BA International Development with Overseas Experience


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
L922
A-Level typical
ABB (2017/8 entry) See All Requirements
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“Being able to develop my own field of expertise at UEA really enabled me to take a holistic approach on development, which changed my perception on the topic and enriched my knowledge and future career plans.”

In their words

Holger Vogt, Business Development Officer, Bahrain Economic Development Board

The BA (Hons) International Development degree with Overseas Experience is ideal for those primarily interested in the social, political, and economic dimensions of international development. It tackles diverse issues such as poverty, gender inequality, conflict and economic growth. It also gives you the option of taking natural resource modules that examine the sustainability and governance of issues such as soil, water, food production and fisheries.

Overview

“There is the opportunity to do a Development Work Experience abroad, which gives students a unique chance to apply the methods and theories learnt to actually doing development work in practice.”

  • Angelika Marning, BA International Development with Overseas Experience graduate

The BA International Development degree programme focuses on the social, political, and economic dimensions of international development. The course tackles a diverse range of topics, covering issues such as poverty, gender inequality, conflict and economic growth. Alongside this you have the opportunity to study natural resource modules, examining the sustainability and governance of soils, water, food production, fisheries and more.

The programme enables you to develop a thorough understanding of contemporary issues in international development, and of academic disciplines relevant to the study of development (eg anthropology, politics, economics, geography). You will also have the chance to develop a range of skills valued by employers, including the ability to analyse data, prepare reports, give presentations, and work as part of a team. Our flexible approach to learning enables you to explore your interests and strengths, graduating with a world-class degree in international development.

Course Structure

The first year provides an introduction to key themes in international development and teaches you how evidence is used in development policy. The degree programme becomes more flexible in years two and three, allowing you to combine a variety of modules focusing on various topics, regions and themes.

Year 1

In your first year you will be introduced to contemporary debates and issues in international development. You will take two compulsory core modules – ‘Introduction to Development Studies’ and ‘Evidence in Development’. Alongside these modules, you will choose three optional modules from a diverse range provided by the School. These include ‘Introduction to Economics of Development’, ‘Introduction to Human Geography', and 'Social Anthropology and International Development 1'.

Year 2

In your second year you will start to tailor your learning and will select and continue with two main subject areas, chosen from anthropology, politics, economics, natural resources and geography. You will also be able to choose from a range of optional modules, including ‘Gender and Development’, ‘Communication for Development’ and ‘Latin American Development.’

You will also study research methods, and there is the opportunity to study a module from a different School, such as a foreign language.

Year 3

During your third year you will write a dissertation on a development topic of your own choice, supervised by an academic with expertise in your chosen area of research. In addition to this you will continue to define your own learning, selecting a number of optional modules from a diverse range that will include ‘Wars and Humanitarian Crises’, ‘Education and Development,’ or a module from another School.

In the spring semester you will have the opportunity to choose modules from an alternative range, including 'Globalisation and Economic Development', 'Urban Geographies', 'Resource Development and Conservation' and 'Engaging Anthropology in Development' amongst others. You can also opt to do a work placement in the UK, or take a vocational skills module, 'Development in Practice'.

Assessment

A combination of coursework and unseen written examination is used to assess your progress. Coursework typically consists of two of the following: an essay, an exam or course test, a quantitative assignment, a practical assignment and an assessed presentation. The dissertation is highly weighted and is the most significant opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate your skills in interdisciplinary analysis in a self-motivated study.

Where Next?

You will graduate with specialist and practical skills needed for a successful career in the UK or overseas. Many of our graduates work in development, including roles in:

  • United Nations World Food Programme
  • British Red Cross
  • Government (both UK and foreign)

Others use the academic and transferable skills gained for careers in business, the voluntary and public sector, community development, environment, and media. 

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT AND GEOGRAPHY

The Evidence in International Development (EID) module is closely integrated with the DEV-4001A Introduction to Development Studies (IDS) module taken by all students. This module focuses on the role of evidence in understanding the themes introduced in IDS. We aim to provide a basic introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods; introduce key concepts in maths and statistics relevant to the study of international development and human geography; provide training in use of important technology such as Geographical Information Systems, Statistical Software and online collaboration tools; and to provide a foundation in the key academic skills expected at university including writing, reading and thinking critically, using UEA Library services and computing systems and developing effective oral communication and teamwork skills. Learning by doing is the central teaching approach and throughout the term students will apply ideas from classes to their work on two projects. One of these is on a topic from the IDS module. There is only one lecture; most sessions are interactive workshops, complemented by IT lab sessions.

DEV-4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, human geography and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress.

DEV-4001A

40

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module introduces students to the main macro- and micro-economic issues of development. It lays the foundations for the modules Microeconomics of Development and Macroeconomics of Development. The main theories of development will be reviewed. Central issues related to poverty, human capital development, the environment, globalisation, balance of payments and financial systems will also be covered.

DEV-4003B

20

INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module introduces geographical approaches to the key processes of change that shape our world and its societies. You will examine how people and places are connected and transformed as a result of processes such as colonialism, globalisation, industrialisation, migration, urbanisation and development, and explore how differences and inequalities emerge. A central theme will be why space matters, as people's lives are influenced by the places that surround them - both near and far - and as they in turn change those places. These issues will be explored through a range of contemporary geographical topics, from sweatshops to climate change, through which you will be introduced to core geographical concepts, ideas and approaches, emphasising on critical thinking and practice. The module will also cover key methods for geographical research, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and will include field-based practical work in the local area.

DEV-4007B

20

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS

This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The course has an integrated biophysical core and also deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4004B

20

INTRODUCTION TO THE POLITICS OF DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an introduction to political concepts and frameworks that are central to the study of international development. Through studying theoretical approaches students will gain the foundations required to critically evaluate contemporary development debates and development policy and practice.

DEV-4009B

20

MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT 1: HUMANITARIAN COMMUNICATION

This module will critically explore changing trends in humanitarian communication by both the international news media and international development actors, such as NGOs. This will include a critical review of media representations of development in the Global South and the role and responsibility of journalists reporting about humanitarian crises and poverty. We will also explore conventional strategies of humanitarian communication, such as 'pornography of poverty', as well as more contemporary issues such as the role of celebrities, social media and the rise of 'post-humanitarian' communication. With case studies ranging from Live Aid to Kony 2012, you will be introduced to key concepts and theoretical approaches cutting across a range of disciplines. This module also contains an integral practical skills component. Speakers from leading NGOs and experienced practitioners will share their insights about the everyday complexities of humanitarian communication and a number of workshops will focus on a relevant hands-on skills such blogging, writing a press release, and the basics of photography.

DEV-4008B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1

This is the first part of a two-year integrated course that covers basic principles from the social sciences, and uses them to think critically about processes of social change in developing countries. SAID1 provides an introduction to social analysis and is framed by the study of social anthropology. Concepts and methods are explained through the use of indepth case studies which from a range of developing country contexts. Issues covered in the course include: kinship, religion, violence, labour, politics and resistance. As well as introducing students to classical anthropological texts the course engages with the work of anthropologists looking at issues of contemporary development and change.

DEV-4005B

20

Students must study the following modules for credits:

Name Code Credits

Students will select 80 credits from the following modules:

During their 2nd year, students continue with two out of the four disciplinary streams in DEV: Economics, Natural Resources, Social Anthropology and Politics, and Geography

Name Code Credits

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 2: Microeconomics

Economics for Development II (Microeconomics) introduces students to basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomic theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets and households are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. In addition to conventional microeconomic principles, insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered.

DEV-5016A

20

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 3: Macroeconomics

The course introduces students to the main macroeconomic issues of development. The first part of the unit covers long-run macroeconomics, with a particular focus on economic growth, while the second part focuses on short-run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. The unit will be a combination of theory and evidence/discussion, relating theoretical arguments with recent macroeconomic phenomena, such as the recent global economic crisis and the current debates on climate change. More specific topics include the government budget and fiscal policy, inflation and monetary policy, trade and the balance of payments, exchange rates and capital flows, long-term economic growth, gender, institutions, and physical, human and natural capital.

DEV-5017B

20

GEOGRAPHIES OF DEVELOPMENT

What is uneven development and why should we care about it? How did uneven development emerge, and what can we do about it? This module focuses on how geographers have engaged with these questions, drawing on three perspectives within geographical thinking. We start by exploring the unevenness of economic activity. We examine the evidence for 'natural advantage' and explore how the broadly-neoclassical 'New Economic Geography' School has sought to understand the spatiality of economic activity. But some geographers have argued that capitalism itself is the cause of uneven development, so we investigate their arguments in the context of work on the restructuring of cities and the neoliberalization of nature. You will be introduced to Marxist theory and invited to critique it. Following this, we turn our attention to society, and particularly how civil society and ordinary people have tried to address, contest and resist uneven development. We conclude by considering what the future might hold for both spatial difference and the geographies of development.

DEV-5010B

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 2

This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, variability and stability, change and degradation etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management of natural resources. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. The module also develops students' understanding of and experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5012A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 3

This module continues to explore and develop the themes covered in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development and Natural Resources And Development 2 and exposes students to a number of new quantitative data collection and analysis tools to analyze and interpret data sets. The module also introduces some conceptual and management approaches to natural resources. The module focuses on the understanding of climate and water as resources and agricultural research and agricultural systems. The module is taught around themes of: quantifying natural resources - the water balance; managing water resources - supply and demand; dealing with environmental variability; agricultural research and innovation; and participation processes and users of outputs.

DEV-5013B

20

PEOPLE AND PLACE

This module analyses two key questions about people, place and space: how and why people's health varies in different development settings; and the links between development processes and people's migration. The ways that migration affects health are also examined. The module begins by analysing global patterns of health and development, and a framework for analysing the social determinants of health, including risk levels of non-communicable diseases across many parts of the world, and broad patterns of health inequality. The social determinants of health and risk environments are then examined in detail, , focusing on how social relations (related to class, occupation, gender, ethnicity, colonial history), operating across different spaces, generate susceptibility to health risks in particular places. The examples of HIV and TB are used to illustrate the ways social processes cerate risk environments. The module also looks at places where good health has been achieved and why. The module provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. The module also develops understanding of the factors driving migration, such as labour relations, conflict or climate change and how these population movements influence men and women, risk environments and their health and well-being?

DEV-5011A

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This political analysis for development module focuses on core principles in politics and their application to development analysis, covering topics that include power and resistance, states and nations, citizenship and justice, violence and non-violence, democratisation and electoral systems and the role of the media. The various topics will be taught with intensive reference to theory but also integrated with empirical material, both historical and contemporary in nature. It is taught through a combination of lectures, facilitated reading groups, video sessions and student-led seminars.

DEV-5008B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or AMAA4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014A

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other units, ii) to become critical readers of Published quantitative data analysis and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with sampling approaches, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and linear regression.

DEV-5002A

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In RMSA we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. It aims the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. It offers a historical perspective on how climate has influenced society, on how global climate change has developed as a scientific object of enquiry, and on the difficulties and controversies over policies and politics on this issue, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. The course gives grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the theoretical and empirical development of contemporary environmental politics. It is structured to analyse these issues from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on dynamic examples of environmental politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module encourages and supports student-led learning by enabling students to develop their own theoretical interpretations of real world examples of politics. These are explored in seminar presentations and in an extended (4000 word) case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics/social sciences.

ENV-5002B

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAID 2 anthropology modulewhere disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GEOGRAPHY FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The course includes UK fieldwork as well as an overseas field trip to Chile, Kenya or India. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BA GEOGRAPHY STUDENTS, THOUGH STUDENTS ON OTHER RELEVANT PROGRAMMES ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-5016B

20

GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of the intermediate course in Arabic (PPLB5035A). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

An intermediate course in Greek for those students who have taken Beginners' Greek I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

A continuation of Intermediate Greek I. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT 2: COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? This module will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, community media, press freedom, media literacy, entertainment education and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to DEV students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

DEV-5015A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN LANGUAGE 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A, or equivalent to B1 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN LANGUAGE 1/II

A continuation of post A-Level German I consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading of texts and discussion of relevant topics. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German', depending on student interest and enrolment.) Not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4021B

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investiages the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST

This module provides a historical background to the Middle East and its politics. It is concerned with politics within the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. The module encourages students to think critically about the links between some key concepts in the comparative politics of non-Western countries, including historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/neo-colonialism, the role of culture and identity and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

HIS-5048B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6007Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

This module provides students with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. Students are expected to fund their own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The school has a database of projects to assist students with their project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (July) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). As a 20 credit module students are expected to work for a minimum of 2 months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing (750 words) about the placement;, and an essay of 2500 words related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6004A

20

OVERSEAS STUDY UNIT

This overseas based module is designed to enable students to undertake courses of study approved by the School and organised in association with overseas institutions of learning. The assessment is based on a 2500 word essay on a subject to be agreed with the OSU convenor. The subject will normally be thematically linked to the content of the course of study overseas. Students will also have to pass local exams and complete and pass other forms of local assessments at their host university. The work burden should be equivalent to a 20 credit module at UEA, i.e. around 4-8 hours a week. THIS IS RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6002A

20

Students will select 40 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Students must not take more than 20 credits of Level 5 modules in their 3rd year.

Name Code Credits

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

RDC aims to use recent research and practical experience in the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis of critical challenges in resource development and conservation in the developing world. Specifically, themes such as the relation between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control are examined through discussions of theory and the use of case studies, in order to develop an understanding of their natural and social science, and policy dimensions. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-6005B

20

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-6009B

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

ENGAGING ANTHROPOLOGY IN DEVELOPMENT

The unit will be taught in small groups of 10, and on a seminar basis. It will run across the year, starting in week 3 of Semester 1, to allow returning DWE students to enrol. Fortnightly seminars will allow reading and preparation time and will take a number of formats but emphasis is on student engagement and active participation. EAD will take up dominant approaches and intervention in current development projects, programming and policy, and show the ways in which social anthropology offers insights into actors and practices, the formation of policy, the successes and failures of interventions and the outcomes and impacts of development work. It will also develop the applied analytical skills and competencies that are expected of social anthropologists employed by development agencies and enhance employability. The content will include sessions on both broad cross sectoral themes such as: Policy discourses through an anthropological lens and doing discourse analysis; institutional priors in development practice; analysing development institutions; recognising development actors and subjectivities; rights discourses and consequences; evidence-based policy in development knowledges; interdisciplinary consultancy/advisory teams and anthropological knowledges. As well more sectoral approaches showing how anthropology engages with humanitarian interventions; the consequences of economic policy modalities; climate change interventions; educational 'quality' beliefs, and good governance and anti-corruption. Specific foci will depend on the particular teaching team, but in the pool specified we have a wide range of expertise to share with students. The content would complement that in PPW and DIP, neither of which is specifically anthropological.

DEV-6008Y

20

FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-6001A

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAID 2 anthropology modulewhere disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Economics of Development (DEV-5012Y). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-6006B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT 2: COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? This module will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, community media, press freedom, media literacy, entertainment education and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to DEV students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

DEV-5015A

20

PUBLIC POLICY AND WELFARE

This inter-disciplinary module is organized around the following themes: i) the politics of public and social policy; ii) poverty, livelihoods and international organisations; iii) migration and the International Labour Organisation; iv) fair trade, consumer movements and corporate social responsibility; v) Trade Unions and NGOs; vi) the media and public policy; and vii) health. Using a relational approach to development, it analyses the changing and uneven conditions of the working poor in the developing world, combining examination of their conditions in different countries and regions with critical analysis of the activities of international organisations, the media, consumer movements and organisations of the working poor.

DEV-6008B

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investiages the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

URBAN GEOGRAPHIES

This module will examine the historical and contemporary development and governance of urban centres around the globe. In order to understand these processes, we will explore both the structure of human settlements and the multiple relationships and processes that shape and reshape urban spaces. We will examine the changing environmental, political, social, and economic dynamics of cities and smaller urban centres, drawing on case studies from the global north and the global south. The module will cover a range of concepts and topics which have preoccupied urban geographers, including: urbanization and urban growth patterns; urban economic restructuring and neoliberalism; urban infrastructure; poverty and inequality; informality; migration; citizenship; urban nature; urban environmental governance; and urban planning and regeneration. A one-day field trip is an integral part of the module.

DEV-6010B

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of WHC is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; strategies and challenges of peace-building; and the strengths and weaknesses of institutional design as a conflict management tool, including territorial solutions to violent conflicts and the establishment of power-sharing arrangements.

DEV-6003A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students must not take more than 20 credits of Level 5 modules in their 3rd year.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. It offers a historical perspective on how climate has influenced society, on how global climate change has developed as a scientific object of enquiry, and on the difficulties and controversies over policies and politics on this issue, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. The course gives grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

ENERGY AND PEOPLE

This module will introduce students to a range of social science perspectives on the inter-relationships between energy and people. The module begins by tracing the history and development of energy intensive societies and everyday lives as a means of understanding how energy has emerged as a key sustainability problem. The second part of the module then introduces some theories of social and technical change and uses these to critically analyse a range of people-based solutions to energy problems - including behaviour change initiatives, domestic energy efficiency technologies, and community-scale renewables - that are currently being tried and tested around the world. TEACHING AND LEARNING The module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars involving group projects, peer discussions, practical exercises and student-led learning. The lectures (2 per week) will introduce students to some core theoretical ideas about the relationships between energy and people, as well as examining a series of people-based solutions to energy problems that have been attempted around the world. The seminar sessions (1 per week) will give students the opportunity to engage with the lecture content in more depth through a range of exercises designed to promote discussion with both course lecturers and peers. Essential readings will be identified for each lecture. To do well in the module students will need to demonstrate that they have engaged extensively with the literature in this area, particularly regarding the 'real world' implications of theoretical ideas and debates. CAREER PROSPECTS Contemporary energy problems are a key concern of central and local government policy, business activities, charity and community work and wider public debates. A key reason why existing solutions to these problems either fail or are not as effective as at first assumed, is that they are often based on a poor understanding of how people use and engage with energy in the course of their everyday lives. Improving students' understanding of the relationships between energy and people and providing them with the intellectual tools necessarily to critically assess energy problems and potential solutions will therefore give them with a significant advantage in this growing job market. In addition to enhancing employability in the specific area of energy, this module will also provide students with a range of key transferable skills that will help them secure gainful employment on completion of their undergraduate degree. These include: developing analytical and critical thinking skills; understanding how to work effectively in teams; advocacy and negotiation skills; developing creative approaches to presentation; and presenting work to different audiences.

ENV-6026B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the theoretical and empirical development of contemporary environmental politics. It is structured to analyse these issues from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on dynamic examples of environmental politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module encourages and supports student-led learning by enabling students to develop their own theoretical interpretations of real world examples of politics. These are explored in seminar presentations and in an extended (4000 word) case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics/social sciences.

ENV-5002B

20

GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of the intermediate course in Arabic (PPLB5035A). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

An intermediate course in Greek for those students who have taken Beginners' Greek I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

A continuation of Intermediate Greek I. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

Have you ever wondered why human economic activity seems to be so bad for the environment? Does it have to be like that? Is it possible for human beings to enjoy high standards of living and a high quality environment? Through the study of the principles of Environmental Economics this course sets out to answer those questions. Addressing a wide-range of economy-environment problems including car pollution, over-fishing, climate change and declining oil stocks, the course shows that most environmental problems can be solved through the adoption of policies crafted with the careful application of economic reasoning.

ENV-6012B

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST

This module provides a historical background to the Middle East and its politics. It is concerned with politics within the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. The module encourages students to think critically about the links between some key concepts in the comparative politics of non-Western countries, including historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/neo-colonialism, the role of culture and identity and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

HIS-5048B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Course Director - Prof Cecile Jackson

    Read Prof Cecile Jackson's welcome to prospective students interested in studying International Development at UEA.

    Read it Course Director - Prof Cecile Jackson
  • Environmental Justice

    A group of International Development Researchers at UEA are working on global environmental justice, linking in with questions of biodiversity conservation, climate change, ecosystem management, forestry, disaster risks and water.

    Read it Environmental Justice
  • School Newsletter

    Read our International Development Annual Newsletter

    Read it School Newsletter
  • Undergraduate Scholarships

    UEA has an awesome range of scholarships to support your undergraduate degree – make sure you check them out!

    Read it Undergraduate Scholarships

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course n ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

International Foundation in General Science

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32
  • Scottish Highers AABBB One Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB (acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications)
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB
  • Access Course Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM in a relevant subject
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

International Foundation in General Science

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English Language GCSEs at grade C or above.

Assessment

Key factors used to assess an application include:

  • Past and future achievement in examinations
  • Academic interest in the subject
  • Personal interests and extra-curricular activities
  • The reference

All applications are considered on their own individual merits.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

 

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Development)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515

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