discusses algorithm analysis. At the same time, the module provides the student with the opportunity to reinforce and enhance the programming skills developed at level 1.

CMP-5014Y

20

DATABASE SYSTEMS

This module introduces most aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. The module is based on the relational model. The students will explore the tools and methods for database design and manipulation as well as the programming of database applications. Part of the practical experience gained will be acquired using a modern relational database management system. Students will also gain programming experience using SQL, and using the Java JDBC interface. A high level language programming module is a pre-requisite.

CMP-5005B

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLIED METHODS

(a) Ordinary Differential Equations: solution by reduction of order; variation of parameters for inhomogeneous problems; series solution and the method of Frobenius. Legendre's and Bessel's equations: Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions and their recurrence relations; Fourier series; Partial differential equations (PDEs): heat equation, wave equation, Laplace's equation; solution by separation of variables. (b) Method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; the characteristic equations; Fourier transform and its use in solving linear PDEs; (c) Dynamical Systems: equilibrium points and their stability; the phase plane; theory and applications.

MTHA5004Y

20

EARTH SCIENCE LAB SKILLS

Before taking this module you must take or be enrolled on at least 40 credits from this list - ENV-5004B, ENVK5005B, ENV-5018A, ENV-5021A, ENV-5011A, ENV-5012A,ENV-5013B, ENV-5015A Good observational and descriptive skills lie at the heart of many areas of Environmental Science. This module is designed to develop those and is particularly suitable for students with interests in Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic Earth science skills of use for projects in this area. The module will include: observing, describing and recording the characteristics of geological materials (hand specimen and under microscope); measuring and representing 3d data, and reading geological maps. The module also includes a portion of project work where the students will practice these skills and also skills of time management and other study skills. This module will be taken by Environmental Earth Science undergraduate students who for any reason cannot take the Earth Science Skills module (that includes a week-long field course), and by students taking related degrees with a large component of Earth Science (e.g. some students taking degrees in Geophysics, Environmental Sciences, Nat Sci). Assessment is coursework only and will include a laboratory test and a practical report. The practical project will build on the skills learned in the first part of the module. CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-5030B

ENV-5029B

20

EARTH SCIENCE SKILLS

Before taking this module you must take or be enrolled on at least 40 credits from this list - ENV-5004B, ENVK5005B, ENV-5018A, ENV-5021A, ENV-5011A, ENV-5012A,ENV-5013B, ENV-5015A Good observational and descriptive skills lie at the heart of many areas of Environmental Science. This module is designed to develop those and is particularly suitable for students with interests in Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic Earth science skills of use for projects in this area. The module will include: observing, describing and recording the characteristics of geological materials (in the field, in hand specimen and under microscope); measuring and representing 3d data, reading geological maps and basic geological mapping. This module is strongly recommended for Environmental Earth Science students and it is required for the Geological Society accreditation pathway. It will also be of use to students taking related degrees with a large component of Earth science (e.g. some students taking degrees in Geophysics, Environmental Sciences, Nat Sci). Assessment is coursework only and will include a laboratory test and work undertaken during fieldwork. The field work builds on the skills learned in the lab-based first part of the module. CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-5029B

ENV-5030B

20

EARTH SYSTEM GEOCHEMISTRY

Examines how the earth system and its geochemical cycling operate on both global and micro scales. Emphasis is on natural cycles, starting with big themes such as crust-hydrosphere-biosphere interaction and its effects on the long term C cycle, including regulation of carbon dioxide. Elements, isotopes, organic molecules (and their isotopic compositions) are used as tracers of processes and events in earth history. Organic matter, its chemistry and its relationship to both the C and S cycles is explored. Dating of geological materials with radiometric methods is introduced. The course explores themes in both deep time (millions of years) and more recent glacial-interglacial cycles (thousands to hundreds of thousands of years). This module replaces ENV-2A80.

ENV-5013B

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND COMBINATORICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory.

MTHF5012Y

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5013Y

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechanics the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators.

MTHF5011A

20

ENERGETICS AND SPECTROSCOPY

This module considers the way in which chemical systems, in the form of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, are described in terms of their energetics and dynamics. Topics include simple phase equilibria, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics in a chemical context, electrochemical cells, and acid base and redox equilibria. The module also includes a series of lectures on the principles of spectroscopy applied to chemical systems, i.e. how light interacts with matter.

CHE-4201Y

20

ENERGY AND PEOPLE

This module will introduce students to a range of social science perspectives on the inter-relationships between energy and people. The module begins by tracing the history and development of energy intensive societies and everyday lives as a means of understanding how energy has emerged as a key sustainability problem. The second part of the module then introduces some theories of social and technical change and uses these to critically analyse a range of people-based solutions to energy problems that are currently being tried and tested around the world. This module is assessed by formative assessment and coursework which includes a group presentation and an individual written essay.

ENV-5033B

20

ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS AND MECHANICS

RESERVED FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS. This module utilises the mathematical concepts from the Maths for Scientists module in an engineering context, before complementing the material with practical mechanics to solve real-world problems. Over the first semester students are introduced to the vocational necessity of estimation in the absence of accurate data through a team-based competition , as well as the practical geometry and numerical methods which can be used when analytical techniques fail. This is supplemented by practical exercises in graphical presentation and data analysis which will contribute to the coursework element of the module. Teaching then concentrates on mechanics in the second semester, encompassing Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics and conservation laws before a final exam.

ENG-4004Y

20

ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES AND LAWS

To take this module you will need the equivalent of Maths A level grade B. This 20-credit module consolidates several distinct topics - all of which will be essential during the later stages of the course. During the first semester, students investigate how to harness the properties of modern materials within an engineering context through lab work whilst developing an appreciation of structural behaviour through examination of solid and lattice structures. Semester 2 focuses on thermodynamics, integrating the study of heat transfer, fluid flow and hydraulics into coursework and a final exam worth 70% of the module. The formative assessment is a laboratory report to prepare students for the summative report.

ENG-4002Y

20

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

This module is designed to teach skills necessary for the acquisition of good quality chemical data in environmental systems, and in the interpretation of this data. The module will focus on the collection of environmental samples for chemical analysis, methods of chemical analysis and the analytical and mathematical techniques used for data quality control. There will be a large component of practical work. This module will be particularly relevant for those wishing to do a chemistry-related project later in their degree.

ENV-5027B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the theoretical and empirical development of contemporary environmental politics. It is structured to analyse these issues from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on dynamic examples of environmental politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module encourages and supports student-led learning by enabling students to develop their own theoretical interpretations of real world examples of politics. These are explored in seminar presentations and in an extended (4000 word) case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics/social sciences.

ENV-5002B

20

EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY

This module introduces the main ideas in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology and ecology. It concentrates on outlining concepts as well as describing examples. Specific topics to be covered include the genetical basis of evolution by natural selection, systematics and phylogeny, the adaptive interpretation of animal sexual and social behaviour, ecological processes and population biology.

BIO-4002B

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

A basic understanding of genetics and evolution is required. The aim of this module is to provide a thorough background and understanding of the concepts and principles of evolutionary biology. This will involve you combining approaches and information from several disciplines - viz: molecular and population genetics, adaptive and population ecology, biogeography and systematics. This module will enable you to understand, analyse and evaluate the basic principles of evolutionary biology and be able to synthesise the various components into an overall appreciation of how evolution works, Weekly workshops will be held in which you will be able to explore in depth a number of the conceptual issues in evolutionary biology through discussions, modelling and problem solving. This module is assessed by coursework and an exam.

BIO-5008B

20

FIELD ECOLOGY

Students explore the ecology of moorlands, bogs, sand dunes, rocky shores, estuaries and woodlands. Students should develop skills in identifying plants and animals using scientific keys, carrying out quantitative surveys and statistically analysing their data. Strong emphasis is placed on student-lead project work. The bulk of the teaching takes place on a two week field course in Western Ireland, that runs immediately before the start of the Autumn Semester.

BIO-5013A

20

FLUID DYNAMICS - THEORY AND COMPUTATION

(a) Hydrostatics, compressibility. Kinematics: velocity, particle path, streamlines. Continuity, incompressibility, streamtubes. Dynamics: Material derivative, Euler's equations, vorticity and irrotational flows. Velocity potential and streamfunction. Bernoulli's equation for unsteady flow. Circulation: Kelvin's Theorem, Helmholtz's theorems. Basic water waves. (b) Computational methods for fluid dynamics; Euler's method and Runge-Kutta methods and their use for computing particle paths and streamlines in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows; numerical computation and flow visualisation using Matlab; convergence, consistency and stability of numerical integration methods for ODEs. (c) Theory of Irrotational and Incompressible Flows: velocity potential, Laplace's Equation, sources and vortices, complex potential. Force on a body and the Blasius theorem. Method of images and conformal mappings.

MTHA5002Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - ANALYSIS

Module Summary Aim: Following on from CHE-4701Y, where the emphasis was on collection of evidence, this module introduces more in-depth forensic chemistry, looking at the way evidence gathered at a crime scene may be analysed in the laboratory. The objective is to familiarise students with critical thinking and evaluation of evidence, build a model for case assessment and interpretation and thus increase understanding of the role of the Expert Witness in court. It is open to students on FF41 and other chemistry courses where CHE-5701Y is a core or optional module. Content: The module will deepen the knowledge of forensic statistics and cover basic detection and recovery techniques for body fluids; fingerprint development and recovery; advanced microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy and their application to fibres, paint and other particulates; the use of elemental analysis in forensic science; and questioned document examination including counterfeiting. Teaching and Learning Methods: Lectures, practicals and mentor groups (PBL- problem based learning). The students will be divided into groups and each group will then investigate a hypothetical criminal case using simulated evidence material. As part of this students will write an expert witness statement which will be presented and defended in a mock court. Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to apply acquired skills, work as part of a team and to produce an expert witness report, using literature and experimental data to inform their analysis. The "mock court" will be aimed at developing the individual's presentation skills in a challenging environment. Students should gain further confidence in the use of statistics to analyse data, test hypotheses and draw conclusions from them.

CHE-5701Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - COLLECTION AND COMPARISON

History of forensic science, forensic collection and recovery methods, anti-contamination precautions, microscopy, glass refractive index, introduction to pattern recognition including footwear; introduction to Drugs analysis; forensic statistics and QA chain of custody issues. The second half Introduces the student to the fundamentals of DNA and biotechnology essential for an understanding of forensics technologies. Topics covered include: nucleic acid/chromosome structure, replication, mutation and repair; concepts of genetic inheritance; DNA manipulation and visualisation; DNA sequencing; DNA fingerprinting. Teaching and learning methods: lectures, practicals and mentor groups (pbl). Presentation of a case study.

CHE-4701Y

20

FOUNDATIONS FOR CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Through a series of lectures, tutorials and practicals, this year-long module aims to provide the basic knowledge of general chemistry (including aspects of inorganic and organic), physico-chemistry and biochemistry essential for the understanding of system-related mechanisms in physiology and a wider context of life sciences.

BIO-4009Y

20

FUNDAMENTALS OF CELL BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

The module aims to provide an introduction to the basic aspects of biochemistry and cell biology. Basic biochemical processes will be explored, as well as catalysis and enzymology. There will be an introduction to the nature of the living cell, its membranes, and organelles, how cells communicate and also how they are visualised.

BIO-4004B

20

FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

The module aims to provide an introduction to the basic aspects of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics. The module explores the fundamental properties of macromolecules, DNA structure, synthesis and replication, as well as the structure and function of proteins. The genetic code, genes and their expression will be covered as well as the rapidly expanding area of molecular biology. The module also covers chromosome structure, mechanisms of heredity, medical genetics and cytogenetics.

BIO-4003A

20

FURTHER COMPUTING SYSTEMS

The module is designed to provide students with: an overview of the organisational, cultural and technical context of current software development, experience of developing software in a web context, and an introduction to the principal architectures of contemporary computing systems.

CMP-5016B

20

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

This module is for those students who have passed CMP-4004Y or equivalent, in their first year and would like to study further theory that is a pre-requisite for several other 2nd and 3rd level modules in CMP. For such students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. 3D Vectors and complex numbers are also studied.

CMP-5006A

20

GENETICS

This module will describe the basis of heredity, describing both the functions and the structures of genes and whole genomes. Examples will be taken from bacterial, animal and plant systems and will be considered from both functional and molecular points of view. The influence of the "new genetics" on medicine, agriculture and society will also be covered. Practical work will involve a molecular genetic analysis of a symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium and a molecular mapping exercise of traits that confer disease resistance in plants. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B (Molecular Biology).

BIO-5009A

20

GEODYNAMICS: EARTH'S ENGINE

Processes in the Earth's interior have exerted a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system through geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the heat distribution of the Earth's interior, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes and distribution of seismic energy. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

This module will provide an introduction and orientation regarding geographical thought, methods and concepts. The module will begin with an overview of the history and development of the discipline. This will lead on to discussion of core concepts such as space, place, scale, systems, landscape, nature, globalization and risk. Students will also be introduced to the methods and different types of evidence used by geographers (e.g. texts, archival data, maps, imagery and field observations). Students will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the diversity of approaches to the generation of geographical knowledge and understanding and the capacity to communicate geographical ideas, principles, and theories effectively and fluently by written, oral and visual means. This module is assessed by a combination of both formative and summative oral presentations and written work.

ENV-4010Y

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

The module will review the different techniques that can be used to create and edit data in a GIS, as well as existing digital databases from which map data can be extracted and downloaded. Particular attention will be given to Ordnance Survey mapping for the UK, but other international resources will also be discussed. The module will emphasise issues of data quality (e.g. error and uncertainty) as they apply to spatial data and introduce the use of scripting tools (e.g. ArcGIS ModelBuilder) as a way of documenting and efficiently repeating more complex analysis procedures. The module is assessed by a combination of both formative and summative coursework. The module will build upon material introduced in the Year 1 Research and Field Skills module. It will be particularly relevant for final year projects (ENV-3A91) but also be valuable for some students on Year in Industry programmes (ENV-2Y5Y) and a range of other modules which use spatial data (e.g. Catchment Water Resources, ENV-3A60).

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES

What are the most pressing environmental challenges facing the world today? How do we understand these problems through cutting-edge environmental science research? What are the possibilities for building sustainable solutions to address them in policy and society? In this module you will tackle these questions by taking an interdisciplinary approach to consider challenges relating to climate change, biodiversity, water resources, natural hazards, and technological risks. In doing so you will gain an insight into environmental science research 'in action' and develop essential academic study skills needed to explore these issues. Please note that ENV students, BIO Ecology students, NAT SCI students and SCI Foundation Year students can request a space on this module. Please note that NAT SCI and SCI Foundation Year students wishing to select this module must obtain a signature from their advisor confirming they will meet the marking requirements (which will be to mark the independent essay component of the module assessments). The advisor must confirm agreement in writing to env_ug.hub@uea.ac.uk).

ENV-4001A

20

GRAPHICS 1

Graphics 1 provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics for all computing students. It aims to provide a strong foundation for students wishing to study graphics, focusing on 2D graphics, algorithms and interaction. The module requires a good background in programming. OpenGL is utilised as the graphics API with examples provided in the lectures and supported in the laboratory classes. Other topics covered include transformations, texture mapping, collision detection, graphics hardware, fonts, algorithms for line drawing, polygon filling, clipping and colour.

CMP-5010B

20

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

The module aims to provide an understanding of the physiology of several organ systems found within the human body. Learning Outcomes: On completion of the module it is expected the student will have gained an understanding of: - Information transmission within the body by the nervous system and the integrative processes within the spinal cord and brain. - Reaction to the environment through reception of external stimuli by sensory receptors, such as the eye. - Effector systems, including muscle contraction and its control. - Respiration, gas transport, blood circulation and heart function. - Kidney function in excretion and in water and mineral ion homeostasis - The digestive system and nutrition, including patterns of health and sickness. - Endocrine regulation and integration, including reproduction cycles in the female. The module is backed up with a comprehensive programme of practical work involving human physiological experiments.

BIO-5004A

20

HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY

An introduction to hydrology and hydrogeology: the basic equations describing fluid movement in groundwater systems will be derived and applied. The main techniques to investigate groundwater flow systems are highlighted. Water circulation within river catchments is discussed by means of the catchment water balance. The physical process represented by each component of the water balance will be covered as well as the current methods of quantifying these fluxes of water within the catchment . Principles of catchment modelling are outlined. The unit requires at least A-level equivalent mathematical skills. For example, an ability to work with common mathematical operations is essential such as the simple rearrangement of equations, and the ability to convert between varying units of length and volume. Basic differential equations will be presented for the description of groundwater flow.

ENV-5021A

20

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The central theme of the module is the chemistry of the p and d block elements: structure and bonding, coordination complexes and the organometallic chemistry of main group and transition metals. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5301B

20

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

PRE-REQUISITES: CHE-4001Y, CHE-4601Y or other suitable laboratory experience from CHE/ENV/BIO This module begins with underpinning aspects of instrumental analysis such as analytical programme design and basic analyticl statistics and then progresses through instrumentation, sample preparation and techniques related to the key analytical techniques of atomic and molecular spectroscopy, electroanalytical chemistry and chromatography. The module includes laboratory sessions where students can work with common instruments and practice key skills in calibration, sample preparation and measurement and data analysis. As well as the formal assessment, there will also be formative assessment through interactive quiz-style revision workshops.

CHE-5501Y

20

LINEAR ALGEBRA

Linear equations and matrices (including geometric aspects); Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Diagonalization. Vector spaces and linear transformations.

MTHA4002Y

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module is assessed by formative assessment and coursework. This module replaces ENV-2A84.

ENV-5022B

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module, which includes a one week field course that will take place at Easter, is assessed by formative assessment, coursework and fieldwork projects. This module replaces ENV-2A82K.

ENVK5023B

20

MARINE SCIENCES FIELDCOURSE

This 11 day 20 credit field course studies physical, chemical and biological coastal oceanographic processes and will probably take place in June. The course includes lectures and practical experience of oceanographic instrumentation, chartwork, numerical analysis of data using matlab and a poster presentation at ENV. The second week of the course will take place in Oban, using the oceanographic research ships and laboratory facilities of the Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory. The course has no pre- or co-requisites and is open to 1st and 2nd year students. However it will be of particular relevance to those studying ENV-5016A Ocean Circulation, ENV-5019A Chemical Oceanography and ENV-6005A Biological Oceanography and Marine Ecology. PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU CAN ONLY ENROL ONTO THIS MODULE VIA AN APPLICATION FORM FROM THE SCHOOL AND NOT VIA THE STANDARD MODULE ENROLMENT PROCESS. ALSO THE MODULE RUNS IN THE SUMMER PRIOR TO THE START OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR.

ENVK5020A

20

MATERIALS AND POLYMER CHEMISTRY

An introduction to the basic principles of polymer synthesis is presented, together with a discussion of their physical properties. Speciality polymers are discussed. Materials chemistry is developed further with the introduction of inorganic structures and the concept of ferroelectric properties together with powder x-ray diffraction as applied to cubic crystals. Ion conductivity and basic band theory are also discussed. Semiconductivity is introduced and related to the band description of these materials. The experiments in this laboratory class involve the synthesis and evaluation of inorganic and organic materials.

CHE-5350Y

20

MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING, MECHANICS AND MODELLING

STUDENTS FROM YEARS 2 OUTSIDE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS CAN TAKE THIS MODULE IF THEY HAVE TAKEN BEFORE MTHA4005Y OR MTHB4006Y OR ENV-4002Y AND THEY HAVE NOT TAKEN MTHB4007B. The first part of the module is about how to approach mathematical problems (both pure and applied) and write mathematics. It aims to promote accurate writing, reading and thinking about mathematics, and to improve students' confidence and abilities to tackle unfamiliar problems. The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. This module is reserved for students registered in the School of Mathematics or registered on the Natural Sciences programme.

MTHA4004Y

20

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

It introduces the essential concepts of mathematical statistics deriving the necessary distribution theory as required. In consequence in addition to ideas of sampling and central limit theorem, it will cover estimation methods and hypothesis-testing. Some Bayesian ideas will be also introduced.

CMP-5034A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING A

The module is designed to provide students who have not studied A level Mathematics with sufficient understanding of basic algebra to give them confidence to embark on the study of computing fundamentals. Various topics in discrete and continuous mathematics which are fundamental to Computer Science will be introduced.

CMP-4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING B

This module is designed for students with an A level (or equivalent) in Mathematics. For these students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. In addition 3D Vectors are introduced and complex numbers are studied.

CMP-4005Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4003Y. This module in designed for students with A2 or AS level mathematics. It covers differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers, and statistical methods. In addition to the theoretical background, there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for students across the Faculty of Science, that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The modules that follow at Level 2 are Mathematics for Scientists B and C. This module is assessed by formative assessments and coursework / examination.

ENV-4002Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module is the third in a series of four mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers vector calculus (used in the study of vector fields in subjects such as fluid dynamics and electromagnetism), time series and spectral analysis (a highly adaptable and useful mathematical technique in many science fields, including data analysis), and fluid dynamics (which has applications to the circulation of the atmosphere, ocean, interior of the Earth, chemical engineering, and biology). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab). This module replaces ENV-2A61.

ENV-5006A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the third in a series of three mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods (with applications to many multi-variable problems in science), second order partial differential equations (which govern the behaviour of diffusive, advective and wave-like systems), and solid mechanics (applications in geophysics, glaciology, and material science). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. This module replaces ENV-2A62.

ENV-5007B

20

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

This module is concerned with the broad aspects of medicinal chemistry, from the discovery of lead compounds and the recognition of biological activity, to the production of pharmaceuticals. Biological activity is discussed in terms of metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and structure-activity relationships (SAR). Drug targets and their exploitation in drug therapies are also discussed. The medicinal chemistry content of this module contains aspects of both chemistry and biology. Therefore the course is started with a series of 'introductory' seminars relevant to BIO and CHEM students on underlying principles.

CHE-5150Y

20

METEOROLOGY I

This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processes in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of Radiation Balance, Cloud Physics, Thermodynamics and Dynamics and the assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential.

ENV-5008A

20

METEOROLOGY II

This module will build upon the material covered in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting.

ENV-5009B

20

METEOROLOGY II WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting. The module also includes a week long Easter vacation residential fieldcourse, based in the Lake District, focusing on micrometeorology, microclimate and synoptic processes.

ENVK5010B

20

MICROBIOLOGY

A broad module covering all aspects of the biology of microorganisms, providing key knowledge for specialist Level 3 modules. Detailed description is given about the cell biology of bacteria, fungi and protists together with microbial physiology, genetics and environmental and applied microbiology. The biology of disease-causing microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) and prions is also covered. Practical work provides hands-on experience of important microbiological techniques, and expands on concepts introduced in lectures. The module should appeal to biology students across a wide range of disciplines and interests.

BIO-5015B

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The module provides an introduction to the principles of molecular biology. The programme starts with the structure of DNA, genes and genomes, followed by the characterisation of the information flow including the mechanisms and regulation of transcription and translation. Protein folding, modification and turnover are described together with reactions concerning DNA (replication, recombination and repair). The module ends with a detailed description of methods used for the experimental manipulation of genetic material (gene isolation, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction, molecular cloning, transgenic plants and animals and global functional genomics). Practical work includes an introduction to molecular biology techniques together with computer assisted DNA and protein sequence analysis.

BIO-5003B

20

MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND ENERGY LEVELS

Quantum mechanics, one of the key scientific ideas of the 20th century, has had a wide impact in chemistry. In the first part of the module you will be introduced to the language and methods of quantum mechanics. In the second part, the close relation between spectroscopic measurements of small molecules and quantum theory will be discussed. Further methods of spectroscopy will then be introduced, beginning with the most widely used of all techniques in structure determination, NMR spectroscopy. This will be followed by a discussion of molecular electronic spectra which are widely used in chemical analysis.

CHE-5202Y

20

NUMERICAL SKILLS FOR SCIENTISTS

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4002Y This module is about revising GCSE level mathematics and learning how to apply these skills to solving applied environmental science problems. It is designed for students who have not studied mathematics at AS or equivalent level and will cover essential mathematics (algebra, indices and scientific notation, manipulating and solving equations, units, accuracy and errors, reading graphs, logs, exponentials, trigonometrical functions, concept of rate of change, and an introduction to calculus). It will also cover the most important statistical methods that you will need during the rest of your career in ENV, including ways of summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. An important part of this module is applying these numerical skills to environmental problems. This module is assessed by formative assessment and coursetest / examination.

ENV-4003Y

20

OCEAN CIRCULATION

This module gives you an understanding of the physical processes occurring in the basin-scale ocean environment. We will introduce and discuss large scale global ocean circulation, including gyres, boundary currents and the overturning circulation. Major themes include the interaction between ocean and atmosphere, and the forces which drive ocean circulation. You should be familiar with partial differentiation, integration, handling equations and using calculators. ENV-5017B is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here.

ENV-5016A

20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The topics covered in the module include an introduction to organic synthesis, carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, aromaticity, heterocyclic chemistry, and stereochemistry and mechanism. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5101A

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM I

IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE ENV-4008B THIS MODULE CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4008B. This course is divided into two parts and introduces students to the Earth as a chemical and physical system. This version of the course is designed for students with essentially no chemistry background knowledge and therefore includes a component of basic chemistry. Students with A level, a good AS level or whole year of foundation level chemistry should take ENV-4008B Physical and Chemical Processes in the Earth System II. The first part of the course focuses upon basic chemical principles and then to environmental chemistry particularly chemical processes in the atmosphere, freshwater, seawater, soils, sediments and rocks. The natural system and its anthropogenic perturbation will be considered. The module includes laboratory practicals. The second part of the course focuses on the physical processes occurring in the atmosphere and the oceans with an emphasis on the links between the two. This will include the following topics: radiation from the Sun and its effect on the Earth, structure and circulation of the atmosphere, ocean currents and the thermohaline circulation, the hydrostatic equation and pressure forces, stability, air masses and fronts, the Coriolis force and geostrophy, the effect of the wind on the ocean, and the hydrological cycle. Background reading will help on concepts such as pressure, density, buoyancy and the Coriolis force. Students should be prepared for the use of basic mathematics and physics in this course. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4007B

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM II

IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE ENV-4007B THIS MODULE CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4007B. This course is divided into two parts and introduces students to the Earth as a chemical and physical system. This course is designed for students with chemistry background knowledge. Students without A level, a good AS level or a whole year of foundation level chemistry should take ENV-4007B Physical and Chemical Processes in the Earth System I. The first part of the course focuses upon environmental chemistry particularly chemical processes in the atmosphere, freshwater, seawater, soils, sediments and rocks. The natural system and its anthropogenic perturbation will be considered. The module includes laboratory practicals. The second part of the course focuses on the physical processes occurring in the atmosphere and the oceans with an emphasis on the links between the two. This will include the following topics: radiation from the Sun and its effect on the Earth, structure and circulation of the atmosphere, ocean currents and the thermohaline circulation, the hydrostatic equation and pressure forces, stability, air masses and fronts, the Coriolis force and geostrophy, the effect of the wind on the ocean, and the hydrological cycle. Background reading will help on concepts such as pressure, density, buoyancy and the Coriolis force. Students should be prepared for the use of basic mathematics and physics in this course. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4008B

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

The module covers a number of areas of modern physical chemistry which are essential to a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include the second Law of thermodynamics and entropy, the thermodynamics of solutions, chemical kinetics, surface chemistry and catalysis. The module includes laboratory work. Due to the laboratory-based content on this module students must have completed at least one level 4 module containing laboratory work.

CHE-5201Y

20

PHYSICS OF MUSIC

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music. We begin by developing some of the essential physics of wave motion and defining sound measurement terms. This equips us to analyse the physics of stringed instruments (bowed, plucked and struck), woodwind instruments, brass instruments, percussion instruments and the acoustics of singing. We also look at tuning systems, human hearing, and the physics of sound in rooms. Lab-classes include an introduction to MATLAB to enable you to record and analyse the sound of your own instrument, which constitutes the coursework. A-level standard of mathematics is preferred, but anyone without this level who is prepared to work a little to enhance their understanding of mathematics in one or two areas will be able to take this module.

NAT-4003A

20

PHYSICS OF MUSIC

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music. We begin by developing some of the essential physics of wave motion and defining sound measurement terms. This equips us to analyse the physics of stringed instruments (bowed, plucked and struck), woodwind instruments, brass instruments, percussion instruments and the acoustics of singing. We also look at tuning systems, human hearing, and the physics of sound in rooms. Lab-classes include an introduction to MATLAB to enable you to record and analyse the sound of your own instrument, which constitutes the coursework. A-level standard of mathematics is preferred, but anyone without this level who is prepared to work a little to enhance their understanding of mathematics in one or two areas will be able to take this module.

NAT-5003A

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

This module aims to provide an appreciation of modern plant biology with an emphasis on development, signalling and response to the environment. It consists of practical classes and lectures. It encompasses molecular genetics, molecular, biochemical and physiological perspectives, and affords an understanding of aspects of plant and plant cell function including photosynthesis and the mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic environments.

BIO-5006A

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

In this module we will look closely at how interactions between individuals determine the structure and functioning of populations. We will consider both antagonistic interactions between members of different trophic levels, their evolution and their possible co-evolution. Consideration of competition will lead into the population consequences of both within trophic level and between trophic level interactions. We will then move on to consider spatially explicit population processes including meta population dynamics and possible ecological responses to climate change including range shifts. Students taking this module must have a background in basic statistics and have taken any Level 1 ecology module in ENV or BIO, or equivalent.

ENV-5014A

20

PRACTICAL and QUANTITATIVE SKILLS IN CHEMISTRY

Laboratory-based module exposing the students to experimental and computational aspects of different areas of chemistry: organic, inorganic, analytical and physical. The experiments and simulations exemplify the content of lectures in other modules and provide practical chemistry skills. Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts will be introduced. Statistics as applied to experimental chemistry. Error propagation in physical chemistry. Physical principles through applied mathematics.

CHE-4601Y

20

PROBABILITY AND MECHANICS

STUDENTS FROM YEARS 2 OUTSIDE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS CAN TAKE THIS MODULE IF THEY HAVE TAKEN BEFORE MTHA4005Y OR MTHB4006Y OR ENV-4002Y AND THEY HAVE NOT TAKEN MTHA4001Y NOR MTHA4004Y. (a) Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability. (b) The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. Students must have A-level Mathematics Grade 'B' or above or equivalent.

MTHB4007B

20

PROGRAMMING 1

The purpose of the module is to give the student a solid grounding in the essential features of object-oriented computer programming using the Java programming language. The module is designed to meet the needs of a student who has not previously studied programming, although it is recognised that many will in fact have done so in some measure. On completing this module the student should be capable of developing, testing and documenting simple but non-trivial object-oriented programs, and of using the appropriate technical terminology in discussing these programs.

CMP-4008Y

20

PROGRAMMING FOR APPLICATIONS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of second level CMP modules, including CMPC2M11 and CMPC2G04.

CMP-4009B

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of other second level CMP modules.

CMP-5020B

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS AND COMBINATORICS

Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory.

MTHF5014Y

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5015Y

20

QUANTUM THEORY AND SYMMETRY

This course covers the foundation and basics of quantum theory and symmetry, starting with features of the quantum world and including elements of quantum chemistry, group theory, computer-based methods for calculating molecular wavefunctions, quantum information, and the quantum nature of light. The subject matter paves the way for applications to a variety of chemical and physical systems - in particular, processes and properties involving the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

CHE-5250Y

20

REAL ANALYSIS

Sequences and series, tests for convergence. Limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, Fundamental Theorem.

MTHA4003Y

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

This year long module introduces a range of transferable skills, tools and data resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences. The aim is to provide a broad understanding of the research process by undertaking different activities that involve i) formulating research questions, ii) collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, iii) collating and evaluating information and iv) presenting results. The module will include the use of digital mapping technologies (such as geographical information systems) and a 6 day residential field course held during the Easter break. This module is assessed by formative assessments and coursework.

ENV-4004Y

20

RESEARCH SKILLS FOR SOCIAL SCIENTISTS

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. It covers research design, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and presentation of results. It is recommended for any student intending to carry out a social science-based research project.

ENV-5031B

20

SEDIMENTOLOGY

Sedimentary rocks contain many of the world's natural resources and cover much of the Earth's surface, record the Earth's history, and contain the fossil record. Sedimentology includes the study of modern sediments such as sand, mud and carbonates and the processes that result in their deposition. Understanding of modern processes is used to interpret ancient sedimentary rocks and sedimentary structures. The module will cover sedimentary fluid dynamics; modern sediments from deserts, rivers, the coast and deep ocean, the differences between siliciclastic and carbonate rocks; biological influence on sedimentary processes and stratigraphy (the study of the physical and temporal relationships between rock layers). This module replaces ENV-2A85.

ENV-5011A

20

SETS, NUMBERS AND PROBABILITY

Basic set-theoretic notation, functions. Proof by induction, arithmetic, rationals and irrationals, the Euclidean algorithm. Styles of proof. Elementary set theory. Modular arithmetic, equivalence relations. Countability. Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory.

MTHA4001Y

20

SHELF SEA DYNAMICS AND COASTAL PROCESSES

This module will explore the physical processes that occur in shelf seas and coastal regions, building on what you learnt in Ocean Circulation. Topics will include: Wave and tide generation; Tidal amplification in shallow water; Timeseries data analysis; Seasonal stratification and phytoplankton blooms; Turbulent mixing, nutrient fluxes, and deep chlorophyll maxima; Tidal mixing fronts; Internal waves, internal tides, and their role in global ocean mixing; Shelf edge processes; Climate variability in shelf seas; Optics and remote sensing of primary productivity; Estuarine circulation and sediment transport; Wave and tidal energy capture devices. ENV-2A39 (Ocean Circulation) is the only pre-requisite for this module, although we strongly recommend that you also gain fieldwork experience by taking the 20-credit biennial Marine Sciences fieldcourse.

ENV-5017B

20

SKILLS FOR CHEMISTS

This module will include: Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; Statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; Error propagation in physical chemistry and Physical principles through applied mathematics. Aims of this module are to bring students' understanding of mathematical ideas and physics to a sufficient level to study core physical chemistry in later stages

CHE-4050Y

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 1

Software Engineering is one of the most essential skills for work in the software development industry. Students will gain an understanding of the issues involved in designing and creating software systems from an industry perspective. They will be taught state of the art in phased software development methodology, with a special focus on the activities required to go from initial class model design to actual running software systems. These activities are complemented with an introduction into software project management and development facilitation.

CMP-5012B

20

SOIL PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

This module will combine lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork to provide students with an appreciation of the soil environment and the processes that occurs within it. The module will progress through: basic soil components/properties; soil identification and classification; soil as a habitat; soil organisms; soil functions; the agricultural environment; soil-organism-agrochemical interaction; soil contamination; soil and climate change.

ENV-5012A

20

SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometres. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-4002Y Mathematics for Scientists A or equivalent).

ENV-5004B

20

SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS WITH FIELDCOURSE

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometres. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. The fieldcourse provides "hands-on" experience of the various techniques and applications, adding on valuable practical skills. This module is highly valued by employers in industry; guest industrial lecturers will cover the current 'state-of-the-art' applications in real world situations. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-1A61 Mathematics for Scientists I, ENV-1A62 Mathematics for Scientists II or equivalent).

ENVK5005B

20

SOUND AND IMAGE 1

There has recently been a huge growth in the power and sophistication of tools that enable us to manipulate images and sounds on computers. In this module, we study how audio and video signals generated by cameras and microphones are captured and represented on a computer, and then how they can be analysed in order to extract information or to compress them for efficient storage and transmission. Our study includes the coverage of topics such as sampling, time, spatial and frequency domains, filtering, Fourier representation etc., and also practical work on processing sounds and images to e.g. modify speech sounds or filter an image. Assignments in this module are done using the MATLAB programming language, which is introduced progressively: some familiarity with programming concepts is preferred, although these can be developed during the module.

CMP-5033A

20

SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY

This module comprises a broadly-based series of lectures on science, particularly chemistry, coupled with written activities based upon them. The twin objectives are to provide a contextual backdrop to the more focussed studies in other concurrent and subsequent modules, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information. The topics in semester 1 will be used as a basis for assignments and exercises which will help to develop students' team-working and presentational skills.

CHE-4090Y

20

SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIETY AND BIODIVERSITY

Striking a balance between societal development, economic growth and environmental protection has proven difficult and controversial. The terms 'sustainability' and 'sustainable development' have been coined to enable development achieving these three areas. Yet the contested and ambiguous nature of these concepts has hampered their implementation. The first half of this module considers sustainability in theory and practice by examining the relationships between environment and society, through the contributions of a variety of social science disciplines. The second half of this module explores sustainability from an ecological perspective, introducing a range of concepts relevant to the structure and functioning of the biosphere and topics ranging from landscape and population ecology, to behavioural, physiological, molecular, genetic and chemical ecology. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4006B

20

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

This module considers various activities associated with the development of all types of computer based information systems including project management, feasibility, investigation, analysis, logical and physical design, and the links to file design, software design, and user interface design. It makes use of a number of analysis and design tools and techniques in order to produce readable system specifications. Students are introduced to a number of development methods including structured, object oriented, soft systems, participative, iterative and rapid approaches.

CMP-5003A

20

THEORETICAL COMPUTING

This module provides an introduction to computing theory. Topics covered include an introduction to formal language theory, complexity analysis of algorithms, and formal correctness proofs. CMPC1F01 is a minimum prerequisite; students who have done this module are advised to take CMPC2F01 before taking CMPC2F02.

CMP-5007B

20

TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5017Y

40

TOPICS IN PHYSICS

The material covered will expand on some of the topics from the 'A' level syllabus, such as optics and electromagnetism. It will also cover some modern physics such as special relativity. Topics include molecular motion, the electrical properties of matter, intermolecular forces and their role in determining bulk properties of matter, and an introduction to nanoscience and nanotechnology.

CHE-4801Y

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. This module explores energy, mechanics, physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour#from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. Plate Tectonics is studied to explain Earth's physiographic features#such as mountain belts and volcanoes#and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. We also explore geological time#the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet and introduce geological materials, resources and hazards. This module is assessed by coursework and examination.

ENV-4005A

20

Option B Study

Students will select 0 credits from the following modules:

A further 20 credits may be chosen from Options Range A above, or by taking a module from other schools (such as those listed below) which will require the approval of the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

A WORLD AT WAR

This module will consider the history of the Second World War from 1939 to 1945, looking at the decisive battles that settled its outcome. It interprets 'battle' in the widest sense and it will look at 'classic' land, sea and air encounters - from the fall of France to midway, Stalingrad and D Day - and also at the other critical battles such as the battle of production, the Home Front and the technological battle, from Enigma to the atomic bomb

HIS-6003A

30

AFTERLIVES OF EMPIRE: RACE, 'DEVELOPMENT' AND POLITICAL ACTIVISM IN THE POSTCOLONIAL WORLD, 1956-PRESENT

Leading historical research is currently challenging the notion that the mechanics, expertise and ideologies of British imperialism simply ceased in the early 1960s. With decolonization, the British state's involvement in the economic and social life of newly independent states often intensified rather than weakened. This module will track the transformations and persistence of imperial forms in what was once Britain's empire. We will track the creation of Britain's Institute of Race Relations, funded by American, British and South African businesses, and its influence on understandings of the 'colour problem' in postwar Britain. We will uncover the application of colonial knowledge and economic expertise within British 'development' work in Cold War Africa. And we will look to the profound significance of the imperial legacy within political activist and community organising circles throughout this period and especially in the 1970s, in the context for instance of the African Asian refugee crises and newly formed British anti-racist groups. The module will be split into three thematic cores: (1) constructions of race and its discontents, (2) 'development' as an emergent field of academic study in the Cold War period and as a political and economic tool and (3) contestation and activism surrounding Britain's continued responsibilities/influence within postcolonial states. These themes will, of course, consistently highlight the significance of Cold War tensions and American geopolitical power. The themes will structure the teaching and provide students with a framework within which to make comparisons, think globally and across national boundaries.

HIS-6065A

30

AGE OF CHARLEMAGNE

This module explores how Frankish and Byzantine rulers in the eighth century#queens as well as kings#sought the security and salvation of their peoples though sustained investment in aggressive war and ambitious campaigns of spiritual renewal and how their power, ideals, and virtues constrasts with those of other rulers in the eighth century, from Pictland to 'Abbasid Baghdad.

HIS-6071Y

60

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

This module offers a critical introduction to understanding America's role in the world. It provides historical and political analyses of U.S. foreign relations, looking at the themes and traditions that have shaped America's increasing influence in global affairs during the twentieth century up to the present day. From the war of 1898 to the conflicts of the early twenty-first century, it examines how and why the U.S. relationship to the world has changed. Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? In discussing foreign relations, the course analyses political and diplomatic elites, but also, the role of foreign actors and private organisations, from religious groups to citizen organisations to NGOs, in defining America in the world. It also engages with important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, modernization, and the 'cultural turn' - and connects these to emerging trends in the fields of American Studies and international relations.

HIS-5053A

20

ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND, C. 500-1066

This module surveys the history of the English from their arrival in Britain in the fifth century until the end of the eleventh century and the conquest of England by the Normans. We shall cover topics such as the conversion of the English in the seventh century; the domination of England by Mercia in the eighth century; the Viking invasions and the reign of Alfred the Great; the emergence of Wessex as the dominant force in Britain in the tenth century; the conquest of England by the Danes in the eleventh century; and the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

HIS-5005A

20

APPEASEMENT AND WAR: BRITAIN AND THE DICTATORS, 1935-1945

The decade from 1935 to 1945 was one of the most tumultuous in global history. The expansionist powers of Germany, Italy and Japan were the focus of Britain's peacetime diplomacy and wartime strategy. In the years before 1939, those resurgent powers worked systematically to undermine and overturn the post-Great War peace settlement. The British National Government of Baldwin and Chamberlain struggled to deal with those threats against a backdrop of profound domestic difficulties. The policy of 'appeasement' adopted by those governments remains hugely controversial, and the subject of vigorous debate between historians. After 1939, Britain's decision to defend its guarantee to Poland plunged it into a global war, which eventually ended in victory as part of an international 'Grand Alliance', but under a very different wartime coalition led by Churchill. In the autumn semester, this module will explore the foreign policies adopted by the National Government, from Baldwin's victory in the 1935 election to the outbreak of war in September 1939. It will assess why and how these policies were adopted, the wider political and economic context within which policy was made, and the national and international consequences. In the spring semester, the module will consider Britain's wartime role in the context of grand strategy and international politics. In addition to considering topics such as Churchill's 'finest hour', we will spend some time examining the operation of the Grand Alliance and the series of wartime conferences between Britain and its allies. The decisions made in this period would have profound consequences for Britain thereafter. Throughout its course, the module will explore the rich historiography available to us, and examine its complexities. It will draw upon a wide range of primary documentation, which will provide the basis of debate and discussion.

HIS-6072Y

60

APPLIED METHODS FOR IMPACT EVALUATION

This module aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the most important methods of impact evaluation. For that purpose, it provides instruction in and hands on experiences of the main quantitative and qualitative impact evaluation methods, with an emphasis on the quantitative.

DEV-M096

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This is the first part of a beginners' course in Arabic assuming no prior knowledge of the language. The module aims to develop the ability to use Arabic effectively in everyday practical situations with speakers of Arabic both in the UK and overseas. Alternative and additional slots may be available, depending on enrolment.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (LCSS4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year LCS students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (LCSS4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year LCS students. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent)

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module LCSS4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to LCS students. This module has three contact hours per week. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent)

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4023B

20

BRITAIN AT WAR AND OTHER MODERN MYTHS

This module invites students to critically analyse popular understandings of the recent past in modern Britain. You will investigate the political uses of certain histories, shifts in meaning over time and preoccupations with the past in British politics and culture. Students will have the opportunity to examine why particular events in modern British history#such as the Second World War#have become so central to British national identity. In the first semester, we will focus on individual experiences and collective memories of the First and Second World Wars. We will look to popular poetry and public policies which worked to make sense of the horrors and sacrifices of modern warfare. You will have the opportunity to analyse a wide range of source material, including film and television, oral testimonies, diaries, state memorials and political speeches. In the second semester, we turn, firstly, to the contested memory of the British Empire, to memories of colonial violence and to the making of a 'post-imperial' Britain. Lastly, we will consider myths of a youth revolt in 1960s Britain as well as modern nostalgia for Britain's 'lost' traditional society. In the second semester, also, you will be trained in oral history techniques and have the chance to contribute to a collective oral history project on UEA and student protest in the 1960s.

HIS-6036Y

60

BRITISH INTELLIGENCE IN THE 20TH CENTURY - MYTH AND REALITY

The study of intelligence history has seen considerable growth over the last 20 years, as a result of new archival evidence and above all a growing realisation that intelligence has for long been the "missing dimension" in historical interpretation of 20th century diplomacy, defence policy and strategy and in the operational history of two world wars. A consideration of the impact of intelligence assessment, its acceptance (or rejection) and its proponents has well known areas of historical analysis, particularly in the period from the 1930s to the Cold War. The aim of this module is to examine the current historiography of this "missing dimension" and assess its impact in the interpretation of British strategic and defence policy and to some extent, in internal and imperial security as well as considering popular and fictional interpretations of the intelligence service.

HIS-6009B

30

BRITISH INTELLIGENCE IN THE 20TH CENTURY - MYTH AND REALITY

The study of intelligence history has seen considerable growth over the last 20 years, as a result of new archival evidence and above all a growing realisation that intelligence has for long been the "missing dimension" in historical interpretation of 20th century diplomacy, defence policy and strategy and in the operational history of two world wars. A consideration of the impact of intelligence assessment, its acceptance (or rejection) and its proponents has well known areas of historical analysis, particularly in the period from the 1930s to the Cold War. The aim of this module is to examine the current historiography of this "missing dimension" and assess its impact in the interpretation of British strategic and defence policy and to some extent, in internal and imperial security as well as considering popular and fictional interpretations of the intelligence service.

HIS-6010A

30

CHAMBERLAIN, CHURCHILL AND APPEASEMENT, 1935-1940

Britain's response to the aggression of the fascist powers in the inter-war period has been the subject of fierce debate for decades, and is still hotly disputed between historians. This module examines British foreign policy in the era of 'appeasement'. It will focus on the period between 1935 and 1940, analysing a range of primary source material in detail. It will explore the role of key policy-makers, their critics, and the domestic context in which policy was constructed.

HIS-6011A

30

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT I: SCIENCE, IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION

This module introduces students to the phenomenon of climate change, interconnections between climate change and development and theory and practice for adapting to climate change, in the context of developing countries. The first part of the module covers key aspects of climate change science necessary for a basic understanding of the causes of climate change, future projections of climate change and key impacts as well as methods for assessing these. The second part of the module focuses on adaptation to climate change by introducing the concepts of adaptation, vulnerability and resilience. National and sectoral policy making for adapting to climate change is then explored with reference to case studies. Finally the interconnections between disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation are explored. Seminars explore climate science and adaptation topics.

DEV-M103

20

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT II: GOVERNANCE, POLICY AND SOCIETY

This module critically examines international/national climate change governance and policy and societal impacts from and responses to climate change and climate change policy. The first half of the semester (Section A) will discuss the history and politics of the international climate change negotiations and then critically examine the way the climate regime (UNFCCC) operates. The following three lectures will look in detail at two items under negotiation with significant implications for developing countries. Finally we will discuss global carbon markets. The second half of the semester (Section B) will turn to the interface of climate change and society. It will start by discussing urban responses to climate change before critically examining geoengineering and other ethical/justice related debates before examining the role of energy demand and lifestyle in tackling climate change and ending with a session on conflict and human security implications from climate change. The seminars will be interactive and enable students to better understand the international negotiating process and ways to engage positively with climate change.

DEV-M118

20

COLD WAR IN EUROPE

This module will combine analysis of grand strategies and Cold War flashpoints with consideration of counter-culture and civilian resistance in Soviet-controlled Europe, and the circumstances which led to the peaceful end of the Cold War in 1989.

HIS-6034Y

60

COMMUNISM AND NATIONALISM IN YUGOSLAVIA

This module will look at the creation of the Communist state of Yugoslavia after the Second World War. We shall examine the course of the war and the bitter fighting between fascists, nationalists and communists which resulted in the eventual victory of the partisans led by Tito. After 1945, he and his followers built a state which survived until 1991. With the demise of Communism, Yugoslavia fragmented into new nations. In some cases this transition was largely peaceful, but the wars for independence in Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo gave rise to the bloodiest fighting in Europe for decades. We shall look at the role of individuals and ideas, including the career of key figures such as Milosevic and end by assessing at the international community's response to the crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia at the Hague Tribunal.

HIS-6032Y

60

CONCEPTUALISING SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH

This module provides students at school and faculty level with a generic introduction to social science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of social science research, research design, the nature of quantitative and qualitative research methodology, and examines the process and skills needed for social science research. The module is the core module for DEV's 3 MRes programmes: MRes International Development; MRes Development Practice and MRes Social Science Research (Faculty-wide). The module focuses on social science research in terms of design and methodology and complements other modules being offered in DEV and other schools on social science research methods and tools.

DEV-M087

20

CONFLICT GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

Thi is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA Conflict Governance and International Development.

DEV-M054

20

CONFLICT, PEACE AND SECURITY

The aim of CPS is to promote an understanding of the driving forces behind armed conflicts, including civil wars, riots, and communal conflicts, which have become a major obstacle to development. It situates these within the global political economy, particularly within the neo-liberal politics of the last few decades, as well as within concepts of post-colonial state building. Security is conceptualised broadly as not just national/international security but also as the right to security of individuals, including women and children, as well as civilian men. Gender is an important analytical lens here, used not as a proxy for women but as a vitally important component of global militarism, particularly as regards the part played by hegemonic masculinist concepts and ways in which masculinisms play out in specific conflict settings. Peace is conceptualised not just as the situation that breaks out after the signing of a peace treaty but also in relation to post-conflict levels of direct and structural violence that affect individuals and groups of citizens, including women and children at the domestic as well as other levels. Humanitarian agendas are discussed along with their effects on conflict as well as the politics of the UN, and conflicts arising out of competition over natural resources. Students who have taken this module should be able to situate the causes of conflict within the global political economy and understand how conflicts relate to the wider regional and international contexts.

DEV-M052

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

RDC aims to use recent research and practical experience in the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis of critical challenges in resource development and conservation in the developing world. Specifically, themes such as the relation between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control are examined through discussions of theory and the use of case studies, in order to develop an understanding of their natural and social science, and policy dimensions. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-3D12

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

RDC aims to use recent research and practical experience in the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis of critical challenges in resource development and conservation in the developing world. Specifically, themes such as the relation between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control are examined through discussions of theory and the use of case studies, in order to develop an understanding of their natural and social science, and policy dimensions. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-6005B

20

CONTEMPORARY WORLD DEVELOPMENT

This module is guided by the premise that theoretical perspectives about development are shaped by historical contexts and conditions that shape them. These contexts critically influence the issues and processes that are identified as the key concerns of development. They also impact upon the nature of the agency that is chosen to offer solutions to these concerns. Contemporary World Development explores how key development perspectives inform the most important issues in development today and different kinds of agency.

DEV-M002

20

CONTESTING THE PAST: REPRESENTATION AND MEMORY

Historical representation and memory is constantly constructed and reconstructed. This module examines the role of documentaries and feature films in this process, exploring the close interplay and tensions between history, memory, the past and present. Feature films, in particular, have a powerful capacity to reconstruct historical narratives and understanding. Their visual vividness provides a magical simulation of the past. Indeed, in the case of medieval and early modern history, they provide a prime media through which popular understanding of these historical times is conveyed and shaped. Moreover, documentaries and feature films alike often contaminate collective memories of contemporaries and eyewitnesses of specific events, creating further challenges to historians in their pursuit to reconstruct the past. Students will examine what role films play in the process of national memory-work in popular culture and commemoration of historical events as well as how film as a medium can help but also hinder conveying historical understanding. They will also be able to discuss the work of documentary film makers and the practical challenges and responsibilities that come with it: interviewing eyewitnesses and the perils of oral history, organising and constructing a historical narrative, tensions between documentary as an art form and as a medium to transmit knowledge.

HIS-6063A

30

DEATH IN THE MIDDLE AGES

In medieval England, death and what lay beyond it were constantly visible out of the corner of the eye. Large portions of the landscape were given over to the dead: there were barrows, haunted by the ancient pagan dead; cemeteries for the Christian dead; and lonely hermitages, whose occupants spoke with the dead. 'King Death', shown as a skeleton with spear or bow, would strike down the living at any age. And if prayers were not said for them, their ghosts would wander forth from the grave to terrify their neighbours. Vivid images of what happened to the dead were painted and carved over the archways of churches, haunting the living every Sunday and dancing before their mind's eye in their dreams. Visions of the dead were not uncommon, and sometimes they made such demands on the living that the latter spent their lives serving them. This module examines beliefs about death and the otherworld in medieval England; how medieval people prepared for death; how ghosts and the 'undead' irrupted into their world; the role of those who served the dead or acted as mediators between the dead and the living; demons, the evil dead and saints (the holy dead); and how death was represented in medieval art. There will be a trip to see tombs and wall paintings.

HIS-6052B

30

DEATH, BODY AND DISEASE: THEMES IN MEDICAL and SOCIAL HISTORY

This module focuses upon the theory and practice of medicine in the context of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century social history. Topics include healing and science; concepts of 'orthodox' and 'alternative' medicine; interpretations of epidemic disease; the sufferer's agenda; minds, brains and bodies; and changing perceptions of death. We will consider contemporary texts and key contributions to the historiographical literature. It is expected that you will have some background in level 2 medical history course modules.

HIS-6008A

30

DEATH, THE BODY AND DISEASE: FROM GALEN TO THE NHS

Documents and a wide range of visual material from contemporary sources are used to examine the theory and practice of medicine in English and European society from the early modern period to the recent past. Topics include: changing perceptions of death, disease and the body; medicine and religion; the impact of medical ideas upon literary and political thought; the emergence of a healing profession; and women as healers and patients. We also examine the changing function of institutional care; concepts of 'orthodox' and 'alternative' medicine; the dissemination of medical knowledge and the rise of questioning of scientific medicine.

HIS-6029Y

60

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-3D40

20

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-6009B

20

DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES

The objective of this module is to explore different theoretical ideas and debates about development, and place these in their historical and political contexts. We will critically assess the various ways in which development has been conceptualized, from the end of the Second World War to the present day. Topics covered will include modernisation theory; dependency theory; the role of the state; neo-liberalism and the Washington Consensus, neo-institutionalism and the post-Washington Consensus; poverty and basic needs; human development and capabilities; equity and justice; rights and empowerment; and sustainable development. A key point of the module is to show how ideas in development emerge and how they shape policies and practice in development in the present day.

DEV-M003

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

This module provides students with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. Students are expected to fund their own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The school has a database of projects to assist students with their project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (July) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). As a 20 credit module students are expected to work for a minimum of 2 months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing (750 words) about the placement;, and an essay of 2500 words related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6004A

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

No Description

DEV-3C35

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK PLACEMENT

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON THE FOLLOWING ROUTES ONLY; Media and International Develpment, Clmate Change and International Development and Environment and International Development. This module is offered as an alternative to the 40 credit dissertation module (DEV-M04X) that all MA/MSc students in DEV currently take. Whilst an academic dissertation will benefit most master's students, for others there may be more benefit to be gained from an appropriate, challenging work experience placement that is then linked to theory and reflected on critically in a report. Students will be responsible for finding a suitable placement but will be given a range of support from DEV which includes: giving the students access to the DEV internship host data base compiled over nearly a decade; advice on identifying appropriate placements; advice on CV design, fund-raising (where necessary), health and safety, ethical considerations etc.; facilitate communication between student and potential host, in some cases acting as a mediator. Whilst we cannot guarantee a placement we are confident that most students who take this module and apply themselves to identifying an internship, will be successful. If there are any students who cannot find a suitable internship then they will automatically transfer to the standard dissertation module.

DEV-M06X

40

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-3D2Y

40

DISSERTATION

Production of a short (8000-12000) dissertation on an approved topic.

DEV-M04X

40

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6007Y

40

DISSERTATION IN HISTORY

This module offers students the opportunity to submit a dissertation of 9,000 words on a topic approved by the School.

HIS-6022Y

30

DISSERTATION PREPARATION

This module consists of both generic training sessions for all students as well as course-specific exercises and training. A key requirement of the module is for students to make an oral presentation in the Spring semester, to be attended by all MA students, after which they will submit their formal dissertation proposal. The module is assessed on a pass/fail basis.

HIS-M22Y

0

EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module focuses on the geographical area covered by the Carolingian Empire - that is, the modern territorial units of France, Germany, Italy, and the Benelux countries. It begins in the late sixth century with the Merovingian dynasty and ends with the reform of the Papacy and the first crusade at the end of the 11th century.

HIS-5008A

20

ECONOMETRIC METHODS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this introductory module is to expose students to basic econometric theory and provide them with sufficient knowledge and practical skill for competent use of econometrics in empirical research. The module also enables students to understand and interpret econometric research results. By the end of the module students acquire sufficient knowledge and skill to apply multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data to a wide range of macro- and micro-economic problems of development. In addition to lectures, the module includes computer workshops on Stata (widely used econometrics software) and seminars.

DEV-M067

20

ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4003B This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in EC1. It provides a solid grounding in intermediate principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, and their application to developing countries. The first part of the module introduces the student to basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomics theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. Insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered. The second part of the module covers the main macroeconomics and issues of development. This includes long run economics with a particular focus on economic growth, and short run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. This will include recent macroeconomic phenomena such as the global economic crisis and the current debates on climate change.

DEV-5012Y

40

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND PRACTICE FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is to enable students to understand current debates on education and development and their implications for international and national education strategies. Students will critically examine education policy documents (including web-based literature), investigate policy development processes and develop the ability to locate global, national and local levels policies and practices within a range of discourses and theoretical frameworks. These processes will be investigated in relation to particular policy agendas including access and quality, educational governance, social justice and school choice, as well as areas such as education and conflict, poverty and marginalisation, gender and HIV and AIDS.

DEV-M046

20

EDWARDIAN BRITAIN

This module will examine the 'crisis of Liberal England' which has dominated modern discussion of this period. Themes will include the rise of new liberalism, the tariff reform controversy, women's suffrage, health and social welfare, the land question, national efficiency and Home Rule for Ireland.

HIS-6062A

30

ENERGY, ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

This course deals with the energy history of Europe over the past three centuries and the impact of transformations in the scale and form of energy consumption on economic growth, social and cultural life and environmental change. It will examine debates about the reality of resource limits on the economy; the causes of the Industrial Revolution and modern growth; the changing impact of energy use on the landscape; social and cultural shifts associated with energy transitions; how and why energy transitions have occurred in the past; and long-term patterns of the relationships between energy systems and environmental problems.

HIS-M012

20

ENGLAND AND THE CONTINENT IN THE MIDDLE AGES

This team-taught compulsory module runs over the course of two semesters. In this module the following themes and topics may be covered according to the needs and interests of those participating in the programme of study: Society, 970-1066; Domesday Book; Letter Collections; Historical Writing; Charters; the Royal Household; Royal Record Keeping; Urban Communities 1200-1500; Rural Communities 1200-1500; Monasticism; the Church; Canon Law; Magna Carta. Teaching is mainly through the medium of the seminar; weekly preparation is, therefore, a requirement of the course.

HIS-M17Y

60

ENGLISH PALEOGRAPHY

This module is essential for all historians and archaeologists who wish to be able to read the handwriting of the period that they are researching! This can be demanding, but also fun.

HIS-MA37

10

EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to provide a basic introduction into quantitative and qualitative research methods; introduce key concepts in maths and statistics relevant to the study of international development; and to provide a foundation in the key academic skills expected at university including essay planning and writing, reading and thinking critically, using UEA Library services and computing systems and developing effective oral communication and teamwork skills. The unit will be taught through lectures, practical workshops and computer-based lab sessions.

DEV-4002A

20

FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-3C11

20

FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-6001A

20

FIELDWORK IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY

The field course builds on the landscape archaeology units to provide forty hours of practical instruction in the field. The field course runs for one week in June, concentrating on the recording and analysis of archaeological earthworks, buildings and historic landscapes. Assessment will take the form of a short report and an extended project.

HIS-6023Y

30

FORENSIC LINGUISTICS AND TRANSLATION

This module is focused on theoretical and practical aspects of the interplay between language and other language-driven activities such as translation and memory in special circumstances of witnessing, experiencing or judging crime and providing expert linguistic testimony and language services such as translating and interpreting. It contextualises the consequences of this relationship within an interactive environment, namely forensic, psycholinguistic and cross-cultural contexts of language use. Another dimension of the course is an emphatic cross-linguistic approach, whereby we assume the latest linguistic typological perspective and discuss the effects of language differences on the kind of information habitually provided in or omitted from reports in one language and translation.

PPL-MA05

20

FROM AGINCOURT TO BOSWORTH: ENGLAND IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES

Through a close examination of the lives and reigns of four very different monarchs this unit investigates the workings of kingship and high politics in one of the most turbulent periods of English History (1415-1485). New interpretations of the Wars of the Roses, as well as original source material, will be studied.

HIS-5009B

20

FROM THE ZENITH OF IMPERIAL PRESTIGE TO THE NADIR OF BRITISH POWER: THE BRITISH EMPIRE 1919-1956

This module explores developments within the British Empire between the high noon of Empire following the settlement of the First World War to the Suez Crisis of 1956. It will examine the various challenges posed to the British imperial system from the growth of resistance and nationalism in India and the Middle East during the inter war period to the important role played by imperial questions in relations between Britain and the United States (the 'Special Relationship'). Alongside the perceived internal threats to the Empire this module will consider Britain's responses to wartime US criticism of the British Empire and the redefinition of British Imperial policy, the roles planned for the Empire in securing Britain's economic and strategic interests, the scope for Anglo-American co-operation in the Cold War and possible sources of friction between the two powers, culminating in their disagreement over policy in the Middle East at the time of the Suez Crisis.

HIS-M25Y

30

FROM THE ZENITH OF IMPERIAL PRESTIGE TO THE NADIR OF BRITISH POWER: THE BRITISH EMPIRE 1919-1956

This module explores developments within the British Empire between the high noon of Empire following the settlement of the First World War to the Suez Crisis of 1956. It will examine the various challenges posed to the British imperial system from the growth of resistance and nationalism in India and the Middle East during the inter war period to the important role played by imperial questions in relations between Britain and the United States (the 'Special Relationship'). Alongside the perceived internal threats to the Empire this module will consider Britain's responses to wartime US criticism of the British Empire and the redefinition of British Imperial policy, the roles planned for the Empire in securing Britain's economic and strategic interests, the scope for Anglo-American co-operation in the Cold War and possible sources of friction between the two powers, culminating in their disagreement over policy in the Middle East at the time of the Suez Crisis.

HIS-M32Y

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAND 2 anthropology modulewhere disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GENDER CONCEPTS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aims of this module are to provide students with a solid understanding of both the theoretical perspectives and concepts that have underpinned the field of gender and development; and to enable students to understand the link between gender and key debates within development studies such as poverty, violence, religion and the role of men in gender and development. The module begins by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, as they have evolved in recent decades. It then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analysis. The second part of the module applies these concepts in examining a selection of important and policy relevant debates: the nature of the household and kinship, gender roles, power and empowerment, poverty, violence, masculinities, religion and the gendered nature of institutions. The module builds the foundation for the more applied units which follow, and whilst it touches on policy implications as they arise, it does not focus on gender policy as such.

DEV-M015

20

GENDER DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

This module explores relations between social policies (defined broadly) and various forms of identity and difference. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries and pays particular attention to gender issues, although other aspects of diversity (such as ethnicity, disability and age) are also addressed explicitly. The module has both theoretical and more practical components, including sessions on gender planning and mainstreaming analysis. This module has a limit of 40 students.

DEV-M066

20

GEOGRAPHIES OF DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4007B This module explores the place of development in geographical thinking. It begins by looking at intellectual foundations of the geographies of development, beginning with post-war modernism theory and proceeding through neo-Marxist and post-modern approaches to the understanding uneven development and distributional inequities. Following this explicit theorising about geography and development, the module proceeds to explore implicit view as observed in changing development practices in policy debates and discourses and in representations of development in film and print media. finally, the module explores how thinking about geography of development is changing and in particular, how this change is associated with process of economic, political and cultural globalisation including changing patterns of natural resource exploitation and trade and changing relationships between citizens, the state and civil society.

DEV-5010A

20

GEORGIAN REBELLIONS

Compared to the tumultuous seventeenth century, the eighteenth century has long been viewed as a period of unusual political stability in England. But the veneer of order - exemplified by Georgian architecture, the celebration of science and the rule of law - masked undercurrents of resentment, especially outside of England and Wales in Scotland, Ireland and the rest of the British Empire. This module will examine several case studies, including the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745, the Jamaican maroon wars, the Stono Rebellion, Pontiac's War, the American Revolution, and the Irish Rebellion of 1798. We will consider, from the perspective of the discontented, what these violent outbursts tell us about the structure of power in Britain and its empire, and, from the perspective of the government's forces in the suppression of these disturbances, what ideological and legal restraints limited the deployment of military force. Embedded within both of these issues was the question of membership within the political community, and by examining these crises the module will investigate the status of various people including Scottish Highlanders, slaves, maroons, American Indians, colonists and the Irish within the Georgian political system. Analysing a combination of primary sources and scholarly texts, the students will address issues including: 1) The viability of "British" nationality following the Act of Union of 1707 2) The development of an unwritten "imperial constitution" and its implications for colonists, American Indians, and slaves 3) The origins of the American Revolution and its meaning in a British-imperial context 4) The relationship between law and the "rules of war" within Britain and across the empire At the end of the semester, the students will have a detailed historical understanding of several rebellions and the American Revolution; a sound knowledge of the scholarly debates surrounding eighteenth-century British politics and the empire; an ability to utilise and critically evaluate textual evidence in the context of historical work.

HIS-6064A

30

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Macroeconomics of Development (DEV-2D52). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-3D22

20

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Macroeconomics of Development (DEV-2D52). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-6006B

20

GLOBALISATION, BUSINESS AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an understanding of the economic, social and environmental impacts of globalisation. It focuses on the role of business, particularly corporate social responsibility, and the changing role of the state in promoting economic development.

DEV-M110

20

GLOBALISED AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS

The aim of this module is to understand how food security is affected by policies, environmental processes, and actions that occur at the international level. Food security is a central theme, and how it is constructed and contested at international level, involving global institutions, interest groups, and diverse policy agendas. This exploration does not confine itself exclusively to production, but also considers other areas of concern, including: global environmental change, dietary shifts, 'post-production' concerns with food quality or ecosystem integrity, agribusiness, public versus private agricultural innovation, intellectual property rights, and strategies for technological development. Students will gain critical understanding of these debates and how different policy actors engage with them at both the local and the global level. These actors include firms, public RandD institutions, civil society, farmers' movements, consumers' groups, and major donors and philanthropic organizations. The module will help students develop a critical and inter-disciplinary understanding of key international policy debates that have relevance to agriculture. Additionally, students will gain a better understanding of how trends in globalised agriculture affect poor people, particularly smallholder farmers, but also consumers and those involved in value chains.

DEV-M106

20

GOVERNANCE DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT

The concepts of governance and democracy hold very different meanings for distinct political trends. Thus, on the one hand democracy is cited as the only way for citizens to have meaningful input into their government, while on the other it is seen as empty of most substantial content consisting mainly of relatively meaningless formal components such as multi-party elections, a vehicle for enabling globalisation. Similarly, there are multiple ways of conceptualising governance. Recently, 'good governance' has become a development buzzword that now occupies a central place in development thinking, policy-making and practice. But what does good governance mean and why has it become so important for development? How are democracy and governance related to the state and how are they affected by global governance? What does it mean to be a citizen, whether of a state or globally and how does gender, in the form of masculinisms, affect the way all these are conceptualised? These are some of the key issues and questions that this module will try to address. Students who have taken this course should understand the historical roots of democracy and the political aims behind the governance agenda. They will also have gained theoretical perspectives, analytical tools, and basic information that can help them evaluate wider debates about political development, democracy, and governance.

DEV-M065

20

HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a broad introduction to health issues in a context of development. It reviews different cultural understandings of health, and relationships between health, socio-economic change, livelihoods and poverty. The module also examines health policies of particular relevance to developing countries. While the module looks at health issues in general, it pays particular attention to links between HIV/AIDS and development.

DEV-M070

20

HENRY VIII: THE MAKING OF A TYRANT?

The reign of Henry VIII was a major turning point in British history, and 'bluff King Hal' continues to horrify and fascinate us in equal measure. This special subject uses the preoccupations, ambitions, and character of Henry VIII as a route into the political, religious and cultural changes of this tumultuous period. Starting with the acclaimed young king, his Spanish bride, Katherine of Aragon, and his consummate minister, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, the course works chronologically and thematically through to the declining years of Henry VIII's reign, when a paranoid, obese and cruel monarch presided over an irrevocably changed religious and political landscape. It examines in detail the divorce crisis, the establishment of the Church of England, the Henrician Reformation, the politics and factionalism of the Court, war and foreign policy, magnificence, and opposition to the king, and engages with the intense historiographical debates on all these issues. The module considers some of the most colourful personalities in British history - Wolsey, More, Boleyn, Cromwell, and Cranmer - as well as structures, and the falls of Anne Boleyn and Thomas Cromwell are given particular attention. Finally, the module draws on material culture, art history, literature, film, and even dress, as well as relying on the more usual documentary sources, such as the State Papers. Above all, we will try to answer: did Henry VIII really become a tyrant?

HIS-6035Y

60

HERITAGE AND PUBLIC HISTORY

Public history is history in the public sphere, whether in museums and galleries, heritage sites and historic houses, radio and television broadcasting, film, popular history books, or public policy within government. The central challenge and task of public history is making history relevant and accessible to its audience of people outside academia, whilst adhering to an academically credible historical method. This module explores the theory and practice of public history in the heritage sector. The module considers questions such as, how is the past used? What is authenticity? Who 'owns' historic sites? The module also offers the opportunity for undergraduates to work on a heritage project with a local heritage partner - the nature of this project varies each year depending on the availability of such partnership opportunities. PLEASE NOTE: The availability of places with partners this year means that the module will be limited to twelve undergraduate places. All students on the module will be required to engage in preparatory reading and writing over the course of the summer break.

HIS-5026A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH I

This course is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH II

This course may be taken as a self-standing module or as a continuation of Higher Advanced English I. It is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are native or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5044B

20

IMPERIAL RUSSIAN AND SOVIET HISTORY, 1861-1945

This module examines some of the main themes in Russian history between the Emancipation of the Serfs and the outbreak of the Second World War. We will look at the nature of industrialisation and the peasant economy, the autocracy and its fall in 1917, the revolutionary movement and the nationalities question. We will then examine how the Revolution of 1917 changed the state and the ways in which the Communists attempted to change society before 1929. We conclude by examining the country during the era of the five year plans and the impact of the Stalinist system on the Soviet Union before the outbreak of world war.

HIS-5019A

20

IMPERIALISTS, PASHAS and REVOLUTIONARIES: IRAQ, 1914-2003

This module explores the eventful and troubled history of modern Iraq. Taking its starting point in the nineteenth century, when Iraq was part of the grand Ottoman Empire that covered much of the Middle East, the module explores how ancient Mesopotamia came under British tutelage following the Great War and how it subsequently experienced a turbulent history as various political actors sought to wrest control of the newly established state. The module pays special attention to key moments when the course of Iraq's history changed, such as wars, military coups and revolutions, but also periods in between when society returned to some sort of normality. Particular focus is on the rise of political ideologies, in particular Arab nationalism, and its local counterpart, Iraqi nationalism - but also other ideologies such as socialism, communism and Ba#thism. Saddam Hussein's domination of the country (1979-2003) is also an important element of the module.

HIS-6069Y

60

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROJECT

In this module, students will conduct and write up their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD8X

60

INTELLECTUALS AND US FOREIGN POLICY, 1880-2012

This module examines the ideas and influence of nine American foreign policy "intellectuals," beginning with Alfred Mahan and concluding with Paul Wolfowitz. Why did each "intellectual" strike a particular chord at a particular time? Do individuals matter in the history of US foreign policy? How, and with what consequences, were these ideas translated into policy? This module will explore the origins of key US foreign policy concepts such as isolationism, internationalism, containment and "pre-emptive defence." Aims of the Module #To introduce students to nine particular strains of US foreign policy ideology. #To encourage students to engage critically with the primary output of these "intellectuals" and to identify their strengths and weaknesses. #To stimulate students to consider whether these ideas have been manifested in policy, and to trace their impact. #To encourage students to develop their own foreign policy philosophy.

HIS-6074B

30

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level. The module is made up of three elements, each taught for one hour per week: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is not available to students with AS or A-Level French. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

A continuation of Intermediate French I. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module consists of three contact hours per week.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent)

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent)

PPLB5034B

20

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY

This module provides an understanding of the economics of international trade and investment and their implications for development. It analyses the impacts of international trade, foreign investment and technology transfer on developing countries and evaluates the effects of national trade and investment policies and international economic agreements and institutions. It covers both trade theory and more applied topics such as the impact of trade on labour and the environment.

DEV-M056

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES-EXAMINATION

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Relations and Development Studies.

DEV-M048

20

INTRODUCING PPL

PPL-4030Y

0

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4032B

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT FIELDWORK

This module will help prepare students for development fieldwork and focus on practical and ethical issues. Topics covered will include understanding the local context and culture, working with marginalised, vulnerable and privileged groups, negotiating access to field sites and power relations. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD3X

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development,human geography and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress.

DEV-4001A

40

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress. This module is reserved for students on BSc(Hons) Environmental Geography and International Development.

DEV-4006A

20

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY MODERN STUDIES

This module introduces key themes in early modern history: witchcraft, gender, rebellion, religious conflict, the reformation, warfare, state formation and other key aspects of the period 1500-1750.

HIS-4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module introduces students to the main macro- and micro-economic issues of development. It lays the foundations for the modules Microeconomics of Development and Macroeconomics of Development. The main theories of development will be reviewed. Central issues related to poverty, human capital development, the environment, globalisation, balance of payments and financial systems will also be covered.

DEV-4003B

20

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is for students to understand current debates on the principles and theories linking education to development in a range of social contexts. The module will introduce students to theories of education and development including international and comparative education. These are examined in relation to the broader challenges of development. Topics in the module may include: theories of human development and capabilities, human capital and rights based approaches, theories of equity, social justice and inclusive education. We will examine schooling in contexts of chronic poverty, models of schooling and de-schooling, formal and non-formal education, the challenges of linguistic and cultural diversity, inclusive education and disability, gender inequalities, and the education of nomads and other migratory groups.

DEV-M007

20

INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

This module is designed to provide an introduction to medieval history both for first year historians and students from other schools. It surveys the history of medieval Europe, including England, from c.1000 to c1300, and also examines some archaeology, literature, art, and architecture from the period. The module also aims to introduce students to a range of primary sources, including some of the physical remains to be found in East Anglia.

HIS-4001A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN HISTORY

This module provides a wide-ranging introduction to the political, social and economic transformation of Britain and Europe from the late eighteenth century to the First World War. Among the themes it considers are industrialisation and its impact; revolution and reform; nationalism and imperialism; gender and society; great power relations; the impact of war and the collapse of the old Europe in 1917-18.

HIS-4003A

20

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS

This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The course has an integrated biophysical core and also deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4004B

20

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS

The module will provide an overview of different research methods and how they can be applied within the context of development practice. Among other things, it will cover the following topics: interviewing, mixed methods approaches, participatory research methods and basic statistical analysis. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD2Y

20

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH (MRES DP)

This module provides students with a generic introduction to Social Science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of Social Science research, research design and the nature of quantitative and qualitative research methodology. It also examines the skills needed for Social Science research. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD1Y

20

ISOLATION TO WORLD WAR: BRITAIN AND THE ORIGINS OF WWI

This module examines the development of British foreign policy between 1880 and 1914. In the first semester we will undertake a detailed examination of Salisbury's foreign policy and the debate surrounding Britain's international 'isolation' up to the conclusion of the French entente. The second semester will see us examining the cause of British foreign policy under Sir Edward Grey until the outbreak of war in August 1914.

HIS-6030Y

60

LATER MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module examines the political, cultural and social history of later medieval Europe (circa 1100-1500) with a particular focus on France and Italy. The topics addressed include the formation of cities, the position of the papacy, lay piety, and the role of women.

HIS-5006B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

LATIN AND PALEOGRAPHY

A good command of basic Latin and Latin palaeography are fundamental tools for the aspiring medievalist. The basic Medieval Latin element of this module is suitable for complete beginners, but more advanced tuition is available for students with a prior knowledge of the language. The palaeography element concentrates on the reading and interpretation of a range of original Latin sources from the late 11th to the early 16th century.

HIS-M02Y

30

LATIN FOR HISTORIANS

This module provides an introduction to the linguistic skills in medieval Latin which enable students to read administrative documents such as charters, accounts, court rolls, etc. It is particularly suited for those who intend proceeding to postgraduate study in aspects of the past, such as medieval history, which require a reading knowledge of Latin. This course is not intended for students who have already studied Latin to A level or equivalent.

HIS-5004B

20

MA IN EARLY MODERN HISTORY DISSERTATION

80-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Early Modern History in the School of History.

HIS-M03X

80

MA IN EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT - EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Education and Development.

DEV-M036

20

MA IN GENDER ANALYSIS IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Gender Analysis in International Development.

DEV-M034

20

MA IN GLOBALISATION BUSINESS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA Globalisation Business and Sustainable Development: Exam.

DEV-M114

20

MA IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Development.

DEV-M112

20

MA IN INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Social Development.

DEV-M038

20

MA IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY DISSERTATION

70-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Landscape History in the School of History.

HIS-M01X

70

MA IN MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Media and International Development.

DEV-M084

20

MA IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Medieval History in the School of History.

HIS-M02X

90

MA IN MODERN BRITISH HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Modern British History in the School of History.

HIS-M04X

90

MA IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Modern European History in the School of History.

HIS-M05X

90

MA IN RURAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Rural Development.

DEV-M030

20

MACROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

Why are some countries richer than others? The objective of the module is to provide a rigorous analysis of economic growth issues and examine macroeconomic models that describe determinants of long-term growth and income. We will study the role of capital accumulation, initial income, population growth, education, technological progress, and institutions in determining different patterns of economic development. Theory and data analysis will jointly help explain why some countries embark on divergent development paths.

DEV-M076

20

MADNESS AND MEDICINE

This module considers the practice of medicine in Britain from the eighteenth century to the establishment of the NHS. Themes include the impact of science and professions, the organisation and control aspects of medical and hospital services and healthcare as seen by sufferers and patients.

HIS-6005B

30

MASTER IN RESEARCH DISSERTATION

15,000 to 20,000 words on an approved topic.

DEV-M05X

80

MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

In this module students will be working in the university and in the local community to design, implement and evaluate their own 'live' media and development project. This module is taught and facilitated by lecturers from DEV and by a team of professionals from a media and development organisation, called New Media Networks (NMN). NMN is a creative industries company that works in the UK and internationally for lasting social change. Students will also be working with staff (and possibly volunteers) from the local organisations we collaborate with.

DEV-M099

20

MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the analysis of the different approaches to development communication and the wider relationships between media and development.

DEV-M082

20

MEDIA AND SOCIETY

This module is intended to provide all students studying media related postgraduate degrees with a broad, current and inter-disciplinary understanding of the media today. Our guiding philosophy is that in order properly to understand the media, whether as a lawyer, economist, development studies professional, media studies specialist or political scientist, it is essential to have a wide-ranging and multi-disciplinary understanding of the modern media. What we shall be doing over the year, therefore, is to look at the structure of media today in the UK and globally. We will consider, from several different academic perspectives, how media content is constructed, what shapes content and how content may be controlled and even censored. We will also look at the media industry, examining how it is currently organised and managed, what factors influence its current organisation and consider how it might develop. We will examine how media affects peoples and societies, particularly with the rise of social media, and review the debates about media influence and power. Finally, we will seek to draw together key aspects of modern media.

DEV-M105

20

MEDICINE AND GENDER

This module offers a broad historical treatment of gender issues in medicine, examining women as providers and recipients of healthcare from Ancient Greece to the NHS. Topics for study include the female body, obstetrics and gynaecology, the female healer and the medical profession, women, witchcraft and popular healing, scientific medicine and professionalisation, nurses, nursing and reform, and women's health.

HIS-5016A

20

MEDICINE AND SOCIETY BEFORE THE 17TH CENTURY

This module examines the theory and practice of medicine at all levels of English society during the medieval and early modern periods, and assesses the impact of medical ideas upon religious, literary and political thought. Topics include: the emergence of a healing profession and its attempts to secure a monopoly of practice; the role of women as both patients and practitioners; theories about the spread of disease and necessary measures for public health; medicine and the Church;and attitudes to mortality. Edited versions of original documents are used.

HIS-5014A

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014B

20

MICROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module provides the building blocks for microeconomic analysis of development. Topics include: #Poverty, inequality and welfare #Agricultural household production #Intra- household allocation #Risk, uncertainty and insurance #Markets and Institutions: credit #Markets and institutions: labour #Human capital : education, health and nutrition #Public goods, collective action #Institutions, transaction costs #Policy reforms #Household surveys and their analysis. The module consists of lectures, seminars and workshops. Students are assessed by essay and exam.

DEV-M057

20

MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990

This module introduces students to German history in the twentieth century which was characterised by various radical regime changes and territorial alterations. Topics include German world policy and nationalism in the late imperial period; imperialism and expansionism during the First World War; the challenges of modernity in the Weimar Republic; the rise of Hitler and the formation of the Nazi empire in Europe; the post-war division of Germany and the legacy of the Third Reich; the nature of the GDR dictatorship and the problem of West German terrorism; as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification. Special attention will be given to questions of nationalism and national identity, issues of history and memory, and Germany's role in Europe and the world. On completion of this unit, students will have developed a solid understanding of one of the most dramatic periods of German history when the country oscillated between the two extremes of war and repression, on the one hand, and the return to peace and democracy, on the other.

HIS-5018A

20

MODERN ITALY, 1860-1945

This module studies the social, political and economic history of Italy from its unification in 1860 until the end of the Second World War. It will begin by looking at the process of unification, the difficulties encountered in governing the new nation-state and the problems of uneven social and economic modernisation. The module then focuses on the First World War and the rise of Fascism after 1918, before assessing the nature of Mussolini's regime and the reasons for its downfall.

HIS-5021B

20

MODERNITY IN RUSSIA

The module will explore the revolutionary period and beyond in Russia, concentrating on the way in which Russian culture and society moved towards modernity. Drawing on the wide range of materials, including images, films and imaginative literature, the module will explore the pioneering aspects of Russia's modernist culture and society, as well as discussing the problems that Russia faced in fully embracing the modern age. The module will be taught by a weekly seminar.

HIS-M09Y

60

MSC IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Climate Change and International Development.

DEV-M086

20

MSC IN DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Development Economics.

DEV-M116

20

MSC IN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Environment and International Development.

DEV-M042

20

MSC IN IMPACT EVALUATION FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Impact Evaluation for International Development.

DEV-M108

20

MSC IN WATER SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Water Security and International Development.

DEV-M104

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN: THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

This module deals with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the start of the Cold War.

HIS-5017B

20

NAPOLEONIC EUROPE

This module examines the impact of Napoleonic rule on Europe. Beginning with an examination of the foundations of the French Empire, the unit goes on to examine different aspects of Napoleonic rule: social and economic change; culture and ideology; warfare and the state; collaboration and resistance. It will look comparatively at the experience of France, Italy, Germany and Spain under Napoleon, before assessing the reasons for the downfall of the Napoleonic regime. Material used will include memoirs, literature and other contemporary documents.

HIS-6015A

30

NATIONALISM AND VIOLENCE IN 20TH-CENTURY EUROPE

Students will study and reflect on the problem of nationalism and violence in modern European history. Topics to be discussed include: the Armenian Genocide, the Irish Question, the Holocaust, the legacy of the Second World War, multinationalism and ethnic cleansing in the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, the French-Algerian problem, the nature and limitations of 'European identity', and the relationship between sport and nationalism. The module will involve the discussion of relevant theoretical literature and be taught as a reading group with close reference to original texts, focussing particularly on memoirs and the exploration of their value as historical sources. The seminars will run in alternate weeks over the autumn and spring semesters. Students will make a 15-minute seminar presentation (20% of the mark) and submit an essay of 4-5,000 words.

HIS-M29Y

30

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE STUDENTS MUST TAKE DEV-4004B. This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in NR1, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, stability, change and degradation, etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management in NR systems. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. a number of different conceptual frameworks such as legal pluralism, value chains, capabilities and rights- centred perspectives are introduced and used to explore particular aspects of resource management issues. Specific natural resource management, biotechnology, renewable energy and biodiversity the module also develops students understanding of experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5013Y

40

NATURE AND SOCIETY

Ideas about nature have always lain at the heart of how we think people should behave and society should be organised. Equally, we have long measured our human virtues against how we have treated nature, and where we belong in it. This course traces those two issues as they have shaped the society and culture of Europeans and their descendants overseas from the early modern age until the birth of modern environmentalism in the 1960s. We will examine changing beliefs about the place of God and humanity in the natural world; how people have imagined themselves shaped by or shaping climate, and tested themselves against nature in polar exploration, local recreation and mountaineering; how we have responded to the problems of modern society, such as air and water pollution, species extinction, and resource exhaustion; how nature has been central to the arts, from the romantic poets to landscape painters and the modern avant-garde, and the arts to our imagination of nature; how nature and land have been major themes of to nationalism and identity; and how scientific knowledge transformed not just our idea of nature, but ourselves.

HIS-6058B

30

NEW WORLDS: THE EUROPEAN COLONIAL EXPANSION FROM COLUMBUS TO ABOLITIONISM

This module looks at the European colonial enterprise in America and Asia. Starting from the explorations in the Mediterranean we will then look at the expansion of European powers across the Atlantic and the Indian oceans: Columbus and the discovery of America, the first colonies of New England, the creation of trading posts in India and East Asia, and the missionary campaigns in China and Japan. Drawing on selected extracts from travel writings and ethnographic descriptions of previously unknown places and people, we will focus on the protagonists of these explorations - conquerors, adventurers, merchants and settlers - and their interaction with and exploitation of non-European people and cultures, and we will finally conclude by considering the debates which developed around these themes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

HIS-5044B

20

NORMAN AND PLANTAGENET ENGLAND, 1066-1307

This module follows the history of England from the Norman Conquest of 1066 down to the death of Edward 1 in 1307. The aim of this module is to look at the political, ecclesiastical, social and intellectual history of England in this period and to place English history in the wider context of European history in the Middle Ages.

HIS-5007B

20

OLIVER CROMWELL

After forty years of relative obscurity, Oliver Cromwell emerged as a leader in the parliamentary opposition to the king during the English Revolution and became the most powerful man in Britain. This course will explore the life and legacies of Cromwell and provide a point of entry into political, religious and social change in early modern England from the long Reformation to the Restoration. Cromwell has remained one of the most divisive figures in British history from the early modern period until the present. His reputation will soon be reinterpreted with the publication of a new edition of his writings and speeches. This will represent the most extensive and scholarly treatment of Cromwellian sources to date. Students on this module will have unique access to samples from this edition prior to publication. Drawing from a wide range of primary sources, including samples from the new edition, this module will enter into Cromwell's puritan mental world and seek to understand his personal and national aspirations. It will build on this to explore Cromwell's conquest of Ireland and Scotland and his ambitious plans to undermine Spanish power in the Atlantic. Finally, the course will consider Cromwell's controversial reception by contemporaries and his diverse representations in popular culture, film and history. This module introduces students to a close and critical reading of primary and secondary sources. The coursework is specifically designed to enable students to progressively build toward a longer piece of writing that reflects a firm grasp of the secondary literature and engages with primary sources to mount a compelling thesis. The overall aim is to equip students with the skills to engage in independent research and to produce a sustained piece of writing. Another pedagogical aim will be to engage the students directly with the editorial process. This will be done by inviting them to evaluate sample documents from the latest Cromwell edition and to complete a mock exercise in annotating and commenting upon the sample material (autumn document analysis). Students will also be encouraged to develop oral communication and engagement in seminars by delivering an oral presentation. This will be done by the student's oral delivery of his or her second document analysis to the seminar, followed by questions and further discussion.

HIS-6068Y

60

OLIVER CROMWELL AND THE PURITAN WORLD

After forty years of relative obscurity, Oliver Cromwell emerged as a leader in the parliamentary opposition to the king during the English Revolution and became the most powerful man in Britain. This module will explore the life and times of Cromwell and provide a point of entry into political, religious and social change in early modern England from the long Reformation to the Restoration. It will draw from a host of primary sources to enter into Cromwell's puritan mental world and seek to understand his personal and national aspirations. It will build on this to explore Cromwell's conquest of Ireland and Scotland and his ambitious plans to undermine Spanish power in the Atlantic. Finally, the module will consider Cromwell's controversial reception by contemporaries and his diverse representations in popular culture, film and history.

HIS-6016A

30

OVERSEAS STUDY UNIT

This overseas based module is designed to enable students to undertake courses of study approved by the School and organised in association with overseas institutions of learning. The assessment is based on a 2500 word essay on a subject to be agreed with the OSU convenor. The subject will normally be thematically linked to the content of the course of study overseas. Students will also have to pass local exams and complete and pass other forms of local assessments at their host university. The work burden should be equivalent to a 20 credit module at UEA, i.e. around 4-8 hours a week. THIS IS RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6002A

20

OVERSEAS STUDY UNIT

This overseas based module is designed to enable students to undertake courses of study approved by the School and organised in association with overseas institutions of learning. The assessment is based on a 2500 word essay on a subject to be agreed with the OSU convenor. The subject will normally be thematically linked to the content of the course of study overseas. Students will also have to pass local exams and complete and pass other forms of local assessments at their host university. The work burden should be equivalent to a 20 credit module at UEA, i.e. around 4-8 hours a week. THIS IS RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-3C23

20

PAST ENVIRONMENTS: THEORY AND PRACTICE IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY

This year-long module examines the nature of past environments from prehistory to the present. It will focus on the theory and practice of Landscape History and examine a series of semi-natural environments, such as woodland, fieldscapes and parkland. It will also look at the impact of man-made structures - such as fortifications - on the landscape.

HIS-M11Y

60

PEOPLE AND PLACE

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4007B. This module analyses two key questions about people, place and space: how and why people's health varies in different development settings; and the links between development processes and people's migration. The ways that migration affects health are also examined. The module begins by analysing global patterns of health and development, including risk levels of non-communicable diseases across many parts of the world, the global institutions involved in the governance of health and migration, and broad patterns of health inequality. The second part of the module provides and understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. The geography and risk environments for health is then examined: how social relations (related to class, occupation, gender, ethnicity, colonial history), operating across different spaces, generate susceptibility to health risks in particular places. The examples of HIV and TB are used to illustrate the ways social processes cerate risk environments. The module also looks at places where good health has been achieved and why. The third part of the module develops understanding of the factors driving migration, such as labour relations, conflict or climate change and how these population movements influence men and women, risk environments and their health and well-being?

DEV-5011B

20

PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBALISATION

The module is designed to provide a broad overview of the debates on globalisation and its implications for developing countries. It is taught from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives and considers a range of views and critiques. It addresses key issues such as the impact of globalisation on poverty and inequality, the role of the state, and conflict and security, as well as addressing the resistance to globalisation and the rise of global social movements.

DEV-M071

20

PLAGUE AND DISEASE IN THE MEDIEVAL CITY

Plague and Disease in the Medieval City is an interdisciplinary module which examines the health and illnesses of the urban population in England and Northern Europe during the later Middle Ages. By using the unparalleled riches of Norwich's medieval buildings and landscape, students will investigate standards of living alongside patterns of disease and the relative effectiveness of both individual and corporate actions in halting the spread of plague within the medieval city. Supplementary iconographical, archaeological and documentary evidence from other cities, including Coventry, Winchester, York, London and Paris, will also be used. We will examine the main influences upon the developments within medicine and its practice from the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries. The impact of medical theory on urban politics and planning is also considered, as is the close connection between the Church and medicine, notably through the medium of religious iconography. The module will conclude by assessing the influences upon and developments within medicine and its practice which took place between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries and look at whether any of these were reflected in the changes which took place in Norwich during the same period. *THIS MODULE IS FOR INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY*

HIS-5001S

20

POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This course seeks to provide students with a solid understanding of political ecology theory and to enable them to apply this theory for analyzing environment and development problems. After a brief introduction to key theoretical concepts in political ecology, students review key contributions to major policy fields in environment and development. They do this in a series of reading seminars, covering agriculture and biotechnology, climate change, conservation, fisheries, forestry, water management and other fields. The course ends with a workshop on the role of policy in political ecology.

DEV-M090

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

"This political analysis for development module focuses on core principles in politics and their application to development analysis, covering topics that include power and resistance, states and nations, citizenship and participation, identities and multiculturalism, democratic and authoritarian regimes, and elections and the use of force. The various topics will be taught with intensive reference to theory but integrated with empirical material, both historical and contemporary in nature. It is taught through a combination of lectures, facilitated reading groups, video sessions and student-led seminars."

DEV-5008B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN LANGUAGE 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLB4020A

20

PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module introduces geographical approaches to the key processes of change that shape our world and its societies. You will examine how people and places are connected and transformed as a result of processes such as colonialism, globalisation, industrialisation, migration, urbanisation and development, and explore how differences and inequalities emerge. A central theme will be why space matters, as people's lives are influenced by the places that surround them - both near and far - and as they in turn change those places. These issues will be explored through a range of contemporary geographical topics, from sweatshops to climate change, through which you will be introduced to core geographical concepts, ideas and approaches, emphasising on critical thinking and practice. The module will also cover key methods for geographical research, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and will include field-based practical work in the local area.

DEV-4007B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module will introduce students to the history of propaganda. It will ask students to consider what constitutes propaganda, and to understand the techniques of propaganda, as well as its purposes and effectiveness. It will consider the issue across the twentieth century and will do so by looking at the issue of propaganda in dictatorial regimes, such as Nazi Germany (and fascism more widely), as well as the communist dictatorships. It will also look at the role of propaganda in the Western democracies, looking especially at the issue of the British Empire and the Cold War. It will also look at the role of propaganda in radical politics and protest movements, such as the environmental movement. In doing so it will provide students with an understanding of important historical and ethical debates.

HIS-5050B

20

PUBLIC POLICY AND WELFARE

This module explores relations between public policies (defined broadly) and processes of social and political change. The course has both theoretical and more practical components. Reflecting on the politics of public policy and the unevenness of the state in the developing world the course provides a framework for thinking about social change and public welfare. As well as the role of state institutions, there is also a discussion of the role played by NGOs and other civil society actors in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. Issues covered include HIVAids and public policy in Africa, and state poverty reduction programmes in South Asia.

DEV-3D38

20

PUBLIC POLICY AND WELFARE

This module explores relations between public policies (defined broadly) and processes of social and political change. The course has both theoretical and more practical components. Reflecting on the politics of public policy and the unevenness of the state in the developing world the course provides a framework for thinking about social change and public welfare. As well as the role of state institutions, there is also a discussion of the role played by NGOs and other civil society actors in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. Issues covered include HIVAids and public policy in Africa, and state poverty reduction programmes in South Asia.

DEV-6008B

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other units, ii) to become critical readers of Published quantitative data analysis and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with sampling approaches, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and linear regression.

DEV-5002A

20

QUEENS, COURTESANS AND COMMONERS: WOMEN AND GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the issue of gender in European history, between 1500 and 1750. Using a variety of written and visual sources, and including a comparative element, it focuses on the following themes: definitions of femininity and masculinity; life-cycles; family, kinship, and marriage; social exclusion, charity and the welfare state; law, crime, and order; witchcraft and magic; honour, sex, and sexual identities; work; learning and the arts; material culture; the impact of European expansions.

HIS-5022A

20

REDCOATS': BRITISH MILITARY POWER IN THE AGE OF THE FIRST GLOBAL WARS, 1754-1783

This module concerns the experience of the British army in the period of the Seven Years War and American War of Independence. It will examine the organisation and conduct of war in both Europe and America from a British perspective and discuss how the British army coped with the demands of conducting operations in the era of the first truly 'global' wars.

HIS-6007A

30

REFORMATION TO REVOLUTION

This module examines three centuries of European history connecting two unprecedented revolutionary epochs: the Reformation of the sixteenth century and the American and French revolutions at the end of the early modern era. We will look at key themes and movements in these centuries, including the politics of the Reformation; the Mediterranean work of the Ottomans and Habsburg Spain; the Dutch Golden Age; the great political and religious struggles of the seventeenth century, including wars in the British Isles, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Baltic; the Russia of the Romanov czars and Peter the Great; the growth of centralised states and absolutism in France, Prussia and Austria; the Enlightenment; the rise of the Atlantic economies; and the challenge to the Old Regime from revolutionary politics.

HIS-5025A

20

RENAISSANCE ITALY

This module looks at social, religious and gender norms, and the way in which the institutions of state and church sought to order the lives of men and women in Italy. Providing background knowledge on the period (c.1500-1650), the module focuses on: social, religious, and gender norms; informal community rules and rituals; broken marriages, infanticide, and sexual violence; poor and vagrants; public brothels and women 'in danger'; male and female religious in civic life; forms of religious conversion; customs and costumes; cross-dressing; images of ethnicity.

HIS-6024A

30

RENAISSANCE WORLDS

This module examines the Renaissance in its European and global dimensions. Drawing on a vast array of written and visual sources the module will focus on some of the most debated themes in the history of this period: high politics, popular politics and seditious speeches; the ideals and practices of the Renaissance courts; civility, the culture of display and consumption; warfare; sex and violence; knowledge, travelling and the exploration of the world.

HIS-6055A

30

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In RMSA we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 1

In this module, students will conduct an organisational and policy analysis for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD4Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 2

In this module, students will design and pilot their own research instruments for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD5Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 3

In this module, students will develop a detailed research proposal for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD6Y

20

RESEARCH SKILLS WORKSHOP: DESIGN AND WRITING

RSW:DW will focus on identifying research questions; scoping existing knowledge and finding literature; critical reading and writing; editing and planning arguments; comparing conceptual approaches and preliminary thinking about theory-data linkages.

DEV-M091

10

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS

The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: # Development research and research ethics # Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews # The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods # Participatory and action research # Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are taught using SPSS.

DEV-M027

20

ROBIN HOOD: THE MEDIEVAL OUTLAW IN HISTORY AND LEGEND

The English medieval kingdom was extremely hierarchical. It was a society in which resistance to authority by the vast majority of society was discouraged by the widespread use of mutilation and execution. Yet it was also a society which applauded that resistance. All sorts of levels of society, from the highest in the land (such as the king's sons) to the lowest, indulged in rebellion, but it was the outlaw who captured the popular imagination. Encapsulated in the tales of Robin Hood, the outlaw is loyal, courageous, as well as being clever enough to outsmart the authorities. And the authorities, of course, are disloyal, stupid, and cowardly and use the cover of the law to behave corruptly. And so long as the outlaw commits his crimes for a noble purpose, he remains a hero of the people. The unit will examine the wider subject of resistance to royal authority by men who become outlaws and their portrayal in popular legend from the Norman Conquest of England to the modern age with its focus being the outlaw, for whom the name Robin Hood has become an archetype, as, indeed, it did in the later middle ages, as outlaws took on the name pseudonym for their own criminal activities.

HIS-6053B

30

RSW: ELABORATING RESEARCH DESIGN

This module continues from where RSW1 leaves off. It provides students with the skills to complete their procedural paper, particularly focusing on methodology and moving further on theory-data linkages towards the construction of a conceptual framework.

DEV-M092

10

RURAL ENGLAND 1660 TO 1900

This module will encourage you to consider broad questions in relation to life in rural England and, specifically, as it related to individuals in England between 1660-1900. Topics to be covered will include changes in land use and technology; landowners: affluence and decline; rural crime; housing - types and conditions; family life; childhood; education; poverty and health care.

HIS-5038B

20

RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND AGRARIAN CHANGE

Rural Livelihoods and Agrarian Change is a core module for all MAARD and MAGAID students and is an option for all other masters students. It is an inter-disciplinary module that uses a social relations perspective to understand how people make a living in contexts of poverty and vulnerability. It aims to provide an overview of rural livelihoods and approaches to their analysis as well as a critical assessment of the implications of gender relations and poverty, for livelihood building. The interconnections between the wider context within which livelihoods are built, including national policies and the character of specific locations, the social structure and rules that determine entitlements, the assets or resources available to individuals and groups, and their livelihood strategies, will be examined. The links between rural and urban, farm and non-farm for the livelihoods of rural people, over time, will also be explored.

DEV-M061

20

RURAL POLICIES and POLITICS

Around three-quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas and the gap between poor and rich continues to widen. The fate of the rural poor can be greatly influenced by policies in areas such as agriculture, land, social protection, natural resources, health, education and trade. This module reviews key policies and issues in these and other areas. It also guides students to critically analyse policy choices within specific contexts. Rural Policies recognises the importance of looking at rural policies with consideration of particular socio-economic contexts and in relation to larger-scale trends that are affecting rural areas: globalisation, urbanisation, de-agrarianisation, rural-urban linkages, conflict, HIV/AIDS and decentralisation. At the same time, it is based on the premise that rural areas require particular policies because of the distinct conditions characterizing them.

DEV-M016

20

RUSSIA IN REVOLUTION 1905-1921

This module will look at the upheavals in Russia between 1905 and the introduction of a limited Parliament, and continue by examining the First World War and the downfall of the Romanov monarchy. We will then study the year 1917 in some detail and discuss the causes of the Bolshevik seizure of power. The Civil War and the reasons of the Communist victory will be analysed. The module will place the Russian Revolutions in their historical, political and geographical context and will consider the impact that these events had in the history of the twentieth century.

HIS-6004B

30

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (AUTUMN SEMSTER)

X05 This module offers HIS students on the V100 programme the opportunity to spend the Autumn semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5031A

60

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (SPRING SEMSTER)

X04 This module offers HIS students on the V100 programme the opportunity to spend the Spring semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5030B

60

SEX and DRUGS and ROCK N ROLL? SIXTIES BRITAIN

Few decades in the modern period have proved as polarising as the 1960s. From 'swinging' London and the student protests of 1968 to the consequences of an allegedly 'permissive' society, the social, cultural and political implications of the decade reverberate into the present. We will cover the political impact of social and cultural trends such as: affluence and consumer culture; youth, pop music and subcultures; the counter-culture, pop-art; film, theatre, television and censorship; the 'New Left' and the birth of cultural studies; changing sexual behaviour and the 'permissive' moment; the politics of 'race' and immigration; education, social mobility and the 'new' universities; slum clearance, suburbanisation and the rise of the tower block. While focusing on Britain, key global themes will be unpacked and their local significance explored: cultures of the cold-war; decolonisation anti-colonial struggles; anti-nuclear and anti-Vietnam protests; the civil rights movement; the rise of 'second wave' feminism and gay liberation; structuralism and post-modernity. Through the analysis of autobiographical accounts and oral histories and contemporary books, films, music, television shows, sociological surveys, archival sources, official publications and material culture students will be encouraged to come to their own conclusions about this tumultuous decade.

HIS-6057Y

60

SKILLS IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM

This module takes place in the Spring Semester and is taught through a combination of practical group sessions and independent tasks. The main focus of the course is the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Landscape History and there is a strong emphasis on the practical application of GIS in examining Britain's historic landscape. This 20-credit module is ONLY available to students on the Environmental Sciences and Humanities course.

HIS-M006

20

SKILLS IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

This module takes place in the Spring Semester and is taught through a combination of practical group sessions and independent tasks. The main focus of the course is the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Landscape History and there is a strong emphasis on the practical application of GIS in examining Britain's historic landscape.

HIS-M002

30

SLAVERY AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1619-1807

This module will investigate how and why a relatively small number of colonists from England - a nation that prided itself as being free from slavery - adopted a way of life thoroughly dependant on slave labour. By the late eighteenth century, slavery influenced the lives of British people everywhere, and this circumstance helped inspire Britain's drive to outlaw the slave trade and consign slavery itself to history. Analysing a combination of primary sources and scholarly texts, the students will address a variety of issues related to slavery in the British Empire, including: 1) The contribution of slave labour to economic development in Britain and its empire; 2) The influence of slavery on political ideology in Britain, the British colonies, and the early United States; 3) The role of Africans in shaping and supplying the slave trade; 4) The intimate influence of slavery on the lives all those directly involved in the practice, including slaveholders and the enslaved, women, men, and children; 5) The complex politics that led to the official abolition of Britain's slave trade in 1807.

HIS-6059B

30

SOCIAL ANALYSIS FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Over the last few years, social development has become a leading focus in international development policy. Most international agencies and many of the larger NGOs have their own departments or divisions of social development. This module offers a detailed theoretical analysis of key concepts issues in social development, such as power relations, social capital, social exclusion, participatory development and different understandings of poverty. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries.

DEV-M063

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1

This is the first part of a two-year integrated course that covers basic principles from the social sciences, and uses them to think critically about processes of social change in developing countries. SAID1 provides an introduction to social analysis and is framed by the study of social anthropology. Concepts and methods are explained through the use of indepth case studies which from a range of developing country contexts. Issues covered in the course include: kinship, religion, violence, labour, politics and resistance. As well as introducing students to classical anthropological texts the course engages with the work of anthropologists looking at issues of contemporary development and change.

DEV-4005B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or ART-4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

SOCIETY, POLITICS AND CULTURE IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND

This year-long module covers a wide range of issues in the social and cultural history of England, c.1500-1750. Weekly two-hour classes are spread over both semesters and examine issues such as methodology and interpretation in social and cultural history; the nature of early modernity; senses of place, belonging and local identity; custom and popular memory; social relations and social conflict; crime, the law and legal culture; magic and popular religion; witchcraft; gender relations and gender identities; literacy, print and oral culture; and senses of the self. Assessment is based upon two 5,000 word essays, focussing on a question that has been tailored to the specific needs and interests of the student.

HIS-M04Y

60

SOURCES FOR LANDSCAPE HISTORY

This is a specialist preparatory exercise, examining sources for landscape history, ranging from historical documents through to field evidence and maps. There will be a strong practical element to this component, with an emphasis on how landscape historians use their sources.

HIS-M001

10

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

STALIN AND STALINISM: THE USSR 1924-1953

This special subject will examine the Stalin era in the context of other 20th-century dictatorships. There will be a particular focus on: Stalin's rise to power; Stalin's revolution; terror and its impact on Soviet society; war and dictatorship; decline and fall - Stalin and destalinization.

HIS-6031Y

60

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investiages the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR TRANSLATORS

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to computer-based tools, technologies and methodologies used in the translation industry, and to examine critically the strengths and weaknesses of such tools. All students learn to use the main market-leading applications (MemoQ, SDL Trados, Systran and others as appropriate); at least five tools will be covered each year. Individual or small-group exploration of a range of further tools is also supported, in response to student interests and needs. A 'learning by doing' approach is central to the module. Students learn to be confident explorers and adopters of translation technologies, so they can master new tools they need in future. As far as possible, learning replicates 'real-world' use of the technology and prepares those attending to join the industry in a range of roles on completion of their studies. To this end, students are expected to participate in collaborative team translation projects, to share in communicating best practice to their class colleagues, and to build a portfolio of their own translations during the module.

PPL-MT13

20

THE 'GOLDEN' TWENTIES: WEIMAR CULTURE AND THE SPIRIT OF MODERNITY

This module focuses on one of the most exciting and fascinating decades in German history. The Weimar Republic has become legendary for its intense creativity during a time of socio-economic crisis and political upheaval. It was a period when art and unrest flourished side by side, an age characterised by a new rhythm of life and filled by visionaries and bohemians, making Germany the incomparable centre of European cultural and intellectual life. Few places in the world were so inventive and exhilarating, but also so decadent and despairing. Beyond the glamour and glory of cabarets and department stores, gaudy jazz bands and gay bars, architectural innovation and cinematographic experimentation, there was also extreme poverty and an escalation of prostitution, youth delinquency, and political violence. This course attempts to capture this ambivalence of Weimar culture and society between glitter and doom, promise and tragedy.

HIS-6066A

30

THE AGE OF EXTREMES: EUROPE 1918 - 2001

This module examines the dramatic history of Europe during the twentieth century in its global context. It will consider the century's turbulent swings between war and peace before discussing the economic revolutions that engulfed the globe. The complex interactions between humans and the natural environment will form a central part of the module, before discussion of the ideological fissures that divided Europe for much of the twentieth century. The concluding section will consider the development of popular social movements and how they have shaped Europe.

HIS-4006B

20

THE AMERICAS 1492-1820

This module examines the history of North and South America and the Caribbean from 1492 to 1820, focusing on encounters between indigenous peoples, and on people of African heritage and settlers of European descent. We will examine a variety of primary sources in order to study such diverse subjects as race relations, missionary activity, the development of slavery, changing gender relations, economic development, and patterns of imperial administration and self-government. These will be studied using Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, English, and French colonial settings. Aims include: to contrast and compare different patterns of colonization in early Spanish and English America; to look at the development of different ideas of colonial societies; to assess the impact of the revolutions throughout the Americas.

HIS-6073Y

60

THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1857-1956

This module surveys the history of the British Empire from the mid-nineteenth century to the Suez Crisis, seeking to explain the Empire's growth and the early stages of its contraction. It examines the nature and impact of British colonial rule, at the political, economic and social/cultural levels, addressing the development of the 'settler' colonies/Dominions, the special significance of India and the implications of the 'New Imperialism'. Problems to be considered include theories of 'development' and 'collaboration', the growth of resistance and nationalism, and Britain's responses to these, and the impacts of the two World Wars and the Cold War on Britain's Imperial system.

HIS-5013B

20

THE CLASSICS AND THE CONTROVERSIES: EARLY MODERN HISTORY READING GROUP

This module introduces students to some key texts encompassing different approaches to early modern history, and engages them in broad debates with the wider community of early modernists about developments in the field. Each seminar will be held fortnightly and be based around the preparation of a text that everyone has read. Seminar participants (including staff) will be expected to make one short introductory presentation on the text as the basis for in-depth discussion about the text itself, and the issues raised by it. Texts may include authors such as Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Natalie Zemon Davis, and Michel Foucault, E P Thompson, and Keith Thomas covering a wide range of the social, cultural, political and economic history of Europe and the wider world. Students will be supplied with copies of all of the readings as well as a supplementary reading list on key themes and debates in early modern history. The aim is not only to introduce students to a broad range of theoretical perspectives and approaches to early modern history, but also to assist in developing skills of close reading, discussion, presentation, listening, and the application of different theoretical perspectives. Students will also acquire a broad knowledge of historiographical approaches to early modern history, although it is not a module in historiography. The module will be led by Drs Warde and Evangelisti, but other staff members in the School and postgraduate students may also contribute to help engage students in a wider current of debate surrounding key themes in early modern history. Assessment will be by means of a 4-5,000-word essay at the end of the Spring Semester, which may take the form of: (a) a detailed analysis of one core text; (b) a discussion of one or more of the core texts within the wider historiography of the field; or (c) a comparative discussion of the approaches embodied in different texts.

HIS-M03Y

30

THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This module analyses the emergence, development and end of the Cold War. In doing so it examines political, ideological and legal aspects of conflict between and within states, issues of sovereignty, nuclear strategy and arms control, as well as peacekeeping, disarmament and non-violent resistance. Alongside political developments, themes such as everyday life, culture, sport and the existence of alternatives during the Cold War era will also be considered.

HIS-5024B

20

THE CONQUEST OF AMERICA

This module examines the discovery of the New World, and the Spanish and Portuguese conquest of America. Through the letters of Columbus, Cortes, and other written and visual narratives of the time, we shall study the impact of the Conquest on both European and native American societies, and the long-lasting effects that the circulation of people, goods, and ideas, had on Western cultures.

HIS-6038Y

60

THE CRUSADES

This module will consider the history of the Crusades and the Crusader States from 1095 to 1291, covering a broad range of themes, religious , military and social, and taking into consideration the relations between Christians and Moslems in the Holy Land. Particular attention will be paid to primary sources, which are abundant and available in English translation.

HIS-6001A

30

THE DEVIL'S BROOD: THE ANGEVIN KINGS OF ENGLAND (1154-1225)

This Special Subject focuses on the lives and actions of three of the most charismatic kings of the English. It begins by an examination of the creator of the Angevin dynasty, Henry fitz Empress, who, by the time he was twenty-one, dominated more than half of France as well as being king of the English. On the continent, Henry was a successful military commander; in England, he was the creator of the English common law and a centralising administration. And it was of him that St Bernard is supposed to have declared 'he came from the Devil and he will go to the Devil'. His son and successor, Richard the Lionheart, was one of the greatest knights of his age as well as being a crusader and successful military commander who seemingly placed the Angevin Empire on a solid footing. After these two great makers of empire, the third ruler of the dynasty almost brought the whole edifice crashing down. King John lost the continental lands, and by the time of his death his lands were being ravaged by a foreign prince, his barons were in revolt having gathered themselves behind a document we know as Magna Carta, and his dynasty on the verge of extinction. This Special Subject has at its core the story of the creation and near destruction of this dynasty; and seeks further to examine the politics, culture, and society of the lands over which the Angevin dynasty held sway. This was an age of profound intellectual, religious, and political change, and this Special Subject will be set within this wider context. Students will be expected to become conversant with the primary sources in translation and to be aware of current historiographical debates. Teaching will be through student-centred seminars. Students will be expected to do weekly gobbets both as a way of becoming familiar with the sources and as preparation for the examination.

HIS-6027Y

60

THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR: WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS

This module explores female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. It will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes. It will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5029B

20

THE ENGLISH CIVIL WARS

This module looks at the causes, course and significance at what, in terms of relative population loss was probably the single most devastating conflict in English history; the civil wars of 1642-6, 1648 and 1651. In those years, families, villages and towns were divided by political allegiances and military mobilisation. Hundreds of thousands died, not just from warfare, but also from the spread of infectious disease, siege and the disruption of food supplies. In the rest of the British Isles, suffering was even more profound. The execution of the King in 1649, intended to bring an end to the wars, divided the country ever more deeply. By the late 1640s, radical social groups had emerged who questioned the very basis of authority in Early Modern Society, and made arguments for democracy and for the redistribution of land and power. Karl Marx thought that English revolution marked the beginnings of capitalism. Was he right? Focussing on ordinary men and women as well as upon important generals, politicians and monarchs, this module examines the following issues: the causes of the civil war; the reign of Charles I; the start of the warfare in Ireland and Scotland; the outbreak of the English Civil war; the course of the war; popular allegiances - why did ordinary people fight?; the Levellers, Diggers and Ranters; the crisis of 1647-9; the trial and execution of Charles I; gender, women and revolution; the experience of warfare; print and popular political gossip; the failure of the English Republic and the Restoration of Charles II. Particular use will be made of the primary source extracts and web resources.

HIS-5028B

20

THE ENGLISH IN AMERICA 1607-1692

This module explores the colonization of America by seventeenth-century English people. The memory of the Mayflower Pilgrims has obscured the fact that the first three generations remained English, unaware of the political and cultural distinctiveness to come. We will therefore be concerned with 'the repatriation of early American history'. We shall examine settlers' lives from the foundation of Jamestown in 1607, through the creation of Massachusetts in the 1630s, to the wars and rebellions of 1670-90. Not confined to New England, this module looks at a range of colonial experiences from Maine to the Caribbean, especially the mentalities of people moving between old and new worlds.

HIS-6033Y

60

THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1066 TO 1600: BUILT AND SEMI-NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS

This module will examine the development of the English countryside from late Saxon times into the eighteenth century. Topics covered will include woods and wood-pastures, enclosure, walls and hedges, the archaeology of churches and vernacular houses. There will be a substantial practical component to the module, involving the analysis of buildings, hedges and woods and other semi-natural environments.

HIS-5003B

20

THE FIRST WORLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This reading-intensive module explores the impact of the First World War on European and non-European states, societies, and cultures. It aims to broaden and deepen the students' knowledge by introducing some of the lesser known aspects of the conflict, such as the campaigns on the Eastern front, in Africa, or the Middle East. Students will investigate the role and perception of colonial troops in the European theatre of war and examine the war efforts of such countries as Italy, Serbia, the Ottoman Empire, and Australia. Further topics to be discussed include alliance politics and the role of neutral states, psychological effects of 'industrialised slaughter', atrocities against non-combatant civilians, captivity and occupation, state propaganda and the spiritual mobilisation of intellectuals, as well as processes of social change with regard to home and family life, ethnicity and class. The module will draw on a wide range of primary sources, including poems, paintings, and film. In their coursework, students will have the opportunity to study more specific issues, such as naval and aerial warfare, British military strategy, civil-military relations in democratic and autocratic states, medical innovations, the war experiences of children, or questions of memory and commemoration.

HIS-6051B

30

THE GREAT POWERS AND THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN

This module will look at the Eastern Mediterranean as a centre of Great Power rivalry through a series of case studies, stretching from the late eighteenth to the later twentieth century. It will consider such issues as the region’s impact on wider international politics and the impact on the region of Great Powers’ involvement in its affairs. In doing so, the module will examine key aspects of diplomacy, economic rivalries, the role of sea power, the origins and conduct of wars, and attempts at conflict resolution. Extensive use will be made of primary sources.

HIS-6054A

30

THE HISTORY OF NORWICH

This module will focus on the development of towns and cities in England from the Norman Conquest until the present day. We will use Norwich as our main case study, but will also draw on other comparative examples around England, such as London, York, Exeter or Leeds, to place Norwich within its wider context. This module will combine social, political and economic history with a detailed consideration of the built environment of the city; key buildings, open spaces and street patterns. There will be regular field trips into Norwich to explore historic buildings, collections and landscapes.

HIS-5040A

20

THE HOLOCAUST IN HISTORY

In the last twenty years there has been a sustained and remarkable growth of historical and public interest in the 'Holocaust'. The proliferation of academic work on all aspects of the history of the Holocaust, accompanied more recently by a burgeoning scholarship on genocide in general, has been matched by an enormous output of 'private' and 'public' history, from memoirs and recollections by 'survivors' to films and documentaries, websites of all kinds and the official commemoration of the Holocaust in museums, exhibitions and days of remembrance. The Holocaust has thus been transformed from a specialised branch field of historical enquiry into a contemporary cultural phenomenon. This module encourages you to reflect critically on this phenomenon by setting the history of the Holocaust into its wider context. This will involve study of: the history of the persecution of the Jews since the Middle Ages; the changing nature of antisemitism in Europe over the centuries; the emergence of a racial-political antisemitism at the end of the 19th century; the impact of the First World War on attitudes to minorities and on the propensity for more violent assertions of nationhood; Nazi practices of isolation, Aryanisation, deportation and ghettoisation; the German war of racial annihilation in the East and the implementation of the 'Final Solution'; the experience, motivations and psychology of the 'ordinary' perpetrator; the testimony of those who survived the Holocaust; the relationship of the Holocaust to other genocides; the challenges of representing and teaching the Holocaust. The module will therefore enable you to reflect more widely on what history is, how we do it, and why we do it; on the methods one can use, the questions one can ask, the variety of sources one can tackle and why history matters.

HIS-4005B

20

THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION - THE MAKING OF MODERN BRITAIN 1500-1700

In the two hundred years following 1700, the British economy and population entered a sustained and unprecedented phase of growth. The economic, demographic, social and cultural changes that ensued were so far reaching, that by 1850, commentators were agreed that an 'industrial revolution' had taken place. This module seeks to illuminate the many facets of this transformation, and to explore the extensive historiography surrounding them. This module introduces students both to the economic processes which underpinned industrialisation, and to many ways in which Britons of all social levels ranks experienced and thought about their changing world.

HIS-6025A

30

THE MAKING OF MODERN BRITAIN, 1851-1951

This core module will enable you to examine a tumultuous period in which Britain was transformed, both at home and in its worldwide role. In the mid-nineteenth century it had become the global hegemon, buoyed by industrial revolution and drawing on British power overseas. By the late nineteenth century, it was already being challenged; two cataclysmic world wars left its power draining away. Or did it? Alternating between Britain within its borders and its role beyond them, this module will allow you to explore a range of topics, questions and approaches to illuminate the period. The module is team-taught by a group of historians who represent one of the largest concentrations of expertise in this period in a British university, with specialisms including foreign and imperial policy, economic and social history, gender history and a range of other interests. They will draw upon primary material from their own research as the basis for seminar discussion, while the topics of your written work will be defined by you.

HIS-M31Y

60

THE MAKING OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1450 TO 1950

This Special Subject deals with the development of the English landscape from c.1450 to 1950. We will focus on agricultural change in the period up to 1870, before moving on to consider the landscape and architecture of the English country house and landed estates. We will discuss developments in architectural design, spatial planning and the changing appearance of parks and gardens during this period, as well as discussing the social and political ideologies that underpin these developments. We will also consider the development of the rural landscape in the period after 1870; the decline of the great estates, the effects of the agricultural depression and the impact of war and suburbanisation. Finally, we will discuss changing attitudes towards the conservation and preservation of the countryside. There will be a number of field trips during the year.

HIS-6026Y

60

THE NORMAN CONQUEST

In the first semester, we shall examine the Old English and Norman states before 1066. In the second semester the module will focus on the Conquest and the colonisation of the Kingdom of England. Particular attention will be given to the processes by which England was brought under Norman rule, both in the ecclesiastical and secular spheres. The module will be taught through original sources in translation.

HIS-6037Y

60

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

This module will examine the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Saxon period. We will examine the field archaeology of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, discuss in some detail the landscapes of Roman Britain, and assess the nature of the Roman/Saxon transition. We will then investigate the development of territorial organisation, field systems and settlement patterns during the Saxon and Medieval periods. The module provides an introduction to archaeological theory and methods, as well as giving a broad overview of the development of society, economy and environment in the period up to c.1300.

HIS-5002A

20

THE PAPACY, CHRISTIANITY AND THE STATE, 1050-1300

In these centuries the pope became the most influential figure in Europe. He could depose emperors, mobilise vast armies to fight on crusade, and intervene in disputes in far-away realms. This module explores the origins of papal power and its impact on emerging nations in the west.

HIS-5048A

20

THE RISE AND FALL OF BRITISH POWER

This module examines Britain's expansion and decline as a great power, from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the 1950s. It considers the foundations of British power, the emergence of rivals, Britain's relationship with the European powers and the USA, and the impact of two World Wars and Cold War. It investigates the reasons for Britain's changing fortunes, as it moved from guarding the balance of power to losing its empire.

HIS-5011A

20

THE THIRD REICH

This module studies the history of the Third Reich from an international and comparative perspective through the extensive use of primary sources. It examines the origins and the rise of National Socialism, the seizure and consolidation of power, the nature and political structure of the dictatorship, and the transformation of German society under Nazi rule, but there is a particular focus on foreign policy and the impact of the regime's policies on Europe and the world. Aspects covered include Nazi Germany's relationship with other autocracies and right-wing forces in Europe, German geopolitical thought and the role of the Foreign Office, the formation and administration of the Nazi empire, issues of collaboration and resistance in occupied territories, combat motivation and war crimes of ordinary soldiers, the importance of non-German perpetrators of the Holocaust, the German home front and the effects of Allied aerial bombings, the various plans for a post-war Europe, and the problem of ethnic cleansing both before and after 1945.

HIS-6028Y

60

TOOLS AND SKILLS IN ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to introduce a range of tools and frameworks used by researchers, government agencies, businesses and NGOs to inform and develop their environmental management strategies in a sustainable development context. Students will gain familiarity with the most important available approaches and an understanding of the key assumptions and ideas in environment-development research, monitoring and management systems. The module is taught through workshops and practical sessions, lectures and field or study visits within Norfolk. There is an emphasis on putting concepts into practice and understanding how environmental assessments guide management actions. Both individual and team projects will be important. Tools and frameworks covered may include environmental and social impact assessments, survey techniques for land, water or biodiversity, GIS and modelling of social-ecological systems, sustainable livelihoods analysis and integrated conservation and development.

DEV-M064

20

TRANSLATION IN CONTEXT

This module explores the issues fundamental to translation as process and product in practical contexts, examines theories of equivalence and textual structure in different language-cultures, and applies theory to specialised practice (e.g. commercial, legal, technical, political).

PPL-MA14

20

TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND

This module seeks to identify patterns of continuity and change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with a view to defining the early modern period in practice. Through an examination of both political and constitutional history from the top down, and social and cultural history from the bottom up, it seeks to understand the period dynamically, in terms of new and often troubled relationships which were formed between governors and governed. Topics include: Tudor monarchy, the Protestant Reformation, the social order, popular religion and literacy, riot and rebellion, the Stuart state, the civil wars, crime and the law, women and gender.

HIS-5010A

20

TUDOR REBELLIONS

This module looks at the nature of rebellions, riot and popular politics in Tudor England. The early part of the module proceeds in a chronological format; and after that, we analyse rebellion in more thematic terms, individual sessions look at: late medieval rebellion; early Tudor rebellion; The Pilgrimage of Grace of 1536; the 1549 rebellions Kett's rebellion, popular rebellion in the 1580s and 1590os; gender and ritual; seditious speech; popular culture; Shakespeare, drama and popular protest; food and enclosure rioting. A lot of use is made of extracts of primary material . After we have studied Kett's Rebellion of 1549, there will be a fieldtrip to examine key sites in Norwich associated with those events. This may possibly end in one of the oldest pubs in Britain; the Adam and Eve.

HIS-6018B

30

TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN, 1914 TO THE PRESENT

This module examines the themes of conflict and consensus in Britain from the Great War to the present day, both through the study of political life and also by assessing the impact of economic, social and cultural change. There are opportunities to re-evaluate issues such as the impact of war on society, "landmark" General Elections such as those of 1945 and 1979, the nature and durability of consensus politics in the 1950s, or Britain's role in the contemporary world.

HIS-5023A

20

TWENTIETH-CENTURY SPORT HISTORY

This module explores key themes and topics in the history of twentieth century sport, from the founding of the modern Olympic Games in Athens in 1896 to the impact which the collapse of socialism had upon sport at the end of the century. Sport's interaction with empire, nationalism, fascism , socialism and capitalism will be considered, demonstrating that the political history and international relations of the century are deeply entwined with sport. A range of examples are examined, from Franco's Spain to the superpower competition of the Cold War. As an aspect of social history, issues of gender, race and disability are inseparable from this topic, as are the harnessing and exploitation of sport as a means of war or reconciliation at various periods throughout the century.

HIS-6006B

30

TYRANNY AND REVOLUTION: THE AGE OF RICHARD II

This module explores the 'Age of Richard II' (1377-99) as revealed in an exceptionally-rich corpus of primary sources. Richard's was a tumultuous reign. To many contemporaries it seemed as if the world was turning upside down as those who traditionally wielded power in English society - the king, the church and the aristocracy - faced unprecedented challenges to their authority. Through weekly seminar discussions, members of the class will learn to assess the significance of the reign based on a close reading of selected texts. Two sources in particular will provide the documentary spine of the course: the 'Parliament Rolls of medieval England' (recently re-edited in translation and freely available online) and the great chronicle of Thomas Walsingham, a monk of St Albans and perhaps England's foremost chronicler of the period. We will also explore a range of other records and narratives as well as the verse of some of England's most famous medieval poets, many of whom (notably Geoffrey Chaucer) were closely connected to the court of Richard II. The module falls into two parts. Part 1 investigates the political developments from the dying days of Edward III through the Peasant's revolt (1381) to Richard II's final years of 'tyranny' (1397-9). Part two adopts a thematic approach. Topics here include parliament, political society, heresy, the Hundred Years War, chivalry and courtliness. We conclude by examining the revolution of 1399, which resulted in Richard's deposition and death.

HIS-6021A

30

UNDERSTANDING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This module provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the analysis and understanding of issues of environmental change, and of the relationships between environment and development. Students will have a critical understanding of social constructions of cause and effect relationships in environment and development issues, including a critical understanding of scientific assessments. They will be able to link these understandings to topics encountered in other courses, and to develop their own perspectives on environment and development issues. In particular they should understand the somewhat different perspectives in 'less developed countries' on environment and development issues. The course consists of weekly workshops and seminar sessions, which include videos and discussions oriented around core issues and readings. Assessment is based on coursework and written examination.

DEV-M051

20

UTOPIAS AND DYSTOPIAS

"As one form of government must be allowed more perfect than another....why may we not enquire what is the most perfect of all?...This subject is surely the most worthy of curiosity of any that the wit of man can possibly devise." David Hume "A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at..." Oscar Wilde Utopian visions, ridiculed in past ages as impossible dreams, such as votes for women and universal healthcare provision, have often eventually proved prophetic, informing highly-valued societal institutions in later epochs. Yet utopian thinking can also have dangers particularly where experiments seeking to realise elevated political goals become justifications for totalitarianism and persecution. Both before and since the appearance of Thomas Moore's tale of the fantastic customers of an imaginary island called Utopia (1516), writers have imagined better worlds that their followers have sought to make real. This course seeks to understand different perspectives on the utopian tradition, examining various examples in some of its multiple forms - novels, films, folklore, experimental communities and political blueprints. Using lectures, trips, workshops and discussions, 'utopian' solutions to problems such as eliminating crime, gender inequalities, environmental destruction, and political/societal conflict will be analysed. As well as 'positive' visions the course also focuses on dystopian works such as Brave New World and 1984 and considers the significance of anti-utopian thought for political understanding.

PPL-2002S

20

VICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN BRITAIN

The module will cover the main themes in British history between 1848 and the eve of the First World War. Starting with the Great Exhibition of 1851, it will examine themes such as religion and the impact of Darwin; the emergence of 'democracy' and political parties in the age of Gladstone and Disraeli; the critics of Victorian and Edwardian society; the Irish question and the domestic impact of Empire; the rise of labour and the 'crises' of Liberalism and Conservatism; the monarchy under Queen Victoria and Edward VII; the women's suffrage movement; the decline of the aristocracy and the nature of Edwardian patriotism as Britain faced the prospect of war.

HIS-5052B

20

VICTORIAN UNDERWORLDS

This module introduces students to the darker side of life in Victorian Britain. Though this was undoubtedly a period of economic prosperity, not everyone shared in the gains. In this module we shall look at those who, for reasons of poverty or 'deviance' were confined to the margins. Topics will include the poor, the criminal and insane, prostitution, drink, child-workers, the workhouse, the London Irish, homosexuality and the Oscar Wilde case. By looking at the margins and the misfits, we will seek to gain a deeper understanding of British society in the nineteenth century.

HIS-6012B

30

VISUAL(ISING) HISTORY

The importance of visual and material sources as historical evidence, as witnesses to history, has long been recognised by historians. Relics, buildings, maps, paintings, photographs, and films are all visual and material sources from which historians can elicit meaning. Paintings, photographs, films, in particular, promise to give us unique access to the ideological, physical and emotional content of a specific historic moment. They are text to be analysed. But visual evidence also challenges us to consider where we as historians draw the line between the mediated and unmediated 'truth' of the past. History is never static. It is always an interpretation of the past that changes. The module will introduce students to the analysis and interpretation of a wide range of visual and material evidence. Furthermore, students will examine the manifold ways in which audiovisual historical representation in form of documentaries and feature films shape and reshape our collective memory and understanding of the past from the medieval to the contemporary. The seminars at UEA will be accompanied by film screenings, sessions held in conjunction with CinemaPlus (Media Education Partnership for Norfolk) at Cinema City, seminars at the East Anglian Film Archive and a field trip to the permanent Holocaust exhibition at the Imperial War Museum, London. THIS MODULE IS FOR STUDENTS ON THE 'FILM and HISTORY' COURSE ONLY

HIS-4007B

20

WARS, HUMANITARIAN CRISES AND AID

This module will provide an overview of complex emergencies across the globe (conflicts, natural disasters), their causes, their impacts on human security and the multiple challenges they pose to the aid community. It will combine approaches 'from below' (drivers of political violence and state failures) with global perspectives on security, the politicisation of aid and the ethical debates surrounding humanitarian intervention.

DEV-3C29

20

WARS, HUMANITARIAN CRISES AND AID

This module will provide an overview of complex emergencies across the globe (conflicts, natural disasters), their causes, their impacts on human security and the multiple challenges they pose to the aid community. It will combine approaches 'from below' (drivers of political violence and state failures) with global perspectives on security, the politicisation of aid and the ethical debates surrounding humanitarian intervention.

DEV-6003A

20

WATER SECURITY FOR DEVELOPMENT - THEORY AND CONCEPTS

The aim of 'Water Security Theory and Concepts' is to investigate the theory and conceptual frameworks that underpin research and policy work on 'water security'. The module explores the background to rising concerns regarding the protection and use of water, and outlines key issues and interests relevant to its current treatment in research and in practice. It examines the differences between water security and water resources security, and moreover, investigates the connections between water security with food, climate or energy security, and international, state and individual concerns regarding military security.

DEV-M101

20

WATER SECURITY FOR DEVELOPMENT - TOOLS AND POLICY

The aim of 'Water Security Tools and Policy' is to investigate and provide a working familiarity with established and cutting-edge analytical, decision-making, and development tools (such as water footprinting or climate impacts assessment) for effective water security policy. It will utilise case study material, physical models, computer exercises and material brought or sourced by students to audit the water security of a system of interest (e.g. city, region, country, irrigation scheme). The students will record and assess the factors that affect water security such as laws and legal frameworks; water supply and demand volumes; institutions for managing water; climate change science and models; climate risks and adaptation; and future projections regarding societal change. Actions to address security will be discussed and formulated.

DEV-M102

20

WE ARE NOT AMUSED: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF QUEEN VICTORIA

This special subject focuses on the life and times of Britain's longest serving monarch, Queen Victoria. The module starts by exploring Queen Victoria's public and private life. It will examine in detail her political and diplomatic influence, and her experiences as a wife and mother. Drawing on a wide and expansive range of primary sources, including Queen Victoria's own journals and letters, we will seek to piece together the personality and ideology of the woman who ruled Britain for 63 years. Using Queen Victoria's reign as a backdrop, the module will also consider a number of the key political, social and cultural changes Britain witnessed in the nineteenth century. Seminar topics will include: Queenship; Constitutional Monarch; Imperialism; Religion; Womanhood; Patriotism; and Republicanism. The module will conclude by examining the perceptions of Queen Victoria and her reign in the twentieth and twenty-first century.

HIS-6070Y

60

WEALTH AND WELFARE IN EDWARDIAN BRITAIN

This module will provide a detailed investigation of Edwardian Britain, a period associated with both lavish lifestyles of the wealthy but also a new concern with the condition of the poor. Themes will include the debate on the physical deterioration of the British race, following the Boer war; the impact of social investigators such as Charles Booth; Conservative, Liberal and Labour approaches to social policies and the emergence of a 'welfare state'; the costs and benefits of the British empire; the 'Indian Summer' of the aristocracy and the land question; monarchy and welfare; Edwardian town planning and architecture.

HIS-6067B

30

WELFARE AND EVALUATION IN DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of Impact Evaluation. For that purpose, the first part intends to address the theory of welfare, with particular reference to poverty, inequality and multi-dimensional ill-being. The second part of the module intends to provide an introduction the theories and practices of evidence based policy making, and the third part to cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis.

DEV-M097

20

WITCHCRAFT, MAGIC AND BELIEF IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the history of early modern Europe through the history of witchcraft, witch-beliefs, and especially witchcraft prosecutions after 1500. Through learned demonology and folk traditions, we explore the development of the idea of the witch, and see how during the turbulent era of the Reformation this thinking translated into legal trials and, occasionally some savage witch-panics. We look in detail at subjects such as gender, fear and anxiety, state building, and scepticism, ranging across early modern Britain, continental Europe and colonial America.

HIS-4004B

20

WORKING IN THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT

This module will provide students with the opportunity to undertake a work placement with an employer working in the historic environment sector. A number of placements based on specific projects will be arranged with host organisations, and students will choose their placement from these options. Every student will be expected to attend an informal interview with their host organisation prior to starting their placement. Alternatively, a student may arrange their own work placement but this must be approved in advance by the module organisers. Past placements have been hosted by the National Trust, Norfolk Historic Environment Service, Suffolk County Council and the Peak District National Park Authority. Placements must be undertaken between June and December, and will be followed up by a series of practical seminars in the spring semester. A list of provisional placements and projects will be available in Spring 2012. Please note that enrolment on this module will only be confirmed after a short interview with the module organisers.

HIS-6013Y

30

YEAR ABROAD

A compulsory year abroad for students taking one or more honours language(s). Satisfactory completion of the year abroad, as defined by the School Board, is necessary for registration in the following year.

PPL-2X0Y

120

YOUTH IN MODERN EUROPE

The importance of youth as a driving force for social change has been recognised by many historians. Young people were often at the forefront wherever revolutions took place, wars were fought and tensions in society erupted. However, the historical study of youth is still a relatively young discipline. The module uses 'youth' as a prism to study key themes in 20th century European history, such as the experience of war, life under dictatorship and the longue duree of social change. We shall examine the diverse experience of youth in Western and Eastern Europe during war and peace times, including the Communist and Nazi state-sponsored youth systems, and also the way in which generational experience and conflicts became underlying forces for social and political change. The module employs a strong comparative approach and countries studied include France, Britain, the Soviet Union, West and East Germany, Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia. The seminars will be accompanied by several film screenings.

HIS-6014B

30

Students should complete at least 80 credits in their two major subjects by the end of Year 3. The Project module can count as 20 credits towards each major subject or 40 credits towards one major subject, depending on the topic chosen. In Year 3 students are expected to take a minimum of 40 credits at level 3 in addition to the Natural Sciences project.

Compulsory Study (40 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

NATURAL SCIENCES BSC PROJECT

This individual research module is compulsory for all Natural Sciences students and is only available to Natural Sciences students. It comprises supervised research in at least one area of science. It may involve research partners across the Norwich Research Park. The project can involve collection of data in the laboratory or in the field, and/or development of a piece of equipment, and/or development of software or a theoretical/numerical model, and/or analysis of pre-existing data from a variety of sources. It must include independent scientific analysis. It will be assessed by a written report, a presentation, and a web log maintained throughout the project.

NAT-6001Y

40

Option A Study (60 credits)

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL TECHNIQUES

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C1Y AND TAKE MTH-2C4Y Calculus of variations. Sturm-Liouville theory. Orthogonal polynomials. Laplace and Fourier transforms. Asymptotic methods including steepest descent and Green's functions.

MTHD6017B

20

ADVANCED STATISTICS

This module covers three topics in statistical theory. For this year they are Regression and Linear Model, Generalised Models and Non-parametric Methods. The first two topics consider both the theory and practice of statistical model fitting and students will be expected to analyse real data. The third topic is chosen to be a contrasting one. Non-parametric methods are a vital part of the statisticians armoury and cheap computing makes such techniques very powerful. We look at the traditional permutation based methods as well as the empirical distribution function.

CMP-6004A

20

ADVANCED TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Discussion of the reactivity of pi electron rich molecules, particularly to light and heat, through consideration of current approaches such as Frontier Molecular Orbital theory. Reactions ranging from the isomerisation of alkenes through to more complex electrocyclic processes are examined. The module also examines the role of substituents on reactivity of aromatic compounds and its quantification using the Hammett equation. There follows a consideration of the physical organic chemistry of organic radicals, SET mechanisms and the rationalisation of the organic photochemistry of aldehydes and ketones in terms of free radical chemistry. Also examines examples of biogenesis, chemical synthesis and biological action of selected natural products and pharmaceutical chemicals. Specifically, ribosomal peptides, non ribosomal peptides and terpenoids are introduced. Students enrolled on this module will benefit from a number of complementary lectures delivered by guest lecturers from both academia and industry.

CHE-6150Y

20

ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHYSICS

This module comprises a broadly-based series of lectures on physics, coupled with written activities based upon them. The twin objectives are to provide a contextual backdrop to the more focussed studies in other physical science modules, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information. The topics in the module will be used as a basis for assignments and exercises which will help to develop students' team-working and presentational skills.

NAT-6002B

20

ALGEBRA

(a) Group theory: basic concepts and examples. Cosets, Lagrange's theorem. Normal subgroups and quotient groups. First isomorphism theorem. Quotient spaces in linear algebra. (b) Rings, elementary properties and examples of commutative rings. Ideals, quotient rings. Polynomial rings and construction of finite fields. Unique Factorization in rings. Applications in linear algebra.

MTHA5003Y

20

ANALYSIS

(a) Continuity, differentiation, uniform convergence, power series and how they represent functions for both real and complex variables. (b) Topology of the complex plane, holomorphic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy and Laurent theorems, residue calculus.

MTHA5001Y

20

ANALYTICAL NUMBER THEORY

Before taking this module you must take MTHA5001Y (MTH-2C1Y). This module will be assessed by 100% examination but you may also be informally assessed by coursework and/or project.

MTHD6022A

20

APPLIED STATISTICS A

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE AND BUSINESS STATISTICS STUDENTS SHOULD TAKE CMPC2S12, APPLIED STATISTICS B, DUE TO THE DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS OF THEIR COURSE. This is a module designed to give students the opportunity to apply statistical methods in realistic situations. While no advanced knowledge of probability and statistics is required, we expect students to have some background in probability and statistics before taking this module. The aim is to introduce students to R statistical language and to cover Regression, Analysis of Variance and Survival analysis. Other topics from a list including: Extremes and quartiles, Bootstrap methods and their application, Sample surveys, Simulations, Subjective statistics, Forecasting and Clustering methods, may be offered to cover the interests of those in the class.

CMP-5017B

20

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

An analysis of how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. There is an important practical component to this module that includes laboratory work and three field visits. The first piece of course work involves statistical analysis of class data. The module can be taken alongside hydrology or geochemical modules and also fits well with other ecology modules. Pre-requisite requirements: An A-level in a biological subject, a biologically biased access course or any 1st year ecology module in ENV or BIO. Students must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data.

ENV-5001A

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

This module studies the organization of both the system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of both hardware and software components is emphasized throughout, and the central concepts of the module are reinforced by practical work in the laboratory.

CMP-5013A

20

ASTROPHYSICS WITH ADVANCED TOPICS

This 20 credit module gives an overview of astrophysics through lectures and workshops. Assessment will involve some coursework and a coursetest. The module assumes previous study of either A level physics or an equivalent course. Topics covered will include some history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology. Some of these topics will be taken to a more advanced level. The more advanced topics will include workshop examples and coursetest questions at level 2 standard.

NAT-5001A

20

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE

Atmospheric chemistry and global change are in the news: stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, greenhouse gases, and global scale air pollution are seen as some of the most significant environmental problems of our age. Chemical composition and transformations underlie these issues, and drive many important atmospheric processes. This module covers the fundamental chemical principles and underlying physical processes in the atmosphere from the stratosphere to the surface, and considers the role of chemistry in current issues of atmospheric chemical change through a series of lectures, problem solving classes, seminars, experimental and computing labs as well as a field trip to UEA's own atmospheric observatory in Weybourne/North Norfolk. A solid background in chemistry is recommended (e.g., AS-level or equivalent). ENV-6020B is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here.

ENV-5015A

20

ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION: MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING

PLEASE NOTE: FOR THIS MODULE, IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT ENV-5015A HAS ALREADY BEEN TAKEN Emissions of gases and other pollutants from human activities are critical drivers of phenomena such as climate change, degradation of air quality in urban and rural areas, and long-range transport of air pollution. To understand these impacts it is necessary to make atmospheric measurements of chemical composition, and to interpret these observations with a range of statistical, conceptual, and computer-based models. In this module you will be introduced to a range of modern atmospheric chemical measurements techniques, both those used in the field and in the laboratory. Consideration will be given to the relevant chemical and physical processes that are required to understand these observations. You will then learn about a range of interpretive techniques including numerical models, and you will put some of these in to practice. Teaching will be via lectures, lab sessions and workshops. This module is a natural follow-on to ENV-5015A, which you are recommended to take first. This module will particularly interest those considering a career or research related to air quality measurement and assessment.

ENV-6020B

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

In this module, the interrelationships between animal behaviour, ecology and evolution will be explored. Students will examine how behaviour has evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles will provide the theoretical framework, within which the module will seek to explain the ultimate function of animal behaviours. Concepts and examples will be developed through the lecture series, exploring behaviours in the context of altruism, optimality, foraging, and particularly reproduction, the key currency of evolutionary success. In parallel with the lectures, students will design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, collecting original data to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE BIO-4004B This module builds on the principles of biochemistry and cell biology taught in BIO-4004B. Selected topics in intermediary metabolism are covered in greater depth, especially in relation to aspects relevant to disease and ageing in mammalian physiology. In turn this leads to a discussion of the roles of specific proteins and their involvement in cellular reactions, protein synthesis and breakdown, bioenergetics and signalling processes. The recent contributions of structural biology to cellular biochemistry are acknowledged in both the lecture series and associated practical classes, whilst ATP utilization is illustrated by consideration of the active transport of molecules across membranes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

BIO-5002A

20

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND HUMAN SOCIETY

This is an inter-disciplinary module focusing on the interaction between ecology, biodiversity and human societies. It examines the human drivers of biodiversity loss, the importance of biodiversity to human society, conflicts between human society and conservation and how these can be resolved, and institutions for biodiversity conservation and environmental management. It is designed for students of Biology, Ecology, Environmental Science, Environmental Geography and International Development and Development Studies. This inter-disciplinary module does not require previous detailed knowledge of ecological mechanisms; where a simple understanding of key ecological processes is important, this will be reviewed and taught in class. Key principles, issues and theory are covered in lectures by UEA faculty. These are supported by case studies from external speakers working in conservation, environmental and resource management agencies and NGOs. The module will comprise 2 core lectures plus one workshop / seminar / outside speaker each week. The module will be assessed by a spring semester exam and coursework designed to develop skills in reviewing and interpreting evidence to non-scientists. This will comprise a briefing paper written for non-specialist policy makers, reviewing scientific evidence and areas of uncertainty on a conservation topic, and providing recommendations for UK government policy and identifying research needed, involving both group (written report max 1500 words, conducted in pairs) and individual (powerpoint slideshow: a summary presentation for policy makers) elements. There are no formal prerequisites, but the module complements and builds on a number of 500 level module including: ENV / BIO 500 level core ecology modules (ie, populations, processes), ENV-5002B Environmental Politics and Policy Making, DEV-5013Y Natural Resources for Development.

ENV-6006A

20

BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE ECOLOGY

This module examines the microbial processes that underpin our dependence on the marine environment for 'services' such as climate modulation and nutrient regeneration. The module will cover the evolution, biodiversity and molecular ecology of bacteria, diatoms, coccolithophores and nitrogen fixers, and the physiology and distribution of zooplankton. Example ecosystems such as the Antarctic, mid ocean gyres and Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems will be studied in detail and predictions of the impact of environmental change (increasing temperature, decreasing pH, decreasing oxygen, and changes in nutrient supply) on marine ecosystem dynamics will be examined. Biological oceanographic methods will be critically evaluated. The module will include a reading week in week 7 and employability visits to the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

ENV-6005A

20

BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO ANY STUDENT THAT SATISFIES THE PRE-REQUISITE REQUIREMENTS. Alternative pre-requisites are BIO-4001A and BIO-4002B, or BIO-4003A and BIO-4004B. This module will provide an opportunity to discuss various aspects of biology in society. Students will be able to critically analyse the way biological sciences issues are represented in popular literature and the media and an idea of the current 'hot topics' in biological ethics. Specific topics to be covered will involve aspects of contemporary biological science that have important ethical considerations for society, such as GM crops, DNA databases, designer babies, stem cell research etc. Being able to understand the difference between scientific fact and scientific fiction is not always straightforward. What was once viewed as science fiction has sometimes become a scientific fact or scientific reality as our scientific knowledge and technology has increased exponentially. Conversely, science fiction can sometimes be portrayed inaccurately as scientific fact. Students will research relevant scientific literature and discover the degree of scientific accuracy represented within the genre of science fiction.

BIO-5012Y

20

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE BIO-4007Y OR CHE-4201Y. This module explores the structural, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of biological systems and the methodologies used to define them. Using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry, these topics will be discussed within three major themes: 1) Binding, activation and transfer in biological systems, 2) Enzyme catalysis, and 3) Macromolecular size, shape and structure determination. The concluding lectures will explore protein disorder, folding and structure to illustrate how biophysicists integrate concepts and methods from each of these themes when addressing a specific research topic.

CHE-5601Y

20

CANCER BIOLOGY

This module deals with the concepts and principles of genetic analysis of cancer. The various roles of genes in development, apoptosis, the cell cycle, metastasis and angiogenesis are covered for example. A discussion on the potential of novel therapies concludes the module. This module takes advantage of several experts from the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. Students will thus gain an in-depth appreciation of cancer as a disease process from both the scientific and clinical viewpoints. It is highly advantageous to have taken BIO-5003B as well as BIO-5005B.

BIO-6009A

20

CATCHMENT WATER RESOURCES

This module will adopt an integrated approach to studying surface water and groundwater resources in river basins. Approaches to catchment management will be considered in the context of improving water-dependent terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Topics of climate change impacts on water resources in terms of droughts and floods, as well as water quality issues arising from changing land-use patterns will be considered, together with the engineering and socio-economic methods necessary to adapt to future pressures on water resources. Co-taught with ENV-7019B.

ENV-6018B

20

CELL BIOLOGY

This module explores the molecular organisation of cells and the regulation of dynamic cellular changes, with some emphasis on medical cell biology. Dynamic properties of cell membranes, cell signalling, growth factor function and aspects of cancer biology and immunology. Regulation of the internal cell environment (nuclear organisation and information flow, cell growth, division and motility), the relationship of the cell to its extracellular matrix and the determination of cell phenotype. Aspects of cell death, the ageing process, developmental biology, mechanisms of tissue renewal and repair. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B or BIO-5009A.

BIO-5005B

20

CELL BIOLOGY AND MECHANISMS OF DISEASE

This module is concerned with the structure and function of cells in health and disease. It includes demonstrations of some of the imaging techniques used in the study of Cell Biology and workshops focused on how to design experiments and analyse research papers. Topics to be covered include: ubiquitination, the cytoskeleton and mechanics of cell division, signalling and cell migration, differentiation and apoptosis.

BIO-6006B

20

CELLULAR SIGNALLING

The module deals with signal transduction mechanisms, particularly in mammalian cells and with emphasis on human disease. Topics include the molecular basis of cell surface receptor activation, G-protein coupled receptors, kinases/phosphatases, 2nd messengers such as calcium and inositol lipids, and ion channels. The module then goes on to consider signalling mechanisms important for cell growth, differentiation and survival. (With the agreement of the module organiser, students who have taken BIO-5002A but not BIO-5005B may be allowed to take this module.)

BIO-6003A

20

CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Covers the major processes that set the chemical composition of the oceans, the distribution of nutrient, and carbon, the distribution of life in the oceans and the interaction of the oceans and atmosphere. Elements of physical oceanography and ocean circulation, of geochemistry, marine biology and global change science are covered.

ENV-5019A

20

CHEMICAL PHYSICS - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

The module consists of topics covering important areas of modern physical chemistry and chemical physics. The material will blend together experimental and theoretical aspects of condensed phase chemistry and materials chemistry.

CHE-6250Y

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: PHYSICAL SCIENCE BASIS

Climate change and variability has played a major role in shaping human history and the prospect of a warming world as a result of human activities (global warming) presents society with an increasing challenge over the coming decades. This module covers the science of climate change, our current understanding of anthropogenic effects on climate, and the uncertainties/limitations of our scientific knowledge. It provides details about the approaches, methods and techniques for understanding the history of climate change and for developing climate projections for the next 100 years, supporting further study of the scientific or policy aspects of the subject in either an academic or applied context. Co-taught with ENV-7014A.

ENV-6013A

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills in the scientific and social scientific analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from natural sciences, science studies, and economics and politics. It first offers a historical perspective on how global climate change developed as a scientific and social object of inquiry. The course then gives grounding in climate and society relations, economic principles and the political science and governance of climate hazards, energy and greenhouse gas emissions. This module replaces ENV-2A69.

ENV-5003A

20

COMBINATORICS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5016B

20

COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT ACROSS BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES

The biological activity of cellular membranes is mediated by an array of fascinating and highly specialised proteins embedded within the lipid bilayer. These proteins support essential functions such as sensing, signalling, transport and energy transduction and form the focus of this module. An introduction to the principles that govern the structure of these proteins is followed by a series of case studies that explore the link between protein structure, location and function that includes the following; aquaporins and water transport, bacteriorhodopsin and light driven proton movements and hypoxia signalling by mitochondrial proteins. NB students who do not have the pre-requisite module (BIO-5002A), but who have taken and passed BIO-4003A, BIO-4009Y and either BIO-5005B or BIO-5015B can take this module if they obtain the agreement of the module organiser.

BIO-6002B

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

The module will introduce the main concepts in community, ecosystem and macro-ecology - patterns and processes related to species richness; diversity; stability; succession; primary and secondary productivity and energy flows. We will then examine how these concepts aid our understanding of the functioning of terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

BIO-5014B

20

CONTINUUM MECHANICS AND ELASTICITY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C2Y or TAKE ENV-2A22 This module will be assessed by 100% examination, but you may also be informally assessed by coursework and/or project. The deformation and motion of a continuous body, the balance laws of continuum mechanics (conservation of mass, momentum and energy) and the formulation of constitutive equations (principle of objectivity). Application of these ideas to the fundamental properties of viscous fluids, viscoelasticity and nonlinear elasticity. Nonlinear elasticity is the subject of the second half of the module. We consider a variety of constitutive equations in compressible and incompressible nonlinear elasticity and develop nonlinear analogues of the bulk modulus, Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio of linear elasticity. Many examples of exact finite elastic solutions are given, including the famous universal solutions in finite incompressible elasticity of Rivlin. We also consider the inflation of balloons.

MTHD6019A

20

DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

This is a compulsory module for all computing students and provides the necessary foundation in data and storage structures for all computing streams. In addition, the module emphasises systematic algorithm design and discusses algorithm analysis. At the same time, the module provides the student with the opportunity to reinforce and enhance the programming skills developed at level 1.

CMP-5014Y

20

DATABASE SYSTEMS

This module introduces most aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. The module is based on the relational model. The students will explore the tools and methods for database design and manipulation as well as the programming of database applications. Part of the practical experience gained will be acquired using a modern relational database management system. Students will also gain programming experience using SQL, and using the Java JDBC interface. A high level language programming module is a pre-requisite.

CMP-5005B

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLIED METHODS

(a) Ordinary Differential Equations: solution by reduction of order; variation of parameters for inhomogeneous problems; series solution and the method of Frobenius. Legendre's and Bessel's equations: Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions and their recurrence relations; Fourier series; Partial differential equations (PDEs): heat equation, wave equation, Laplace's equation; solution by separation of variables. (b) Method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; the characteristic equations; Fourier transform and its use in solving linear PDEs; (c) Dynamical Systems: equilibrium points and their stability; the phase plane; theory and applications.

MTHA5004Y

20

DYNAMICAL METEOROLOGY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C2Y OR TAKE ENV-2A21 Dynamical meteorology is a core subject on which weather forecasting and the study of climate and climate change are based. This module applies fluid dynamics to the study of the circulation of the Earth's atmosphere. The fluid dynamical equations and some basic thermodynamics for the atmosphere are introduced. These are then applied to topics such as geostrophic flow, thermal wind and the jet streams, boundary layers, gravity waves, the Hadley circulation, vorticity and potential vorticity, Rossby waves, and equatorial waves. Emphasis will be placed on fluid dynamical concepts as well as on finding analytical solutions to the equations of motion.

MTHD6018B

20

EARTH AND LIFE

This module introduces Earth system science, taking a top-down approach to the Earth as a whole system, and tracing its development since its formation 4.5 billion years ago. The main focus is on the coupled evolution of life and its environment through a series of revolutions. Theoretical approaches are introduced, including Gaia, feedback mechanisms and systems theory, and practical sessions use models to build up conceptual understanding. The subject is inherently inter-disciplinary, including aspects of biology, chemistry and physics, and unifying the study of climate and global biogeochemical cycles. Co-taught with ENV-7010B.

ENV-6010B

20

EARTH SCIENCE LAB SKILLS

Before taking this module you must take or be enrolled on at least 40 credits from this list - ENV-5004B, ENVK5005B, ENV-5018A, ENV-5021A, ENV-5011A, ENV-5012A,ENV-5013B, ENV-5015A Good observational and descriptive skills lie at the heart of many areas of Environmental Science. This module is designed to develop those and is particularly suitable for students with interests in Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic Earth science skills of use for projects in this area. The module will include: observing, describing and recording the characteristics of geological materials (hand specimen and under microscope); measuring and representing 3d data, and reading geological maps. The module also includes a portion of project work where the students will practice these skills and also skills of time management and other study skills. This module will be taken by Environmental Earth Science undergraduate students who for any reason cannot take the Earth Science Skills module (that includes a week-long field course), and by students taking related degrees with a large component of Earth Science (e.g. some students taking degrees in Geophysics, Environmental Sciences, Nat Sci). Assessment is coursework only and will include a laboratory test and a practical report. The practical project will build on the skills learned in the first part of the module. CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-5030B

ENV-5029B

20

EARTH SCIENCE SKILLS

Before taking this module you must take or be enrolled on at least 40 credits from this list - ENV-5004B, ENVK5005B, ENV-5018A, ENV-5021A, ENV-5011A, ENV-5012A,ENV-5013B, ENV-5015A Good observational and descriptive skills lie at the heart of many areas of Environmental Science. This module is designed to develop those and is particularly suitable for students with interests in Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic Earth science skills of use for projects in this area. The module will include: observing, describing and recording the characteristics of geological materials (in the field, in hand specimen and under microscope); measuring and representing 3d data, reading geological maps and basic geological mapping. This module is strongly recommended for Environmental Earth Science students and it is required for the Geological Society accreditation pathway. It will also be of use to students taking related degrees with a large component of Earth science (e.g. some students taking degrees in Geophysics, Environmental Sciences, Nat Sci). Assessment is coursework only and will include a laboratory test and work undertaken during fieldwork. The field work builds on the skills learned in the lab-based first part of the module. CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-5029B

ENV-5030B

20

EARTH SYSTEM GEOCHEMISTRY

Examines how the earth system and its geochemical cycling operate on both global and micro scales. Emphasis is on natural cycles, starting with big themes such as crust-hydrosphere-biosphere interaction and its effects on the long term C cycle, including regulation of carbon dioxide. Elements, isotopes, organic molecules (and their isotopic compositions) are used as tracers of processes and events in earth history. Organic matter, its chemistry and its relationship to both the C and S cycles is explored. Dating of geological materials with radiometric methods is introduced. The course explores themes in both deep time (millions of years) and more recent glacial-interglacial cycles (thousands to hundreds of thousands of years). This module replaces ENV-2A80.

ENV-5013B

20

EARTHQUAKE AND VOLCANIC HAZARDS

The aim of the module is to be able to solve geophysical problems (both physical and chemical) in a methodical way. Problems will be described conceptually, then defined mathematically, then solved numerically. Emphasis on numerical solutions to partial differential equations encountered in geophysical sciences: their stability and accuracy. Case studies from meteorology, oceanography, hydrology and geophysics. Extensive project work involved.

ENV-6001B

20

EARTHQUAKE AND VOLCANIC HAZARDS WITH FIELDCOURSE

Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions have significant environmental and societal impacts. This module focuses on the physical basis and analysis of each hazard, their global range of occurrence and their global impact. The module also addresses approaches towards hazard mitigation and minimising vulnerability, with an emphasis on their practical implication. Scenarios and probabilities occurrence of mega-disasters are also investigated. A one week field trip in Scotland takes place to introduce you to various aspects of natural hazards and in particular to faulting and earthquake hazards. This module is co-taught with ENVK7002B

ENV-6002K

20

ELECTRICITY GENERATION AND DISTRIBUTION

In the final semester of third year this module will build on your established understanding of electricity by studying the technical aspects of the electrical industry. Analysing transformer designs will help consolidate your knowledge of generation before developing an advanced understanding of the constraints of cabling for offshore wind turbines. You will evaluate the efficiency of the national grid by comparing the practical design aspects to the costs involved. A detailed consideration of the current shortfall in meeting demand for electricity will lead to the study of novel methods of distribution, including pumped-storage schemes and super-capacitors.

ENG-6001B

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND COMBINATORICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory.

MTHF5012Y

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5013Y

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechanics the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators.

MTHF5011A

20

ENERGY AND PEOPLE

This module will introduce students to a range of social science perspectives on the inter-relationships between energy and people. The module begins by tracing the history and development of energy intensive societies and everyday lives as a means of understanding how energy has emerged as a key sustainability problem. The second part of the module then introduces some theories of social and technical change and uses these to critically analyse a range of people-based solutions to energy problems that are currently being tried and tested around the world. This module is assessed by formative assessment and coursework which includes a group presentation and an individual written essay.

ENV-5033B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

This module is designed to teach skills necessary for the acquisition of good quality chemical data in environmental systems, and in the interpretation of this data. The module will focus on the collection of environmental samples for chemical analysis, methods of chemical analysis and the analytical and mathematical techniques used for data quality control. There will be a large component of practical work. This module will be particularly relevant for those wishing to do a chemistry-related project later in their degree.

ENV-5027B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the theoretical and empirical development of contemporary environmental politics. It is structured to analyse these issues from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on dynamic examples of environmental politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module encourages and supports student-led learning by enabling students to develop their own theoretical interpretations of real world examples of politics. These are explored in seminar presentations and in an extended (4000 word) case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics/social sciences.

ENV-5002B

20

EVOLUTION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

The module aims to provide an up-to-date and thought-provoking discussion about evolutionary medicine and the evolution of disease. The module will examine how evolutionary principles illuminate and provide fresh insight into a broad range of contemporary health problems including infectious, chronic and nutritional diseases and disorders. Topics are introduced in a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the relationship between biology and society as it relates to understanding, treating, and preventing disease. Evidence will be presented that all aspects of the human condition have an evolutionary basis. The course will cover 4 broad areas: (i) principles of evolutionary medicine - humans in their evolutionary context, and discussion of the factors that drive evolutionary change; (ii) evolution and non-infectious diseases (cancer, lifestyles, ageing); (iii) evolution and infection (vaccines, antibiotics, pathogens, emerging diseases); (iv) personalised medicine and social context of evolutionary medicine.

BIO-6017A

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

A basic understanding of genetics and evolution is required. The aim of this module is to provide a thorough background and understanding of the concepts and principles of evolutionary biology. This will involve you combining approaches and information from several disciplines - viz: molecular and population genetics, adaptive and population ecology, biogeography and systematics. This module will enable you to understand, analyse and evaluate the basic principles of evolutionary biology and be able to synthesise the various components into an overall appreciation of how evolution works, Weekly workshops will be held in which you will be able to explore in depth a number of the conceptual issues in evolutionary biology through discussions, modelling and problem solving. This module is assessed by coursework and an exam.

BIO-5008B

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION GENETICS

In this module, students will study evolutionary theory and its application to conservation genetics. The principal focus will be on how evolutionary forces (mutation, recombination, genetic drift, gene flow, and selection) and epigenetics affect phenotype, behaviour and genetic variation. We will cover the rich evolutionary literature, discussing the paradigm shifting studies by Darwin, Fisher, Wright, Haldane and others. The module also covers current knowledge of molecular technology as applied to ecological, evolutionary and conservation studies.

BIO-6008B

20

FIELD ECOLOGY

Students explore the ecology of moorlands, bogs, sand dunes, rocky shores, estuaries and woodlands. Students should develop skills in identifying plants and animals using scientific keys, carrying out quantitative surveys and statistically analysing their data. Strong emphasis is placed on student-lead project work. The bulk of the teaching takes place on a two week field course in Western Ireland, that runs immediately before the start of the Autumn Semester.

BIO-5013A

20

FLUID DYNAMICS

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C2Y OR TAKE ENV-2A21 This module will be assessed by 100% examination, but you may also be informally assessed by coursework and/or project. The equations governing the motion of viscous, incompressible fluids, simple exact solutions. Low and high Reynolds number flows. Boundary-layers. Stability theory.

MTHD6020A

20

FLUID DYNAMICS - THEORY AND COMPUTATION

(a) Hydrostatics, compressibility. Kinematics: velocity, particle path, streamlines. Continuity, incompressibility, streamtubes. Dynamics: Material derivative, Euler's equations, vorticity and irrotational flows. Velocity potential and streamfunction. Bernoulli's equation for unsteady flow. Circulation: Kelvin's Theorem, Helmholtz's theorems. Basic water waves. (b) Computational methods for fluid dynamics; Euler's method and Runge-Kutta methods and their use for computing particle paths and streamlines in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows; numerical computation and flow visualisation using Matlab; convergence, consistency and stability of numerical integration methods for ODEs. (c) Theory of Irrotational and Incompressible Flows: velocity potential, Laplace's Equation, sources and vortices, complex potential. Force on a body and the Blasius theorem. Method of images and conformal mappings.

MTHA5002Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - ANALYSIS

Module Summary Aim: Following on from CHE-4701Y, where the emphasis was on collection of evidence, this module introduces more in-depth forensic chemistry, looking at the way evidence gathered at a crime scene may be analysed in the laboratory. The objective is to familiarise students with critical thinking and evaluation of evidence, build a model for case assessment and interpretation and thus increase understanding of the role of the Expert Witness in court. It is open to students on FF41 and other chemistry courses where CHE-5701Y is a core or optional module. Content: The module will deepen the knowledge of forensic statistics and cover basic detection and recovery techniques for body fluids; fingerprint development and recovery; advanced microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy and their application to fibres, paint and other particulates; the use of elemental analysis in forensic science; and questioned document examination including counterfeiting. Teaching and Learning Methods: Lectures, practicals and mentor groups (PBL- problem based learning). The students will be divided into groups and each group will then investigate a hypothetical criminal case using simulated evidence material. As part of this students will write an expert witness statement which will be presented and defended in a mock court. Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to apply acquired skills, work as part of a team and to produce an expert witness report, using literature and experimental data to inform their analysis. The "mock court" will be aimed at developing the individual's presentation skills in a challenging environment. Students should gain further confidence in the use of statistics to analyse data, test hypotheses and draw conclusions from them.

CHE-5701Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - INTERPRETATION AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS

The first semester is co-taught with CHE-3H57. See CHE-3H57 synopsis for description of the content in the first semester. The second semester of this module will concentrate on developing interpretation and presentation skills required in presenting evidence in courts of law. The topics covered will be: complex DNA interpretation including mixtures and partial profiles; drugs intelligence; firearms. Throughout, the course will concentrate on how forensic evidence is interpreted and communicated. This will include the development of written and verbal skills required for the presentation of evidence to a court, and will culminate in a "mock court" where students will present and defend a statement they have written.

CHE-6701Y

20

FOSSIL FUELS

Geological, economic and political aspects of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) are introduced. These are used to discuss environmental concerns arising from the use of fossil fuels, and the potentially profound implications of future fuel scarcity. This module is suitable for students taking degrees in the School of Environmental Sciences. Some knowledge of Earth Science will be expected. Before taking this module you must take or be taking at least 20 credits of Earth Science or Geophysics modules at honours level. This module replaces ENV-3A35. In taking this module you cannot take ENV-7008A.

ENV-6009A

20

FURTHER COMPUTING SYSTEMS

The module is designed to provide students with: an overview of the organisational, cultural and technical context of current software development, experience of developing software in a web context, and an introduction to the principal architectures of contemporary computing systems.

CMP-5016B

20

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

This module is for those students who have passed CMP-4004Y or equivalent, in their first year and would like to study further theory that is a pre-requisite for several other 2nd and 3rd level modules in CMP. For such students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. 3D Vectors and complex numbers are also studied.

CMP-5006A

20

GENETICS

This module will describe the basis of heredity, describing both the functions and the structures of genes and whole genomes. Examples will be taken from bacterial, animal and plant systems and will be considered from both functional and molecular points of view. The influence of the "new genetics" on medicine, agriculture and society will also be covered. Practical work will involve a molecular genetic analysis of a symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium and a molecular mapping exercise of traits that confer disease resistance in plants. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B (Molecular Biology).

BIO-5009A

20

GENOMES, GENES AND GENOMICS

This module will provide a description of contemporary biological studies of genomes. There will be a focus on a molecular understanding of gene expression within organisms, with a particular emphasis on regulatory processes that affect expression at the genome level. Topics to be covered include comparative and functional genomics, organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, global regulation of genome expression and mechanisms involved in maintaining genome integrity. Lectures and the associated practical will also provide a thorough grounding in technologies that analyse genomes and their gene products.

BIO-6013A

20

GEODYNAMICS: EARTH'S ENGINE

Processes in the Earth's interior have exerted a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system through geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the heat distribution of the Earth's interior, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes and distribution of seismic energy. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

GEOSCIENCES FIELDCOURSE: GREECE

This module is designed to promote a deeper understanding and integration of geoscience subjects: the fieldwork will usually concentrate on aspects of structural geology, regional tectonics, sedimentology, palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironments, and volcanology. A key feature of the course is that the location is chosen where there are excellent and substantial exposures of rock formation showing evidence of processes. There are two field bases in the Aegean (Greece), the Gulf of Corinth active rift, and Santorini volcano. The field trip is usually takes place from 8-22nd September 2014 aprox. The approximate cost to the student is expected to be ~GBP400 (though much depends on the Greece currency exchange rate). This includes BandB, and travel costs. Please consult the module organiser at the time of enrolling to ensure places are available, unless you already have confirmation that you already have a place on the fieldcourse. This module is co-taught with ENV-7016A.

ENV-6022K

20

GEOSCIENCES FIELDCOURSE: IRELAND

ENV-6016K

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

The module will review the different techniques that can be used to create and edit data in a GIS, as well as existing digital databases from which map data can be extracted and downloaded. Particular attention will be given to Ordnance Survey mapping for the UK, but other international resources will also be discussed. The module will emphasise issues of data quality (e.g. error and uncertainty) as they apply to spatial data and introduce the use of scripting tools (e.g. ArcGIS ModelBuilder) as a way of documenting and efficiently repeating more complex analysis procedures. The module is assessed by a combination of both formative and summative coursework. The module will build upon material introduced in the Year 1 Research and Field Skills module. It will be particularly relevant for final year projects (ENV-3A91) but also be valuable for some students on Year in Industry programmes (ENV-2Y5Y) and a range of other modules which use spatial data (e.g. Catchment Water Resources, ENV-3A60).

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This module is an exploration of both the scientific causes of global environmental change and the integrative and complex nature of society's response to such changes. The module provides an appreciation of the "big picture", to remind the students of the reasons why global environmental issues are at the forefront of the political and scientific agenda, and to encourage students to form their own opinion on current issues. This module also aims to encourage a cross-disciplinary approach to problems and research in global change. This module is assessed by a course test and group project and presentation but also by formative assessment.

ENV-6007B

20

GRAPHICS 1

Graphics 1 provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics for all computing students. It aims to provide a strong foundation for students wishing to study graphics, focusing on 2D graphics, algorithms and interaction. The module requires a good background in programming. OpenGL is utilised as the graphics API with examples provided in the lectures and supported in the laboratory classes. Other topics covered include transformations, texture mapping, collision detection, graphics hardware, fonts, algorithms for line drawing, polygon filling, clipping and colour.

CMP-5010B

20

GRAPHICS 2

This module introduces the fundamentals of 3D geometric transformations and viewing using OpenGL. It teaches the theory and implementation of fundamental visibility determination algorithms and techniques for lighting, shading and anti-aliasing. Issues involved with modern high performance graphics processor are also considered. It also studies 3D curves and fundamental geometric data structures.

CMP-6006A

20

HOST-PARASITE INTERACTIONS

The object of the module is to examine, from a evolutionary and ecological perspective, the complex interactions between parasites/diseases and their hosts and to show how the selection pressures that each side of these interactions impose lead to coevolutionary processes. We will take an overview of the role that such parasitic interactions may have played in the development of key biological traits, such as the evolution of sexual reproduction, and their current role in sexual selection. The module will include traditional parasitology (to set the scene and understand the complexity of the interactions), introducing the major groups of parasites and their hosts. We will examine the role of parasites and host-parasite interactions in evolution, drawing examples from conservation, behaviour, current research, theoretical predictions and models.

BIO-6016A

20

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

The module aims to provide an understanding of the physiology of several organ systems found within the human body. Learning Outcomes: On completion of the module it is expected the student will have gained an understanding of: - Information transmission within the body by the nervous system and the integrative processes within the spinal cord and brain. - Reaction to the environment through reception of external stimuli by sensory receptors, such as the eye. - Effector systems, including muscle contraction and its control. - Respiration, gas transport, blood circulation and heart function. - Kidney function in excretion and in water and mineral ion homeostasis - The digestive system and nutrition, including patterns of health and sickness. - Endocrine regulation and integration, including reproduction cycles in the female. The module is backed up with a comprehensive programme of practical work involving human physiological experiments.

BIO-5004A

20

HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY

An introduction to hydrology and hydrogeology: the basic equations describing fluid movement in groundwater systems will be derived and applied. The main techniques to investigate groundwater flow systems are highlighted. Water circulation within river catchments is discussed by means of the catchment water balance. The physical process represented by each component of the water balance will be covered as well as the current methods of quantifying these fluxes of water within the catchment . Principles of catchment modelling are outlined. The unit requires at least A-level equivalent mathematical skills. For example, an ability to work with common mathematical operations is essential such as the simple rearrangement of equations, and the ability to convert between varying units of length and volume. Basic differential equations will be presented for the description of groundwater flow.

ENV-5021A

20

INFECTION AND IMMUNITY

This module aims to provide a detailed coverage of the biology of selected infectious microorganisms, in the context of host and responses to pathogens. The properties of organs, cells and molecules of the immune system are described, along with the mechanism of antibody diversity generation, and the exploitation of the immune response for vaccine development. Examples of microbiological pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are used to illustrate major virulence strategies. The impact of genomics on the study of infection, and on mechanisms used by pathogens to evade host responses will be discussed. The module's theme is the molecular and cellular biology events at the host-pathogen interface.

BIO-6010B

20

INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

Nowadays, millions of people worldwide make use of IR systems every day via search engines, and the exponential increase in the number of websites and documents available means that these systems have been developed to be highly efficient. In this module, we will cover the essential theoretical ideas that underpin modern information retrieval (e.g. the vector-space model, probabilistic approaches, relevance feedback etc.) and examine how they are practically implemented in current systems. Lecture material is re-enforced by a set of laboratory exercises and an assessment that enable you to implement some of these ideas practically. We also examine natural language processing techniques that are increasingly used in IR, and the emerging technologies of audio and video retrieval.

CMP-6008A

20

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The central theme of the module is the chemistry of the p and d block elements: structure and bonding, coordination complexes and the organometallic chemistry of main group and transition metals. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5301B

20

INORGANIC COMPOUNDS: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

This module concentrates on two important themes in contemporary inorganic chemistry: transition metal clusters and homogeneous catalysis. The structure and bonding in these compounds will be discussed as well as applications in materials chemistry and synthesis. There will also be a series of workshops on the subjects presented.

CHE-6301Y

20

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

PRE-REQUISITES: CHE-4001Y, CHE-4601Y or other suitable laboratory experience from CHE/ENV/BIO This module begins with underpinning aspects of instrumental analysis such as analytical programme design and basic analyticl statistics and then progresses through instrumentation, sample preparation and techniques related to the key analytical techniques of atomic and molecular spectroscopy, electroanalytical chemistry and chromatography. The module includes laboratory sessions where students can work with common instruments and practice key skills in calibration, sample preparation and measurement and data analysis. As well as the formal assessment, there will also be formative assessment through interactive quiz-style revision workshops.

CHE-5501Y

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module is assessed by formative assessment and coursework. This module replaces ENV-2A84.

ENV-5022B

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module, which includes a one week field course that will take place at Easter, is assessed by formative assessment, coursework and fieldwork projects. This module replaces ENV-2A82K.

ENVK5023B

20

MARINE SCIENCES FIELDCOURSE

This 11 day 20 credit field course studies physical, chemical and biological coastal oceanographic processes and will probably take place in June. The course includes lectures and practical experience of oceanographic instrumentation, chartwork, numerical analysis of data using matlab and a poster presentation at ENV. The second week of the course will take place in Oban, using the oceanographic research ships and laboratory facilities of the Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory. The course has no pre- or co-requisites and is open to 1st and 2nd year students. However it will be of particular relevance to those studying ENV-5016A Ocean Circulation, ENV-5019A Chemical Oceanography and ENV-6005A Biological Oceanography and Marine Ecology. PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU CAN ONLY ENROL ONTO THIS MODULE VIA AN APPLICATION FORM FROM THE SCHOOL AND NOT VIA THE STANDARD MODULE ENROLMENT PROCESS. ALSO THE MODULE RUNS IN THE SUMMER PRIOR TO THE START OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR.

ENVK5020A

20

MATERIALS AND POLYMER CHEMISTRY

An introduction to the basic principles of polymer synthesis is presented, together with a discussion of their physical properties. Speciality polymers are discussed. Materials chemistry is developed further with the introduction of inorganic structures and the concept of ferroelectric properties together with powder x-ray diffraction as applied to cubic crystals. Ion conductivity and basic band theory are also discussed. Semiconductivity is introduced and related to the band description of these materials. The experiments in this laboratory class involve the synthesis and evaluation of inorganic and organic materials.

CHE-5350Y

20

MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C2Y OR TAKE ENV-2A22 Mathematics finds wide-ranging applications in biological systems: including population dynamics, epidemics and the spread of diseases, enzyme kinetics, some diffusion models in biology including Turing instabilities and pattern formation, and various aspects of physiological fluid dynamics.

MTHD6021A

20

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

It introduces the essential concepts of mathematical statistics deriving the necessary distribution theory as required. In consequence in addition to ideas of sampling and central limit theorem, it will cover estimation methods and hypothesis-testing. Some Bayesian ideas will be also introduced.

CMP-5034A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module is the third in a series of four mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers vector calculus (used in the study of vector fields in subjects such as fluid dynamics and electromagnetism), time series and spectral analysis (a highly adaptable and useful mathematical technique in many science fields, including data analysis), and fluid dynamics (which has applications to the circulation of the atmosphere, ocean, interior of the Earth, chemical engineering, and biology). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab). This module replaces ENV-2A61.

ENV-5006A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the third in a series of three mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods (with applications to many multi-variable problems in science), second order partial differential equations (which govern the behaviour of diffusive, advective and wave-like systems), and solid mechanics (applications in geophysics, glaciology, and material science). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. This module replaces ENV-2A62.

ENV-5007B

20

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

This module is concerned with the broad aspects of medicinal chemistry, from the discovery of lead compounds and the recognition of biological activity, to the production of pharmaceuticals. Biological activity is discussed in terms of metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and structure-activity relationships (SAR). Drug targets and their exploitation in drug therapies are also discussed. The medicinal chemistry content of this module contains aspects of both chemistry and biology. Therefore the course is started with a series of 'introductory' seminars relevant to BIO and CHEM students on underlying principles.

CHE-5150Y

20

METEOROLOGY I

This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processes in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of Radiation Balance, Cloud Physics, Thermodynamics and Dynamics and the assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential.

ENV-5008A

20

METEOROLOGY II

This module will build upon the material covered in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting.

ENV-5009B

20

METEOROLOGY II WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting. The module also includes a week long Easter vacation residential fieldcourse, based in the Lake District, focusing on micrometeorology, microclimate and synoptic processes.

ENVK5010B

20

MICROBIAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

This module provides a training in the culture techniques, microbial physiology and genetics that underpin the production of bioproducts such as biofuels, bioplastics, antibiotics and food products, and the use of micro-organisms in wastewater treatment and bioremediation.

BIO-6004A

20

MICROBIOLOGY

A broad module covering all aspects of the biology of microorganisms, providing key knowledge for specialist Level 3 modules. Detailed description is given about the cell biology of bacteria, fungi and protists together with microbial physiology, genetics and environmental and applied microbiology. The biology of disease-causing microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) and prions is also covered. Practical work provides hands-on experience of important microbiological techniques, and expands on concepts introduced in lectures. The module should appeal to biology students across a wide range of disciplines and interests.

BIO-5015B

20

MODELLING ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESSES

The aim of the module is to show how environmental problems may be solved from the initial problem, to mathematical formulation and numerical solution. Problems will be described conceptually, then defined mathematically, then solved numerically via computer programming. The module consists of lectures on numerical methods and computing practicals (Matlab): the practicals being designed to illustrate the solution of problems using the methods covered in lectures. The module will guide students through the solution of a model of an environmental process of their own choosing. The problem will be discussed and placed into context through an essay, and then solved and written up in a project report. The skills developed in this module are highly valued by prospective employers of students wishing to carry on into further studies or in professional employment.

ENV-6004A

20

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENT

This module will discuss the molecular and cellular principles that drive embryonic development, including the signals and signalling pathways that lead to the establishment of the body plan, pattern formation and differentiation/organogenesis. Lectures will cover a number of different model organism used in the study of development including plants and Drosophila, however there is a focus on vertebrate systems. The relevance of embryonic development to our understanding of human development and disease is a recurring theme throughout the module.

BIO-6012A

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The module provides an introduction to the principles of molecular biology. The programme starts with the structure of DNA, genes and genomes, followed by the characterisation of the information flow including the mechanisms and regulation of transcription and translation. Protein folding, modification and turnover are described together with reactions concerning DNA (replication, recombination and repair). The module ends with a detailed description of methods used for the experimental manipulation of genetic material (gene isolation, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction, molecular cloning, transgenic plants and animals and global functional genomics). Practical work includes an introduction to molecular biology techniques together with computer assisted DNA and protein sequence analysis.

BIO-5003B

20

MOLECULAR ENZYMOLOGY IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE

The module sets out to explain the molecular basis of the often complex catalytic mechanisms of enzymes in biological systems concentrating particularly on their relevance to and applications in medicine. Covered are the underlying principles of enzyme catalysis and techniques for the study of enzyme mechanism and structure. These provide a foundation for discussions of the catalytic and cellular mechanisms of proteinase families such as the serine and metalloproteinases. Mechanism-based drug design is discussed particularly with respect to development of inhibitors of retroviral enzymes. Covered also are molecular motors , complex nanomachines involved in vesicle transport, ATP synthesis and DNA replication. Finally, the biosynthesis of the signalling molecule nitric oxide and the P450s involved in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics are presented. An extended practical based on the kinetics of a model enzyme, chymotrypsin, helps underpin concepts learnt in the module.

BIO-6001A

20

MOLECULAR PLANT-MICROBE INTERACTIONS

Plants interact with a whole range of microbes with effects that are both beneficial (e.g. nitrogen-fixing symbioses between legumes with Rhizobium, and the wide ranging mycorrhizal interactions between plants and fungi) and harmful, with many diseases being caused by viruses, fungi and oomycetes. The module will encompass examples of all these interactions, addressing them mainly from a molecular level, both in the ways in which the microbes recognise and invade their specific hosts and in the responses and mechanisms used by the host plant to encourage the good microbes and fight off the bad ones. The Norwich Research Park is a world centre for this subject, and the module will be taught by researchers from the John Innes Centre and the Sainsbury Laboratory, as well as from UEA. There is no pre-requisite for this module, but knowledge of both plant and molecular biology would be advantageous.

BIO-6007B

20

MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND ENERGY LEVELS

Quantum mechanics, one of the key scientific ideas of the 20th century, has had a wide impact in chemistry. In the first part of the module you will be introduced to the language and methods of quantum mechanics. In the second part, the close relation between spectroscopic measurements of small molecules and quantum theory will be discussed. Further methods of spectroscopy will then be introduced, beginning with the most widely used of all techniques in structure determination, NMR spectroscopy. This will be followed by a discussion of molecular electronic spectra which are widely used in chemical analysis.

CHE-5202Y

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

Have you ever wondered why human economic activity seems to be so bad for the environment? Does it have to be like that? Is it possible for human beings to enjoy high standards of living and a high quality environment? Through the study of the principles of Environmental Economics this course sets out to answer those questions. Addressing a wide-range of economy-environment problems including car pollution, over-fishing, climate change and declining oil stocks, the course shows that most environmental problems can be solved through the adoption of policies crafted with the careful application of economic reasoning. Co-taught with ENV-7013B.

ENV-6012B

20

NETWORKS

This module examines networks and how they are designed and implemented to provide reliable data transmission. A layered approach is taken in the study of networks with emphasis given to the functionality of the traditional OSI 7 layer reference model and the TCP/IP model. Week-by-week the module examines the functionality provided by each layer and how this contributes to the overall reliable data transmission that the network provides. Underlying theory behind each layer is studied and then examples given as to how this is used in practice - for example within voice over IP (VoIP). An emphasis is placed on practical issues associated with networking such as real-time delivery of multimedia information and network security. The coursework tends to be highly practical and underpins the theory learnt in lectures.

CMP-6009B

20

OCEAN CIRCULATION

This module gives you an understanding of the physical processes occurring in the basin-scale ocean environment. We will introduce and discuss large scale global ocean circulation, including gyres, boundary currents and the overturning circulation. Major themes include the interaction between ocean and atmosphere, and the forces which drive ocean circulation. You should be familiar with partial differentiation, integration, handling equations and using calculators. ENV-5017B is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here.

ENV-5016A

20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The topics covered in the module include an introduction to organic synthesis, carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, aromaticity, heterocyclic chemistry, and stereochemistry and mechanism. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5101A

20

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES

This module starts by considering the concept of retrosynthetic analysis. Strategies for the disconnection and synthesis of complex molecular targets will be considered. An introduction to Asymmetric Synthesis follows, which covers nomenclature, synthesis using "chiral pool" starting materials, chiral auxiliaries and catalytic asymmetric synthesis. Organometallic chemistry is covered next, giving particular emphasis to transition metal catalysis and mediated processes. This part of the course surveys new methods for bond formation and provides practice in the skills detailed in the planning and execution of syntheses of complex organic target molecules. The course is completed by looking at the application of sulfur, selenium and silicon to modern organic chemistry.

CHE-6101Y

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

The module covers a number of areas of modern physical chemistry which are essential to a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include the second Law of thermodynamics and entropy, the thermodynamics of solutions, chemical kinetics, surface chemistry and catalysis. The module includes laboratory work. Due to the laboratory-based content on this module students must have completed at least one level 4 module containing laboratory work.

CHE-5201Y

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

The module covers fundamental material in Physical Chemistry including statistical thermodynamics, plus specialist topics such as lasers and photochemistry, diffraction methods, interfacial kinetics and dynamic electrochemistry.

CHE-6201Y

20

PHYSICS OF MUSIC

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music. We begin by developing some of the essential physics of wave motion and defining sound measurement terms. This equips us to analyse the physics of stringed instruments (bowed, plucked and struck), woodwind instruments, brass instruments, percussion instruments and the acoustics of singing. We also look at tuning systems, human hearing, and the physics of sound in rooms. Lab-classes include an introduction to MATLAB to enable you to record and analyse the sound of your own instrument, which constitutes the coursework. A-level standard of mathematics is preferred, but anyone without this level who is prepared to work a little to enhance their understanding of mathematics in one or two areas will be able to take this module.

NAT-5003A

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

This module aims to provide an appreciation of modern plant biology with an emphasis on development, signalling and response to the environment. It consists of practical classes and lectures. It encompasses molecular genetics, molecular, biochemical and physiological perspectives, and affords an understanding of aspects of plant and plant cell function including photosynthesis and the mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic environments.

BIO-5006A

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

In this module we will look closely at how interactions between individuals determine the structure and functioning of populations. We will consider both antagonistic interactions between members of different trophic levels, their evolution and their possible co-evolution. Consideration of competition will lead into the population consequences of both within trophic level and between trophic level interactions. We will then move on to consider spatially explicit population processes including meta population dynamics and possible ecological responses to climate change including range shifts. Students taking this module must have a background in basic statistics and have taken any Level 1 ecology module in ENV or BIO, or equivalent.

ENV-5014A

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of other second level CMP modules.

CMP-5020B

20

PROTEIN STRUCTURE, CHEMISTRY AND ENGINEERING

An introduction to the diversity of protein structures, their properties and to interactions between proteins and metal ions. Lectures cover protein structure, protein stability and folding, molecular modelling, the chemical principles of protein-metal interactions, spectroscopic techniques for studying protein metal centres, and the techniques employed in protein structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Covers how protein structures can be altered by biological and chemical procedures, and the principles underlying the design of proteins for specific tasks. Topics include the creation of artificial enzymes though the use of peptide dendrimers and of artificial metallo-enzymes by non-covalent insertion of a metallocomplexes into protein scaffolds. Examples of engineered proteins designed for a range of industrial and medical uses are considered.

CHE-6601Y

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS AND COMBINATORICS

Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory.

MTHF5014Y

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5015Y

20

QUANTUM THEORY AND SYMMETRY

This course covers the foundation and basics of quantum theory and symmetry, starting with features of the quantum world and including elements of quantum chemistry, group theory, computer-based methods for calculating molecular wavefunctions, quantum information, and the quantum nature of light. The subject matter paves the way for applications to a variety of chemical and physical systems - in particular, processes and properties involving the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

CHE-5250Y

20

REPRESENTATION THEORY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C3Y Definition and basic properties of complex representations of a finite group. Examples, Regular representations. Maschke's Theorem. Characters, and character tables. Cyclic groups, abelian groups, 1-dimensional representations. Direct sums and tensor products. Schur's Lemma, orthogonality relations, the number of irreducibles. Induced representations, Frobenius Reciprocity. Examples and applications.

MTHD6016B

20

RESEARCH SKILLS FOR SOCIAL SCIENTISTS

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. It covers research design, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and presentation of results. It is recommended for any student intending to carry out a social science-based research project.

ENV-5031B

20

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

This module aims to bring an understanding of how science is disseminated to the public. Students on the module will be made aware of the theories surrounding learning and communication. They will investigate science as a culture and how this culture interfaces with the public. Students will examine case studies in a variety of different scientific areas. They will look at how information is released in scientific literature and how this is subsequently picked up by the public press. They will gain an appreciation of how science information can be used to change public perception and how it can sometimes be misinterpreted. Students will also learn practical skills by designing, running and evaluating a public outreach event at a school or in a public area. OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS REGISTERED IN THE SCIENCE FACULTY.

BIO-6018Y

20

SEDIMENTOLOGY

Sedimentary rocks contain many of the world's natural resources and cover much of the Earth's surface, record the Earth's history, and contain the fossil record. Sedimentology includes the study of modern sediments such as sand, mud and carbonates and the processes that result in their deposition. Understanding of modern processes is used to interpret ancient sedimentary rocks and sedimentary structures. The module will cover sedimentary fluid dynamics; modern sediments from deserts, rivers, the coast and deep ocean, the differences between siliciclastic and carbonate rocks; biological influence on sedimentary processes and stratigraphy (the study of the physical and temporal relationships between rock layers). This module replaces ENV-2A85.

ENV-5011A

20

SHELF SEA DYNAMICS AND COASTAL PROCESSES

This module will explore the physical processes that occur in shelf seas and coastal regions, building on what you learnt in Ocean Circulation. Topics will include: Wave and tide generation; Tidal amplification in shallow water; Timeseries data analysis; Seasonal stratification and phytoplankton blooms; Turbulent mixing, nutrient fluxes, and deep chlorophyll maxima; Tidal mixing fronts; Internal waves, internal tides, and their role in global ocean mixing; Shelf edge processes; Climate variability in shelf seas; Optics and remote sensing of primary productivity; Estuarine circulation and sediment transport; Wave and tidal energy capture devices. ENV-2A39 (Ocean Circulation) is the only pre-requisite for this module, although we strongly recommend that you also gain fieldwork experience by taking the 20-credit biennial Marine Sciences fieldcourse.

ENV-5017B

20

SOCIAL EVOLUTION

Life is organised hierarchically. Genes aggregate in cells, cells aggregate in organisms, and organisms aggregate in societies. Recent developments in evolutionary biology have defined each step in the formation of this hierarchy as representing a major evolutionary transition in which a new type of individuality has arisen. Common principles of social evolution underlie evolution at each step in the hierarchy. Hence, the study of the evolution of altruism and cooperation has broadened out from the study of animal societies alone, and now embraces the fundamental hierarchical structure common to all life. This module will investigate this new vision of social evolution. It will consider which principles of social evolution underlie each hierarchical step and show how applying this approach illuminates our understanding of life's diversity and organisation, with examples ranging from intracellular selfish genetic elements to societies of insects and mammals.

BIO-6011B

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 1

Software Engineering is one of the most essential skills for work in the software development industry. Students will gain an understanding of the issues involved in designing and creating software systems from an industry perspective. They will be taught state of the art in phased software development methodology, with a special focus on the activities required to go from initial class model design to actual running software systems. These activities are complemented with an introduction into software project management and development facilitation.

CMP-5012B

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 2

Industrial software development is seldom started from scratch, companies generally have large systems of legacy software that need to be maintained, improved and extended. This module focuses on advanced software engineering topics, such as reverse engineering to understand legacy software, refactoring and design patterns to improve the design of software systems and developing new software products using third-party software components. Assessment will be done by a group project which consists of a design and analysis task, and the group implementation task of a software project. Confidence in Java programming language skills as well as software engineering practice (phased development with agile methods, Unified Modeling Language, test-driven development) are pre-requisites. Software Engineering I (2M02) is required for this module.

CMP-6010B

20

SOIL PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

This module will combine lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork to provide students with an appreciation of the soil environment and the processes that occurs within it. The module will progress through: basic soil components/properties; soil identification and classification; soil as a habitat; soil organisms; soil functions; the agricultural environment; soil-organism-agrochemical interaction; soil contamination; soil and climate change.

ENV-5012A

20

SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometres. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-4002Y Mathematics for Scientists A or equivalent).

ENV-5004B

20

SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS WITH FIELDCOURSE

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometres. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. The fieldcourse provides "hands-on" experience of the various techniques and applications, adding on valuable practical skills. This module is highly valued by employers in industry; guest industrial lecturers will cover the current 'state-of-the-art' applications in real world situations. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-1A61 Mathematics for Scientists I, ENV-1A62 Mathematics for Scientists II or equivalent).

ENVK5005B

20

SOUND AND IMAGE 1

There has recently been a huge growth in the power and sophistication of tools that enable us to manipulate images and sounds on computers. In this module, we study how audio and video signals generated by cameras and microphones are captured and represented on a computer, and then how they can be analysed in order to extract information or to compress them for efficient storage and transmission. Our study includes the coverage of topics such as sampling, time, spatial and frequency domains, filtering, Fourier representation etc., and also practical work on processing sounds and images to e.g. modify speech sounds or filter an image. Assignments in this module are done using the MATLAB programming language, which is introduced progressively: some familiarity with programming concepts is preferred, although these can be developed during the module.

CMP-5033A

20

SOUND AND IMAGE 2

This module continues the exploration of computer processing of sound and image signals begun in Sound and Image I. In the "sound" component, we focus on speech processing, a technology that has already had a huge impact and holds great promise for the future. We cover: 1) speech-coding, which enables us to understand how one of the most significant technologies of recent times (the mobile telephone) is able to transmit speech at a low data-rate; 2) speech recognition, which is now becoming commonplace in interactive voice systems; and 3) speech synthesis. In the "image" component, we focus on the analysis of image signals and learn how to apply advanced filtering and enhancement techniques to images to restore them, and the basics of computer vision systems. These concepts are re-enforced with practical coursework, which gives students hands-on experience of processing audio and video signals.

CMP-6026A

20

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

This module considers various activities associated with the development of all types of computer based information systems including project management, feasibility, investigation, analysis, logical and physical design, and the links to file design, software design, and user interface design. It makes use of a number of analysis and design tools and techniques in order to produce readable system specifications. Students are introduced to a number of development methods including structured, object oriented, soft systems, participative, iterative and rapid approaches.

CMP-5003A

20

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

This module draws together a wide range of material and considers it in the context of developing modern large-scale computer systems. Topics such as Outsourcing, Process Improvement, System Failure, Project Management, Configuration Management, Maintainability, Legacy Systems and Re-engineering, Acceptance and Performance Testing, Metrics and Human Factors are covered in this module. The module is supported by a series of industrial case studies and includes speakers from industry.

CMP-6003B

20

THE CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the greenhouse gas that has, by far, the greatest impact on climate change. CO2 is becoming even more important to climate owing to continued, escalating use of fossil fuel energy and CO2's very long lifetime in the atmosphere. Predicting future climate or defining 'dangerous' climate change is challenging, in large part because the Earth's carbon cycle is very complex and not fully understood. You will learn about the atmospheric, oceanic and land components of the carbon cycle, how they interact with each other, and how they interact with climate in so-called 'feedbacks'. We also cover pressing global issues such as ocean acidification, ocean deoxygenation, geo-engineering the climate and how to get off our fossil fuel 'addiction'. The understanding of the carbon cycle gained from this module is an important foundation for all climate change research. Emphasis is given to the most recent, cutting-edge research in the field. Co-taught with ENV-7007A.

ENV-6008A

20

THEORETICAL COMPUTING

This module provides an introduction to computing theory. Topics covered include an introduction to formal language theory, complexity analysis of algorithms, and formal correctness proofs. CMPC1F01 is a minimum prerequisite; students who have done this module are advised to take CMPC2F01 before taking CMPC2F02.

CMP-5007B

20

TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5017Y

40

Option B Study

Students will select 0 credits from the following modules:

A further 20 credits may be chosen from Options Range A above, or by taking a module from other schools (such as those listed below) which will require the approval of the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

A WORLD AT WAR

This module will consider the history of the Second World War from 1939 to 1945, looking at the decisive battles that settled its outcome. It interprets 'battle' in the widest sense and it will look at 'classic' land, sea and air encounters - from the fall of France to midway, Stalingrad and D Day - and also at the other critical battles such as the battle of production, the Home Front and the technological battle, from Enigma to the atomic bomb

HIS-6003A

30

AFTERLIVES OF EMPIRE: RACE, 'DEVELOPMENT' AND POLITICAL ACTIVISM IN THE POSTCOLONIAL WORLD, 1956-PRESENT

Leading historical research is currently challenging the notion that the mechanics, expertise and ideologies of British imperialism simply ceased in the early 1960s. With decolonization, the British state's involvement in the economic and social life of newly independent states often intensified rather than weakened. This module will track the transformations and persistence of imperial forms in what was once Britain's empire. We will track the creation of Britain's Institute of Race Relations, funded by American, British and South African businesses, and its influence on understandings of the 'colour problem' in postwar Britain. We will uncover the application of colonial knowledge and economic expertise within British 'development' work in Cold War Africa. And we will look to the profound significance of the imperial legacy within political activist and community organising circles throughout this period and especially in the 1970s, in the context for instance of the African Asian refugee crises and newly formed British anti-racist groups. The module will be split into three thematic cores: (1) constructions of race and its discontents, (2) 'development' as an emergent field of academic study in the Cold War period and as a political and economic tool and (3) contestation and activism surrounding Britain's continued responsibilities/influence within postcolonial states. These themes will, of course, consistently highlight the significance of Cold War tensions and American geopolitical power. The themes will structure the teaching and provide students with a framework within which to make comparisons, think globally and across national boundaries.

HIS-6065A

30

AGE OF CHARLEMAGNE

This module explores how Frankish and Byzantine rulers in the eighth century#queens as well as kings#sought the security and salvation of their peoples though sustained investment in aggressive war and ambitious campaigns of spiritual renewal and how their power, ideals, and virtues constrasts with those of other rulers in the eighth century, from Pictland to 'Abbasid Baghdad.

HIS-6071Y

60

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

This module offers a critical introduction to understanding America's role in the world. It provides historical and political analyses of U.S. foreign relations, looking at the themes and traditions that have shaped America's increasing influence in global affairs during the twentieth century up to the present day. From the war of 1898 to the conflicts of the early twenty-first century, it examines how and why the U.S. relationship to the world has changed. Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? In discussing foreign relations, the course analyses political and diplomatic elites, but also, the role of foreign actors and private organisations, from religious groups to citizen organisations to NGOs, in defining America in the world. It also engages with important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, modernization, and the 'cultural turn' - and connects these to emerging trends in the fields of American Studies and international relations.

HIS-5053A

20

ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND, C. 500-1066

This module surveys the history of the English from their arrival in Britain in the fifth century until the end of the eleventh century and the conquest of England by the Normans. We shall cover topics such as the conversion of the English in the seventh century; the domination of England by Mercia in the eighth century; the Viking invasions and the reign of Alfred the Great; the emergence of Wessex as the dominant force in Britain in the tenth century; the conquest of England by the Danes in the eleventh century; and the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

HIS-5005A

20

APPEASEMENT AND WAR: BRITAIN AND THE DICTATORS, 1935-1945

The decade from 1935 to 1945 was one of the most tumultuous in global history. The expansionist powers of Germany, Italy and Japan were the focus of Britain's peacetime diplomacy and wartime strategy. In the years before 1939, those resurgent powers worked systematically to undermine and overturn the post-Great War peace settlement. The British National Government of Baldwin and Chamberlain struggled to deal with those threats against a backdrop of profound domestic difficulties. The policy of 'appeasement' adopted by those governments remains hugely controversial, and the subject of vigorous debate between historians. After 1939, Britain's decision to defend its guarantee to Poland plunged it into a global war, which eventually ended in victory as part of an international 'Grand Alliance', but under a very different wartime coalition led by Churchill. In the autumn semester, this module will explore the foreign policies adopted by the National Government, from Baldwin's victory in the 1935 election to the outbreak of war in September 1939. It will assess why and how these policies were adopted, the wider political and economic context within which policy was made, and the national and international consequences. In the spring semester, the module will consider Britain's wartime role in the context of grand strategy and international politics. In addition to considering topics such as Churchill's 'finest hour', we will spend some time examining the operation of the Grand Alliance and the series of wartime conferences between Britain and its allies. The decisions made in this period would have profound consequences for Britain thereafter. Throughout its course, the module will explore the rich historiography available to us, and examine its complexities. It will draw upon a wide range of primary documentation, which will provide the basis of debate and discussion.

HIS-6072Y

60

APPLIED METHODS FOR IMPACT EVALUATION

This module aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the most important methods of impact evaluation. For that purpose, it provides instruction in and hands on experiences of the main quantitative and qualitative impact evaluation methods, with an emphasis on the quantitative.

DEV-M096

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This is the first part of a beginners' course in Arabic assuming no prior knowledge of the language. The module aims to develop the ability to use Arabic effectively in everyday practical situations with speakers of Arabic both in the UK and overseas. Alternative and additional slots may be available, depending on enrolment.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (LCSS4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year LCS students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (LCSS4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year LCS students. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module has three contact hours per week. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent)

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module LCSS4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to LCS students. This module has three contact hours per week. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent)

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module has three contact hours per week. It cannot be taken by final-year LCS students.

PPLB4023B

20

BRITAIN AT WAR AND OTHER MODERN MYTHS

This module invites students to critically analyse popular understandings of the recent past in modern Britain. You will investigate the political uses of certain histories, shifts in meaning over time and preoccupations with the past in British politics and culture. Students will have the opportunity to examine why particular events in modern British history#such as the Second World War#have become so central to British national identity. In the first semester, we will focus on individual experiences and collective memories of the First and Second World Wars. We will look to popular poetry and public policies which worked to make sense of the horrors and sacrifices of modern warfare. You will have the opportunity to analyse a wide range of source material, including film and television, oral testimonies, diaries, state memorials and political speeches. In the second semester, we turn, firstly, to the contested memory of the British Empire, to memories of colonial violence and to the making of a 'post-imperial' Britain. Lastly, we will consider myths of a youth revolt in 1960s Britain as well as modern nostalgia for Britain's 'lost' traditional society. In the second semester, also, you will be trained in oral history techniques and have the chance to contribute to a collective oral history project on UEA and student protest in the 1960s.

HIS-6036Y

60

BRITISH INTELLIGENCE IN THE 20TH CENTURY - MYTH AND REALITY

The study of intelligence history has seen considerable growth over the last 20 years, as a result of new archival evidence and above all a growing realisation that intelligence has for long been the "missing dimension" in historical interpretation of 20th century diplomacy, defence policy and strategy and in the operational history of two world wars. A consideration of the impact of intelligence assessment, its acceptance (or rejection) and its proponents has well known areas of historical analysis, particularly in the period from the 1930s to the Cold War. The aim of this module is to examine the current historiography of this "missing dimension" and assess its impact in the interpretation of British strategic and defence policy and to some extent, in internal and imperial security as well as considering popular and fictional interpretations of the intelligence service.

HIS-6009B

30

BRITISH INTELLIGENCE IN THE 20TH CENTURY - MYTH AND REALITY

The study of intelligence history has seen considerable growth over the last 20 years, as a result of new archival evidence and above all a growing realisation that intelligence has for long been the "missing dimension" in historical interpretation of 20th century diplomacy, defence policy and strategy and in the operational history of two world wars. A consideration of the impact of intelligence assessment, its acceptance (or rejection) and its proponents has well known areas of historical analysis, particularly in the period from the 1930s to the Cold War. The aim of this module is to examine the current historiography of this "missing dimension" and assess its impact in the interpretation of British strategic and defence policy and to some extent, in internal and imperial security as well as considering popular and fictional interpretations of the intelligence service.

HIS-6010A

30

CHAMBERLAIN, CHURCHILL AND APPEASEMENT, 1935-1940

Britain's response to the aggression of the fascist powers in the inter-war period has been the subject of fierce debate for decades, and is still hotly disputed between historians. This module examines British foreign policy in the era of 'appeasement'. It will focus on the period between 1935 and 1940, analysing a range of primary source material in detail. It will explore the role of key policy-makers, their critics, and the domestic context in which policy was constructed.

HIS-6011A

30

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT I: SCIENCE, IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION

This module introduces students to the phenomenon of climate change, interconnections between climate change and development and theory and practice for adapting to climate change, in the context of developing countries. The first part of the module covers key aspects of climate change science necessary for a basic understanding of the causes of climate change, future projections of climate change and key impacts as well as methods for assessing these. The second part of the module focuses on adaptation to climate change by introducing the concepts of adaptation, vulnerability and resilience. National and sectoral policy making for adapting to climate change is then explored with reference to case studies. Finally the interconnections between disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation are explored. Seminars explore climate science and adaptation topics.

DEV-M103

20

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT II: GOVERNANCE, POLICY AND SOCIETY

This module critically examines international/national climate change governance and policy and societal impacts from and responses to climate change and climate change policy. The first half of the semester (Section A) will discuss the history and politics of the international climate change negotiations and then critically examine the way the climate regime (UNFCCC) operates. The following three lectures will look in detail at two items under negotiation with significant implications for developing countries. Finally we will discuss global carbon markets. The second half of the semester (Section B) will turn to the interface of climate change and society. It will start by discussing urban responses to climate change before critically examining geoengineering and other ethical/justice related debates before examining the role of energy demand and lifestyle in tackling climate change and ending with a session on conflict and human security implications from climate change. The seminars will be interactive and enable students to better understand the international negotiating process and ways to engage positively with climate change.

DEV-M118

20

COLD WAR IN EUROPE

This module will combine analysis of grand strategies and Cold War flashpoints with consideration of counter-culture and civilian resistance in Soviet-controlled Europe, and the circumstances which led to the peaceful end of the Cold War in 1989.

HIS-6034Y

60

COMMUNISM AND NATIONALISM IN YUGOSLAVIA

This module will look at the creation of the Communist state of Yugoslavia after the Second World War. We shall examine the course of the war and the bitter fighting between fascists, nationalists and communists which resulted in the eventual victory of the partisans led by Tito. After 1945, he and his followers built a state which survived until 1991. With the demise of Communism, Yugoslavia fragmented into new nations. In some cases this transition was largely peaceful, but the wars for independence in Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo gave rise to the bloodiest fighting in Europe for decades. We shall look at the role of individuals and ideas, including the career of key figures such as Milosevic and end by assessing at the international community's response to the crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia at the Hague Tribunal.

HIS-6032Y

60

CONCEPTUALISING SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH

This module provides students at school and faculty level with a generic introduction to social science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of social science research, research design, the nature of quantitative and qualitative research methodology, and examines the process and skills needed for social science research. The module is the core module for DEV's 3 MRes programmes: MRes International Development; MRes Development Practice and MRes Social Science Research (Faculty-wide). The module focuses on social science research in terms of design and methodology and complements other modules being offered in DEV and other schools on social science research methods and tools.

DEV-M087

20

CONFLICT GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

Thi is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA Conflict Governance and International Development.

DEV-M054

20

CONFLICT, PEACE AND SECURITY

The aim of CPS is to promote an understanding of the driving forces behind armed conflicts, including civil wars, riots, and communal conflicts, which have become a major obstacle to development. It situates these within the global political economy, particularly within the neo-liberal politics of the last few decades, as well as within concepts of post-colonial state building. Security is conceptualised broadly as not just national/international security but also as the right to security of individuals, including women and children, as well as civilian men. Gender is an important analytical lens here, used not as a proxy for women but as a vitally important component of global militarism, particularly as regards the part played by hegemonic masculinist concepts and ways in which masculinisms play out in specific conflict settings. Peace is conceptualised not just as the situation that breaks out after the signing of a peace treaty but also in relation to post-conflict levels of direct and structural violence that affect individuals and groups of citizens, including women and children at the domestic as well as other levels. Humanitarian agendas are discussed along with their effects on conflict as well as the politics of the UN, and conflicts arising out of competition over natural resources. Students who have taken this module should be able to situate the causes of conflict within the global political economy and understand how conflicts relate to the wider regional and international contexts.

DEV-M052

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

RDC aims to use recent research and practical experience in the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis of critical challenges in resource development and conservation in the developing world. Specifically, themes such as the relation between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control are examined through discussions of theory and the use of case studies, in order to develop an understanding of their natural and social science, and policy dimensions. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-3D12

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

RDC aims to use recent research and practical experience in the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis of critical challenges in resource development and conservation in the developing world. Specifically, themes such as the relation between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control are examined through discussions of theory and the use of case studies, in order to develop an understanding of their natural and social science, and policy dimensions. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-6005B

20

CONTEMPORARY WORLD DEVELOPMENT

This module is guided by the premise that theoretical perspectives about development are shaped by historical contexts and conditions that shape them. These contexts critically influence the issues and processes that are identified as the key concerns of development. They also impact upon the nature of the agency that is chosen to offer solutions to these concerns. Contemporary World Development explores how key development perspectives inform the most important issues in development today and different kinds of agency.

DEV-M002

20

CONTESTING THE PAST: REPRESENTATION AND MEMORY

Historical representation and memory is constantly constructed and reconstructed. This module examines the role of documentaries and feature films in this process, exploring the close interplay and tensions between history, memory, the past and present. Feature films, in particular, have a powerful capacity to reconstruct historical narratives and understanding. Their visual vividness provides a magical simulation of the past. Indeed, in the case of medieval and early modern history, they provide a prime media through which popular understanding of these historical times is conveyed and shaped. Moreover, documentaries and feature films alike often contaminate collective memories of contemporaries and eyewitnesses of specific events, creating further challenges to historians in their pursuit to reconstruct the past. Students will examine what role films play in the process of national memory-work in popular culture and commemoration of historical events as well as how film as a medium can help but also hinder conveying historical understanding. They will also be able to discuss the work of documentary film makers and the practical challenges and responsibilities that come with it: interviewing eyewitnesses and the perils of oral history, organising and constructing a historical narrative, tensions between documentary as an art form and as a medium to transmit knowledge.

HIS-6063A

30

DEATH IN THE MIDDLE AGES

In medieval England, death and what lay beyond it were constantly visible out of the corner of the eye. Large portions of the landscape were given over to the dead: there were barrows, haunted by the ancient pagan dead; cemeteries for the Christian dead; and lonely hermitages, whose occupants spoke with the dead. 'King Death', shown as a skeleton with spear or bow, would strike down the living at any age. And if prayers were not said for them, their ghosts would wander forth from the grave to terrify their neighbours. Vivid images of what happened to the dead were painted and carved over the archways of churches, haunting the living every Sunday and dancing before their mind's eye in their dreams. Visions of the dead were not uncommon, and sometimes they made such demands on the living that the latter spent their lives serving them. This module examines beliefs about death and the otherworld in medieval England; how medieval people prepared for death; how ghosts and the 'undead' irrupted into their world; the role of those who served the dead or acted as mediators between the dead and the living; demons, the evil dead and saints (the holy dead); and how death was represented in medieval art. There will be a trip to see tombs and wall paintings.

HIS-6052B

30

DEATH, BODY AND DISEASE: THEMES IN MEDICAL and SOCIAL HISTORY

This module focuses upon the theory and practice of medicine in the context of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century social history. Topics include healing and science; concepts of 'orthodox' and 'alternative' medicine; interpretations of epidemic disease; the sufferer's agenda; minds, brains and bodies; and changing perceptions of death. We will consider contemporary texts and key contributions to the historiographical literature. It is expected that you will have some background in level 2 medical history course modules.

HIS-6008A

30

DEATH, THE BODY AND DISEASE: FROM GALEN TO THE NHS

Documents and a wide range of visual material from contemporary sources are used to examine the theory and practice of medicine in English and European society from the early modern period to the recent past. Topics include: changing perceptions of death, disease and the body; medicine and religion; the impact of medical ideas upon literary and political thought; the emergence of a healing profession; and women as healers and patients. We also examine the changing function of institutional care; concepts of 'orthodox' and 'alternative' medicine; the dissemination of medical knowledge and the rise of questioning of scientific medicine.

HIS-6029Y

60

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-3D40

20

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-6009B

20

DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES

The objective of this module is to explore different theoretical ideas and debates about development, and place these in their historical and political contexts. We will critically assess the various ways in which development has been conceptualized, from the end of the Second World War to the present day. Topics covered will include modernisation theory; dependency theory; the role of the state; neo-liberalism and the Washington Consensus, neo-institutionalism and the post-Washington Consensus; poverty and basic needs; human development and capabilities; equity and justice; rights and empowerment; and sustainable development. A key point of the module is to show how ideas in development emerge and how they shape policies and practice in development in the present day.

DEV-M003

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

This module provides students with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. Students are expected to fund their own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The school has a database of projects to assist students with their project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (July) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). As a 20 credit module students are expected to work for a minimum of 2 months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing (750 words) about the placement;, and an essay of 2500 words related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6004A

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

No Description

DEV-3C35

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK PLACEMENT

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON THE FOLLOWING ROUTES ONLY; Media and International Develpment, Clmate Change and International Development and Environment and International Development. This module is offered as an alternative to the 40 credit dissertation module (DEV-M04X) that all MA/MSc students in DEV currently take. Whilst an academic dissertation will benefit most master's students, for others there may be more benefit to be gained from an appropriate, challenging work experience placement that is then linked to theory and reflected on critically in a report. Students will be responsible for finding a suitable placement but will be given a range of support from DEV which includes: giving the students access to the DEV internship host data base compiled over nearly a decade; advice on identifying appropriate placements; advice on CV design, fund-raising (where necessary), health and safety, ethical considerations etc.; facilitate communication between student and potential host, in some cases acting as a mediator. Whilst we cannot guarantee a placement we are confident that most students who take this module and apply themselves to identifying an internship, will be successful. If there are any students who cannot find a suitable internship then they will automatically transfer to the standard dissertation module.

DEV-M06X

40

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-3D2Y

40

DISSERTATION

Production of a short (8000-12000) dissertation on an approved topic.

DEV-M04X

40

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6007Y

40

DISSERTATION IN HISTORY

This module offers students the opportunity to submit a dissertation of 9,000 words on a topic approved by the School.

HIS-6022Y

30

DISSERTATION PREPARATION

This module consists of both generic training sessions for all students as well as course-specific exercises and training. A key requirement of the module is for students to make an oral presentation in the Spring semester, to be attended by all MA students, after which they will submit their formal dissertation proposal. The module is assessed on a pass/fail basis.

HIS-M22Y

0

EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module focuses on the geographical area covered by the Carolingian Empire - that is, the modern territorial units of France, Germany, Italy, and the Benelux countries. It begins in the late sixth century with the Merovingian dynasty and ends with the reform of the Papacy and the first crusade at the end of the 11th century.

HIS-5008A

20

ECONOMETRIC METHODS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this introductory module is to expose students to basic econometric theory and provide them with sufficient knowledge and practical skill for competent use of econometrics in empirical research. The module also enables students to understand and interpret econometric research results. By the end of the module students acquire sufficient knowledge and skill to apply multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data to a wide range of macro- and micro-economic problems of development. In addition to lectures, the module includes computer workshops on Stata (widely used econometrics software) and seminars.

DEV-M067

20

ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4003B This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in EC1. It provides a solid grounding in intermediate principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, and their application to developing countries. The first part of the module introduces the student to basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomics theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. Insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered. The second part of the module covers the main macroeconomics and issues of development. This includes long run economics with a particular focus on economic growth, and short run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. This will include recent macroeconomic phenomena such as the global economic crisis and the current debates on climate change.

DEV-5012Y

40

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND PRACTICE FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is to enable students to understand current debates on education and development and their implications for international and national education strategies. Students will critically examine education policy documents (including web-based literature), investigate policy development processes and develop the ability to locate global, national and local levels policies and practices within a range of discourses and theoretical frameworks. These processes will be investigated in relation to particular policy agendas including access and quality, educational governance, social justice and school choice, as well as areas such as education and conflict, poverty and marginalisation, gender and HIV and AIDS.

DEV-M046

20

EDWARDIAN BRITAIN

This module will examine the 'crisis of Liberal England' which has dominated modern discussion of this period. Themes will include the rise of new liberalism, the tariff reform controversy, women's suffrage, health and social welfare, the land question, national efficiency and Home Rule for Ireland.

HIS-6062A

30

ENERGY, ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

This course deals with the energy history of Europe over the past three centuries and the impact of transformations in the scale and form of energy consumption on economic growth, social and cultural life and environmental change. It will examine debates about the reality of resource limits on the economy; the causes of the Industrial Revolution and modern growth; the changing impact of energy use on the landscape; social and cultural shifts associated with energy transitions; how and why energy transitions have occurred in the past; and long-term patterns of the relationships between energy systems and environmental problems.

HIS-M012

20

ENGLAND AND THE CONTINENT IN THE MIDDLE AGES

This team-taught compulsory module runs over the course of two semesters. In this module the following themes and topics may be covered according to the needs and interests of those participating in the programme of study: Society, 970-1066; Domesday Book; Letter Collections; Historical Writing; Charters; the Royal Household; Royal Record Keeping; Urban Communities 1200-1500; Rural Communities 1200-1500; Monasticism; the Church; Canon Law; Magna Carta. Teaching is mainly through the medium of the seminar; weekly preparation is, therefore, a requirement of the course.

HIS-M17Y

60

ENGLISH PALEOGRAPHY

This module is essential for all historians and archaeologists who wish to be able to read the handwriting of the period that they are researching! This can be demanding, but also fun.

HIS-MA37

10

EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to provide a basic introduction into quantitative and qualitative research methods; introduce key concepts in maths and statistics relevant to the study of international development; and to provide a foundation in the key academic skills expected at university including essay planning and writing, reading and thinking critically, using UEA Library services and computing systems and developing effective oral communication and teamwork skills. The unit will be taught through lectures, practical workshops and computer-based lab sessions.

DEV-4002A

20

FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-3C11

20

FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-6001A

20

FIELDWORK IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY

The field course builds on the landscape archaeology units to provide forty hours of practical instruction in the field. The field course runs for one week in June, concentrating on the recording and analysis of archaeological earthworks, buildings and historic landscapes. Assessment will take the form of a short report and an extended project.

HIS-6023Y

30

FORENSIC LINGUISTICS AND TRANSLATION

This module is focused on theoretical and practical aspects of the interplay between language and other language-driven activities such as translation and memory in special circumstances of witnessing, experiencing or judging crime and providing expert linguistic testimony and language services such as translating and interpreting. It contextualises the consequences of this relationship within an interactive environment, namely forensic, psycholinguistic and cross-cultural contexts of language use. Another dimension of the course is an emphatic cross-linguistic approach, whereby we assume the latest linguistic typological perspective and discuss the effects of language differences on the kind of information habitually provided in or omitted from reports in one language and translation.

PPL-MA05

20

FROM AGINCOURT TO BOSWORTH: ENGLAND IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES

Through a close examination of the lives and reigns of four very different monarchs this unit investigates the workings of kingship and high politics in one of the most turbulent periods of English History (1415-1485). New interpretations of the Wars of the Roses, as well as original source material, will be studied.

HIS-5009B

20

FROM THE ZENITH OF IMPERIAL PRESTIGE TO THE NADIR OF BRITISH POWER: THE BRITISH EMPIRE 1919-1956

This module explores developments within the British Empire between the high noon of Empire following the settlement of the First World War to the Suez Crisis of 1956. It will examine the various challenges posed to the British imperial system from the growth of resistance and nationalism in India and the Middle East during the inter war period to the important role played by imperial questions in relations between Britain and the United States (the 'Special Relationship'). Alongside the perceived internal threats to the Empire this module will consider Britain's responses to wartime US criticism of the British Empire and the redefinition of British Imperial policy, the roles planned for the Empire in securing Britain's economic and strategic interests, the scope for Anglo-American co-operation in the Cold War and possible sources of friction between the two powers, culminating in their disagreement over policy in the Middle East at the time of the Suez Crisis.

HIS-M25Y

30

FROM THE ZENITH OF IMPERIAL PRESTIGE TO THE NADIR OF BRITISH POWER: THE BRITISH EMPIRE 1919-1956

This module explores developments within the British Empire between the high noon of Empire following the settlement of the First World War to the Suez Crisis of 1956. It will examine the various challenges posed to the British imperial system from the growth of resistance and nationalism in India and the Middle East during the inter war period to the important role played by imperial questions in relations between Britain and the United States (the 'Special Relationship'). Alongside the perceived internal threats to the Empire this module will consider Britain's responses to wartime US criticism of the British Empire and the redefinition of British Imperial policy, the roles planned for the Empire in securing Britain's economic and strategic interests, the scope for Anglo-American co-operation in the Cold War and possible sources of friction between the two powers, culminating in their disagreement over policy in the Middle East at the time of the Suez Crisis.

HIS-M32Y

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAND 2 anthropology modulewhere disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GENDER CONCEPTS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aims of this module are to provide students with a solid understanding of both the theoretical perspectives and concepts that have underpinned the field of gender and development; and to enable students to understand the link between gender and key debates within development studies such as poverty, violence, religion and the role of men in gender and development. The module begins by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, as they have evolved in recent decades. It then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analysis. The second part of the module applies these concepts in examining a selection of important and policy relevant debates: the nature of the household and kinship, gender roles, power and empowerment, poverty, violence, masculinities, religion and the gendered nature of institutions. The module builds the foundation for the more applied units which follow, and whilst it touches on policy implications as they arise, it does not focus on gender policy as such.

DEV-M015

20

GENDER DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

This module explores relations between social policies (defined broadly) and various forms of identity and difference. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries and pays particular attention to gender issues, although other aspects of diversity (such as ethnicity, disability and age) are also addressed explicitly. The module has both theoretical and more practical components, including sessions on gender planning and mainstreaming analysis. This module has a limit of 40 students.

DEV-M066

20

GEOGRAPHIES OF DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4007B This module explores the place of development in geographical thinking. It begins by looking at intellectual foundations of the geographies of development, beginning with post-war modernism theory and proceeding through neo-Marxist and post-modern approaches to the understanding uneven development and distributional inequities. Following this explicit theorising about geography and development, the module proceeds to explore implicit view as observed in changing development practices in policy debates and discourses and in representations of development in film and print media. finally, the module explores how thinking about geography of development is changing and in particular, how this change is associated with process of economic, political and cultural globalisation including changing patterns of natural resource exploitation and trade and changing relationships between citizens, the state and civil society.

DEV-5010A

20

GEORGIAN REBELLIONS

Compared to the tumultuous seventeenth century, the eighteenth century has long been viewed as a period of unusual political stability in England. But the veneer of order - exemplified by Georgian architecture, the celebration of science and the rule of law - masked undercurrents of resentment, especially outside of England and Wales in Scotland, Ireland and the rest of the British Empire. This module will examine several case studies, including the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745, the Jamaican maroon wars, the Stono Rebellion, Pontiac's War, the American Revolution, and the Irish Rebellion of 1798. We will consider, from the perspective of the discontented, what these violent outbursts tell us about the structure of power in Britain and its empire, and, from the perspective of the government's forces in the suppression of these disturbances, what ideological and legal restraints limited the deployment of military force. Embedded within both of these issues was the question of membership within the political community, and by examining these crises the module will investigate the status of various people including Scottish Highlanders, slaves, maroons, American Indians, colonists and the Irish within the Georgian political system. Analysing a combination of primary sources and scholarly texts, the students will address issues including: 1) The viability of "British" nationality following the Act of Union of 1707 2) The development of an unwritten "imperial constitution" and its implications for colonists, American Indians, and slaves 3) The origins of the American Revolution and its meaning in a British-imperial context 4) The relationship between law and the "rules of war" within Britain and across the empire At the end of the semester, the students will have a detailed historical understanding of several rebellions and the American Revolution; a sound knowledge of the scholarly debates surrounding eighteenth-century British politics and the empire; an ability to utilise and critically evaluate textual evidence in the context of historical work.

HIS-6064A

30

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Macroeconomics of Development (DEV-2D52). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-3D22

20

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Macroeconomics of Development (DEV-2D52). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-6006B

20

GLOBALISATION, BUSINESS AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an understanding of the economic, social and environmental impacts of globalisation. It focuses on the role of business, particularly corporate social responsibility, and the changing role of the state in promoting economic development.

DEV-M110

20

GLOBALISED AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS

The aim of this module is to understand how food security is affected by policies, environmental processes, and actions that occur at the international level. Food security is a central theme, and how it is constructed and contested at international level, involving global institutions, interest groups, and diverse policy agendas. This exploration does not confine itself exclusively to production, but also considers other areas of concern, including: global environmental change, dietary shifts, 'post-production' concerns with food quality or ecosystem integrity, agribusiness, public versus private agricultural innovation, intellectual property rights, and strategies for technological development. Students will gain critical understanding of these debates and how different policy actors engage with them at both the local and the global level. These actors include firms, public RandD institutions, civil society, farmers' movements, consumers' groups, and major donors and philanthropic organizations. The module will help students develop a critical and inter-disciplinary understanding of key international policy debates that have relevance to agriculture. Additionally, students will gain a better understanding of how trends in globalised agriculture affect poor people, particularly smallholder farmers, but also consumers and those involved in value chains.

DEV-M106

20

GOVERNANCE DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT

The concepts of governance and democracy hold very different meanings for distinct political trends. Thus, on the one hand democracy is cited as the only way for citizens to have meaningful input into their government, while on the other it is seen as empty of most substantial content consisting mainly of relatively meaningless formal components such as multi-party elections, a vehicle for enabling globalisation. Similarly, there are multiple ways of conceptualising governance. Recently, 'good governance' has become a development buzzword that now occupies a central place in development thinking, policy-making and practice. But what does good governance mean and why has it become so important for development? How are democracy and governance related to the state and how are they affected by global governance? What does it mean to be a citizen, whether of a state or globally and how does gender, in the form of masculinisms, affect the way all these are conceptualised? These are some of the key issues and questions that this module will try to address. Students who have taken this course should understand the historical roots of democracy and the political aims behind the governance agenda. They will also have gained theoretical perspectives, analytical tools, and basic information that can help them evaluate wider debates about political development, democracy, and governance.

DEV-M065

20

HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a broad introduction to health issues in a context of development. It reviews different cultural understandings of health, and relationships between health, socio-economic change, livelihoods and poverty. The module also examines health policies of particular relevance to developing countries. While the module looks at health issues in general, it pays particular attention to links between HIV/AIDS and development.

DEV-M070

20

HENRY VIII: THE MAKING OF A TYRANT?

The reign of Henry VIII was a major turning point in British history, and 'bluff King Hal' continues to horrify and fascinate us in equal measure. This special subject uses the preoccupations, ambitions, and character of Henry VIII as a route into the political, religious and cultural changes of this tumultuous period. Starting with the acclaimed young king, his Spanish bride, Katherine of Aragon, and his consummate minister, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, the course works chronologically and thematically through to the declining years of Henry VIII's reign, when a paranoid, obese and cruel monarch presided over an irrevocably changed religious and political landscape. It examines in detail the divorce crisis, the establishment of the Church of England, the Henrician Reformation, the politics and factionalism of the Court, war and foreign policy, magnificence, and opposition to the king, and engages with the intense historiographical debates on all these issues. The module considers some of the most colourful personalities in British history - Wolsey, More, Boleyn, Cromwell, and Cranmer - as well as structures, and the falls of Anne Boleyn and Thomas Cromwell are given particular attention. Finally, the module draws on material culture, art history, literature, film, and even dress, as well as relying on the more usual documentary sources, such as the State Papers. Above all, we will try to answer: did Henry VIII really become a tyrant?

HIS-6035Y

60

HERITAGE AND PUBLIC HISTORY

Public history is history in the public sphere, whether in museums and galleries, heritage sites and historic houses, radio and television broadcasting, film, popular history books, or public policy within government. The central challenge and task of public history is making history relevant and accessible to its audience of people outside academia, whilst adhering to an academically credible historical method. This module explores the theory and practice of public history in the heritage sector. The module considers questions such as, how is the past used? What is authenticity? Who 'owns' historic sites? The module also offers the opportunity for undergraduates to work on a heritage project with a local heritage partner - the nature of this project varies each year depending on the availability of such partnership opportunities. PLEASE NOTE: The availability of places with partners this year means that the module will be limited to twelve undergraduate places. All students on the module will be required to engage in preparatory reading and writing over the course of the summer break.

HIS-5026A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH I

This course is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

HIGHER ADVANCED ENGLISH II

This course may be taken as a self-standing module or as a continuation of Higher Advanced English I. It is suitable for people who already have an advanced knowledge of English (grade 6 IELTS or above/Strong B2 CEF (Common European Framework)) but would like to improve or consolidate their skills to reach a more competent level equivalent to grade 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF. The course will allow you to understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. You will practise summarising information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. You will learn how to express yourself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. This module will also look at cultural aspects of English and the dynamic nature of English as a global language. You MAY NOT enrol on this module if you already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.0 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if you are native or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5044B

20

IMPERIAL RUSSIAN AND SOVIET HISTORY, 1861-1945

This module examines some of the main themes in Russian history between the Emancipation of the Serfs and the outbreak of the Second World War. We will look at the nature of industrialisation and the peasant economy, the autocracy and its fall in 1917, the revolutionary movement and the nationalities question. We will then examine how the Revolution of 1917 changed the state and the ways in which the Communists attempted to change society before 1929. We conclude by examining the country during the era of the five year plans and the impact of the Stalinist system on the Soviet Union before the outbreak of world war.

HIS-5019A

20

IMPERIALISTS, PASHAS and REVOLUTIONARIES: IRAQ, 1914-2003

This module explores the eventful and troubled history of modern Iraq. Taking its starting point in the nineteenth century, when Iraq was part of the grand Ottoman Empire that covered much of the Middle East, the module explores how ancient Mesopotamia came under British tutelage following the Great War and how it subsequently experienced a turbulent history as various political actors sought to wrest control of the newly established state. The module pays special attention to key moments when the course of Iraq's history changed, such as wars, military coups and revolutions, but also periods in between when society returned to some sort of normality. Particular focus is on the rise of political ideologies, in particular Arab nationalism, and its local counterpart, Iraqi nationalism - but also other ideologies such as socialism, communism and Ba#thism. Saddam Hussein's domination of the country (1979-2003) is also an important element of the module.

HIS-6069Y

60

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROJECT

In this module, students will conduct and write up their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD8X

60

INTELLECTUALS AND US FOREIGN POLICY, 1880-2012

This module examines the ideas and influence of nine American foreign policy "intellectuals," beginning with Alfred Mahan and concluding with Paul Wolfowitz. Why did each "intellectual" strike a particular chord at a particular time? Do individuals matter in the history of US foreign policy? How, and with what consequences, were these ideas translated into policy? This module will explore the origins of key US foreign policy concepts such as isolationism, internationalism, containment and "pre-emptive defence." Aims of the Module #To introduce students to nine particular strains of US foreign policy ideology. #To encourage students to engage critically with the primary output of these "intellectuals" and to identify their strengths and weaknesses. #To stimulate students to consider whether these ideas have been manifested in policy, and to trace their impact. #To encourage students to develop their own foreign policy philosophy.

HIS-6074B

30

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level. The module is made up of three elements, each taught for one hour per week: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is not available to students with AS or A-Level French. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.)

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

A continuation of Intermediate French I. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module consists of three contact hours per week.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module has three contact hours per week.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent)

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent)

PPLB5034B

20

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY

This module provides an understanding of the economics of international trade and investment and their implications for development. It analyses the impacts of international trade, foreign investment and technology transfer on developing countries and evaluates the effects of national trade and investment policies and international economic agreements and institutions. It covers both trade theory and more applied topics such as the impact of trade on labour and the environment.

DEV-M056

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES-EXAMINATION

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Relations and Development Studies.

DEV-M048

20

INTRODUCING PPL

PPL-4030Y

0

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments.

PPLB4032B

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT FIELDWORK

This module will help prepare students for development fieldwork and focus on practical and ethical issues. Topics covered will include understanding the local context and culture, working with marginalised, vulnerable and privileged groups, negotiating access to field sites and power relations. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD3X

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development,human geography and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress.

DEV-4001A

40

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress. This module is reserved for students on BSc(Hons) Environmental Geography and International Development.

DEV-4006A

20

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY MODERN STUDIES

This module introduces key themes in early modern history: witchcraft, gender, rebellion, religious conflict, the reformation, warfare, state formation and other key aspects of the period 1500-1750.

HIS-4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module introduces students to the main macro- and micro-economic issues of development. It lays the foundations for the modules Microeconomics of Development and Macroeconomics of Development. The main theories of development will be reviewed. Central issues related to poverty, human capital development, the environment, globalisation, balance of payments and financial systems will also be covered.

DEV-4003B

20

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is for students to understand current debates on the principles and theories linking education to development in a range of social contexts. The module will introduce students to theories of education and development including international and comparative education. These are examined in relation to the broader challenges of development. Topics in the module may include: theories of human development and capabilities, human capital and rights based approaches, theories of equity, social justice and inclusive education. We will examine schooling in contexts of chronic poverty, models of schooling and de-schooling, formal and non-formal education, the challenges of linguistic and cultural diversity, inclusive education and disability, gender inequalities, and the education of nomads and other migratory groups.

DEV-M007

20

INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

This module is designed to provide an introduction to medieval history both for first year historians and students from other schools. It surveys the history of medieval Europe, including England, from c.1000 to c1300, and also examines some archaeology, literature, art, and architecture from the period. The module also aims to introduce students to a range of primary sources, including some of the physical remains to be found in East Anglia.

HIS-4001A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN HISTORY

This module provides a wide-ranging introduction to the political, social and economic transformation of Britain and Europe from the late eighteenth century to the First World War. Among the themes it considers are industrialisation and its impact; revolution and reform; nationalism and imperialism; gender and society; great power relations; the impact of war and the collapse of the old Europe in 1917-18.

HIS-4003A

20

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS

This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The course has an integrated biophysical core and also deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4004B

20

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS

The module will provide an overview of different research methods and how they can be applied within the context of development practice. Among other things, it will cover the following topics: interviewing, mixed methods approaches, participatory research methods and basic statistical analysis. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD2Y

20

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH (MRES DP)

This module provides students with a generic introduction to Social Science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of Social Science research, research design and the nature of quantitative and qualitative research methodology. It also examines the skills needed for Social Science research. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD1Y

20

ISOLATION TO WORLD WAR: BRITAIN AND THE ORIGINS OF WWI

This module examines the development of British foreign policy between 1880 and 1914. In the first semester we will undertake a detailed examination of Salisbury's foreign policy and the debate surrounding Britain's international 'isolation' up to the conclusion of the French entente. The second semester will see us examining the cause of British foreign policy under Sir Edward Grey until the outbreak of war in August 1914.

HIS-6030Y

60

LATER MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This module examines the political, cultural and social history of later medieval Europe (circa 1100-1500) with a particular focus on France and Italy. The topics addressed include the formation of cities, the position of the papacy, lay piety, and the role of women.

HIS-5006B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

LATIN AND PALEOGRAPHY

A good command of basic Latin and Latin palaeography are fundamental tools for the aspiring medievalist. The basic Medieval Latin element of this module is suitable for complete beginners, but more advanced tuition is available for students with a prior knowledge of the language. The palaeography element concentrates on the reading and interpretation of a range of original Latin sources from the late 11th to the early 16th century.

HIS-M02Y

30

LATIN FOR HISTORIANS

This module provides an introduction to the linguistic skills in medieval Latin which enable students to read administrative documents such as charters, accounts, court rolls, etc. It is particularly suited for those who intend proceeding to postgraduate study in aspects of the past, such as medieval history, which require a reading knowledge of Latin. This course is not intended for students who have already studied Latin to A level or equivalent.

HIS-5004B

20

MA IN EARLY MODERN HISTORY DISSERTATION

80-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Early Modern History in the School of History.

HIS-M03X

80

MA IN EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT - EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Education and Development.

DEV-M036

20

MA IN GENDER ANALYSIS IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Gender Analysis in International Development.

DEV-M034

20

MA IN GLOBALISATION BUSINESS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA Globalisation Business and Sustainable Development: Exam.

DEV-M114

20

MA IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Development.

DEV-M112

20

MA IN INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in International Social Development.

DEV-M038

20

MA IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY DISSERTATION

70-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Landscape History in the School of History.

HIS-M01X

70

MA IN MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Media and International Development.

DEV-M084

20

MA IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Medieval History in the School of History.

HIS-M02X

90

MA IN MODERN BRITISH HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Modern British History in the School of History.

HIS-M04X

90

MA IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY DISSERTATION

90-credit dissertation for students taking the MA in Modern European History in the School of History.

HIS-M05X

90

MA IN RURAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MA in Rural Development.

DEV-M030

20

MACROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

Why are some countries richer than others? The objective of the module is to provide a rigorous analysis of economic growth issues and examine macroeconomic models that describe determinants of long-term growth and income. We will study the role of capital accumulation, initial income, population growth, education, technological progress, and institutions in determining different patterns of economic development. Theory and data analysis will jointly help explain why some countries embark on divergent development paths.

DEV-M076

20

MADNESS AND MEDICINE

This module considers the practice of medicine in Britain from the eighteenth century to the establishment of the NHS. Themes include the impact of science and professions, the organisation and control aspects of medical and hospital services and healthcare as seen by sufferers and patients.

HIS-6005B

30

MASTER IN RESEARCH DISSERTATION

15,000 to 20,000 words on an approved topic.

DEV-M05X

80

MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

In this module students will be working in the university and in the local community to design, implement and evaluate their own 'live' media and development project. This module is taught and facilitated by lecturers from DEV and by a team of professionals from a media and development organisation, called New Media Networks (NMN). NMN is a creative industries company that works in the UK and internationally for lasting social change. Students will also be working with staff (and possibly volunteers) from the local organisations we collaborate with.

DEV-M099

20

MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the analysis of the different approaches to development communication and the wider relationships between media and development.

DEV-M082

20

MEDIA AND SOCIETY

This module is intended to provide all students studying media related postgraduate degrees with a broad, current and inter-disciplinary understanding of the media today. Our guiding philosophy is that in order properly to understand the media, whether as a lawyer, economist, development studies professional, media studies specialist or political scientist, it is essential to have a wide-ranging and multi-disciplinary understanding of the modern media. What we shall be doing over the year, therefore, is to look at the structure of media today in the UK and globally. We will consider, from several different academic perspectives, how media content is constructed, what shapes content and how content may be controlled and even censored. We will also look at the media industry, examining how it is currently organised and managed, what factors influence its current organisation and consider how it might develop. We will examine how media affects peoples and societies, particularly with the rise of social media, and review the debates about media influence and power. Finally, we will seek to draw together key aspects of modern media.

DEV-M105

20

MEDICINE AND GENDER

This module offers a broad historical treatment of gender issues in medicine, examining women as providers and recipients of healthcare from Ancient Greece to the NHS. Topics for study include the female body, obstetrics and gynaecology, the female healer and the medical profession, women, witchcraft and popular healing, scientific medicine and professionalisation, nurses, nursing and reform, and women's health.

HIS-5016A

20

MEDICINE AND SOCIETY BEFORE THE 17TH CENTURY

This module examines the theory and practice of medicine at all levels of English society during the medieval and early modern periods, and assesses the impact of medical ideas upon religious, literary and political thought. Topics include: the emergence of a healing profession and its attempts to secure a monopoly of practice; the role of women as both patients and practitioners; theories about the spread of disease and necessary measures for public health; medicine and the Church;and attitudes to mortality. Edited versions of original documents are used.

HIS-5014A

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014B

20

MICROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module provides the building blocks for microeconomic analysis of development. Topics include: #Poverty, inequality and welfare #Agricultural household production #Intra- household allocation #Risk, uncertainty and insurance #Markets and Institutions: credit #Markets and institutions: labour #Human capital : education, health and nutrition #Public goods, collective action #Institutions, transaction costs #Policy reforms #Household surveys and their analysis. The module consists of lectures, seminars and workshops. Students are assessed by essay and exam.

DEV-M057

20

MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990

This module introduces students to German history in the twentieth century which was characterised by various radical regime changes and territorial alterations. Topics include German world policy and nationalism in the late imperial period; imperialism and expansionism during the First World War; the challenges of modernity in the Weimar Republic; the rise of Hitler and the formation of the Nazi empire in Europe; the post-war division of Germany and the legacy of the Third Reich; the nature of the GDR dictatorship and the problem of West German terrorism; as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification. Special attention will be given to questions of nationalism and national identity, issues of history and memory, and Germany's role in Europe and the world. On completion of this unit, students will have developed a solid understanding of one of the most dramatic periods of German history when the country oscillated between the two extremes of war and repression, on the one hand, and the return to peace and democracy, on the other.

HIS-5018A

20

MODERN ITALY, 1860-1945

This module studies the social, political and economic history of Italy from its unification in 1860 until the end of the Second World War. It will begin by looking at the process of unification, the difficulties encountered in governing the new nation-state and the problems of uneven social and economic modernisation. The module then focuses on the First World War and the rise of Fascism after 1918, before assessing the nature of Mussolini's regime and the reasons for its downfall.

HIS-5021B

20

MODERNITY IN RUSSIA

The module will explore the revolutionary period and beyond in Russia, concentrating on the way in which Russian culture and society moved towards modernity. Drawing on the wide range of materials, including images, films and imaginative literature, the module will explore the pioneering aspects of Russia's modernist culture and society, as well as discussing the problems that Russia faced in fully embracing the modern age. The module will be taught by a weekly seminar.

HIS-M09Y

60

MSC IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Climate Change and International Development.

DEV-M086

20

MSC IN DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Development Economics.

DEV-M116

20

MSC IN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSC in Environment and International Development.

DEV-M042

20

MSC IN IMPACT EVALUATION FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3 hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Impact Evaluation for International Development.

DEV-M108

20

MSC IN WATER SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Water Security and International Development.

DEV-M104

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN: THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

This module deals with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the start of the Cold War.

HIS-5017B

20

NAPOLEONIC EUROPE

This module examines the impact of Napoleonic rule on Europe. Beginning with an examination of the foundations of the French Empire, the unit goes on to examine different aspects of Napoleonic rule: social and economic change; culture and ideology; warfare and the state; collaboration and resistance. It will look comparatively at the experience of France, Italy, Germany and Spain under Napoleon, before assessing the reasons for the downfall of the Napoleonic regime. Material used will include memoirs, literature and other contemporary documents.

HIS-6015A

30

NATIONALISM AND VIOLENCE IN 20TH-CENTURY EUROPE

Students will study and reflect on the problem of nationalism and violence in modern European history. Topics to be discussed include: the Armenian Genocide, the Irish Question, the Holocaust, the legacy of the Second World War, multinationalism and ethnic cleansing in the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, the French-Algerian problem, the nature and limitations of 'European identity', and the relationship between sport and nationalism. The module will involve the discussion of relevant theoretical literature and be taught as a reading group with close reference to original texts, focussing particularly on memoirs and the exploration of their value as historical sources. The seminars will run in alternate weeks over the autumn and spring semesters. Students will make a 15-minute seminar presentation (20% of the mark) and submit an essay of 4-5,000 words.

HIS-M29Y

30

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE STUDENTS MUST TAKE DEV-4004B. This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in NR1, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, stability, change and degradation, etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management in NR systems. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. a number of different conceptual frameworks such as legal pluralism, value chains, capabilities and rights- centred perspectives are introduced and used to explore particular aspects of resource management issues. Specific natural resource management, biotechnology, renewable energy and biodiversity the module also develops students understanding of experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5013Y

40

NATURE AND SOCIETY

Ideas about nature have always lain at the heart of how we think people should behave and society should be organised. Equally, we have long measured our human virtues against how we have treated nature, and where we belong in it. This course traces those two issues as they have shaped the society and culture of Europeans and their descendants overseas from the early modern age until the birth of modern environmentalism in the 1960s. We will examine changing beliefs about the place of God and humanity in the natural world; how people have imagined themselves shaped by or shaping climate, and tested themselves against nature in polar exploration, local recreation and mountaineering; how we have responded to the problems of modern society, such as air and water pollution, species extinction, and resource exhaustion; how nature has been central to the arts, from the romantic poets to landscape painters and the modern avant-garde, and the arts to our imagination of nature; how nature and land have been major themes of to nationalism and identity; and how scientific knowledge transformed not just our idea of nature, but ourselves.

HIS-6058B

30

NEW WORLDS: THE EUROPEAN COLONIAL EXPANSION FROM COLUMBUS TO ABOLITIONISM

This module looks at the European colonial enterprise in America and Asia. Starting from the explorations in the Mediterranean we will then look at the expansion of European powers across the Atlantic and the Indian oceans: Columbus and the discovery of America, the first colonies of New England, the creation of trading posts in India and East Asia, and the missionary campaigns in China and Japan. Drawing on selected extracts from travel writings and ethnographic descriptions of previously unknown places and people, we will focus on the protagonists of these explorations - conquerors, adventurers, merchants and settlers - and their interaction with and exploitation of non-European people and cultures, and we will finally conclude by considering the debates which developed around these themes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

HIS-5044B

20

NORMAN AND PLANTAGENET ENGLAND, 1066-1307

This module follows the history of England from the Norman Conquest of 1066 down to the death of Edward 1 in 1307. The aim of this module is to look at the political, ecclesiastical, social and intellectual history of England in this period and to place English history in the wider context of European history in the Middle Ages.

HIS-5007B

20

OLIVER CROMWELL

After forty years of relative obscurity, Oliver Cromwell emerged as a leader in the parliamentary opposition to the king during the English Revolution and became the most powerful man in Britain. This course will explore the life and legacies of Cromwell and provide a point of entry into political, religious and social change in early modern England from the long Reformation to the Restoration. Cromwell has remained one of the most divisive figures in British history from the early modern period until the present. His reputation will soon be reinterpreted with the publication of a new edition of his writings and speeches. This will represent the most extensive and scholarly treatment of Cromwellian sources to date. Students on this module will have unique access to samples from this edition prior to publication. Drawing from a wide range of primary sources, including samples from the new edition, this module will enter into Cromwell's puritan mental world and seek to understand his personal and national aspirations. It will build on this to explore Cromwell's conquest of Ireland and Scotland and his ambitious plans to undermine Spanish power in the Atlantic. Finally, the course will consider Cromwell's controversial reception by contemporaries and his diverse representations in popular culture, film and history. This module introduces students to a close and critical reading of primary and secondary sources. The coursework is specifically designed to enable students to progressively build toward a longer piece of writing that reflects a firm grasp of the secondary literature and engages with primary sources to mount a compelling thesis. The overall aim is to equip students with the skills to engage in independent research and to produce a sustained piece of writing. Another pedagogical aim will be to engage the students directly with the editorial process. This will be done by inviting them to evaluate sample documents from the latest Cromwell edition and to complete a mock exercise in annotating and commenting upon the sample material (autumn document analysis). Students will also be encouraged to develop oral communication and engagement in seminars by delivering an oral presentation. This will be done by the student's oral delivery of his or her second document analysis to the seminar, followed by questions and further discussion.

HIS-6068Y

60

OLIVER CROMWELL AND THE PURITAN WORLD

After forty years of relative obscurity, Oliver Cromwell emerged as a leader in the parliamentary opposition to the king during the English Revolution and became the most powerful man in Britain. This module will explore the life and times of Cromwell and provide a point of entry into political, religious and social change in early modern England from the long Reformation to the Restoration. It will draw from a host of primary sources to enter into Cromwell's puritan mental world and seek to understand his personal and national aspirations. It will build on this to explore Cromwell's conquest of Ireland and Scotland and his ambitious plans to undermine Spanish power in the Atlantic. Finally, the module will consider Cromwell's controversial reception by contemporaries and his diverse representations in popular culture, film and history.

HIS-6016A

30

OVERSEAS STUDY UNIT

This overseas based module is designed to enable students to undertake courses of study approved by the School and organised in association with overseas institutions of learning. The assessment is based on a 2500 word essay on a subject to be agreed with the OSU convenor. The subject will normally be thematically linked to the content of the course of study overseas. Students will also have to pass local exams and complete and pass other forms of local assessments at their host university. The work burden should be equivalent to a 20 credit module at UEA, i.e. around 4-8 hours a week. THIS IS RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6002A

20

OVERSEAS STUDY UNIT

This overseas based module is designed to enable students to undertake courses of study approved by the School and organised in association with overseas institutions of learning. The assessment is based on a 2500 word essay on a subject to be agreed with the OSU convenor. The subject will normally be thematically linked to the content of the course of study overseas. Students will also have to pass local exams and complete and pass other forms of local assessments at their host university. The work burden should be equivalent to a 20 credit module at UEA, i.e. around 4-8 hours a week. THIS IS RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-3C23

20

PAST ENVIRONMENTS: THEORY AND PRACTICE IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY

This year-long module examines the nature of past environments from prehistory to the present. It will focus on the theory and practice of Landscape History and examine a series of semi-natural environments, such as woodland, fieldscapes and parkland. It will also look at the impact of man-made structures - such as fortifications - on the landscape.

HIS-M11Y

60

PEOPLE AND PLACE

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE DEV-4007B. This module analyses two key questions about people, place and space: how and why people's health varies in different development settings; and the links between development processes and people's migration. The ways that migration affects health are also examined. The module begins by analysing global patterns of health and development, including risk levels of non-communicable diseases across many parts of the world, the global institutions involved in the governance of health and migration, and broad patterns of health inequality. The second part of the module provides and understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. The geography and risk environments for health is then examined: how social relations (related to class, occupation, gender, ethnicity, colonial history), operating across different spaces, generate susceptibility to health risks in particular places. The examples of HIV and TB are used to illustrate the ways social processes cerate risk environments. The module also looks at places where good health has been achieved and why. The third part of the module develops understanding of the factors driving migration, such as labour relations, conflict or climate change and how these population movements influence men and women, risk environments and their health and well-being?

DEV-5011B

20

PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBALISATION

The module is designed to provide a broad overview of the debates on globalisation and its implications for developing countries. It is taught from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives and considers a range of views and critiques. It addresses key issues such as the impact of globalisation on poverty and inequality, the role of the state, and conflict and security, as well as addressing the resistance to globalisation and the rise of global social movements.

DEV-M071

20

PLAGUE AND DISEASE IN THE MEDIEVAL CITY

Plague and Disease in the Medieval City is an interdisciplinary module which examines the health and illnesses of the urban population in England and Northern Europe during the later Middle Ages. By using the unparalleled riches of Norwich's medieval buildings and landscape, students will investigate standards of living alongside patterns of disease and the relative effectiveness of both individual and corporate actions in halting the spread of plague within the medieval city. Supplementary iconographical, archaeological and documentary evidence from other cities, including Coventry, Winchester, York, London and Paris, will also be used. We will examine the main influences upon the developments within medicine and its practice from the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries. The impact of medical theory on urban politics and planning is also considered, as is the close connection between the Church and medicine, notably through the medium of religious iconography. The module will conclude by assessing the influences upon and developments within medicine and its practice which took place between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries and look at whether any of these were reflected in the changes which took place in Norwich during the same period. *THIS MODULE IS FOR INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY*

HIS-5001S

20

POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This course seeks to provide students with a solid understanding of political ecology theory and to enable them to apply this theory for analyzing environment and development problems. After a brief introduction to key theoretical concepts in political ecology, students review key contributions to major policy fields in environment and development. They do this in a series of reading seminars, covering agriculture and biotechnology, climate change, conservation, fisheries, forestry, water management and other fields. The course ends with a workshop on the role of policy in political ecology.

DEV-M090

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

"This political analysis for development module focuses on core principles in politics and their application to development analysis, covering topics that include power and resistance, states and nations, citizenship and participation, identities and multiculturalism, democratic and authoritarian regimes, and elections and the use of force. The various topics will be taught with intensive reference to theory but integrated with empirical material, both historical and contemporary in nature. It is taught through a combination of lectures, facilitated reading groups, video sessions and student-led seminars."

DEV-5008B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN LANGUAGE 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLB4020A

20

PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module introduces geographical approaches to the key processes of change that shape our world and its societies. You will examine how people and places are connected and transformed as a result of processes such as colonialism, globalisation, industrialisation, migration, urbanisation and development, and explore how differences and inequalities emerge. A central theme will be why space matters, as people's lives are influenced by the places that surround them - both near and far - and as they in turn change those places. These issues will be explored through a range of contemporary geographical topics, from sweatshops to climate change, through which you will be introduced to core geographical concepts, ideas and approaches, emphasising on critical thinking and practice. The module will also cover key methods for geographical research, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and will include field-based practical work in the local area.

DEV-4007B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module will introduce students to the history of propaganda. It will ask students to consider what constitutes propaganda, and to understand the techniques of propaganda, as well as its purposes and effectiveness. It will consider the issue across the twentieth century and will do so by looking at the issue of propaganda in dictatorial regimes, such as Nazi Germany (and fascism more widely), as well as the communist dictatorships. It will also look at the role of propaganda in the Western democracies, looking especially at the issue of the British Empire and the Cold War. It will also look at the role of propaganda in radical politics and protest movements, such as the environmental movement. In doing so it will provide students with an understanding of important historical and ethical debates.

HIS-5050B

20

PUBLIC POLICY AND WELFARE

This module explores relations between public policies (defined broadly) and processes of social and political change. The course has both theoretical and more practical components. Reflecting on the politics of public policy and the unevenness of the state in the developing world the course provides a framework for thinking about social change and public welfare. As well as the role of state institutions, there is also a discussion of the role played by NGOs and other civil society actors in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. Issues covered include HIVAids and public policy in Africa, and state poverty reduction programmes in South Asia.

DEV-3D38

20

PUBLIC POLICY AND WELFARE

This module explores relations between public policies (defined broadly) and processes of social and political change. The course has both theoretical and more practical components. Reflecting on the politics of public policy and the unevenness of the state in the developing world the course provides a framework for thinking about social change and public welfare. As well as the role of state institutions, there is also a discussion of the role played by NGOs and other civil society actors in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. Issues covered include HIVAids and public policy in Africa, and state poverty reduction programmes in South Asia.

DEV-6008B

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other units, ii) to become critical readers of Published quantitative data analysis and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with sampling approaches, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and linear regression.

DEV-5002A

20

QUEENS, COURTESANS AND COMMONERS: WOMEN AND GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the issue of gender in European history, between 1500 and 1750. Using a variety of written and visual sources, and including a comparative element, it focuses on the following themes: definitions of femininity and masculinity; life-cycles; family, kinship, and marriage; social exclusion, charity and the welfare state; law, crime, and order; witchcraft and magic; honour, sex, and sexual identities; work; learning and the arts; material culture; the impact of European expansions.

HIS-5022A

20

REDCOATS': BRITISH MILITARY POWER IN THE AGE OF THE FIRST GLOBAL WARS, 1754-1783

This module concerns the experience of the British army in the period of the Seven Years War and American War of Independence. It will examine the organisation and conduct of war in both Europe and America from a British perspective and discuss how the British army coped with the demands of conducting operations in the era of the first truly 'global' wars.

HIS-6007A

30

REFORMATION TO REVOLUTION

This module examines three centuries of European history connecting two unprecedented revolutionary epochs: the Reformation of the sixteenth century and the American and French revolutions at the end of the early modern era. We will look at key themes and movements in these centuries, including the politics of the Reformation; the Mediterranean work of the Ottomans and Habsburg Spain; the Dutch Golden Age; the great political and religious struggles of the seventeenth century, including wars in the British Isles, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Baltic; the Russia of the Romanov czars and Peter the Great; the growth of centralised states and absolutism in France, Prussia and Austria; the Enlightenment; the rise of the Atlantic economies; and the challenge to the Old Regime from revolutionary politics.

HIS-5025A

20

RENAISSANCE ITALY

This module looks at social, religious and gender norms, and the way in which the institutions of state and church sought to order the lives of men and women in Italy. Providing background knowledge on the period (c.1500-1650), the module focuses on: social, religious, and gender norms; informal community rules and rituals; broken marriages, infanticide, and sexual violence; poor and vagrants; public brothels and women 'in danger'; male and female religious in civic life; forms of religious conversion; customs and costumes; cross-dressing; images of ethnicity.

HIS-6024A

30

RENAISSANCE WORLDS

This module examines the Renaissance in its European and global dimensions. Drawing on a vast array of written and visual sources the module will focus on some of the most debated themes in the history of this period: high politics, popular politics and seditious speeches; the ideals and practices of the Renaissance courts; civility, the culture of display and consumption; warfare; sex and violence; knowledge, travelling and the exploration of the world.

HIS-6055A

30

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In RMSA we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 1

In this module, students will conduct an organisational and policy analysis for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD4Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 2

In this module, students will design and pilot their own research instruments for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD5Y

20

RESEARCH PROJECT 3

In this module, students will develop a detailed research proposal for their Final Independent Research Project. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR MRES DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE STUDENTS.

DEV-MD6Y

20

RESEARCH SKILLS WORKSHOP: DESIGN AND WRITING

RSW:DW will focus on identifying research questions; scoping existing knowledge and finding literature; critical reading and writing; editing and planning arguments; comparing conceptual approaches and preliminary thinking about theory-data linkages.

DEV-M091

10

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS

The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: # Development research and research ethics # Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews # The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods # Participatory and action research # Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are taught using SPSS.

DEV-M027

20

ROBIN HOOD: THE MEDIEVAL OUTLAW IN HISTORY AND LEGEND

The English medieval kingdom was extremely hierarchical. It was a society in which resistance to authority by the vast majority of society was discouraged by the widespread use of mutilation and execution. Yet it was also a society which applauded that resistance. All sorts of levels of society, from the highest in the land (such as the king's sons) to the lowest, indulged in rebellion, but it was the outlaw who captured the popular imagination. Encapsulated in the tales of Robin Hood, the outlaw is loyal, courageous, as well as being clever enough to outsmart the authorities. And the authorities, of course, are disloyal, stupid, and cowardly and use the cover of the law to behave corruptly. And so long as the outlaw commits his crimes for a noble purpose, he remains a hero of the people. The unit will examine the wider subject of resistance to royal authority by men who become outlaws and their portrayal in popular legend from the Norman Conquest of England to the modern age with its focus being the outlaw, for whom the name Robin Hood has become an archetype, as, indeed, it did in the later middle ages, as outlaws took on the name pseudonym for their own criminal activities.

HIS-6053B

30

RSW: ELABORATING RESEARCH DESIGN

This module continues from where RSW1 leaves off. It provides students with the skills to complete their procedural paper, particularly focusing on methodology and moving further on theory-data linkages towards the construction of a conceptual framework.

DEV-M092

10

RURAL ENGLAND 1660 TO 1900

This module will encourage you to consider broad questions in relation to life in rural England and, specifically, as it related to individuals in England between 1660-1900. Topics to be covered will include changes in land use and technology; landowners: affluence and decline; rural crime; housing - types and conditions; family life; childhood; education; poverty and health care.

HIS-5038B

20

RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND AGRARIAN CHANGE

Rural Livelihoods and Agrarian Change is a core module for all MAARD and MAGAID students and is an option for all other masters students. It is an inter-disciplinary module that uses a social relations perspective to understand how people make a living in contexts of poverty and vulnerability. It aims to provide an overview of rural livelihoods and approaches to their analysis as well as a critical assessment of the implications of gender relations and poverty, for livelihood building. The interconnections between the wider context within which livelihoods are built, including national policies and the character of specific locations, the social structure and rules that determine entitlements, the assets or resources available to individuals and groups, and their livelihood strategies, will be examined. The links between rural and urban, farm and non-farm for the livelihoods of rural people, over time, will also be explored.

DEV-M061

20

RURAL POLICIES and POLITICS

Around three-quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas and the gap between poor and rich continues to widen. The fate of the rural poor can be greatly influenced by policies in areas such as agriculture, land, social protection, natural resources, health, education and trade. This module reviews key policies and issues in these and other areas. It also guides students to critically analyse policy choices within specific contexts. Rural Policies recognises the importance of looking at rural policies with consideration of particular socio-economic contexts and in relation to larger-scale trends that are affecting rural areas: globalisation, urbanisation, de-agrarianisation, rural-urban linkages, conflict, HIV/AIDS and decentralisation. At the same time, it is based on the premise that rural areas require particular policies because of the distinct conditions characterizing them.

DEV-M016

20

RUSSIA IN REVOLUTION 1905-1921

This module will look at the upheavals in Russia between 1905 and the introduction of a limited Parliament, and continue by examining the First World War and the downfall of the Romanov monarchy. We will then study the year 1917 in some detail and discuss the causes of the Bolshevik seizure of power. The Civil War and the reasons of the Communist victory will be analysed. The module will place the Russian Revolutions in their historical, political and geographical context and will consider the impact that these events had in the history of the twentieth century.

HIS-6004B

30

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (AUTUMN SEMSTER)

X05 This module offers HIS students on the V100 programme the opportunity to spend the Autumn semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5031A

60

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (SPRING SEMSTER)

X04 This module offers HIS students on the V100 programme the opportunity to spend the Spring semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5030B

60

SEX and DRUGS and ROCK N ROLL? SIXTIES BRITAIN

Few decades in the modern period have proved as polarising as the 1960s. From 'swinging' London and the student protests of 1968 to the consequences of an allegedly 'permissive' society, the social, cultural and political implications of the decade reverberate into the present. We will cover the political impact of social and cultural trends such as: affluence and consumer culture; youth, pop music and subcultures; the counter-culture, pop-art; film, theatre, television and censorship; the 'New Left' and the birth of cultural studies; changing sexual behaviour and the 'permissive' moment; the politics of 'race' and immigration; education, social mobility and the 'new' universities; slum clearance, suburbanisation and the rise of the tower block. While focusing on Britain, key global themes will be unpacked and their local significance explored: cultures of the cold-war; decolonisation anti-colonial struggles; anti-nuclear and anti-Vietnam protests; the civil rights movement; the rise of 'second wave' feminism and gay liberation; structuralism and post-modernity. Through the analysis of autobiographical accounts and oral histories and contemporary books, films, music, television shows, sociological surveys, archival sources, official publications and material culture students will be encouraged to come to their own conclusions about this tumultuous decade.

HIS-6057Y

60

SKILLS IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM

This module takes place in the Spring Semester and is taught through a combination of practical group sessions and independent tasks. The main focus of the course is the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Landscape History and there is a strong emphasis on the practical application of GIS in examining Britain's historic landscape. This 20-credit module is ONLY available to students on the Environmental Sciences and Humanities course.

HIS-M006

20

SKILLS IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

This module takes place in the Spring Semester and is taught through a combination of practical group sessions and independent tasks. The main focus of the course is the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Landscape History and there is a strong emphasis on the practical application of GIS in examining Britain's historic landscape.

HIS-M002

30

SLAVERY AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1619-1807

This module will investigate how and why a relatively small number of colonists from England - a nation that prided itself as being free from slavery - adopted a way of life thoroughly dependant on slave labour. By the late eighteenth century, slavery influenced the lives of British people everywhere, and this circumstance helped inspire Britain's drive to outlaw the slave trade and consign slavery itself to history. Analysing a combination of primary sources and scholarly texts, the students will address a variety of issues related to slavery in the British Empire, including: 1) The contribution of slave labour to economic development in Britain and its empire; 2) The influence of slavery on political ideology in Britain, the British colonies, and the early United States; 3) The role of Africans in shaping and supplying the slave trade; 4) The intimate influence of slavery on the lives all those directly involved in the practice, including slaveholders and the enslaved, women, men, and children; 5) The complex politics that led to the official abolition of Britain's slave trade in 1807.

HIS-6059B

30

SOCIAL ANALYSIS FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Over the last few years, social development has become a leading focus in international development policy. Most international agencies and many of the larger NGOs have their own departments or divisions of social development. This module offers a detailed theoretical analysis of key concepts issues in social development, such as power relations, social capital, social exclusion, participatory development and different understandings of poverty. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries.

DEV-M063

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1

This is the first part of a two-year integrated course that covers basic principles from the social sciences, and uses them to think critically about processes of social change in developing countries. SAID1 provides an introduction to social analysis and is framed by the study of social anthropology. Concepts and methods are explained through the use of indepth case studies which from a range of developing country contexts. Issues covered in the course include: kinship, religion, violence, labour, politics and resistance. As well as introducing students to classical anthropological texts the course engages with the work of anthropologists looking at issues of contemporary development and change.

DEV-4005B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or ART-4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

SOCIETY, POLITICS AND CULTURE IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND

This year-long module covers a wide range of issues in the social and cultural history of England, c.1500-1750. Weekly two-hour classes are spread over both semesters and examine issues such as methodology and interpretation in social and cultural history; the nature of early modernity; senses of place, belonging and local identity; custom and popular memory; social relations and social conflict; crime, the law and legal culture; magic and popular religion; witchcraft; gender relations and gender identities; literacy, print and oral culture; and senses of the self. Assessment is based upon two 5,000 word essays, focussing on a question that has been tailored to the specific needs and interests of the student.

HIS-M04Y

60

SOURCES FOR LANDSCAPE HISTORY

This is a specialist preparatory exercise, examining sources for landscape history, ranging from historical documents through to field evidence and maps. There will be a strong practical element to this component, with an emphasis on how landscape historians use their sources.

HIS-M001

10

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

STALIN AND STALINISM: THE USSR 1924-1953

This special subject will examine the Stalin era in the context of other 20th-century dictatorships. There will be a particular focus on: Stalin's rise to power; Stalin's revolution; terror and its impact on Soviet society; war and dictatorship; decline and fall - Stalin and destalinization.

HIS-6031Y

60

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investiages the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR TRANSLATORS

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to computer-based tools, technologies and methodologies used in the translation industry, and to examine critically the strengths and weaknesses of such tools. All students learn to use the main market-leading applications (MemoQ, SDL Trados, Systran and others as appropriate); at least five tools will be covered each year. Individual or small-group exploration of a range of further tools is also supported, in response to student interests and needs. A 'learning by doing' approach is central to the module. Students learn to be confident explorers and adopters of translation technologies, so they can master new tools they need in future. As far as possible, learning replicates 'real-world' use of the technology and prepares those attending to join the industry in a range of roles on completion of their studies. To this end, students are expected to participate in collaborative team translation projects, to share in communicating best practice to their class colleagues, and to build a portfolio of their own translations during the module.

PPL-MT13

20

THE 'GOLDEN' TWENTIES: WEIMAR CULTURE AND THE SPIRIT OF MODERNITY

This module focuses on one of the most exciting and fascinating decades in German history. The Weimar Republic has become legendary for its intense creativity during a time of socio-economic crisis and political upheaval. It was a period when art and unrest flourished side by side, an age characterised by a new rhythm of life and filled by visionaries and bohemians, making Germany the incomparable centre of European cultural and intellectual life. Few places in the world were so inventive and exhilarating, but also so decadent and despairing. Beyond the glamour and glory of cabarets and department stores, gaudy jazz bands and gay bars, architectural innovation and cinematographic experimentation, there was also extreme poverty and an escalation of prostitution, youth delinquency, and political violence. This course attempts to capture this ambivalence of Weimar culture and society between glitter and doom, promise and tragedy.

HIS-6066A

30

THE AGE OF EXTREMES: EUROPE 1918 - 2001

This module examines the dramatic history of Europe during the twentieth century in its global context. It will consider the century's turbulent swings between war and peace before discussing the economic revolutions that engulfed the globe. The complex interactions between humans and the natural environment will form a central part of the module, before discussion of the ideological fissures that divided Europe for much of the twentieth century. The concluding section will consider the development of popular social movements and how they have shaped Europe.

HIS-4006B

20

THE AMERICAS 1492-1820

This module examines the history of North and South America and the Caribbean from 1492 to 1820, focusing on encounters between indigenous peoples, and on people of African heritage and settlers of European descent. We will examine a variety of primary sources in order to study such diverse subjects as race relations, missionary activity, the development of slavery, changing gender relations, economic development, and patterns of imperial administration and self-government. These will be studied using Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, English, and French colonial settings. Aims include: to contrast and compare different patterns of colonization in early Spanish and English America; to look at the development of different ideas of colonial societies; to assess the impact of the revolutions throughout the Americas.

HIS-6073Y

60

THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1857-1956

This module surveys the history of the British Empire from the mid-nineteenth century to the Suez Crisis, seeking to explain the Empire's growth and the early stages of its contraction. It examines the nature and impact of British colonial rule, at the political, economic and social/cultural levels, addressing the development of the 'settler' colonies/Dominions, the special significance of India and the implications of the 'New Imperialism'. Problems to be considered include theories of 'development' and 'collaboration', the growth of resistance and nationalism, and Britain's responses to these, and the impacts of the two World Wars and the Cold War on Britain's Imperial system.

HIS-5013B

20

THE CLASSICS AND THE CONTROVERSIES: EARLY MODERN HISTORY READING GROUP

This module introduces students to some key texts encompassing different approaches to early modern history, and engages them in broad debates with the wider community of early modernists about developments in the field. Each seminar will be held fortnightly and be based around the preparation of a text that everyone has read. Seminar participants (including staff) will be expected to make one short introductory presentation on the text as the basis for in-depth discussion about the text itself, and the issues raised by it. Texts may include authors such as Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Natalie Zemon Davis, and Michel Foucault, E P Thompson, and Keith Thomas covering a wide range of the social, cultural, political and economic history of Europe and the wider world. Students will be supplied with copies of all of the readings as well as a supplementary reading list on key themes and debates in early modern history. The aim is not only to introduce students to a broad range of theoretical perspectives and approaches to early modern history, but also to assist in developing skills of close reading, discussion, presentation, listening, and the application of different theoretical perspectives. Students will also acquire a broad knowledge of historiographical approaches to early modern history, although it is not a module in historiography. The module will be led by Drs Warde and Evangelisti, but other staff members in the School and postgraduate students may also contribute to help engage students in a wider current of debate surrounding key themes in early modern history. Assessment will be by means of a 4-5,000-word essay at the end of the Spring Semester, which may take the form of: (a) a detailed analysis of one core text; (b) a discussion of one or more of the core texts within the wider historiography of the field; or (c) a comparative discussion of the approaches embodied in different texts.

HIS-M03Y

30

THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This module analyses the emergence, development and end of the Cold War. In doing so it examines political, ideological and legal aspects of conflict between and within states, issues of sovereignty, nuclear strategy and arms control, as well as peacekeeping, disarmament and non-violent resistance. Alongside political developments, themes such as everyday life, culture, sport and the existence of alternatives during the Cold War era will also be considered.

HIS-5024B

20

THE CONQUEST OF AMERICA

This module examines the discovery of the New World, and the Spanish and Portuguese conquest of America. Through the letters of Columbus, Cortes, and other written and visual narratives of the time, we shall study the impact of the Conquest on both European and native American societies, and the long-lasting effects that the circulation of people, goods, and ideas, had on Western cultures.

HIS-6038Y

60

THE CRUSADES

This module will consider the history of the Crusades and the Crusader States from 1095 to 1291, covering a broad range of themes, religious , military and social, and taking into consideration the relations between Christians and Moslems in the Holy Land. Particular attention will be paid to primary sources, which are abundant and available in English translation.

HIS-6001A

30

THE DEVIL'S BROOD: THE ANGEVIN KINGS OF ENGLAND (1154-1225)

This Special Subject focuses on the lives and actions of three of the most charismatic kings of the English. It begins by an examination of the creator of the Angevin dynasty, Henry fitz Empress, who, by the time he was twenty-one, dominated more than half of France as well as being king of the English. On the continent, Henry was a successful military commander; in England, he was the creator of the English common law and a centralising administration. And it was of him that St Bernard is supposed to have declared 'he came from the Devil and he will go to the Devil'. His son and successor, Richard the Lionheart, was one of the greatest knights of his age as well as being a crusader and successful military commander who seemingly placed the Angevin Empire on a solid footing. After these two great makers of empire, the third ruler of the dynasty almost brought the whole edifice crashing down. King John lost the continental lands, and by the time of his death his lands were being ravaged by a foreign prince, his barons were in revolt having gathered themselves behind a document we know as Magna Carta, and his dynasty on the verge of extinction. This Special Subject has at its core the story of the creation and near destruction of this dynasty; and seeks further to examine the politics, culture, and society of the lands over which the Angevin dynasty held sway. This was an age of profound intellectual, religious, and political change, and this Special Subject will be set within this wider context. Students will be expected to become conversant with the primary sources in translation and to be aware of current historiographical debates. Teaching will be through student-centred seminars. Students will be expected to do weekly gobbets both as a way of becoming familiar with the sources and as preparation for the examination.

HIS-6027Y

60

THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR: WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS

This module explores female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. It will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes. It will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5029B

20

THE ENGLISH CIVIL WARS

This module looks at the causes, course and significance at what, in terms of relative population loss was probably the single most devastating conflict in English history; the civil wars of 1642-6, 1648 and 1651. In those years, families, villages and towns were divided by political allegiances and military mobilisation. Hundreds of thousands died, not just from warfare, but also from the spread of infectious disease, siege and the disruption of food supplies. In the rest of the British Isles, suffering was even more profound. The execution of the King in 1649, intended to bring an end to the wars, divided the country ever more deeply. By the late 1640s, radical social groups had emerged who questioned the very basis of authority in Early Modern Society, and made arguments for democracy and for the redistribution of land and power. Karl Marx thought that English revolution marked the beginnings of capitalism. Was he right? Focussing on ordinary men and women as well as upon important generals, politicians and monarchs, this module examines the following issues: the causes of the civil war; the reign of Charles I; the start of the warfare in Ireland and Scotland; the outbreak of the English Civil war; the course of the war; popular allegiances - why did ordinary people fight?; the Levellers, Diggers and Ranters; the crisis of 1647-9; the trial and execution of Charles I; gender, women and revolution; the experience of warfare; print and popular political gossip; the failure of the English Republic and the Restoration of Charles II. Particular use will be made of the primary source extracts and web resources.

HIS-5028B

20

THE ENGLISH IN AMERICA 1607-1692

This module explores the colonization of America by seventeenth-century English people. The memory of the Mayflower Pilgrims has obscured the fact that the first three generations remained English, unaware of the political and cultural distinctiveness to come. We will therefore be concerned with 'the repatriation of early American history'. We shall examine settlers' lives from the foundation of Jamestown in 1607, through the creation of Massachusetts in the 1630s, to the wars and rebellions of 1670-90. Not confined to New England, this module looks at a range of colonial experiences from Maine to the Caribbean, especially the mentalities of people moving between old and new worlds.

HIS-6033Y

60

THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1066 TO 1600: BUILT AND SEMI-NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS

This module will examine the development of the English countryside from late Saxon times into the eighteenth century. Topics covered will include woods and wood-pastures, enclosure, walls and hedges, the archaeology of churches and vernacular houses. There will be a substantial practical component to the module, involving the analysis of buildings, hedges and woods and other semi-natural environments.

HIS-5003B

20

THE FIRST WORLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This reading-intensive module explores the impact of the First World War on European and non-European states, societies, and cultures. It aims to broaden and deepen the students' knowledge by introducing some of the lesser known aspects of the conflict, such as the campaigns on the Eastern front, in Africa, or the Middle East. Students will investigate the role and perception of colonial troops in the European theatre of war and examine the war efforts of such countries as Italy, Serbia, the Ottoman Empire, and Australia. Further topics to be discussed include alliance politics and the role of neutral states, psychological effects of 'industrialised slaughter', atrocities against non-combatant civilians, captivity and occupation, state propaganda and the spiritual mobilisation of intellectuals, as well as processes of social change with regard to home and family life, ethnicity and class. The module will draw on a wide range of primary sources, including poems, paintings, and film. In their coursework, students will have the opportunity to study more specific issues, such as naval and aerial warfare, British military strategy, civil-military relations in democratic and autocratic states, medical innovations, the war experiences of children, or questions of memory and commemoration.

HIS-6051B

30

THE GREAT POWERS AND THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN

This module will look at the Eastern Mediterranean as a centre of Great Power rivalry through a series of case studies, stretching from the late eighteenth to the later twentieth century. It will consider such issues as the region’s impact on wider international politics and the impact on the region of Great Powers’ involvement in its affairs. In doing so, the module will examine key aspects of diplomacy, economic rivalries, the role of sea power, the origins and conduct of wars, and attempts at conflict resolution. Extensive use will be made of primary sources.

HIS-6054A

30

THE HISTORY OF NORWICH

This module will focus on the development of towns and cities in England from the Norman Conquest until the present day. We will use Norwich as our main case study, but will also draw on other comparative examples around England, such as London, York, Exeter or Leeds, to place Norwich within its wider context. This module will combine social, political and economic history with a detailed consideration of the built environment of the city; key buildings, open spaces and street patterns. There will be regular field trips into Norwich to explore historic buildings, collections and landscapes.

HIS-5040A

20

THE HOLOCAUST IN HISTORY

In the last twenty years there has been a sustained and remarkable growth of historical and public interest in the 'Holocaust'. The proliferation of academic work on all aspects of the history of the Holocaust, accompanied more recently by a burgeoning scholarship on genocide in general, has been matched by an enormous output of 'private' and 'public' history, from memoirs and recollections by 'survivors' to films and documentaries, websites of all kinds and the official commemoration of the Holocaust in museums, exhibitions and days of remembrance. The Holocaust has thus been transformed from a specialised branch field of historical enquiry into a contemporary cultural phenomenon. This module encourages you to reflect critically on this phenomenon by setting the history of the Holocaust into its wider context. This will involve study of: the history of the persecution of the Jews since the Middle Ages; the changing nature of antisemitism in Europe over the centuries; the emergence of a racial-political antisemitism at the end of the 19th century; the impact of the First World War on attitudes to minorities and on the propensity for more violent assertions of nationhood; Nazi practices of isolation, Aryanisation, deportation and ghettoisation; the German war of racial annihilation in the East and the implementation of the 'Final Solution'; the experience, motivations and psychology of the 'ordinary' perpetrator; the testimony of those who survived the Holocaust; the relationship of the Holocaust to other genocides; the challenges of representing and teaching the Holocaust. The module will therefore enable you to reflect more widely on what history is, how we do it, and why we do it; on the methods one can use, the questions one can ask, the variety of sources one can tackle and why history matters.

HIS-4005B

20

THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION - THE MAKING OF MODERN BRITAIN 1500-1700

In the two hundred years following 1700, the British economy and population entered a sustained and unprecedented phase of growth. The economic, demographic, social and cultural changes that ensued were so far reaching, that by 1850, commentators were agreed that an 'industrial revolution' had taken place. This module seeks to illuminate the many facets of this transformation, and to explore the extensive historiography surrounding them. This module introduces students both to the economic processes which underpinned industrialisation, and to many ways in which Britons of all social levels ranks experienced and thought about their changing world.

HIS-6025A

30

THE MAKING OF MODERN BRITAIN, 1851-1951

This core module will enable you to examine a tumultuous period in which Britain was transformed, both at home and in its worldwide role. In the mid-nineteenth century it had become the global hegemon, buoyed by industrial revolution and drawing on British power overseas. By the late nineteenth century, it was already being challenged; two cataclysmic world wars left its power draining away. Or did it? Alternating between Britain within its borders and its role beyond them, this module will allow you to explore a range of topics, questions and approaches to illuminate the period. The module is team-taught by a group of historians who represent one of the largest concentrations of expertise in this period in a British university, with specialisms including foreign and imperial policy, economic and social history, gender history and a range of other interests. They will draw upon primary material from their own research as the basis for seminar discussion, while the topics of your written work will be defined by you.

HIS-M31Y

60

THE MAKING OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1450 TO 1950

This Special Subject deals with the development of the English landscape from c.1450 to 1950. We will focus on agricultural change in the period up to 1870, before moving on to consider the landscape and architecture of the English country house and landed estates. We will discuss developments in architectural design, spatial planning and the changing appearance of parks and gardens during this period, as well as discussing the social and political ideologies that underpin these developments. We will also consider the development of the rural landscape in the period after 1870; the decline of the great estates, the effects of the agricultural depression and the impact of war and suburbanisation. Finally, we will discuss changing attitudes towards the conservation and preservation of the countryside. There will be a number of field trips during the year.

HIS-6026Y

60

THE NORMAN CONQUEST

In the first semester, we shall examine the Old English and Norman states before 1066. In the second semester the module will focus on the Conquest and the colonisation of the Kingdom of England. Particular attention will be given to the processes by which England was brought under Norman rule, both in the ecclesiastical and secular spheres. The module will be taught through original sources in translation.

HIS-6037Y

60

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

This module will examine the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Saxon period. We will examine the field archaeology of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, discuss in some detail the landscapes of Roman Britain, and assess the nature of the Roman/Saxon transition. We will then investigate the development of territorial organisation, field systems and settlement patterns during the Saxon and Medieval periods. The module provides an introduction to archaeological theory and methods, as well as giving a broad overview of the development of society, economy and environment in the period up to c.1300.

HIS-5002A

20

THE PAPACY, CHRISTIANITY AND THE STATE, 1050-1300

In these centu