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UCAS Course Code

CFG0

Attendance

Full Time

Award

Degree of Bachelor of Science

School of Study

Natural Sciences

Course Organiser

Dr. Stephen Ashworth


“Natural Sciences offered the flexibility to allow me to pursue a variety of subjects. I wasn’t able to make a choice about which area of science I wanted to study so it was ideal to postpone that decision for another year. As it turned out, the subjects I thought I’d end up liking turned out to be very different at university and I discovered new ones that I enjoyed.”

- Graham Walkden, Natural Sciences Student

The Natural Sciences programme is ideal if you wish to combine study in more than one area of science whilst retaining a larger degree of flexibility than joint degrees allow. You will study modules from a minimum of two main disciplines, with the opportunity to study specialist topics as your degree programme develops.

By studying Natural Sciences you will be able to appreciate complex concepts from across contemporary science. An example of this could be examining the biological complexities of how a virus spreads through a population, alongside the computational techniques necessary to predict and illustrate it.

You will experience what is required of a competent scientist; from the deliberation needed to design an experiment, including consideration of the results, to the excitement of discovering something new.

Course Structure

This three year course gives you an opportunity to build on your existing scientific knowledge, and possibly discover new avenues of scientific study available at university level. In the second and third year, you will have the chance to choose from a diverse range of scientific modules from science schools across the faculty; from Artificial Intelligence to Quantum Mechanics and Symmetry.

The degree programme is made up of optional modules from across the Faculty of Science. In your final year of study, you will engage in a substantial research project that will reflect your own scientific interests.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods are used across the different modules available to Natural Sciences students, ranging from 100% coursework to 100% examination. Coursework assessment methods include course tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, field exercises, field notebooks, literature reviews, essays and seminar presentations. Skills-based modules are assessed by 100% coursework. The final year project involves a substantial piece of written research work, which counts for 40% of your final year mark.


Choosing to study at UEA means joining some of the most satisfied students in the UK and being taught by world-leading scientists and researchers.

As one of our students you will:

  • Take part in a stimulating ‘research-led’ teaching programme
  • Be taught at the cutting-edge of your subject
  • Have the opportunity to undertake original interdisciplinary scientific research
  • Develop excellent practical skills through a combination laboratory work, workshops and field courses.

We offer a broad range of degrees to choose from. The BSc Natural Sciences is taught within the Faculty of Science at UEA, a strongly integrated and innovative science cluster comprising Schools of:

  • Biological Sciences 
  • Chemistry
  • Computing Sciences
  • Environmental Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Pharmacy

Beyond the Faculty, we also maintain excellent relationships with the John Innes Centre, Sainsbury Laboratory, the Institute of Food Research based on the Norwich Research Park, the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and UEA’s School of Medicine.

Our Faculty is nationally and internationally renowned for its world-class research. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, all departments were rated as having world-leading research and over 93% of the research outputs were assessed as being of international quality. This has secured our ranking as one of the top fifteen research-intensive universities for science in the UK.

Employability

With a third of our students going on to pursue higher degrees, the remaining two-thirds have an exceptional employment rate, with 100% of our graduates who are available for work in employment or study within six months of leaving.

With a Degree in Natural Sciences you will be in an excellent position to pursue higher degrees such as Master’s or PhDs.  

You will have access to a broad range of subjects through this degree programme, allowing you to follow a career in a particular scientific sector, or gain a more general scientific skill set.

The skills you will gain are recognised as extremely valuable to employers.

Student Experience

Your experience of studying Natural Sciences at UEA will be unique, in that the modules you study are based on your own interests. Your personal academic advisor will help you tailor your choices from across the sciences, helping you create a degree that ignites your passion and crosses conventional boundaries. We also offer you a high level of academic and pastoral care.

The University as a whole has a huge amount to offer. In 2013 we ranked number one for Student Experience in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey.

Throughout your studies, you will be able to access the wealth of activities and opportunities that the campus has on offer and join one of the most satisfied student bodies in the UK.

Teaching Excellence and Facilities

Whatever choices you make, you will benefit from being taught in science departments where the research and teaching is considered internationally excellent.

You will learn from scientists who are at the forefront of their field, and who will share their latest results with you in lectures, seminars, fieldwork or practical classes.

Our award-winning campus offers a broad range of facilities, including state-of-the-art laboratories.

UniStats Information

Year

Students are required to select modules appropriate to the Natural Sciences programme which they have selected, and their choice is subject to approval by their Adviser. Students are required to take at least 80 credits each from two of the following major subjects by the end of their final year: Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Sciences, Mathematics and Physics.

Option A Study (120 credits)

Students will select 120 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ASTROPHYSICS

This 20-credit module gives an overview of astrophysics through lectures and workshops. Assessment will involve some coursework and a coursetest. The module assumes previous study of A level physics or an equivalent course. Topics covered will include some history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology.

NAT-4001A

20

BIODIVERSITY

An introduction to the evolution of the major groups of microorganisms, plants and animals. The module considers structural, physiological and life-cycle characteristics of these organisms. It charts the development of life on land and interprets evolutionary responses to changing environments. Students on this module are strongly advised to also take BIO-4008Y or BIO-4010Y.

BIO-4001A

20

BONDING, STRUCTURE and PERIODICITY

The first six lectures of this module are integrated with CHE-4101Y. The first half of the module brings together fundamental concepts associated with the bonding and structure of inorganic and organic materials, including atomic structure, electron configurations, ionic and covalent bonding, and intermolecular forces. The second half of the module builds on the bonding and structural ideas to explain the structure of the Periodic Table. Trends, comparisons and contrasts will be drawn between the elements of the s/p block metals, non-metals and the transition metals.

CHE-4301Y

20

CALCULUS AND MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS

This module is incompatible with MTHB4006Y and ENV-4002Y. (a) Complex numbers. (b) Differentiation and integration. Taylor and MacLaurin series. Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (c) First order, second order constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reduction of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (d) Vectors. (e) Line integrals. Multiple integrals, including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (f) Euler type and general linear ODEs. Phase plane, direction fields, limit cycles, period doubling and chaos. (g) Divergence, gradient and curl of a vector field. Scalar potential and path independence of line integral. Divergence and Stokes' theorems.

MTHA4005Y

40

CALCULUS AND PROBABILITY

THIS MODULE IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH MTHA4001Y and ENV-4002Y. (a) Complex numbers. (b) Differentiation and integration. Taylor and MacLaurin series. Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (c) First order, second order constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reductions of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (d) Vectors. (e) Line integrals. Multiple integrals including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (f) Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory. Students must have A-level Mathematics Grade 'B' or above or equivalent.

MTHB4006Y

40

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (A)

This 20 credit module comprises laboratory and related IT experiments/ modules relating to aspects of the core chemistry lecture modules.

CHE-4001Y

20

CHEMISTRY OF CARBON-BASED COMPOUNDS

Compatible with CHE-4301Y, or a free-standing module with workload greater than average for 20 credits. The first six lectures of this module are integrated with CHE-4301Y. The module then introduces bonding and hybridisation, conjugation and aromaticity, mechanism and functional groups; principles which are elucidated in topics: electrophilic substitution and addition, organometallic nucleophiles, polar multiple bonds, enolate, Claisen, and Mannich reactions, the Strecker synthesis, stereochemistry (enantiomers and diastereoisomers), SN1/SN2 and E1/E2 reactions, and epoxidation / 1,2-addition to alkenes. Finally, organic synthesis (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, ethers, amines, ketones, carboxylic acids) and the identification of organic structures by spectroscopy are described.

CHE-4101Y

20

COMPUTING SYSTEMS 1

The module is designed to introduce students to some of the principal technologies of contemporary computing systems and to software development in a web context.A basic knowledge of Java progranmming is required; this module is usually taken with a suitable programming module
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CMP-4006A

20

COMPUTING SYSTEMS 2

The module is designed to provide students with: an overview of the organisational, cultural and technical context of current software development, experience of developing software in a web context, and an introduction to the principal architectures of contemporary computing systems.
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CMP-4007B

20

ENERGETICS AND SPECTROSCOPY

This module considers the way in which chemical systems, in the form of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, are described in terms of their energetics and dynamics. Topics include simple phase equilibria, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics in a chemical context, electrochemical cells, and acid base and redox equilibria. The module also includes a series of lectures on the principles of spectroscopy applied to chemical systems, i.e. how light interacts with matter.

CHE-4201Y

20

EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY

This module introduces the main ideas in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology and ecology. It concentrates on outlining concepts as well as describing examples. Specific topics to be covered include the genetical basis of evolution by natural selection, systematics and phylogeny, the adaptive interpretation of animal sexual and social behaviour, ecological processes and population biology.

BIO-4002B

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - COLLECTION AND COMPARISON

History of forensic science, forensic collection and recovery methods, anti-contamination precautions, microscopy, glass refractive index, introduction to pattern recognition including footwear; introduction to Drugs analysis; forensic statistics and QA chain of custody issues. The second half Introduces the student to the fundamentals of DNA and biotechnology essential for an understanding of forensics technologies. Topics covered include: nucleic acid/chromosome structure, replication, mutation and repair; concepts of genetic inheritance; DNA manipulation and visualisation; DNA sequencing; DNA fingerprinting. Teaching and learning methods: lectures, practicals and mentor groups (pbl). Presentation of a case study.

CHE-4701Y

20

FOUNDATIONS FOR CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Through a series of lectures, tutorials and practicals, this year-long module aims to provide the basic knowledge of general chemistry (including aspects of inorganic and organic), physico-chemistry and biochemistry essential for the understanding of system-related mechanisms in physiology and a wider context of life sciences.

BIO-4009Y

20

FUNDAMENTALS OF CELL BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

The module aims to provide an introduction to the basic aspects of biochemistry and cell biology. Basic biochemical processes will be explored, as well as catalysis and enzymology. There will be an introduction to the nature of the living cell, its membranes, and organelles, how cells communicate and also how they are visualised.

BIO-4004B

20

FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

The module aims to provide an introduction to the basic aspects of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics. The module explores the fundamental properties of macromolecules, DNA structure, synthesis and replication, as well as the structure and function of proteins. The genetic code, genes and their expression will be covered as well as the rapidly expanding area of molecular biology. The module also covers chromosome structure, mechanisms of heredity, medical genetics and cytogenetics.

BIO-4003A

20

LINEAR ALGEBRA

Linear equations and matrices (including geometric aspects); Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Diagonalization. Vector spaces and linear transformations.

MTHA4002Y

20

MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING, MECHANICS AND MODELLING

The first part of the module is about how to approach mathematical problems (both pure and applied) and write mathematics. It aims to promote accurate writing, reading and thinking about mathematics, and to improve students' confidence and abilities to tackle unfamiliar problems. The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. This module is reserved for students registered in the School of Mathematics or registered on the Natural Sciences programme.

MTHA4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING A

The module is designed to provide students who have not studied A level Mathematics with sufficient understanding of basic algebra to give them confidence to embark on the study of computing fundamentals. Various topics in discrete and continuous mathematics which are fundamental to Computer Science will be introduced.
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CMP-4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING B

This module is designed for students with an A level (or equivalent) in Mathematics. For these students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. In addition 3D Vectors are introduced and complex numbers are studied.
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CMP-4005Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4003Y. This module in designed for students with A2 or AS level mathematics. It covers differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers, and statistical methods. In addition to the theoretical background, there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for students across the Faculty of Science, that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The modules that follow at Level 2 are Mathematics for Scientists B and C. This module is assessed by formative assessments and coursework / examination.

ENV-4002Y

20

NUMERICIAL SKILLS FOR SCIENTISTS

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4002Y This module is about revising GCSE level mathematics and learning how to apply these skills to solving applied environmental science problems. It is designed for students who have not studied mathematics at AS or equivalent level and will cover essential mathematics (algebra, indices and scientific notation, manipulating and solving equations, units, accuracy and errors, reading graphs, logs, exponentials, trigonometrical functions, concept of rate of change, and an introduction to calculus). It will also cover the most important statistical methods that you will need during the rest of your career in ENV, including ways of summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. An important part of this module is applying these numerical skills to environmental problems. This module is assessed by formative assessment and coursetest / examination.

ENV-4003Y

20

PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN THE BIOMOLECULAR SCIENCES

This year-long module is delivered through a combination of lectures and small group teaching (seminars). The lecture programme will provide an introduction to the physical principles that underpin our understanding of the biological systems including thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry and spectroscopy. Students will prepare in advance for fortnightly seminars that focus on problem solving and data analysis in the biomolecular sciences. Topics will include: the building blocks of life, DNA biochemistry, protein structure, membrane biology, spectroscopy, chemical and enzyme kinetics and bioenergetics and metabolism. During the module additional training will be provided in how to access scientific material and use it critically in essays, reports and presentations. Students must have AS Level Chemistry or equivalent. THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO YEAR 1 STUDENTS. THIS MODULE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR VISITING/EXCHANGE STUDENTS.

BIO-4007Y

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM I

THIS MODULE CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4008B. This course is divided into two parts and introduces students to the Earth as a chemical and physical system. This course is designed for students with essentially no chemistry background knowledge and therefore includes a component of basic chemistry. Students with A, AS or foundation level chemistry should take ENV-4008B Earth Chemical Processes II + Atmosphere and Oceans.The first part of the course focuses upon environmental chemistry and provides an introduction to basic chemistry and then to environmental chemistry particularly chemical processes in the atmosphere, freshwater, seawater, soils, sediments and rocks. The natural system and its anthropogenic perturbation will be considered. The module includes laboratory practicals. The second part of the course focuses on the physical processes occurring in the atmosphere and the oceans with an emphasis on the links between the two. This will include the following topics: radiation from the Sun and its effect on the Earth, structure and circulation of the atmosphere, ocean currents and the thermohaline circulation, the hydrostatic equation and pressure forces, stability, air masses and fronts, the Coriolis force and geostrophy, the effect of the wind on the ocean, and the hydrological cycle. Background reading will help on concepts such as pressure, density, buoyancy and the Coriolis force. Students should be prepared for the use of basic mathematics and physics in this course. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4007B

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM II

THIS MODULE CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4007B. This course is divided into two parts and introduces students to the Earth as a chemical and physical system. This course is designed for students with chemistry background knowledge Students without A, AS or foundation level chemistry should take ENV-4007B Earth's Chemical Processes 1 and Atmosphere and Oceans. The first part of the course focuses upon environmental chemistry particularly chemical processes in the atmosphere, freshwater, seawater, soils, sediments and rocks. The natural system and its anthropogenic perturbation will be considered. The module includes laboratory practicals. The second part of the course focuses on the physical processes occurring in the atmosphere and the oceans with an emphasis on the links between the two. This will include the following topics: radiation from the Sun and its effect on the Earth, structure and circulation of the atmosphere, ocean currents and the thermohaline circulation, the hydrostatic equation and pressure forces, stability, air masses and fronts, the Coriolis force and geostrophy, the effect of the wind on the ocean, and the hydrological cycle. Background reading will help on concepts such as pressure, density, buoyancy and the Coriolis force. Students should be prepared for the use of basic mathematics and physics in this course. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4008B

20

PHYSICS OF MUSIC

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music. We begin by developing some of the essential physics of wave motion and defining sound measurement terms. This equips us to analyse the physics of stringed instruments (bowed, plucked and struck), woodwind instruments, brass instruments, percussion instruments and the acoustics of singing. We also look at tuning systems, human hearing, and the physics of sound in rooms. Lab-classes include an introduction to MATLAB to enable you to record and analyse the sound of your own instrument, which constitutes the coursework. A-level standard of mathematics is preferred, but anyone without this level who is prepared to work a little to enhance their understanding of mathematics in one or two areas will be able to take this module.

NAT-4003A

20

PRACTICAL and QUANTITATIVE SKILLS IN CHEMISTRY

Laboratory-based module exposing the students to experimental and computational aspects of different areas of chemistry: organic, inorganic, analytical and physical. The experiments and simulations exemplify the content of lectures in other modules and provide practical chemistry skills. Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts will be introduced. Statistics as applied to experimental chemistry. Error propagation in physical chemistry. Physical principles through applied mathematics.

CHE-4601Y

20

PROBABILITY AND MECHANICS

THIS MODULE IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH MTHA4001Y and MTHA4004Y (a) Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability. (b) The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. Students must have A-level Mathematics Grade 'B' or above or equivalent.

MTHB4007B

20

PROGRAMMING 1

The purpose of the module is to give the student a solid grounding in the essential features of object-oriented computer programming using the Java programming language. The module is designed to meet the needs of a student who has not previously studied programming, although it is recognised that many will in fact have done so in some measure. On completing this module the student should be capable of developing, testing and documenting simple but non-trivial object-oriented programs, and of using the appropriate technical terminology in discussing these programs.
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CMP-4008Y

20

PROGRAMMING FOR APPLICATIONS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of second level CMP modules, including CMPC2M11 and CMPC2G04.
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CMP-4009B

20

REAL ANALYSIS

Sequences and series, tests for convergence. Limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, Fundamental Theorem.

MTHA4003Y

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

This year long module introduces a range of transferable skills, tools and data resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences. The aim is to provide a broad understanding of the research process by undertaking different activities that involve i) formulating research questions, ii) collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, iii) collating and evaluating information and iv) presenting results. The module will include the use of digital mapping technologies (such as geographical information systems) and a 6 day residential field course held during the Easter break. This module is assessed by formative assessments and coursework.

ENV-4004Y

20

SETS, NUMBERS AND PROBABILITY

Basic set-theoretic notation, functions. Proof by induction, arithmetic, rationals and irrationals, the Euclidean algorithm. Styles of proof. Elementary set theory. Modular arithmetic, equivalence relations. Countability. Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory.

MTHA4001Y

20

SKILLS FOR CHEMISTS

This module will include: Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; Statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; Error propagation in physical chemistry and Physical principles through applied mathematics. Aims of this module are to bring students' understanding of mathematical ideas and physics to a sufficient level to study core physical chemistry in later stages

CHE-4050Y

20

SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY

This module comprises a broadly-based series of lectures on science, particularly chemistry, coupled with written activities based upon them. The twin objectives are to provide a contextual backdrop to the more focussed studies in other concurrent and subsequent modules, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information. The topics in semester 1 will be used as a basis for assignments and exercises which will help to develop students' team-working and presentational skills.

CHE-4090Y

20

SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIETY AND BIODIVERSITY

This module consists of two parts. The first part of this module will consider sustainability in theory and practice. Striking a balance between societal development, economic growth and environmental protection has proven difficult and controversial. The terms 'sustainability' and 'sustainable development' have been used in attempts to reconcile these three areas. Yet the ill-defined and contradictory nature of these concepts has also hampered their implementation. The first half of this module (taught in the first half of the Semester) considers sustainability in theory and practice by examining the relationships between environment and society, through the contributions of a variety of social science disciplines. The second half of this module firmly rests on Ecology as a science and briefly introduces a wide range of concepts relevant to the structure and functioning of the biosphere, from biomes through ecosystems, communities, populations, and whole organisms, including topics ranging from landscape and population ecology, to behavioural, physiological, molecular, genetic and chemical ecology. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4006B

20

THE COMPUTING REVOLUTION

The module is designed to provide students with an overview of the history of computing, the current state-of-the-art in a number of areas, and an insight into likely developments. Students consider social and ethical implications of use of computing technology along with security and safety of computing systems. Research techniques, report writing and team skills are developed.
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CMP-4002A

20

TOPICS IN PHYSICS

The material covered will expand on some of the topics from the 'A' level syllabus, such as optics and electromagnetism. It will also cover some modern physics such as special relativity. Topics include molecular motion, the electrical properties of matter, intermolecular forces and their role in determining bulk properties of matter, and an introduction to nanoscience and nanotechnology.

CHE-4801Y

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. This module explores energy, mechanics, physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour#from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. Plate Tectonics is studied to explain Earth's physiographic features#such as mountain belts and volcanoes#and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. We also explore geological time#the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet and introduce geological materials, resources and hazards. This module is assessed by coursework and examination.

ENV-4005A

20

Students should complete at least 80 credits in each of their two major subjects by the end of Year 3. At least 60 credits of the modules taken in Year 2 should be at Level 2.

Option A Study (120 credits)

Students will select 120 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ALGEBRA

(a) Group theory: basic concepts and examples. Cosets, Lagrange's theorem. Normal subgroups and quotient groups. First isomorphism theorem. Quotient spaces in linear algebra. (b) Rings, elementary properties and examples of commutative rings. Ideals, quotient rings. Polynomial rings and construction of finite fields. Unique Factorization in rings. Applications in linear algebra.

MTHA5003Y

20

ANALYSIS

(a) Continuity, differentiation, uniform convergence, power series and how they represent functions for both real and complex variables. (b) Topology of the complex plane, holomorphic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy and Laurent theorems, residue calculus.

MTHA5001Y

20

APPLIED STATISTICS A

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE AND BUSINESS STATISTICS STUDENTS SHOULD TAKE CMPC2S12, APPLIED STATISTICS B, DUE TO THE DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS OF THEIR COURSE. This is a module designed to give students the opportunity to apply statistical methods in realistic situations. While no advanced knowledge of probability and statistics is required, we expect students to have some background in probability and statistics before taking this module. The aim is to introduce students to R statistical language and to cover Regression, Analysis of Variance and Survival analysis. Other topics from a list including: Extremes and quartiles, Bootstrap methods and their application, Sample surveys, Simulations, Subjective statistics, Forecasting and Clustering methods, may be offered to cover the interests of those in the class.
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CMP-5017B

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

This module studies the organization of both the system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of both hardware and software components is emphasized throughout, and the central concepts of the module are reinforced by practical work involving Lego robots, Java programming exercises and digital logic design.
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CMP-5013A

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

This module studies the organization of both the system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of both hardware and software components is emphasized throughout, and the central concepts of the module are reinforced by practical work involving Lego robots, Java programming exercises and digital logic design.
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CMP-5013A

20

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

This module aims to introduce concepts of classical Artificial Intelligence through the use of the PROLOG language and is based on a selection of chapters from the book "PROLOG programming for Artificial Intelligence" by Ivan Bratko. Beside PROLOG, topics include search techniques, knowledge representation, expert system, and game playing.
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CMP-5002B

20

ASTROPHYSICS

This 20-credit module gives an overview of astrophysics through lectures and workshops. Assessment will involve some coursework and a coursetest. The module assumes previous study of A level physics or an equivalent course. Topics covered will include some history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology.

NAT-4001A

20

ASTROPHYSICS WITH ADVANCED TOPICS

This 20-credit module gives an overview of astrophysics through lectures and workshops. Assessment will involve some coursework and a coursetest. The module assumes previous study of A level physics or an equivalent course. Topics covered will include some history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology. Some of these topics will be taken to a more advanced level. The more advanced topics will include workshop examples and coursetest questions at level 2 standard.

NAT-5001A

20

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE

Atmospheric chemistry and global change are in the news: stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, greenhouse gases, and global scale air pollution are seen as some of the most significant environmental problems of our age. Chemical composition and transformations underlie these issues, and drive many important atmospheric processes. This module covers the fundamental chemical principles and underlying physical processes in the atmosphere from the stratosphere to the surface, and considers the role of chemistry in current issues of atmospheric chemical change through a series of lectures, problem solving classes, seminars, experimental and computing labs as well as a field trip to UEA's own atmospheric observatory in Weybourne/North Norfolk. A solid background in chemistry is recommended (e.g., AS-level or equivalent). ENV-6020B is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here.

ENV-5015A

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

In this module, the interrelationships between animal behaviour, ecology and evolution will be explored. Students will examine how behaviour has evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles will provide the theoretical framework, within which the module will seek to explain the ultimate function of animal behaviours. Concepts and examples will be developed through the lecture series, exploring behaviours in the context of altruism, optimality, foraging, and particularly reproduction, the key currency of evolutionary success. In parallel with the lectures, students will design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, collecting original data to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY

This module builds on the principles of biochemistry taught in BIO-4004B. Selected topics in intermediary metabolism are covered in greater depth and extended to include the specific roles of coenzymes in metabolic pathways. In turn this leads to a discussion of the roles of hormone-receptor interactions and signal transduction in metabolic regulation. The recent contributions of structural biology to cellular biochemistry are acknowledged in both the lecture series and associated practical classes, whilst ATP utilization is illustrated by consideration of the active transport of molecules across membranes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

BIO-5002A

20

BIODIVERSITY

An introduction to the evolution of the major groups of microorganisms, plants and animals. The module considers structural, physiological and life-cycle characteristics of these organisms. It charts the development of life on land and interprets evolutionary responses to changing environments. Students on this module are strongly advised to also take BIO-4008Y or BIO-4010Y.

BIO-4001A

20

BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO ANY STUDENT THAT SATISFIES THE PRE-REQUISITE REQUIREMENTS. Alternative pre-requisites are BIO-4001A and BIO-4002B, or BIO-4003A and BIO-4004B. This module will provide an opportunity to discuss various aspects of biology in society. Students will be able to critically analyse the way biological sciences issues are represented in popular literature and the media and an idea of the current 'hot topics' in biological ethics. Specific topics to be covered will involve aspects of contemporary biological science that have important ethical considerations for society, such as GM crops, DNA databases, designer babies, stem cell research etc. Being able to understand the difference between scientific fact and scientific fiction is not always straightforward. What was once viewed as science fiction has sometimes become a scientific fact or scientific reality as our scientific knowledge and technology has increased exponentially. Conversely, science fiction can sometimes be portrayed inaccurately as scientific fact. Students will research relevant scientific literature and discover the degree of scientific accuracy represented within the genre of science fiction.

BIO-5012Y

20

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE BIO-4007Y OR CHE-4201Y. This module explores the structural, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of biological systems and the methodologies used to define them. Using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry, these topics will be discussed within three major themes: 1) Binding, activation and transfer in biological systems, 2) Enzyme catalysis, and 3) Macromolecular size, shape and structure determination. The concluding lectures will explore protein disorder, folding and structure to illustrate how biophysicists integrate concepts and methods from each of these themes when addressing a specific research topic.

CHE-5601Y

20

BONDING, STRUCTURE and PERIODICITY

The first six lectures of this module are integrated with CHE-4101Y. The first half of the module brings together fundamental concepts associated with the bonding and structure of inorganic and organic materials, including atomic structure, electron configurations, ionic and covalent bonding, and intermolecular forces. The second half of the module builds on the bonding and structural ideas to explain the structure of the Periodic Table. Trends, comparisons and contrasts will be drawn between the elements of the s/p block metals, non-metals and the transition metals.

CHE-4301Y

20

CALCULUS AND MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS

This module is incompatible with MTHB4006Y and ENV-4002Y. (a) Complex numbers. (b) Differentiation and integration. Taylor and MacLaurin series. Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (c) First order, second order constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reduction of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (d) Vectors. (e) Line integrals. Multiple integrals, including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (f) Euler type and general linear ODEs. Phase plane, direction fields, limit cycles, period doubling and chaos. (g) Divergence, gradient and curl of a vector field. Scalar potential and path independence of line integral. Divergence and Stokes' theorems.

MTHA4005Y

40

CALCULUS AND PROBABILITY

THIS MODULE IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH MTHA4001Y and ENV-4002Y. (a) Complex numbers. (b) Differentiation and integration. Taylor and MacLaurin series. Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (c) First order, second order constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reductions of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (d) Vectors. (e) Line integrals. Multiple integrals including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (f) Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory. Students must have A-level Mathematics Grade 'B' or above or equivalent.

MTHB4006Y

40

CELL BIOLOGY

This module explores the molecular organisation of cells and the regulation of dynamic cellular changes, with some emphasis on medical cell biology. Dynamic properties of cell membranes, cell signalling, growth factor function and aspects of cancer biology and immunology. Regulation of the internal cell environment (nuclear organisation and information flow, cell growth, division and motility), the relationship of the cell to its extracellular matrix and the determination of cell phenotype. Aspects of cell death, the ageing process, developmental biology, mechanisms of tissue renewal and repair. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B or BIO-5009A.

BIO-5005B

20

CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Covers the major processes that set the chemical composition of the oceans, the distribution of nutrient, and carbon, the distribution of life in the oceans and the interaction of the oceans and atmosphere. Elements of physical oceanography and ocean circulation, of geochemistry, marine biology and global change science are covered.

ENV-5019A

20

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (A)

This 20 credit module comprises laboratory and related IT experiments/ modules relating to aspects of the core chemistry lecture modules.

CHE-4001Y

20

CHEMISTRY OF CARBON-BASED COMPOUNDS

Compatible with CHE-4301Y, or a free-standing module with workload greater than average for 20 credits. The first six lectures of this module are integrated with CHE-4301Y. The module then introduces bonding and hybridisation, conjugation and aromaticity, mechanism and functional groups; principles which are elucidated in topics: electrophilic substitution and addition, organometallic nucleophiles, polar multiple bonds, enolate, Claisen, and Mannich reactions, the Strecker synthesis, stereochemistry (enantiomers and diastereoisomers), SN1/SN2 and E1/E2 reactions, and epoxidation / 1,2-addition to alkenes. Finally, organic synthesis (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, ethers, amines, ketones, carboxylic acids) and the identification of organic structures by spectroscopy are described.

CHE-4101Y

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills in the scientific and social scientific analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from natural sciences, science studies, and economics and politics. It first offers a historical perspective on how global climate change developed as a scientific and social object of inquiry. The course then gives grounding in climate and society relations, economic principles and the political science and governance of climate hazards, energy and greenhouse gas emissions. This module replaces ENV-2A69.

ENV-5003A

20

COMBINATORICS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5016B

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

The module will introduce the main concepts in community, ecosystem and macro-ecology - patterns and processes related to species richness; diversity; stability; succession; primary and secondary productivity and energy flows. We will then examine how these concepts aid our understanding of the functioning of terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

BIO-5014B

20

COMPUTING SYSTEMS 1

The module is designed to introduce students to some of the principal technologies of contemporary computing systems and to software development in a web context.A basic knowledge of Java progranmming is required; this module is usually taken with a suitable programming module
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CMP-4006A

20

COMPUTING SYSTEMS 2

The module is designed to provide students with: an overview of the organisational, cultural and technical context of current software development, experience of developing software in a web context, and an introduction to the principal architectures of contemporary computing systems.
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CMP-4007B

20

DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

This is a compulsory module for all computing students and provides the necessary foundation in data and storage structures for all computing streams. In addition, the module emphasises systematic algorithm design and discusses algorithm analysis. At the same time, the module provides the student with the opportunity to reinforce and enhance the programming skills developed at level 1.
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CMP-5014A

20

DATABASE SYSTEMS

This module introduces most aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. The module is based on the relational model. The students will explore the tools and methods for database design and manipulation as well as the programming of database applications. Part of the practical experience gained will be acquired using a modern relational database management system. Students will also gain programming experience using SQL, and using the Java JDBC interface. A high level language programming module is a pre-requisite.
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CMP-5005B

20

DATABASE SYSTEMS

This module introduces most aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. The module is based on the relational model. The students will explore the tools and methods for database design and manipulation as well as the programming of database applications. Part of the practical experience gained will be acquired using a modern relational database management system. Students will also gain programming experience using SQL, and using the Java JDBC interface. A high level language programming module is a pre-requisite.
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CMP-5005B

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLIED METHODS

(a) Ordinary Differential Equations: solution by reduction of order; variation of parameters for inhomogeneous problems; series solution and the method of Frobenius. Legendre's and Bessel's equations: Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions and their recurrence relations; Fourier series; Partial differential equations (PDEs): heat equation, wave equation, Laplace's equation; solution by separation of variables. (b) Method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; the characteristic equations; Fourier transform and its use in solving linear PDEs; (c) Dynamical Systems: equilibrium points and their stability; the phase plane; theory and applications.

MTHA5004Y

20

DIGITAL SYSTEMS DESIGN

This module is concerned with the design and implementation of digital electronic systems that form basic components of modern computers. Topics include an introduction to switching algebra, synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits and techniques for circuit minimization. The module also provides a practical introduction to VHDL, an industry standard hardware description language. Students gain practical experience by undertaking a number of projects based on programmable logic devices.
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CMP-5028B

20

EARTH SYSTEM GEOCHEMISTRY

Examines how the earth system and its geochemical cycling operate on both global and micro scales. Emphasis is on natural cycles, starting with big themes such as crust-hydrosphere-biosphere interaction and its effects on the long term C cycle, including regulation of carbon dioxide. Elements, isotopes, organic molecules (and their isotopic compositions) are used as tracers of processes and events in earth history. Organic matter, its chemistry and its relationship to both the C and S cycles is explored. Dating of geological materials with radiometric methods is introduced. The course explores themes in both deep time (millions of years) and more recent glacial-interglacial cycles (thousands to hundreds of thousands of years). This module replaces ENV-2A80.

ENV-5013B

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND COMBINATORICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory.

MTHF5012Y

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5013Y

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators.

MTHF5011A

20

ENERGETICS AND SPECTROSCOPY

This module considers the way in which chemical systems, in the form of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, are described in terms of their energetics and dynamics. Topics include simple phase equilibria, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics in a chemical context, electrochemical cells, and acid base and redox equilibria. The module also includes a series of lectures on the principles of spectroscopy applied to chemical systems, i.e. how light interacts with matter.

CHE-4201Y

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most common obstacles to environmental problem solving are often not scientific or technological, but political. This module examines the theoretical and empirical development of environmental politics in modern society (mostly in Western Europe) including: the sources of modern environmentalism and its many manifestations in modern policy making systems; the environmental policies of the UK and the European Union; different theories of political power and public policy making; the role of environmental pressure groups and business; global environmental politics and policy making. The module encourages student-led learning by enabling students to develop their own theoretical interpretations of real world examples of politics. These are explored in seminar presentations and in an extended (4000 word) case study (i.e. essay). This module assumes no prior knowledge of politics/social sciences.

ENV-5002B

20

EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY

This module introduces the main ideas in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology and ecology. It concentrates on outlining concepts as well as describing examples. Specific topics to be covered include the genetical basis of evolution by natural selection, systematics and phylogeny, the adaptive interpretation of animal sexual and social behaviour, ecological processes and population biology.

BIO-4002B

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

The aim of this module is to provide a background in the concepts and principles of evolutionary biology. It includes discussion of genetic variation, population genetics, natural selection, population structure, ecological adaptation, life history characteristics, speciation, interactions among species, biological diversity, phylogeny and molecular ecology and biogeography. Workshop discussions are held weekly.

BIO-5008B

20

FIELD ECOLOGY

Students explore the ecology of moorlands, bogs, sand dunes, rocky shores, estuaries and woodlands. Students should develop skills in identifying plants and animals using scientific keys, carrying out quantitative surveys and statistically analysing their data. Strong emphasis is placed on student-lead project work. The bulk of the teaching takes place on a two week field course in Western Ireland, that runs immediately before the start of the Autumn Semester.

BIO-5013A

20

FLUID DYNAMICS - THEORY AND COMPUTATION

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-1A5Y IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE ENV-2A21 (a) Hydrostatics, compressibility. Kinematics: velocity, particle path, streamlines. Continuity, incompressibility, streamtubes. Dynamics: Material derivative, Euler's equations, vorticity and irrotational flows. Velocity potential and streamfunction. Bernoulli's equation for unsteady flow. Circulation: Kelvin's Theorem, Helmholtz's theorems. Basic water waves. (b) Computational methods for fluid dynamics; Euler's method and Runge-Kutta methods and their use for computing particle paths and streamlines in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows; numerical computation and flow visualisation using Matlab; convergence, consistency and stability of numerical integration methods for ODEs. (c) Theory of Irrotational and Incompressible Flows: velocity potential, Laplace's Equation, sources and vortices, complex potential. Force on a body and the Blasius theorem. Method of images and conformal mappings.

MTHA5002Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - ANALYSIS

Module Summary Aim: Following on from CHE-4701Y, where the emphasis was on collection of evidence, this module introduces more in-depth forensic chemistry, looking at the way evidence gathered at a crime scene may be analysed in the laboratory. The objective is to familiarise students with critical thinking and evaluation of evidence, build a model for case assessment and interpretation and thus increase understanding of the role of the Expert Witness in court. It is open to students on FF41 and other chemistry courses where CHE-5701Y is a core or optional module. Content: The module will deepen the knowledge of forensic statistics and cover basic detection and recovery techniques for body fluids; fingerprint development and recovery; advanced microscopy and spectroscopy and their application to fibres, paint and other particulates; the use of elemental analysis in forensic science; and questioned document examination including counterfeiting. Teaching and Learning Methods: Lectures, practicals and mentor groups (PBL- problem based learning). The students will be divided into groups and each group will then investigate a hypothetical criminal case using simulated evidence material. As part of this students will write an expert witness statement which will be presented and defended in a mock court. Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to apply acquired skills, work as part of a team and to produce an expert witness report, using literature and experimental data to inform their analysis. The "mock court" will be aimed at developing the individual's presentation skills in a challenging environment. Students should gain further confidence in the use of statistics to analyse data, test hypotheses and draw conclusions from them.

CHE-5701Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - COLLECTION AND COMPARISON

History of forensic science, forensic collection and recovery methods, anti-contamination precautions, microscopy, glass refractive index, introduction to pattern recognition including footwear; introduction to Drugs analysis; forensic statistics and QA chain of custody issues. The second half Introduces the student to the fundamentals of DNA and biotechnology essential for an understanding of forensics technologies. Topics covered include: nucleic acid/chromosome structure, replication, mutation and repair; concepts of genetic inheritance; DNA manipulation and visualisation; DNA sequencing; DNA fingerprinting. Teaching and learning methods: lectures, practicals and mentor groups (pbl). Presentation of a case study.

CHE-4701Y

20

FOUNDATIONS FOR CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Through a series of lectures, tutorials and practicals, this year-long module aims to provide the basic knowledge of general chemistry (including aspects of inorganic and organic), physico-chemistry and biochemistry essential for the understanding of system-related mechanisms in physiology and a wider context of life sciences.

BIO-4009Y

20

FUNDAMENTALS OF CELL BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

The module aims to provide an introduction to the basic aspects of biochemistry and cell biology. Basic biochemical processes will be explored, as well as catalysis and enzymology. There will be an introduction to the nature of the living cell, its membranes, and organelles, how cells communicate and also how they are visualised.

BIO-4004B

20

FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

The module aims to provide an introduction to the basic aspects of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics. The module explores the fundamental properties of macromolecules, DNA structure, synthesis and replication, as well as the structure and function of proteins. The genetic code, genes and their expression will be covered as well as the rapidly expanding area of molecular biology. The module also covers chromosome structure, mechanisms of heredity, medical genetics and cytogenetics.

BIO-4003A

20

FURTHER COMPUTING SYSTEMS

The module is designed to provide students with: an overview of the organisational, cultural and technical context of current software development, experience of developing software in a web context, and an introduction to the principal architectures of contemporary computing systems.
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CMP-5016B

20

FURTHER COMPUTING SYSTEMS

The module is designed to provide students with: an overview of the organisational, cultural and technical context of current software development, experience of developing software in a web context, and an introduction to the principal architectures of contemporary computing systems.
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CMP-5016B

20

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

This module is for those students who have passed CMP-4004Y or equivalent, in their first year and would like to study further theory that is a pre-requisite for several other 2nd and 3rd level modules in CMP. For such students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. 3D Vectors and complex numbers are also studied.
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CMP-5006A

20

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

This module is for those students who have passed CMP-4004Y or equivalent, in their first year and would like to study further theory that is a pre-requisite for several other 2nd and 3rd level modules in CMP. For such students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. 3D Vectors and complex numbers are also studied.
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CMP-5006A

20

GENETICS

This module will describe the basis of heredity, describing both the functions and the structures of genes and whole genomes. Examples will be taken from bacterial, animal and plant systems and will be considered from both functional and molecular points of view. The influence of the "new genetics" on medicine, agriculture and society will also be covered. Practical work will involve a molecular genetic analysis of a symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium and a molecular mapping exercise of traits that confer disease resistance in plants. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B (Molecular Biology).

BIO-5009A

20

GEODYNAMICS: EARTH'S ENGINE

Processes in the Earth's interior have exerted a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system through geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the heat distribution of the Earth's interior, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes and distribution of seismic energy. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

GRAPHICS 1

Graphics 1 provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics for all computing students. It aims to provide a strong foundation for students wishing to study graphics, focusing on 2D graphics, algorithms and interaction. The module requires a good background in programming, although an introduction to C++ is presented. OpenGL is utilised as the graphics library, examples are provided in the lectures and supported in the laboratory classes. Other topics covered include fonts, algorithms for line drawing, clipping and colour.
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CMP-5010B

20

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

The module aims to provide an understanding of the physiology of several organ systems found within the human body. Learning Outcomes: On completion of the module it is expected the student will have gained an understanding of: - Information transmission within the body by the nervous system and the integrative processes within the spinal cord and brain. - Reaction to the environment through reception of external stimuli by sensory receptors, such as the eye. - Effector systems, including muscle contraction and its control. - Respiration, gas transport, blood circulation and heart function. - Kidney function in excretion and in water and mineral ion homeostasis - The digestive system and nutrition, including patterns of health and sickness. - Endocrine regulation and integration, including reproduction cycles in the female. The module is backed up with a comprehensive programme of practical work involving human physiological experiments.

BIO-5004A

20

HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY

An introduction to hydrology and hydrogeology: the basic equations describing fluid movement in groundwater systems will be derived and applied. The main techniques to investigate groundwater flow systems are highlighted. Water circulation within river catchments is discussed by means of the catchment water balance. The physical process represented by each component of the water balance will be covered as well as the current methods of quantifying these fluxes of water within the catchment . Principles of catchment modelling are outlined. The unit requires at least A-level equivalent mathematical skills. For example, an ability to work with common mathematical operations is essential such as the simple rearrangement of equations, and the ability to convert between varying units of length and volume. Basic differential equations will be presented for the description of groundwater flow.

ENV-5021A

20

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The central theme of the module is the chemistry of the p and d block elements: structure and bonding, coordination complexes and the organometallic chemistry of main group and transition metals. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5301B

20

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

This module begins with underpinning aspects of instrumental analysis such as signals, noise, detectors, data smoothing etc. and then progresses through instrumentation, sample preparation and techniques related to the key analytical techniques of atomic and molecular spectroscopy, electroanalytical chemistry and chromatography. The module includes laboratory sessions where students can work with common instruments and practice key skills in calibration, sample preparation and measurement and data analysis. As well as the formal assessment, there will also be formative assessment through compulsory multiple-choice tests and associated feedback workshops.

CHE-5501Y

20

INTERACTIONS AND POPULATIONS

In this module we will look closely at how interactions between individuals determine the structure and functioning of populations. We will consider both antagonistic interactions between members of different trophic levels, their evolution and their possible co-evolution. Consideration of competition will lead into the population consequences of both within trophic level and between trophic level interactions. We will then move on to consider spatially explicit population processes including meta population dynamics and possible ecological responses to climate change including range shifts. Students taking this module must have a background in basic statistics and have taken any Level 1 ecology module in ENV or BIO, or equivalent.

ENV-5014A

20

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

Computational biology is one of the great growth areas of both computing sciences and biology due to the development of robotic systems that are able churn out vast amounts of biological data. The challenge computational biologists' face involves turning this data into understanding. This data is often in the form of DNA, RNA or protein sequence. Although an introduction to the basics of molecular biology will be given, the module will mainly focus on the computational methods used in computational biology and bioinformatics. Topics will include sequence analysis, structural genomics and protein modelling, phylogenetics and evolution and modelling growth. Lecturers will highlight the relevance of the material to cutting-edge research.
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CMP-5004B

20

LINEAR ALGEBRA

Linear equations and matrices (including geometric aspects); Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Diagonalization. Vector spaces and linear transformations.

MTHA4002Y

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module is assessed by formative assessment and coursework. This module replaces ENV-2A84.

ENV-5022B

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module, which includes a one week field course that will take place at Easter, is assessed by formative assessment, coursework and fieldwork projects. This module replaces ENV-2A82K.

ENVK5023B

20

MATERIALS AND POLYMER CHEMISTRY

An introduction to the basic principles of polymer synthesis is presented, together with a discussion of their physical properties. Speciality polymers are discussed. Materials chemistry is developed further with the introduction of inorganic structures and the concept of ferroelectric properties together with powder x-ray diffraction as applied to cubic crystals. Ion conductivity and basic band theory are also discussed. Semiconductivity is introduced and related to the band description of these materials. The experiments in this laboratory class involve the synthesis and evaluation of inorganic and organic materials.

CHE-5350Y

20

MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING, MECHANICS AND MODELLING

The first part of the module is about how to approach mathematical problems (both pure and applied) and write mathematics. It aims to promote accurate writing, reading and thinking about mathematics, and to improve students' confidence and abilities to tackle unfamiliar problems. The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. This module is reserved for students registered in the School of Mathematics or registered on the Natural Sciences programme.

MTHA4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING A

The module is designed to provide students who have not studied A level Mathematics with sufficient understanding of basic algebra to give them confidence to embark on the study of computing fundamentals. Various topics in discrete and continuous mathematics which are fundamental to Computer Science will be introduced.
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CMP-4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING B

This module is designed for students with an A level (or equivalent) in Mathematics. For these students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. In addition 3D Vectors are introduced and complex numbers are studied.
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CMP-4005Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4003Y. This module in designed for students with A2 or AS level mathematics. It covers differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers, and statistical methods. In addition to the theoretical background, there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for students across the Faculty of Science, that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The modules that follow at Level 2 are Mathematics for Scientists B and C. This module is assessed by formative assessments and coursework / examination.

ENV-4002Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module is the third in a series of four mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers vector calculus (used in the study of vector fields in subjects such as fluid dynamics and electromagnetism), time series and spectral analysis (a highly adaptable and useful mathematical technique in many science fields, including data analysis), and fluid dynamics (which has applications to the circulation of the atmosphere, ocean, interior of the Earth, chemical engineering, and biology). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab). This module replaces ENV-2A61.

ENV-5006A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the fourth in a series of four mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods (with applications to many multi-variable problems in science), second order partial differential equations (which govern the behaviour of diffusive, advective and wave-like systems), and solid mechanics (applications in geophysics, glaciology, and material science). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. This module replaces ENV-2A62.

ENV-5007B

20

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

This module is concerned with the broad aspects of medicinal chemistry, from the discovery of lead compounds and the recognition of biological activity, to the production of pharmaceuticals. Biological activity is discussed in terms of metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and structure-activity relationships (SAR). Drug targets and their exploitation in drug therapies are also discussed. The medicinal chemistry content of this module contains aspects of both chemistry and biology. Therefore the course is started with a series of 'introductory' seminars relevant to BIO and CHEM students on underlying principles.

CHE-5150Y

20

METEOROLOGY I

This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processes in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of Radiation Balance, Cloud Physics, Thermodynamics and Dynamics and the assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential.

ENV-5008A

20

METEOROLOGY II

This module will build upon the material covered in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting.

ENV-5009B

20

METEOROLOGY II WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-2A23 (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting. The module also includes a week long Easter vacation residential fieldcourse, based in the Lake District, focusing on micrometeorology, microclimate and synoptic processes.

ENVK5010B

20

MICROBIOLOGY

A broad module covering all aspects of the biology of microorganisms, providing key knowledge for specialist Level 3 modules. Detailed description is given about the cell biology of bacteria, fungi and protists together with microbial physiology, genetics and environmental and applied microbiology. The biology of disease-causing microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) and prions is also covered. Practical work provides hands-on experience of important microbiological techniques, and expands on concepts introduced in lectures. The module should appeal to biology students across a wide range of disciplines and interests.

BIO-5015B

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The module provides an introduction to the principles of molecular biology. The programme starts with the structure of DNA, genes and genomes, followed by the characterisation of the information flow including the mechanisms and regulation of transcription and translation. Protein folding, modification and turnover are described together with reactions concerning DNA (replication, recombination and repair). The module ends with a detailed description of methods used for the experimental manipulation of genetic material (gene isolation, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction, molecular cloning, transgenic plants and animals and global functional genomics). Practical work includes an introduction to molecular biology techniques together with computer assisted DNA and protein sequence analysis.

BIO-5003B

20

MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND ENERGY LEVELS

Quantum mechanics, one of the key scientific ideas of the 20th century, has had a wide impact in chemistry. In the first part of the module you will be introduced to the language and methods of quantum mechanics. In the second part, the close relation between spectroscopic measurements of small molecules and quantum theory will be discussed. Further methods of spectroscopy will then be introduced, beginning with the most widely used of all techniques in structure determination, NMR spectroscopy. This will be followed by a discussion of molecular electronic spectra which are widely used in chemical analysis.

CHE-5202Y

20

NUMERICIAL SKILLS FOR SCIENTISTS

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4002Y This module is about revising GCSE level mathematics and learning how to apply these skills to solving applied environmental science problems. It is designed for students who have not studied mathematics at AS or equivalent level and will cover essential mathematics (algebra, indices and scientific notation, manipulating and solving equations, units, accuracy and errors, reading graphs, logs, exponentials, trigonometrical functions, concept of rate of change, and an introduction to calculus). It will also cover the most important statistical methods that you will need during the rest of your career in ENV, including ways of summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. An important part of this module is applying these numerical skills to environmental problems. This module is assessed by formative assessment and coursetest / examination.

ENV-4003Y

20

OCEAN CIRCULATION

This module gives you an understanding of the physical processes occurring in the basin-scale ocean environment. We will introduce and discuss large scale global ocean circulation, including gyres, boundary currents and the overturning circulation. Major themes include the interaction between ocean and atmosphere, and the forces which drive ocean circulation. You should be familiar with partial differentiation, integration, handling equations and using calculators. Co-taught with ENV-MA39

ENV-5016A

20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The topics covered in the module include an introduction to organic synthesis, carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, aromaticity, heterocyclic chemistry, and stereochemistry and mechanism. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5101A

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM I

THIS MODULE CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4008B. This course is divided into two parts and introduces students to the Earth as a chemical and physical system. This course is designed for students with essentially no chemistry background knowledge and therefore includes a component of basic chemistry. Students with A, AS or foundation level chemistry should take ENV-4008B Earth Chemical Processes II + Atmosphere and Oceans.The first part of the course focuses upon environmental chemistry and provides an introduction to basic chemistry and then to environmental chemistry particularly chemical processes in the atmosphere, freshwater, seawater, soils, sediments and rocks. The natural system and its anthropogenic perturbation will be considered. The module includes laboratory practicals. The second part of the course focuses on the physical processes occurring in the atmosphere and the oceans with an emphasis on the links between the two. This will include the following topics: radiation from the Sun and its effect on the Earth, structure and circulation of the atmosphere, ocean currents and the thermohaline circulation, the hydrostatic equation and pressure forces, stability, air masses and fronts, the Coriolis force and geostrophy, the effect of the wind on the ocean, and the hydrological cycle. Background reading will help on concepts such as pressure, density, buoyancy and the Coriolis force. Students should be prepared for the use of basic mathematics and physics in this course. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4007B

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM II

THIS MODULE CANNOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4007B. This course is divided into two parts and introduces students to the Earth as a chemical and physical system. This course is designed for students with chemistry background knowledge Students without A, AS or foundation level chemistry should take ENV-4007B Earth's Chemical Processes 1 and Atmosphere and Oceans. The first part of the course focuses upon environmental chemistry particularly chemical processes in the atmosphere, freshwater, seawater, soils, sediments and rocks. The natural system and its anthropogenic perturbation will be considered. The module includes laboratory practicals. The second part of the course focuses on the physical processes occurring in the atmosphere and the oceans with an emphasis on the links between the two. This will include the following topics: radiation from the Sun and its effect on the Earth, structure and circulation of the atmosphere, ocean currents and the thermohaline circulation, the hydrostatic equation and pressure forces, stability, air masses and fronts, the Coriolis force and geostrophy, the effect of the wind on the ocean, and the hydrological cycle. Background reading will help on concepts such as pressure, density, buoyancy and the Coriolis force. Students should be prepared for the use of basic mathematics and physics in this course. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4008B

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

The module covers a number of the fundamental areas of physical chemistry which are essential for a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include chemical kinetics, the second law of thermodynamics, thermodynamics and properties of solutions and surface chemistry/catalysis. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5201Y

20

PHYSICS OF MUSIC

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music. We begin by developing some of the essential physics of wave motion and defining sound measurement terms. This equips us to analyse the physics of stringed instruments (bowed, plucked and struck), woodwind instruments, brass instruments, percussion instruments and the acoustics of singing. We also look at tuning systems, human hearing, and the physics of sound in rooms. Lab-classes include an introduction to MATLAB to enable you to record and analyse the sound of your own instrument, which constitutes the coursework. A-level standard of mathematics is preferred, but anyone without this level who is prepared to work a little to enhance their understanding of mathematics in one or two areas will be able to take this module.

NAT-4003A

20

PHYSICS OF MUSIC

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music. We begin by developing some of the essential physics of wave motion and defining sound measurement terms. This equips us to analyse the physics of stringed instruments (bowed, plucked and struck), woodwind instruments, brass instruments, percussion instruments and the acoustics of singing. We also look at tuning systems, human hearing, and the physics of sound in rooms. Lab-classes include an introduction to MATLAB to enable you to record and analyse the sound of your own instrument, which constitutes the coursework. A-level standard of mathematics is preferred, but anyone without this level who is prepared to work a little to enhance their understanding of mathematics in one or two areas will be able to take this module.

NAT-5003A

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

This module aims to provide an appreciation of modern plant biology with an emphasis on development, signalling and response to the environment. It consists of practical classes and lectures. It encompasses molecular genetics, molecular, biochemical and physiological perspectives, and affords an understanding of aspects of plant and plant cell function including photosynthesis and the mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic environments.

BIO-5006A

20

PRACTICAL and QUANTITATIVE SKILLS IN CHEMISTRY

Laboratory-based module exposing the students to experimental and computational aspects of different areas of chemistry: organic, inorganic, analytical and physical. The experiments and simulations exemplify the content of lectures in other modules and provide practical chemistry skills. Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts will be introduced. Statistics as applied to experimental chemistry. Error propagation in physical chemistry. Physical principles through applied mathematics.

CHE-4601Y

20

PROBABILITY AND MECHANICS

THIS MODULE IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH MTHA4001Y and MTHA4004Y (a) Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability. (b) The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. Students must have A-level Mathematics Grade 'B' or above or equivalent.

MTHB4007B

20

PROGRAMMING 1

The purpose of the module is to give the student a solid grounding in the essential features of object-oriented computer programming using the Java programming language. The module is designed to meet the needs of a student who has not previously studied programming, although it is recognised that many will in fact have done so in some measure. On completing this module the student should be capable of developing, testing and documenting simple but non-trivial object-oriented programs, and of using the appropriate technical terminology in discussing these programs.
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CMP-4008Y

20

PROGRAMMING FOR APPLICATIONS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of second level CMP modules, including CMPC2M11 and CMPC2G04.
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CMP-4009B

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of other second level CMP modules.
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CMP-5020B

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of other second level CMP modules.
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CMP-5020B

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS AND COMBINATORICS

Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory.

MTHF5014Y

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5015Y

20

QUANTUM THEORY AND SYMMETRY

CHE-5250Y

20

REAL ANALYSIS

Sequences and series, tests for convergence. Limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, Fundamental Theorem.

MTHA4003Y

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

This year long module introduces a range of transferable skills, tools and data resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences. The aim is to provide a broad understanding of the research process by undertaking different activities that involve i) formulating research questions, ii) collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, iii) collating and evaluating information and iv) presenting results. The module will include the use of digital mapping technologies (such as geographical information systems) and a 6 day residential field course held during the Easter break. This module is assessed by formative assessments and coursework.

ENV-4004Y

20

SEDIMENTOLOGY

Sedimentary rocks contain many of the world's natural resources and cover much of the Earth's surface, record the Earth's history, and contain the fossil record. Sedimentology includes the study of modern sediments such as sand, mud and carbonates and the processes that result in their deposition. Understanding of modern processes is used to interpret ancient sedimentary rocks and sedimentary structures. The module will cover sedimentary fluid dynamics; modern sediments from deserts, rivers, the coast and deep ocean, the differences between siliciclastic and carbonate rocks; biological influence on sedimentary processes and stratigraphy (the study of the physical and temporal relationships between rock layers). This module replaces ENV-2A85.

ENV-5011A

20

SETS, NUMBERS AND PROBABILITY

Basic set-theoretic notation, functions. Proof by induction, arithmetic, rationals and irrationals, the Euclidean algorithm. Styles of proof. Elementary set theory. Modular arithmetic, equivalence relations. Countability. Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory.

MTHA4001Y

20

SHELF SEA DYNAMICS AND COASTAL PROCESSES

This module will explore physical processes in the ocean, building on what you learnt in ENV-5016A Ocean Circulation. There will be a focus on applications of ocean physics to shelf seas. Topics will include: Tide generation, forces, harmonic tidal analysis of time series, propagation in shallow seas; Surface and internal waves, their role in air-sea exchange and upper ocean mixing; Role of tides and internal waves in global ocean mixing; Impact of ocean physics on biogeochemical processes, including seasonal phytoplankton blooms and shelf sea fronts; Remote sensing of sea surface temperature and chlorophyll shelf seas. Estuarine circulation and sediment transport; Applications of ocean physics to water quality and pollution monitoring; Role of ocean science in the marine energy industry. This module is designed to follow on from ENV-5016A, which is a pre-requisite. We strongly recommend that you also gain experience of marine fieldwork by taking the 20-credit biennial ENVK5020A Marine Sciences fieldcourse, next running in June 2013.

ENV-5017B

20

SKILLS FOR CHEMISTS

This module will include: Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; Statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; Error propagation in physical chemistry and Physical principles through applied mathematics. Aims of this module are to bring students' understanding of mathematical ideas and physics to a sufficient level to study core physical chemistry in later stages

CHE-4050Y

20

SOIL PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

This module will combine lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork to provide students with an appreciation of the soil environment and the processes that occurs within it. The module will progress through: basic soil components/properties; soil identification and classification; soil as a habitat; soil organisms; soil functions; the agricultural environment; soil-organism-agrochemical interaction; soil contamination; soil and climate change.

ENV-5012A

20

SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometers. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-4002Y Mathematics for Scientists A or equivalent).

ENV-5004B

20

SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS WITH FIELDCOURSE

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometres. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. The fieldcourse provides "hands-on" experience of the various techniques and applications, adding on valuable practical skills. This module is highly valued by employers in industry; guest industrial lecturers will cover the current 'state-of-the-art' applications in real world situations. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-1A61 Mathematics for Scientists I, ENV-1A62 Mathematics for Scientists II or equivalent).

ENVK5005B

20

SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY

This module comprises a broadly-based series of lectures on science, particularly chemistry, coupled with written activities based upon them. The twin objectives are to provide a contextual backdrop to the more focussed studies in other concurrent and subsequent modules, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information. The topics in semester 1 will be used as a basis for assignments and exercises which will help to develop students' team-working and presentational skills.

CHE-4090Y

20

SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIETY AND BIODIVERSITY

This module consists of two parts. The first part of this module will consider sustainability in theory and practice. Striking a balance between societal development, economic growth and environmental protection has proven difficult and controversial. The terms 'sustainability' and 'sustainable development' have been used in attempts to reconcile these three areas. Yet the ill-defined and contradictory nature of these concepts has also hampered their implementation. The first half of this module (taught in the first half of the Semester) considers sustainability in theory and practice by examining the relationships between environment and society, through the contributions of a variety of social science disciplines. The second half of this module firmly rests on Ecology as a science and briefly introduces a wide range of concepts relevant to the structure and functioning of the biosphere, from biomes through ecosystems, communities, populations, and whole organisms, including topics ranging from landscape and population ecology, to behavioural, physiological, molecular, genetic and chemical ecology. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4006B

20

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

This module considers various activities associated with the development of all types of computer based information systems including project management, feasibility, investigation, analysis, logical and physical design, and the links to file design, software design, and user interface design. It makes use of a number of analysis and design tools and techniques in order to produce readable system specifications. Students are introduced to a number of development methods including structured, object oriented, soft systems, participative, iterative and rapid approaches.
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CMP-5003A

20

THE COMPUTING REVOLUTION

The module is designed to provide students with an overview of the history of computing, the current state-of-the-art in a number of areas, and an insight into likely developments. Students consider social and ethical implications of use of computing technology along with security and safety of computing systems. Research techniques, report writing and team skills are developed.
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CMP-4002A

20

THE COMPUTING REVOLUTION

The module is designed to provide students with an overview of the history of computing, the current state-of-the-art in a number of areas, and an insight into likely developments. Students consider social and ethical implications of use of computing technology along with security and safety of computing systems. Research techniques, report writing and team skills are developed.
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CMP-5008A

20

THEORETICAL COMPUTING

This module provides an introduction to computing theory. Topics covered include an introduction to formal language theory, complexity analysis of algorithms, and formal correctness proofs. CMPC1F01 is a minimum prerequisite; students who have done this module are advised to take CMPC2F01 before taking CMPC2F02.
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CMP-5007B

20

TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5017Y

40

TOPICS IN PHYSICS

The material covered will expand on some of the topics from the 'A' level syllabus, such as optics and electromagnetism. It will also cover some modern physics such as special relativity. Topics include molecular motion, the electrical properties of matter, intermolecular forces and their role in determining bulk properties of matter, and an introduction to nanoscience and nanotechnology.

CHE-4801Y

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. This module explores energy, mechanics, physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour#from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. Plate Tectonics is studied to explain Earth's physiographic features#such as mountain belts and volcanoes#and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. We also explore geological time#the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet and introduce geological materials, resources and hazards. This module is assessed by coursework and examination.

ENV-4005A

20

Students should complete at least 80 credits in their two major subjects by the end of Year 3. The Project module can count as 20 credits towards each major subject or 40 credits towards one major subject, depending on the topic chosen. In Year 3 students are expected to take a minimum of 40 credits at level 3 in addition to the Natural Sciences project.

Compulsory Study (40 credits)

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

Option A Study (80 credits)

Students will select 80 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED GRAPHICS

This is an advanced module aiming to acquaint the student with the techniques of three-dimensional modelling, high-quality rendering, ray tracing, radiosity and modern 3D graphics hardware. It also introduces computational geometry which is the study of algorithms and data structures for solving geometric problems on a computer. The module is a logical continuation of Graphics I and II.
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CMP-6005B

20

ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL TECHNIQUES

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C1Y AND TAKE MTH-2C4Y Calculus of variations. Sturm-Liouville theory. Orthogonal polynomials. Laplace and Fourier transforms. Asymptotic methods including steepest descent and Green's functions.

MTHD6017B

20

ADVANCED STATISTICS

This module covers two topics in statistical theory: Generalised Linear Models and Stochastic Processes. For the former we consider both the theory and practice of statistical model fitting and students will be expected to analyse real data. For the second topic we will be studying processes through time such as Markov chains, Poisson and Birth and death processes.
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CMP-6004B

20

ADVANCED TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Discussion of the reactivity of pi electron rich molecules, particularly to light and heat, through consideration of current approaches such as Frontier Molecular Orbital theory. Reactions ranging from the isomerisation of alkenes through to more complex electrocyclic processes are examined. The module also examines the role of substituents on reactivity of aromatic compounds and its quantification using the Hammett equation. There follows a consideration of the physical organic chemistry of organic radicals, SET mechanisms and the rationalisation of the organic photochemistry of aldehydes and ketones in terms of free radical chemistry. Also examines examples of biogenesis, chemical synthesis and biological action of selected natural products and pharmaceutical chemicals. Specifically, ribosomal peptides, non ribosomal peptides and terpenoids are introduced. Students enrolled on this module will benefit from a number of complementary lectures delivered by guest lecturers from both academia and industry.

CHE-6150Y

20

ALGEBRA

(a) Group theory: basic concepts and examples. Cosets, Lagrange's theorem. Normal subgroups and quotient groups. First isomorphism theorem. Quotient spaces in linear algebra. (b) Rings, elementary properties and examples of commutative rings. Ideals, quotient rings. Polynomial rings and construction of finite fields. Unique Factorization in rings. Applications in linear algebra.

MTHA5003Y

20

ANALYSIS

(a) Continuity, differentiation, uniform convergence, power series and how they represent functions for both real and complex variables. (b) Topology of the complex plane, holomorphic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy and Laurent theorems, residue calculus.

MTHA5001Y

20

ANALYTICAL NUMBER THEORY

This module will be assessed by 100% examination but you may also be informally assessed by coursework and/or project.

MTHD6022A

20

APPLIED STATISTICS A

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE AND BUSINESS STATISTICS STUDENTS SHOULD TAKE CMPC2S12, APPLIED STATISTICS B, DUE TO THE DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS OF THEIR COURSE. This is a module designed to give students the opportunity to apply statistical methods in realistic situations. While no advanced knowledge of probability and statistics is required, we expect students to have some background in probability and statistics before taking this module. The aim is to introduce students to R statistical language and to cover Regression, Analysis of Variance and Survival analysis. Other topics from a list including: Extremes and quartiles, Bootstrap methods and their application, Sample surveys, Simulations, Subjective statistics, Forecasting and Clustering methods, may be offered to cover the interests of those in the class.
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CMP-5017B

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

This module studies the organization of both the system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of both hardware and software components is emphasized throughout, and the central concepts of the module are reinforced by practical work involving Lego robots, Java programming exercises and digital logic design.
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CMP-5013A

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

This module studies the organization of both the system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of both hardware and software components is emphasized throughout, and the central concepts of the module are reinforced by practical work involving Lego robots, Java programming exercises and digital logic design.
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CMP-5013A

20

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

This module aims to introduce concepts of classical Artificial Intelligence through the use of the PROLOG language and is based on a selection of chapters from the book "PROLOG programming for Artificial Intelligence" by Ivan Bratko. Beside PROLOG, topics include search techniques, knowledge representation, expert system, and game playing.
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CMP-5002B

20

ASTROPHYSICS WITH ADVANCED TOPICS

This 20-credit module gives an overview of astrophysics through lectures and workshops. Assessment will involve some coursework and a coursetest. The module assumes previous study of A level physics or an equivalent course. Topics covered will include some history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology. Some of these topics will be taken to a more advanced level. The more advanced topics will include workshop examples and coursetest questions at level 2 standard.

NAT-5001A

20

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE

Atmospheric chemistry and global change are in the news: stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, greenhouse gases, and global scale air pollution are seen as some of the most significant environmental problems of our age. Chemical composition and transformations underlie these issues, and drive many important atmospheric processes. This module covers the fundamental chemical principles and underlying physical processes in the atmosphere from the stratosphere to the surface, and considers the role of chemistry in current issues of atmospheric chemical change through a series of lectures, problem solving classes, seminars, experimental and computing labs as well as a field trip to UEA's own atmospheric observatory in Weybourne/North Norfolk. A solid background in chemistry is recommended (e.g., AS-level or equivalent). ENV-6020B is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here.

ENV-5015A

20

ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION: MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING

PLEASE NOTE: FOR THIS MODULE, IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT ENV-5015A HAS ALREADY BEEN TAKEN Emissions of gases and other pollutants from human activities are critical drivers of phenomena such as climate change, degradation of air quality in urban and rural areas, and long-range transport of air pollution. To understand these impacts it is necessary to make atmospheric measurements of chemical composition, and to interpret these observations with a range of statistical, conceptual, and computer-based models. In this module you will be introduced to a range of modern atmospheric chemical measurements techniques, both those used in the field and in the laboratory. Consideration will be given to the relevant chemical and physical processes that are required to understand these observations. You will then learn about a range of interpretive techniques including numerical models, and you will put some of these in to practice. Teaching will be via lectures, lab sessions and workshops. This module is a natural follow-on to ENV-5015A, which you are recommended to take first. This module will particularly interest those considering a career or research related to air quality measurement and assessment.

ENV-6020B

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

In this module, the interrelationships between animal behaviour, ecology and evolution will be explored. Students will examine how behaviour has evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles will provide the theoretical framework, within which the module will seek to explain the ultimate function of animal behaviours. Concepts and examples will be developed through the lecture series, exploring behaviours in the context of altruism, optimality, foraging, and particularly reproduction, the key currency of evolutionary success. In parallel with the lectures, students will design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, collecting original data to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY

This module builds on the principles of biochemistry taught in BIO-4004B. Selected topics in intermediary metabolism are covered in greater depth and extended to include the specific roles of coenzymes in metabolic pathways. In turn this leads to a discussion of the roles of hormone-receptor interactions and signal transduction in metabolic regulation. The recent contributions of structural biology to cellular biochemistry are acknowledged in both the lecture series and associated practical classes, whilst ATP utilization is illustrated by consideration of the active transport of molecules across membranes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

BIO-5002A

20

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND HUMAN SOCIETY

This is an inter-disciplinary module focusing on the interaction between ecology, biodiversity and human societies. It examines the human drivers of biodiversity loss, the importance of biodiversity to human society, conflicts between human society and conservation and how these can be resolved, and institutions for biodiversity conservation and environmental management. It is designed for students of Biology, Ecology, Environmental Science, Environmental Geography and International Development and Development Studies. This inter-disciplinary module does not require previous detailed knowledge of ecological mechanisms; where a simple understanding of key ecological processes is important, this will be reviewed and taught in class. Key principles, issues and theory are covered in lectures by UEA faculty. These are supported by case studies from external speakers working in conservation, environmental and resource management agencies and NGOs. The module will comprise 2 core lectures plus one workshop / seminar / outside speaker each week. The module will be assessed by a spring semester exam and coursework designed to develop skills in reviewing and interpreting evidence to non-scientists. This will comprise a briefing paper written for non-specialist policy makers, reviewing scientific evidence and areas of uncertainty on a conservation topic, and providing recommendations for UK government policy and identifying research needed, involving both group (written report max 1500 words, conducted in pairs) and individual (powerpoint slideshow: a summary presentation for policy makers) elements. There are no formal prerequisites, but the module complements and builds on a number of 200 level module including: ENV / BIO 200 level core ecology modules (ie, populations, processes), ENV2A8Y Economics of the Environment, ENV-2A06 Environmental Politics and Policy Making, DEV-2C63 Natural Resources for Development II, DEV-2D64 Natural Resources for Development III.

ENV-6006A

20

BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE ECOLOGY

This module examines the microbial processes that underpin our dependence on the marine environment for 'services' such as climate modulation and nutrient regeneration. The module will cover the evolution, biodiversity and molecular ecology of bacteria, diatoms, coccolithophores and nitrogen fixers, and the physiology and distribution of zooplankton. Example ecosystems such as the Antarctic, mid ocean gyres and Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems will be studied in detail and predictions of the impact of environmental change (increasing temperature, decreasing pH, decreasing oxygen, and changes in nutrient supply) on marine ecosystem dynamics will be examined. Biological oceanographic methods will be critically evaluated. The module will include a reading week in week 7 and employability visits to the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

ENV-6005A

20

BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO ANY STUDENT THAT SATISFIES THE PRE-REQUISITE REQUIREMENTS. Alternative pre-requisites are BIO-4001A and BIO-4002B, or BIO-4003A and BIO-4004B. This module will provide an opportunity to discuss various aspects of biology in society. Students will be able to critically analyse the way biological sciences issues are represented in popular literature and the media and an idea of the current 'hot topics' in biological ethics. Specific topics to be covered will involve aspects of contemporary biological science that have important ethical considerations for society, such as GM crops, DNA databases, designer babies, stem cell research etc. Being able to understand the difference between scientific fact and scientific fiction is not always straightforward. What was once viewed as science fiction has sometimes become a scientific fact or scientific reality as our scientific knowledge and technology has increased exponentially. Conversely, science fiction can sometimes be portrayed inaccurately as scientific fact. Students will research relevant scientific literature and discover the degree of scientific accuracy represented within the genre of science fiction.

BIO-5012Y

20

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE BIO-4007Y OR CHE-4201Y. This module explores the structural, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of biological systems and the methodologies used to define them. Using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry, these topics will be discussed within three major themes: 1) Binding, activation and transfer in biological systems, 2) Enzyme catalysis, and 3) Macromolecular size, shape and structure determination. The concluding lectures will explore protein disorder, folding and structure to illustrate how biophysicists integrate concepts and methods from each of these themes when addressing a specific research topic.

CHE-5601Y

20

CANCER BIOLOGY

This module deals with the concepts and principles of genetic analysis of cancer. The various roles of genes in development, apoptosis, the cell cycle, metastasis and angiogenesis are covered for example. A discussion on the potential of novel therapies concludes the module. This module takes advantage of several experts from the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. Students will thus gain an in-depth appreciation of cancer as a disease process from both the scientific and clinical viewpoints. It is highly advantageous to have taken BIO-5003B as well as BIO-5005B.

BIO-6009A

20

CATCHMENT WATER RESOURCES

This module will adopt an integrated approach to studying surface water and groundwater resources in river basins. Approaches to catchment management will be considered in the context of improving water-dependent terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Topics of climate change impacts on water resources in terms of droughts and floods, as well as water quality issues arising from changing land-use patterns will be considered, together with the engineering and socio-economic methods necessary to adapt to future pressures on water resources. Co-taught with ENV-7019B.

ENV-6018B

20

CELL BIOLOGY

This module explores the molecular organisation of cells and the regulation of dynamic cellular changes, with some emphasis on medical cell biology. Dynamic properties of cell membranes, cell signalling, growth factor function and aspects of cancer biology and immunology. Regulation of the internal cell environment (nuclear organisation and information flow, cell growth, division and motility), the relationship of the cell to its extracellular matrix and the determination of cell phenotype. Aspects of cell death, the ageing process, developmental biology, mechanisms of tissue renewal and repair. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B or BIO-5009A.

BIO-5005B

20

CELL BIOLOGY AND MECHANISMS OF DISEASE

This module is concerned with the structure and function of cells in health and disease. It includes demonstrations of some of the imaging techniques used in the study of Cell Biology and workshops focused on how to design experiments and analyse research papers. Topics to be covered include: ubiquitination, the cytoskeleton and mechanics of cell division, signalling and cell migration, differentiation and apoptosis.

BIO-6006B

20

CELLULAR SIGNALLING

The module deals with signal transduction mechanisms, particularly in mammalian cells and with emphasis on human disease. Topics include the molecular basis of cell surface receptor activation, G-protein coupled receptors, kinases/phosphatases, 2nd messengers such as calcium and inositol lipids, and ion channels. The module then goes on to consider signalling mechanisms important for cell growth, differentiation and survival. (With the agreement of the module organiser, students who have taken BIO-5002A but not BIO-5005B may be allowed to take this module.)

BIO-6003A

20

CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Covers the major processes that set the chemical composition of the oceans, the distribution of nutrient, and carbon, the distribution of life in the oceans and the interaction of the oceans and atmosphere. Elements of physical oceanography and ocean circulation, of geochemistry, marine biology and global change science are covered.

ENV-5019A

20

CHEMICAL PHYSICS - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

The module consists of topics covering important areas of modern physical chemistry and chemical physics. The material will blend together experimental and theoretical aspects of condensed phase chemistry and materials chemistry.

CHE-6250Y

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: PHYSICAL SCIENCE BASIS

Climate change and variability has played a major role in shaping human history and the prospect of a warming world as a result of human activities (global warming) presents society with an increasing challenge over the coming decades. This module covers the science of climate change, our current understanding of anthropogenic effects on climate, and the uncertainties/limitations of our scientific knowledge. It provides details about the approaches, methods and techniques for understanding the history of climate change and for developing climate projections for the next 100 years, supporting further study of the scientific or policy aspects of the subject in either an academic or applied context. Co-taught with ENV-7014A. This module is restricted to MSci Climate Science students only.

ENV-6013A

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills in the scientific and social scientific analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from natural sciences, science studies, and economics and politics. It first offers a historical perspective on how global climate change developed as a scientific and social object of inquiry. The course then gives grounding in climate and society relations, economic principles and the political science and governance of climate hazards, energy and greenhouse gas emissions. This module replaces ENV-2A69.

ENV-5003A

20

COMBINATORICS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5016B

20

COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT ACROSS BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES

The biological activity of cellular membranes is mediated by an array of fascinating and highly specialised proteins embedded within the lipid bilayer. These proteins support essential functions such as sensing, signalling, transport and energy transduction and form the focus of this module. An introduction to the principles that govern the structure of these proteins is followed by a series of case studies that explore the link between protein structure, location and function that includes the following; aquaporins and water transport, bacteriorhodopsin and light driven proton movements and hypoxia signalling by mitochondrial proteins. NB students who do not have the pre-requisite module (BIO-5002A), but who have taken and passed BIO-4003A, BIO-4009Y and either BIO-5005B or BIO-5015B can take this module if they obtain the agreement of the module organiser.

BIO-6002B

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

The module will introduce the main concepts in community, ecosystem and macro-ecology - patterns and processes related to species richness; diversity; stability; succession; primary and secondary productivity and energy flows. We will then examine how these concepts aid our understanding of the functioning of terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

BIO-5014B

20

COMPUTER VISION (FOR DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY)

This module covers the various stages in processing the image recorded at the sensor level in a camera so that the output is an attractive photographic image. The first half of the course will cover topics including demosiacking, denoising, white point correction, dynamic range compression and image rendering. The second half will look at higher level functions such as finding faces in images, content recognition (including face recognition) and facial coding in images. The last topic is particularly interesting in the context of mobile phone applications.
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CMP-6007B

20

CONTINUUM MECHANICS AND ELASTICITY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C2Y or TAKE ENV-2A22 This module will be assessed by 100% examination, but you may also be informally assessed by coursework and/or project. The deformation and motion of a continuous body, the balance laws of continuum mechanics (conservation of mass, momentum and energy) and the formulation of constitutive equations (principle of objectivity). Application of these ideas to the fundamental properties of viscous fluids, viscoelasticity and nonlinear elasticity. Nonlinear elasticity is the subject of the second half of the module. We consider a variety of constitutive equations in compressible and incompressible nonlinear elasticity and develop nonlinear analogues of the bulk modulus, Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio of linear elasticity. Many examples of exact finite elastic solutions are given, including the famous universal solutions in finite incompressible elasticity of Rivlin. We also consider the inflation of balloons.

MTHD6019A

20

DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

This is a compulsory module for all computing students and provides the necessary foundation in data and storage structures for all computing streams. In addition, the module emphasises systematic algorithm design and discusses algorithm analysis. At the same time, the module provides the student with the opportunity to reinforce and enhance the programming skills developed at level 1.
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CMP-5014A

20

DATABASE SYSTEMS

This module introduces most aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. The module is based on the relational model. The students will explore the tools and methods for database design and manipulation as well as the programming of database applications. Part of the practical experience gained will be acquired using a modern relational database management system. Students will also gain programming experience using SQL, and using the Java JDBC interface. A high level language programming module is a pre-requisite.
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CMP-5005B

20

DATABASE SYSTEMS

This module introduces most aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. The module is based on the relational model. The students will explore the tools and methods for database design and manipulation as well as the programming of database applications. Part of the practical experience gained will be acquired using a modern relational database management system. Students will also gain programming experience using SQL, and using the Java JDBC interface. A high level language programming module is a pre-requisite.
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CMP-5005B

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLIED METHODS

(a) Ordinary Differential Equations: solution by reduction of order; variation of parameters for inhomogeneous problems; series solution and the method of Frobenius. Legendre's and Bessel's equations: Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions and their recurrence relations; Fourier series; Partial differential equations (PDEs): heat equation, wave equation, Laplace's equation; solution by separation of variables. (b) Method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; the characteristic equations; Fourier transform and its use in solving linear PDEs; (c) Dynamical Systems: equilibrium points and their stability; the phase plane; theory and applications.

MTHA5004Y

20

DIGITAL SYSTEMS DESIGN

This module is concerned with the design and implementation of digital electronic systems that form basic components of modern computers. Topics include an introduction to switching algebra, synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits and techniques for circuit minimization. The module also provides a practical introduction to VHDL, an industry standard hardware description language. Students gain practical experience by undertaking a number of projects based on programmable logic devices.
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CMP-5028B

20

DYNAMICAL METEOROLOGY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C2Y OR TAKE ENV-2A21 Dynamical meteorology is a core subject on which weather forecasting and the study of climate and climate change are based. This module applies fluid dynamics to the study of the circulation of the Earth's atmosphere. The fluid dynamical equations and some basic thermodynamics for the atmosphere are introduced. These are then applied to topics such as geostrophic flow, thermal wind and the jet streams, boundary layers, gravity waves, the Hadley circulation, vorticity and potential vorticity, Rossby waves, and equatorial waves. Emphasis will be placed on fluid dynamical concepts as well as on finding analytical solutions to the equations of motion.

MTHD6018B

20

EARTH AND LIFE

This module introduces Earth system science, taking a top-down approach to the Earth as a whole system, and tracing its development since its formation 4.5 billion years ago. The main focus is on the coupled evolution of life and its environment through a series of revolutions. Theoretical approaches are introduced, including Gaia, feedback mechanisms and systems theory, and practical sessions use models to build up conceptual understanding. The subject is inherently inter-disciplinary, including aspects of biology, chemistry and physics, and unifying the study of climate and global biogeochemical cycles. Co-taught with ENV-7010B.

ENV-6010B

20

EARTH SYSTEM GEOCHEMISTRY

Examines how the earth system and its geochemical cycling operate on both global and micro scales. Emphasis is on natural cycles, starting with big themes such as crust-hydrosphere-biosphere interaction and its effects on the long term C cycle, including regulation of carbon dioxide. Elements, isotopes, organic molecules (and their isotopic compositions) are used as tracers of processes and events in earth history. Organic matter, its chemistry and its relationship to both the C and S cycles is explored. Dating of geological materials with radiometric methods is introduced. The course explores themes in both deep time (millions of years) and more recent glacial-interglacial cycles (thousands to hundreds of thousands of years). This module replaces ENV-2A80.

ENV-5013B

20

EARTHQUAKE AND VOLCANIC HAZARDS

The aim of the module is to be able to solve geophysical problems (both physical and chemical) in a methodical way. Problems will be described conceptionally, then defined mathematically, then solved numerically. Emphasis on numerical solutions to partial differential equations encountered in geophysical sciences: their stability and accuracy. Case studies from meteorology, oceanography, hydrology and geophysics. Extensive project work involved.

ENV-6001B

20

EARTHQUAKE AND VOLCANIC HAZARDS WITH FIELDCOURSE

Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions have significant environmental and societal impacts. This module focuses on the physical basis and analysis of each hazard, their global range of occurrence and their global impact. The module also addresses approaches towards hazard mitigation and minimising vulnerability, with an emphasis on their practical implication. Scenarios and probabilities occurrence of mega-disasters are also investigated. A one week field trip in Scotland takes place to introduce you to various aspects of natural hazards and in particular to faulting and earthquake hazards. This module is co-taught with ENVK7002B

ENV-6002K

20

ELECTRICITY GENERATION AND DISTRIBUTION

In the final semester of third year this module will build on your established understanding of electricity by studying the technical aspects of the electrical industry. Analysing transformer designs will help consolidate your knowledge of generation before developing an advanced understanding of the constraints of cabling for offshore wind turbines. You will evaluate the efficiency of the national grid by comparing the practical design aspects to the costs involved. A detailed consideration of the current shortfall in meeting demand for electricity will lead to the study of novel methods of distribution, including pumped-storage schemes and super-capacitors.

ENG-6001B

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND COMBINATORICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory.

MTHF5012Y

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5013Y

20

ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators.

MTHF5011A

20

EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

Embedded processors are at the core of a huge range of products e.g. mobile telephones, cameras, passenger cars, washing machines, DVD players, medical equipment, etc. The embedded market is currently estimated to be worth around 100x the 'desktop' market and is projected to grow exponentially over the next decade. This module builds on the material delivered in CMPC2M09 to consider the design and development of real-time embedded system applications for commercial off the shelf (COTS) processors running real-time operating systems (RTOS) such as eLinux.
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CMP-6024B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most common obstacles to environmental problem solving are often not scientific or technological, but political. This module examines the theoretical and empirical development of environmental politics in modern society (mostly in Western Europe) including: the sources of modern environmentalism and its many manifestations in modern policy making systems; the environmental policies of the UK and the European Union; different theories of political power and public policy making; the role of environmental pressure groups and business; global environmental politics and policy making. The module encourages student-led learning by enabling students to develop their own theoretical interpretations of real world examples of politics. These are explored in seminar presentations and in an extended (4000 word) case study (i.e. essay). This module assumes no prior knowledge of politics/social sciences.

ENV-5002B

20

EVOLUTION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

The module aims to provide an up-to-date and thought-provoking discussion about evolutionary medicine and the evolution of disease. The module will examine how evolutionary principles illuminate and provide fresh insight into a broad range of contemporary health problems including infectious, chronic and nutritional diseases and disorders. Topics are introduced in a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the relationship between biology and society as it relates to understanding, treating, and preventing disease. Evidence will be presented that all aspects of the human condition have an evolutionary basis. The course will cover 4 broad areas: (i) principles of evolutionary medicine - humans in their evolutionary context, and discussion of the factors that drive evolutionary change; (ii) evolution and non-infectious diseases (cancer, lifestyles, ageing); (iii) evolution and infection (vaccines, antibiotics, pathogens, emerging diseases); (iv) personalised medicine and social context of evolutionary medicine.

BIO-6017A

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

The aim of this module is to provide a background in the concepts and principles of evolutionary biology. It includes discussion of genetic variation, population genetics, natural selection, population structure, ecological adaptation, life history characteristics, speciation, interactions among species, biological diversity, phylogeny and molecular ecology and biogeography. Workshop discussions are held weekly.

BIO-5008B

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION GENETICS

In this module, students will study evolutionary theory and its application to conservation genetics. The principal focus will be on how evolutionary forces (mutation, recombination, genetic drift, gene flow, and selection) and epigenetics affect phenotype, behaviour and genetic variation. We will cover the rich evolutionary literature, discussing the paradigm shifting studies by Darwin, Fisher, Wright, Haldane and others. The module also covers current knowledge of molecular technology as applied to ecological, evolutionary and conservation studies.

BIO-6008B

20

FIELD ECOLOGY

Students explore the ecology of moorlands, bogs, sand dunes, rocky shores, estuaries and woodlands. Students should develop skills in identifying plants and animals using scientific keys, carrying out quantitative surveys and statistically analysing their data. Strong emphasis is placed on student-lead project work. The bulk of the teaching takes place on a two week field course in Western Ireland, that runs immediately before the start of the Autumn Semester.

BIO-5013A

20

FLUID DYNAMICS

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C2Y OR TAKE ENV-2A21 This module will be assessed by 100% examination, but you may also be informally assessed by coursework and/or project. The equations governing the motion of viscous, incompressible fluids, simple exact solutions. Low and high Reynolds number flows. Boundary-layers. Stability theory.

MTHD6020A

20

FLUID DYNAMICS - THEORY AND COMPUTATION

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-1A5Y IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE ENV-2A21 (a) Hydrostatics, compressibility. Kinematics: velocity, particle path, streamlines. Continuity, incompressibility, streamtubes. Dynamics: Material derivative, Euler's equations, vorticity and irrotational flows. Velocity potential and streamfunction. Bernoulli's equation for unsteady flow. Circulation: Kelvin's Theorem, Helmholtz's theorems. Basic water waves. (b) Computational methods for fluid dynamics; Euler's method and Runge-Kutta methods and their use for computing particle paths and streamlines in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows; numerical computation and flow visualisation using Matlab; convergence, consistency and stability of numerical integration methods for ODEs. (c) Theory of Irrotational and Incompressible Flows: velocity potential, Laplace's Equation, sources and vortices, complex potential. Force on a body and the Blasius theorem. Method of images and conformal mappings.

MTHA5002Y

20

FOOD DOMESTICATION AND SUSTAINABILITY

Scientists have recently been delivered with the challenge to double food production over the next 40 years in order to feed the population, without greatly increasing the area of land farmed, and with reduced input from fossil fuel energy. This provides challenges that include food safety (ensuring a sufficient food supply for a nation) and the challenge of food sustainability (ensuring there is sufficient energy to produce the food that is needed). The module addresses these challenges. An important starting point is the history and mechanism of food domestication, current practice, and the prospects and challenges for the future.

BIO-6014B

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - ANALYSIS

Module Summary Aim: Following on from CHE-4701Y, where the emphasis was on collection of evidence, this module introduces more in-depth forensic chemistry, looking at the way evidence gathered at a crime scene may be analysed in the laboratory. The objective is to familiarise students with critical thinking and evaluation of evidence, build a model for case assessment and interpretation and thus increase understanding of the role of the Expert Witness in court. It is open to students on FF41 and other chemistry courses where CHE-5701Y is a core or optional module. Content: The module will deepen the knowledge of forensic statistics and cover basic detection and recovery techniques for body fluids; fingerprint development and recovery; advanced microscopy and spectroscopy and their application to fibres, paint and other particulates; the use of elemental analysis in forensic science; and questioned document examination including counterfeiting. Teaching and Learning Methods: Lectures, practicals and mentor groups (PBL- problem based learning). The students will be divided into groups and each group will then investigate a hypothetical criminal case using simulated evidence material. As part of this students will write an expert witness statement which will be presented and defended in a mock court. Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to apply acquired skills, work as part of a team and to produce an expert witness report, using literature and experimental data to inform their analysis. The "mock court" will be aimed at developing the individual's presentation skills in a challenging environment. Students should gain further confidence in the use of statistics to analyse data, test hypotheses and draw conclusions from them.

CHE-5701Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - INTERPRETATION AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS

The first semester is co-taught with CHE-3H57. See CHE-3H57 synopsis for description of the content in the first semester. The second semester of this module will concentrate on developing interpretation and presentation skills required in presenting evidence in courts of law. The topics covered will be: complex DNA interpretation including mixtures and partial profiles; drugs intelligence; firearms. Throughout, the course will concentrate on how forensic evidence is interpreted and communicated. This will include the development of written and verbal skills required for the presentation of evidence to a court, and will culminate in a "mock court" where students will present and defend a statement they have written.

CHE-6701Y

20

FOSSIL FUELS

Geological, economic and political aspects of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) are introduced. These are used to discuss environmental concerns arising from the use of fossil fuels, and the potentially profound implications of future fuel scarcity. This module is suitable for students taking degrees in the School of Environmental Sciences. Some knowledge of Earth Science will be expected. Before taking this module you must take or be taking at least 20 credits of Earth Science or Geophysics modules at honours level. This module replaces ENV-3A35. In taking this module you cannot take ENV-7008A.

ENV-6009A

20

FURTHER COMPUTING SYSTEMS

The module is designed to provide students with: an overview of the organisational, cultural and technical context of current software development, experience of developing software in a web context, and an introduction to the principal architectures of contemporary computing systems.
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CMP-5016B

20

FURTHER COMPUTING SYSTEMS

The module is designed to provide students with: an overview of the organisational, cultural and technical context of current software development, experience of developing software in a web context, and an introduction to the principal architectures of contemporary computing systems.
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CMP-5016B

20

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

This module is for those students who have passed CMP-4004Y or equivalent, in their first year and would like to study further theory that is a pre-requisite for several other 2nd and 3rd level modules in CMP. For such students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. 3D Vectors and complex numbers are also studied.
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CMP-5006A

20

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

This module is for those students who have passed CMP-4004Y or equivalent, in their first year and would like to study further theory that is a pre-requisite for several other 2nd and 3rd level modules in CMP. For such students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. 3D Vectors and complex numbers are also studied.
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CMP-5006A

20

GENETICS

This module will describe the basis of heredity, describing both the functions and the structures of genes and whole genomes. Examples will be taken from bacterial, animal and plant systems and will be considered from both functional and molecular points of view. The influence of the "new genetics" on medicine, agriculture and society will also be covered. Practical work will involve a molecular genetic analysis of a symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium and a molecular mapping exercise of traits that confer disease resistance in plants. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B (Molecular Biology).

BIO-5009A

20

GENOMES, GENES AND GENOMICS

This module will provide a description of contemporary biological studies of genomes. There will be a focus on a molecular understanding of gene expression within organisms, with a particular emphasis on regulatory processes that affect expression at the genome level. Topics to be covered include comparative and functional genomics, organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, global regulation of genome expression and mechanisms involved in maintaining genome integrity. Lectures and the associated practical will also provide a thorough grounding in technologies that analyse genomes and their gene products.

BIO-6013A

20

GEODYNAMICS: EARTH'S ENGINE

Processes in the Earth's interior have exerted a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system through geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the heat distribution of the Earth's interior, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes and distribution of seismic energy. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

GEOSCIENCES FIELDCOURSE: GREECE

This module is designed to promote a deeper understanding and integration of geoscience subjects: the fieldwork will usually concentrate on aspects of structural geology, regional tectonics, sedimentology, palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironments, and volcanology. A key feature of the course is that the location is chosen where there are excellent and substantial exposures of rock formation showing evidence of processes. There are two field bases in the Aegean (Greece), the Gulf of Corinth active rift, and Santorini volcano. The field trip is usually takes place from 8-22nd September 2013 aprox. The approximate cost to the student is expected to be ~GBP400 (though much depends on the Greece currency exchange rate). This includes BandB, and travel costs. Please consult the module organiser at the time of enrolling to ensure places are available, unless you already have confirmation that you already have a place on the fieldcourse. This module is co-taught with ENV-7016A.

ENV-6022K

20

GEOSCIENCES FIELDCOURSE: IRELAND

This module is designed to promote a deeper understanding and integration of geoscience subjects: the fieldwork will usually concentrate on aspects of structural geology, regional tectonics, hydrogeology, sedimentology, palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironments, metamorphic geology and volcanology. A key feature of the course is that the location is chosen where there are excellent and substantial exposures of rock formation showing evidence of processes. This module runs alternate years with ENV-6022K (Geosciences fieldcourse: Greece). This is to enable field base alternates between Western Ireland the Aegean (Greece) and the detailed content will reflect the field sites. This module is co-taught with ENV-7016A.

ENV-6016K

20

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This module is an exploration of both the scientific causes of global environmental change and the integrative and complex nature of society's response to such changes. The module provides an appreciation of the "big picture", to remind the students of the reasons why global environmental issues are at the forefront of the political and scientific agenda, and to encourage students to form their own opinion on current issues. This module also aims to encourage a cross-disciplinary approach to problems and research in global change. This module is assessed by a course test and group project and presentation but also by formative assessment. Students should note that final module marks can be deducted for the late submission of formative assessment.

ENV-6007B

20

GRAPHICS 1

Graphics 1 provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics for all computing students. It aims to provide a strong foundation for students wishing to study graphics, focusing on 2D graphics, algorithms and interaction. The module requires a good background in programming, although an introduction to C++ is presented. OpenGL is utilised as the graphics library, examples are provided in the lectures and supported in the laboratory classes. Other topics covered include fonts, algorithms for line drawing, clipping and colour.
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CMP-5010B

20

GRAPHICS 2

This module introduces the fundamentals of 3D geometric transformations and viewing using OpenGL. It teaches the theory and implementation of fundamental visibility determination algorithms and techniques for lighting, shading and anti-aliasing. Issues involved with modern high performance graphics processor are also considered. It also studies 3D curves and fundamental geometric data structures.
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CMP-6006A

20

HOST-PARASITE INTERACTIONS

The object of the module is to examine, from a evolutionary and ecological perspective, the complex interactions between parasites/diseases and their hosts and to show how the selection pressures that each side of these interactions impose lead to coevolutionary processes. We will take an overview of the role that such parasitic interactions may have played in the development of key biological traits, such as the evolution of sexual reproduction, and their current role in sexual selection. The module will include traditional parasitology (to set the scene and understand the complexity of the interactions), introducing the major groups of parasites and their hosts. We will examine the role of parasites and host-parasite interactions in evolution, drawing examples from conservation, behaviour, current research, theoretical predictions and models.

BIO-6016A

20

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

The module aims to provide an understanding of the physiology of several organ systems found within the human body. Learning Outcomes: On completion of the module it is expected the student will have gained an understanding of: - Information transmission within the body by the nervous system and the integrative processes within the spinal cord and brain. - Reaction to the environment through reception of external stimuli by sensory receptors, such as the eye. - Effector systems, including muscle contraction and its control. - Respiration, gas transport, blood circulation and heart function. - Kidney function in excretion and in water and mineral ion homeostasis - The digestive system and nutrition, including patterns of health and sickness. - Endocrine regulation and integration, including reproduction cycles in the female. The module is backed up with a comprehensive programme of practical work involving human physiological experiments.

BIO-5004A

20

HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY

An introduction to hydrology and hydrogeology: the basic equations describing fluid movement in groundwater systems will be derived and applied. The main techniques to investigate groundwater flow systems are highlighted. Water circulation within river catchments is discussed by means of the catchment water balance. The physical process represented by each component of the water balance will be covered as well as the current methods of quantifying these fluxes of water within the catchment . Principles of catchment modelling are outlined. The unit requires at least A-level equivalent mathematical skills. For example, an ability to work with common mathematical operations is essential such as the simple rearrangement of equations, and the ability to convert between varying units of length and volume. Basic differential equations will be presented for the description of groundwater flow.

ENV-5021A

20

INFECTION AND IMMUNITY

This module aims to provide a detailed coverage of the biology of selected infectious microorganisms, in the context of host and responses to pathogens. The properties of organs, cells and molecules of the immune system are described, along with the mechanism of antibody diversity generation, and the exploitation of the immune response for vaccine development. Examples of microbiological pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are used to illustrate major virulence strategies. The impact of genomics on the study of infection, and on mechanisms used by pathogens to evade host responses will be discussed. The module's theme is the molecular and cellular biology events at the host-pathogen interface.

BIO-6010B

20

INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

Nowadays, millions of people worldwide make use of IR systems every day via search engines, and the exponential increase in the number of websites and documents available means that these systems have been developed to be highly efficient. In this module, we will cover the essential theoretical ideas that underpin modern information retrieval (e.g. the vector-space model, probabilistic approaches, relevance feedback etc.) and examine how they are practically implemented in current systems. Lecture material is re-enforced by a set of laboratory exercises and an assessment that enable you to implement some of these ideas practically. We also examine natural language processing techniques that are increasingly used in IR, and the emerging technologies of audio and video retrieval.
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CMP-6008A

20

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The central theme of the module is the chemistry of the p and d block elements: structure and bonding, coordination complexes and the organometallic chemistry of main group and transition metals. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5301B

20

INORGANIC COMPOUNDS: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

This module concentrates on two important themes in contemporary inorganic chemistry: transition metal clusters and homogeneous catalysis. The structure and bonding in these compounds will be discussed as well as applications in materials chemistry and synthesis. There will also be a series of workshops on the subjects presented.

CHE-6301Y

20

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

This module begins with underpinning aspects of instrumental analysis such as signals, noise, detectors, data smoothing etc. and then progresses through instrumentation, sample preparation and techniques related to the key analytical techniques of atomic and molecular spectroscopy, electroanalytical chemistry and chromatography. The module includes laboratory sessions where students can work with common instruments and practice key skills in calibration, sample preparation and measurement and data analysis. As well as the formal assessment, there will also be formative assessment through compulsory multiple-choice tests and associated feedback workshops.

CHE-5501Y

20

INTERACTIONS AND POPULATIONS

In this module we will look closely at how interactions between individuals determine the structure and functioning of populations. We will consider both antagonistic interactions between members of different trophic levels, their evolution and their possible co-evolution. Consideration of competition will lead into the population consequences of both within trophic level and between trophic level interactions. We will then move on to consider spatially explicit population processes including meta population dynamics and possible ecological responses to climate change including range shifts. Students taking this module must have a background in basic statistics and have taken any Level 1 ecology module in ENV or BIO, or equivalent.

ENV-5014A

20

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

Computational biology is one of the great growth areas of both computing sciences and biology due to the development of robotic systems that are able churn out vast amounts of biological data. The challenge computational biologists' face involves turning this data into understanding. This data is often in the form of DNA, RNA or protein sequence. Although an introduction to the basics of molecular biology will be given, the module will mainly focus on the computational methods used in computational biology and bioinformatics. Topics will include sequence analysis, structural genomics and protein modelling, phylogenetics and evolution and modelling growth. Lecturers will highlight the relevance of the material to cutting-edge research.
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CMP-5004B

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module is assessed by formative assessment and coursework. This module replaces ENV-2A84.

ENV-5022B

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module, which includes a one week field course that will take place at Easter, is assessed by formative assessment, coursework and fieldwork projects. This module replaces ENV-2A82K.

ENVK5023B

20

MATERIALS AND POLYMER CHEMISTRY

An introduction to the basic principles of polymer synthesis is presented, together with a discussion of their physical properties. Speciality polymers are discussed. Materials chemistry is developed further with the introduction of inorganic structures and the concept of ferroelectric properties together with powder x-ray diffraction as applied to cubic crystals. Ion conductivity and basic band theory are also discussed. Semiconductivity is introduced and related to the band description of these materials. The experiments in this laboratory class involve the synthesis and evaluation of inorganic and organic materials.

CHE-5350Y

20

MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C2Y OR TAKE ENV-2A22 Mathematics finds wide-ranging applications in biological systems: including population dynamics, epidemics and the spread of diseases, enzyme kinetics, some diffusion models in biology including Turing instabilities and pattern formation, and various aspects of physiological fluid dynamics.

MTHD6021A

20

MATHEMATICAL LOGIC

The subject analyses symbolically the way in which we reason formally, particularly about mathematical structures. The ideas have applications to other parts of Mathematics, as well as being important in theoretical computer science and philosophy. We give a thorough treatment of predicate and propositional logic and an introduction to model theory.

MTHD6015B

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module is the third in a series of four mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers vector calculus (used in the study of vector fields in subjects such as fluid dynamics and electromagnetism), time series and spectral analysis (a highly adaptable and useful mathematical technique in many science fields, including data analysis), and fluid dynamics (which has applications to the circulation of the atmosphere, ocean, interior of the Earth, chemical engineering, and biology). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab). This module replaces ENV-2A61.

ENV-5006A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the fourth in a series of four mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods (with applications to many multi-variable problems in science), second order partial differential equations (which govern the behaviour of diffusive, advective and wave-like systems), and solid mechanics (applications in geophysics, glaciology, and material science). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. This module replaces ENV-2A62.

ENV-5007B

20

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

This module is concerned with the broad aspects of medicinal chemistry, from the discovery of lead compounds and the recognition of biological activity, to the production of pharmaceuticals. Biological activity is discussed in terms of metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and structure-activity relationships (SAR). Drug targets and their exploitation in drug therapies are also discussed. The medicinal chemistry content of this module contains aspects of both chemistry and biology. Therefore the course is started with a series of 'introductory' seminars relevant to BIO and CHEM students on underlying principles.

CHE-5150Y

20

METEOROLOGY I

This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processes in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of Radiation Balance, Cloud Physics, Thermodynamics and Dynamics and the assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential.

ENV-5008A

20

METEOROLOGY II

This module will build upon the material covered in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting.

ENV-5009B

20

METEOROLOGY II WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-2A23 (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting. The module also includes a week long Easter vacation residential fieldcourse, based in the Lake District, focusing on micrometeorology, microclimate and synoptic processes.

ENVK5010B

20

MICROBIAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

This module provides a training in the culture techniques, microbial physiology and genetics that underpin the production of bioproducts such as biofuels, bioplastics, antibiotics and food products, and the use of micro-organisms in wastewater treatment and bioremediation.

BIO-6004A

20

MICROBIAL CELL BIOLOGY

This module will cover recent developments in several areas of microbial cell biology, including the cell envelope, cell division, differentiation, secretion, gene expression and cell signalling. The material will be taught in seminar-type sessions by scientists from across the Norwich Research Park, all of whom are experts in their chosen subjects. This exciting module will bring you the most cutting edge research in microbial cell biology.

BIO-6005B

20

MICROBIOLOGY

A broad module covering all aspects of the biology of microorganisms, providing key knowledge for specialist Level 3 modules. Detailed description is given about the cell biology of bacteria, fungi and protists together with microbial physiology, genetics and environmental and applied microbiology. The biology of disease-causing microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) and prions is also covered. Practical work provides hands-on experience of important microbiological techniques, and expands on concepts introduced in lectures. The module should appeal to biology students across a wide range of disciplines and interests.

BIO-5015B

20

MODELLING ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESSES

The aim of the module is to show how environmental problems may be solved from the initial problem, to mathematical formulation and numerical solution. Problems will be described conceptually, then defined mathematically, then solved numerically via computer programming. The module consists of lectures on numerical methods and computing practicals (Matlab): the practicals being designed to illustrate the solution of problems using the methods covered in lectures. The module will guide students through the solution of a model of an environmental process of their own choosing. The problem will be discussed and placed into context through an essay, and then solved and written up in a project report. The skills developed in this module are highly valued by prospective employers of students wishing to carry on into further studies or in professional employment.

ENV-6004A

20

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENT

This module will discuss the molecular and cellular principles that drive embryonic development, including the signals and signalling pathways that lead to the establishment of the body plan, pattern formation and differentiation/organogenesis. Lectures will cover a number of different model organism used in the study of development including plants and Drosophila, however there is a focus on vertebrate systems. The relevance of embryonic development to our understanding of human development and disease is a recurring theme throughout the module.

BIO-6012A

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The module provides an introduction to the principles of molecular biology. The programme starts with the structure of DNA, genes and genomes, followed by the characterisation of the information flow including the mechanisms and regulation of transcription and translation. Protein folding, modification and turnover are described together with reactions concerning DNA (replication, recombination and repair). The module ends with a detailed description of methods used for the experimental manipulation of genetic material (gene isolation, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction, molecular cloning, transgenic plants and animals and global functional genomics). Practical work includes an introduction to molecular biology techniques together with computer assisted DNA and protein sequence analysis.

BIO-5003B

20

MOLECULAR ENZYMOLOGY IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE

The module sets out to explain the molecular basis of the often complex catalytic mechanisms of enzymes in biological systems concentrating particularly on their relevance to and applications in medicine. Covered are the underlying principles of enzyme catalysis and techniques for the study of enzyme mechanism and structure. These provide a foundation for discussions of the catalytic and cellular mechanisms of proteinase families such as the serine and metalloproteinases. Mechanism-based drug design is discussed particularly with respect to development of inhibitors of retroviral enzymes. Covered also are molecular motors , complex nanomachines involved in vesicle transport, ATP synthesis and DNA replication. Finally, the biosynthesis of the signalling molecule nitric oxide and the P450s involved in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics are presented. An extended practical based on the kinetics of a model enzyme, chymotrypsin, helps underpin concepts learnt in the module.

BIO-6001A

20

MOLECULAR PLANT-MICROBE INTERACTIONS

Plants interact with a whole range of microbes with effects that are both beneficial (e.g. nitrogen-fixing symbioses between legumes with Rhizobium, and the wide ranging mycorrhizal interactions between plants and fungi) and harmful, with many diseases being caused by viruses, fungi and oomycetes. The module will encompass examples of all these interactions, addressing them mainly from a molecular level, both in the ways in which the microbes recognise and invade their specific hosts and in the responses and mechanisms used by the host plant to encourage the good microbes and fight off the bad ones. The Norwich Research Park is a world centre for this subject, and the module will be taught by researchers from the John Innes Centre and the Sainsbury Laboratory, as well as from UEA. There is no pre-requisite for this module, but knowledge of both plant and molecular biology would be advantageous.

BIO-6007B

20

MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND ENERGY LEVELS

Quantum mechanics, one of the key scientific ideas of the 20th century, has had a wide impact in chemistry. In the first part of the module you will be introduced to the language and methods of quantum mechanics. In the second part, the close relation between spectroscopic measurements of small molecules and quantum theory will be discussed. Further methods of spectroscopy will then be introduced, beginning with the most widely used of all techniques in structure determination, NMR spectroscopy. This will be followed by a discussion of molecular electronic spectra which are widely used in chemical analysis.

CHE-5202Y

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

Have you ever wondered why human economic activity seems to be so bad for the environment? Does it have to be like that? Is it possible for human beings to enjoy high standards of living and a high quality environment? Through the study of the principles of Environmental Economics this course sets out to answer those questions. Addressing a wide-range of economy-environment problems including car pollution, over-fishing, climate change and declining oil stocks, the course shows that most environmental problems can be solved through the adoption of policies crafted with the careful application of economic reasoning. Co-taught with ENV-7013B.

ENV-6012B

20

NETWORKS

This module examines networks and how they are designed and implemented to provide reliable data transmission. A layered approach is taken in the study of networks with emphasis given to the functionality of the traditional OSI 7 layer reference model and the TCP/IP model. Week-by-week the module examines the functionality provided by each layer and how this contributes to the overall reliable data transmission that the network provides. Underlying theory behind each layer is studied and then examples given as to how this is used in practice - for example within voice over IP (VoIP). An emphasis is placed on practical issues associated with networking such as real-time delivery of multimedia information and network security. The coursework tends to be highly practical and underpins the theory learnt in lectures.
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CMP-6009B

20

OCEAN CIRCULATION

This module gives you an understanding of the physical processes occurring in the basin-scale ocean environment. We will introduce and discuss large scale global ocean circulation, including gyres, boundary currents and the overturning circulation. Major themes include the interaction between ocean and atmosphere, and the forces which drive ocean circulation. You should be familiar with partial differentiation, integration, handling equations and using calculators. Co-taught with ENV-MA39

ENV-5016A

20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The topics covered in the module include an introduction to organic synthesis, carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, aromaticity, heterocyclic chemistry, and stereochemistry and mechanism. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5101A

20

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES

This module starts by considering the concept of retrosynthetic analysis. Strategies for the disconnection and synthesis of complex molecular targets will be considered. An introduction to Asymmetric Synthesis follows, which covers nomenclature, synthesis using "chiral pool" starting materials, chiral auxiliaries and catalytic asymmetric synthesis. Organometallic chemistry is covered next, giving particular emphasis to transition metal catalysis and mediated processes. This part of the course surveys new methods for bond formation and provides practice in the skills detailed in the planning and execution of syntheses of complex organic target molecules. The course is completed by looking at the application of sulfur, selenium and silicon to modern organic chemistry.

CHE-6101Y

20

ORGANISMS AND ENVIRONMENT

This module examines responses to the individual plants and animals, and their populations, to important aspects of terrestrial and aquatic environments that are determinants of distribution and abundance. It investigates in depth the extent to which physiological, metabolic and morphological responses may confer evolutionary fitness, particularly in extreme environments. Some of the environmental constraints covered act by imposing deficiencies of essential resources or conditions (e.g. water, essential ions, oxygen, carbon, light and temperature), whereas others are the result of toxicity, either natural or resulting from human activity (e.g. metal ions, salinity, acidity and organic industrial pollutants). The module will lead you through more fundamental aspects of ecology to consider their application in seeking to meet the multiple challenges of pollution and climate change.

BIO-6015A

20

PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY

This module investigates the geological evidence for major environmental changes through Earth history. It will explore selected topics that relate to the extent, timing and causes of past variations of climate as expressed through changes in the fossil and geological record. Lectures will draw on information from marine, ice core, terrestrial and lacustrine climate archives. Radiometric dating techniques and geochemical/quantitative methods of palaeoenvironmental reconstruction will be examined in practical classes. The module includes half-day excursions to examine key geological field sites in East Anglia. Co-taught with ENV-7017B. STUDENTS MUST TAKE EITHER ENV-5013B EARTH SYSTEM GEOCHEMISTRY OR ENV-5011A SEDIMENTOLOGY PRIOR TO TAKING THIS MODULE

ENV-6017A

20

PARTICIPATORY ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION-MAKING

This module explores the rise of deliberative and participatory approaches to science and decision-making as one of the most significant recent developments in the environmental field. It examines: the theories, rationales and methods of participatory environmental decision-making (PEDM); their application in different institutional, social and geographical contexts; evaluation of participatory process effectiveness; and emerging critiques of participation. There is an emphasis on case studies to address these themes, developing practical as well as theoretical understandings of participatory approaches, and associated skills in facilitating environmental deliberation. Co-taught with ENV-7015B.

ENV-6014B

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

The module covers a number of the fundamental areas of physical chemistry which are essential for a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include chemical kinetics, the second law of thermodynamics, thermodynamics and properties of solutions and surface chemistry/catalysis. The module includes laboratory work.

CHE-5201Y

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

The module covers fundamental material in Physical Chemistry including statistical thermodynamics, plus specialist topics such as lasers and photochemistry, diffraction methods, interfacial kinetics and dynamic electrochemistry.

CHE-6201Y

20

PHYSICS OF MUSIC

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music. We begin by developing some of the essential physics of wave motion and defining sound measurement terms. This equips us to analyse the physics of stringed instruments (bowed, plucked and struck), woodwind instruments, brass instruments, percussion instruments and the acoustics of singing. We also look at tuning systems, human hearing, and the physics of sound in rooms. Lab-classes include an introduction to MATLAB to enable you to record and analyse the sound of your own instrument, which constitutes the coursework. A-level standard of mathematics is preferred, but anyone without this level who is prepared to work a little to enhance their understanding of mathematics in one or two areas will be able to take this module.

NAT-5003A

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

This module aims to provide an appreciation of modern plant biology with an emphasis on development, signalling and response to the environment. It consists of practical classes and lectures. It encompasses molecular genetics, molecular, biochemical and physiological perspectives, and affords an understanding of aspects of plant and plant cell function including photosynthesis and the mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic environments.

BIO-5006A

20

POLLUTION, TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY

Multidisciplinary module about problems of managing pollution, focussing on regional and urban issues, this module will unashamedly shift viewpoint between chemical, legislative, economic, historical and social interpretations of pollution.

ENV-6003B

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of other second level CMP modules.
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CMP-5020B

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

This module gives an introduction to computer systems and to programming using Java. The module assumes no prior knowledge of programming and is aimed at the non-specialist. This module is an alternative pre-requisite for a number of other second level CMP modules.
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CMP-5020B

20

PROTEIN STRUCTURE, CHEMISTRY AND ENGINEERING

An introduction to the diversity of protein structures, their properties and to interactions between proteins and metal ions. Lectures cover protein structure, protein stability and folding, molecular modelling, the chemical principles of protein-metal interactions, spectroscopic techniques for studying protein metal centres, and the techniques employed in protein structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Covers how protein structures can be altered by biological and chemical procedures, and the principles underlying the design of proteins for specific tasks. Topics include the creation of artificial enzymes though the use of peptide dendrimers and of artificial metallo-enzymes by non-covalent insertion of a metallocomplexes into protein scaffolds. Examples of engineered proteins designed for a range of industrial and medical uses are considered.

CHE-6601Y

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS AND COMBINATORICS

Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory.

MTHF5014Y

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5015Y

20

QUANTUM THEORY AND SYMMETRY

CHE-5250Y

20

REPRESENTATION THEORY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C3Y Definition and basic properties of complex representations of a finite group. Examples, Regular representations. Maschke's Theorem. Characters, and character tables. Cyclic groups, abelian groups, 1-dimensional representations. Direct sums and tensor products. Schur's Lemma, orthogonality relations, the number of irreducibles. Induced representations, Frobenius Reciprocity. Examples and applications.

MTHD6016B

20

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

This module aims to bring an understanding of how science is disseminated to the public. Students on the module will be made aware of the theories surrounding learning and communication. They will investigate science as a culture and how this culture interfaces with the public. Students will examine case studies in a variety of different scientific areas. They will look at how information is released in scientific literature and how this is subsequently picked up by the public press. They will gain an appreciation of how science information can be used to change public perception and how it can sometimes be misinterpreted. Students will also learn practical skills by designing, running and evaluating a public outreach event at a school or in a public area. OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS REGISTERED IN THE SCIENCE FACULTY.

BIO-6018Y

20

SEDIMENTOLOGY

Sedimentary rocks contain many of the world's natural resources and cover much of the Earth's surface, record the Earth's history, and contain the fossil record. Sedimentology includes the study of modern sediments such as sand, mud and carbonates and the processes that result in their deposition. Understanding of modern processes is used to interpret ancient sedimentary rocks and sedimentary structures. The module will cover sedimentary fluid dynamics; modern sediments from deserts, rivers, the coast and deep ocean, the differences between siliciclastic and carbonate rocks; biological influence on sedimentary processes and stratigraphy (the study of the physical and temporal relationships between rock layers). This module replaces ENV-2A85.

ENV-5011A

20

SHELF SEA DYNAMICS AND COASTAL PROCESSES

This module will explore physical processes in the ocean, building on what you learnt in ENV-5016A Ocean Circulation. There will be a focus on applications of ocean physics to shelf seas. Topics will include: Tide generation, forces, harmonic tidal analysis of time series, propagation in shallow seas; Surface and internal waves, their role in air-sea exchange and upper ocean mixing; Role of tides and internal waves in global ocean mixing; Impact of ocean physics on biogeochemical processes, including seasonal phytoplankton blooms and shelf sea fronts; Remote sensing of sea surface temperature and chlorophyll shelf seas. Estuarine circulation and sediment transport; Applications of ocean physics to water quality and pollution monitoring; Role of ocean science in the marine energy industry. This module is designed to follow on from ENV-5016A, which is a pre-requisite. We strongly recommend that you also gain experience of marine fieldwork by taking the 20-credit biennial ENVK5020A Marine Sciences fieldcourse, next running in June 2013.

ENV-5017B

20

SOCIAL EVOLUTION

Life is organised hierarchically. Genes aggregate in cells, cells aggregate in organisms, and organisms aggregate in societies. Recent developments in evolutionary biology have defined each step in the formation of this hierarchy as representing a major evolutionary transition in which a new type of individuality has arisen. Common principles of social evolution underlie evolution at each step in the hierarchy. Hence, the study of the evolution of altruism and cooperation has broadened out from the study of animal societies alone, and now embraces the fundamental hierarchical structure common to all life. This module will investigate this new vision of social evolution. It will consider which principles of social evolution underlie each hierarchical step and show how applying this approach illuminates our understanding of life's diversity and organisation, with examples ranging from intracellular selfish genetic elements to societies of insects and mammals.

BIO-6011B

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 2

Industrial software development is seldom started from scratch, companies generally have large systems of legacy software that need to be maintained, improved and extended. This module focuses on advanced software engineering topics, such as reverse engineering to understand legacy software, refactoring and design patterns to improve the design of software systems and developing new software products using third-party software components. Assessment will be done by a group project which consists of a design and analysis task, and the group implementation task of a software project. Confidence in Java programming language skills as well as software engineering practice (phased development with agile methods, Unified Modeling Language, test-driven development) are pre-requisites. Software Engineering I (2M02) is required for this module.
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CMP-6010B

20

SOIL PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

This module will combine lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork to provide students with an appreciation of the soil environment and the processes that occurs within it. The module will progress through: basic soil components/properties; soil identification and classification; soil as a habitat; soil organisms; soil functions; the agricultural environment; soil-organism-agrochemical interaction; soil contamination; soil and climate change.

ENV-5012A

20

SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometers. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-4002Y Mathematics for Scientists A or equivalent).

ENV-5004B

20

SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS WITH FIELDCOURSE

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometres. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. The fieldcourse provides "hands-on" experience of the various techniques and applications, adding on valuable practical skills. This module is highly valued by employers in industry; guest industrial lecturers will cover the current 'state-of-the-art' applications in real world situations. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-1A61 Mathematics for Scientists I, ENV-1A62 Mathematics for Scientists II or equivalent).

ENVK5005B

20

SOUND AND IMAGE 2

This module continues the exploration of computer processing of sound and image signals begun in Sound and Image I. In the "sound" component, we focus on speech processing, a technology that has already had a huge impact and holds great promise for the future. We cover: 1) speech-coding, which enables us to understand how one of the most significant technologies of recent times (the mobile telephone) is able to transmit speech at a low data-rate; 2) speech recognition, which is now becoming commonplace in interactive voice systems; and 3) speech synthesis. In the "image" component, we focus on the analysis of image signals and learn how to apply advanced filtering and enhancement techniques to images to restore them, and the basics of computer vision systems. These concepts are re-enforced with practical coursework, which gives students hands-on experience of processing audio and video signals.
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CMP-6026A

20

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

This module considers various activities associated with the development of all types of computer based information systems including project management, feasibility, investigation, analysis, logical and physical design, and the links to file design, software design, and user interface design. It makes use of a number of analysis and design tools and techniques in order to produce readable system specifications. Students are introduced to a number of development methods including structured, object oriented, soft systems, participative, iterative and rapid approaches.
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CMP-5003A

20

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

This module draws together a wide range of material and considers it in the context of developing modern large-scale computer systems. Topics such as Outsourcing, Process Improvement, System Failure, Project Management, Configuration Management, Maintainability, Legacy Systems and Re-engineering, Acceptance and Performance Testing, Metrics and Human Factors are covered in this module. The module is supported by a series of industrial case studies and includes speakers from industry.
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CMP-6003B

20

THE CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the greenhouse gas that has, by far, the greatest impact on climate change. CO2 is becoming even more important to climate owing to continued, escalating use of fossil fuel energy and CO2's very long lifetime in the atmosphere. Predicting future climate or defining 'dangerous' climate change is challenging, in large part because the Earth's carbon cycle is very complex and not fully understood. You will learn about the atmospheric, oceanic and land components of the carbon cycle, how they interact with each other, and how they interact with climate in so-called 'feedbacks'. We also cover pressing global issues such as ocean acidification, ocean deoxygenation, geo-engineering the climate and how to get off our fossil fuel 'addiction'. The understanding of the carbon cycle gained from this module is an important foundation for all climate change research. Emphasis is given to the most recent, cutting-edge research in the field. Co-taught with ENV-7007A.

ENV-6008A

20

THE COMPUTING REVOLUTION

The module is designed to provide students with an overview of the history of computing, the current state-of-the-art in a number of areas, and an insight into likely developments. Students consider social and ethical implications of use of computing technology along with security and safety of computing systems. Research techniques, report writing and team skills are developed.
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CMP-5008A

20

THEORETICAL COMPUTING

This module provides an introduction to computing theory. Topics covered include an introduction to formal language theory, complexity analysis of algorithms, and formal correctness proofs. CMPC1F01 is a minimum prerequisite; students who have done this module are advised to take CMPC2F01 before taking CMPC2F02.
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CMP-5007B

20

THEORY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Environmental assessment is a term used to describe procedures for evaluating the potential environmental consequences of policies, programmes, plans and projects. It is a well established tool for environmental policy integration, being routinely employed in more than 100 nations and by many international aid and funding agencies. This multidisciplinary module focuses on the theory and methods of environmental assessment and the decision-making contexts in which they are employed. It explains the procedural stages of, and selected methodologies for, environmental assessment and provides practical experience in applying them. This module replaces ENV-3A65. Co-taught with ENV-7020A.

ENV-6019A

20

THEORY OF FINITE GROUPS

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE MTH-2C3Y Group theory is the mathematical study of symmetry. The modern treatment of this is group actions and these are a central theme of this course. We will begin with permutation groups, group actions and the orbit-stabilizer theorem with many applications. This is followed by a discussion of the Sylow theorems, the class equations and an elementary theory of p-groups. Further topics include the theorem of Jordan and Hoelder, solvable groups and simple. Simplicity of finite and infinite alternating groups.

MTHD6014A

20

TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS

Elementary number theory: Congruences, prime factorisation, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, Pell's equation, continued fractions, Gaussian integers, sums of squares, elliptic curves. Quantum mechanics: The motion of very small systems such as atoms does not satisfy the equations of classical mechanics. For example an electron orbiting a nucleus can only have certain discrete energy levels. In quantum mechancis the motion of a particle is described by a wave function which describes the probability of the particle having a certain energy. Topics addressed in this module include: Wave Functions, Schrodinger's Equation, Uncertainty Principle, Wave Scattering, Harmonic Oscillators. Combinatorics: The module is about Counting Things. We will cover: binomial coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion principle, compositions, the pigeonhole principle and Ramsey Theory. Mathematical Modelling: This module will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry.

MTHF5017Y

40

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level: AAA or AABB including two science subjects from preferred list
  • International Baccalaureate: 34 points including two HL science subject from preferred list at 6
  • Scottish Highers: AAAAA
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAA
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAAAA
  • Access Course: Distinction in 45 credits at level 3, inc 24 level 3 credits in two Science subjects
  • BTEC: DDD - with Distinction in a minimum of 12 science units
  • European Baccalaureate: 85%

Entry Requirement

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.0 overall (minimum 5.5 in any component)
  • TOEFL: Internet-based score of 79 overall (minimum 20 in Speaking component, 17 in Writing and Listening components and 18 in Reading components.
  • PTE: 55 overall (minimum 51 in any component).

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in General Science FS1

International Foundation in Pharmacy, Biomedicine and Health FS2

International Foundation in Physical Sciences and Mathematics FS3 

Interviews

Interviews are required as part of the selection process.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

We ask our applicants to have at least two of the following subjects to A2-level or equivalent: Biology; Chemistry; Physics; Mathematics or Further Mathematics; Environmental Science or Geography or Geology; and Information and Communication Technology.

General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact us for further information.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English Language at Grade C or above.

  • A Level: AAA or AABB including two science subjects from preferred list
  • International Baccalaureate: 34 points including two HL science subject from preferred list at 6
  • Scottish Highers: AAAAA
  • Scottish Advanced Highers: AAA
  • Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAAAA
  • Access Course: Distinction in 45 credits at level 3, inc 24 level 3 credits in two Science subjects
  • BTEC: DDD - with Distinction in a minimum of 12 science units
  • European Baccalaureate: 85%

Entry Requirement

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.0 overall (minimum 5.5 in any component)
  • TOEFL: Internet-based score of 79 overall (minimum 20 in Speaking component, 17 in Writing and Listening components and 18 in Reading components.
  • PTE: 55 overall (minimum 51 in any component).

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in General Science FS1

International Foundation in Pharmacy, Biomedicine and Health FS2

International Foundation in Physical Sciences and Mathematics FS3 

Interviews

Interviews are required as part of the selection process.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

We ask our applicants to have at least two of the following subjects to A2-level or equivalent: Biology; Chemistry; Physics; Mathematics or Further Mathematics; Environmental Science or Geography or Geology; and Information and Communication Technology.

General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact us for further information.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English Language at Grade C or above.

Fees and Funding

 

Undergraduate University Fees

We are committed to ensuring that Tuition Fees do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds.  Full time UK/EU students starting an undergraduate degree course in 2014 will be charged a tuition fee of £9,000.  The level of fee may be subject to yearly increases.  Full time International students starting an undergraduate degree course in 2014 will be charged a tuition fee of £15,900. The level of fee may be subject to yearly increases.

Scholarships and Bursaries

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit http://www.uea.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/finance/university-financial-support      

International Students

50th Anniversary Scholarships

 

We recently celebrated our 50th anniversary and to mark this we want to give our international undergraduate students an exciting opportunity.  Once you have an offer from UEA for September 2014, you can apply for our anniversary scholarship. We will award 20 undergraduate students with scholarships covering 50% of the first year’s tuition fee.

Faculty of Science International Scholarships

In addition to this the Faculty of Science is also pleased to announce it has a number of scholarships for international undergraduate offer holders for September 2014 entry.

To find out if you are eligible for these scholarships and for details of how to apply please click here - www.uea.ac.uk/study/international/fees-and-funding/international-undergraduate-scholarships


How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Sign up for myUEA to...

  • request a copy of our latest prospectus and subject brochures
  • get access to exclusive information personalised to your interests
  • keep up to date with news and events at UEA.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International webpages.

 

Full-Time Degrees

Applications to Full-Time Undergraduate degrees at the University of East Anglia must be made through UCAS by going to www.ucas.ac.uk

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

Part-Time Degrees

The University of East Anglia offers some of its undergraduate degrees on a part-time basis. The application form for part-time study can be found at: http://www.uea.ac.uk/courses/parttimestudy. For further information on the part-time application process, please contact the relevant Faculty Office:

Faculty of Arts and Humanities: ug.hum.admiss@uea.ac.uk 
Faculty of Science: sci.admiss@uea.ac.uk 
Faculty of Health: nam.admissions@uea.ac.uk

Each year we hold a series of Open Days, where potential applicants to our Undergraduate courses can come and visit the university to learn more about the courses they are interested in, meet current students and staff and tour our campus. If you decide to apply for a course and are made an offer, you will be invited to a School specific Visit Day. Applicants may be invited for interview or audition for some courses.

For enquiries about the content of the degree or your qualifications please contact Admissions at 01603 591515 or email admissions@uea.ac.uk We can then direct your enquiry to the relevant department to assist you.

If you wish to view the courses available, view our online prospectus or order a hard copy prospectus please visit www.uea.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate