MSc Water Security and International Development


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Master of Science



Article

Founded in 2011, the Water Security Research Centre (WSRC) brings together researchers from across the University of East Anglia to address the theoretical, practical and policy challenges of managing and governing water for different human, economic and environmental needs from the local to the global scales.

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Video

Fundamentally interdisciplinary, the course makes the most of highly experienced lecturers with a wide variety of experience, networks and creative teaching methods - including for example the River Basin Game, featured in this video.

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Key facts

2015 Guardian League Table in Geography and Environmental Studies

Video

Watch our video and hear why our Postgraduate students are so pleased they chose UEA’s School of International Development.

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Article

We actively support our students in finding internships (work placements) with development organisations in fields such as community development, environment, health, education etc. during their Master’s degree.

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This Master's degree interprets water security in its broad political ecology and political economy sense. We believe that the hydrological cycle is intimately connected to critical global policy concerns, climate change, food trade and food security, energy security and in turn to the international cooperation that affects human, community, regional and state security.

The programme will critically reflect on the practical and theoretical facets of ‘water security’, with a view to develop a better foundation upon which to achieve developmental and environmental objectives.

We will provide the latest interdisciplinary theory and tools necessary to rise to the challenges and students will graduate with the knowledge and tools to be able to understand and audit the water security of a system of interest be it nation, region, company, sector, scheme or household.

Overview

The MSc Water Security and International Development degree interprets 'water security' in its broad political ecology and political economy sense. We believe that the hydrological cycle is intimately connected to critical global policy concerns: climate change, food trade and food security, energy security - and in turn to the international cooperation that affects human, community, regional and state security.

Inextricably linked to people's welfare and livelihoods in non-industrialised contexts, water is a resource of fundamental importance to environment and development concerns. This Master's programme will critically reflect on the practical and theoretical facets of 'water security', with a view to develop a better foundation upon which to achieve developmental and environmental objectives. We will provide the latest interdisciplinary theory and tools necessary to rise to the challenges and students will graduate with the knowledge and tools to be able to understand and audit the water security of a system of interest; be it nation, region, company, sector, scheme or household.

The MSc Water Security and International Development degree will be offered over one year full-time, or two years part-time.

Applicants for this degree are encouraged to apply as soon as possible in order to secure their place. Please contact the Course Director, Dr Mark Zeitoun if you would like to discuss your application before it is submitted.

Who is the Course for?

This unique degree seeks to prepare graduates to engage with and contribute to societal responses to critical global water policy issues, encapsulated in part by Professor John Beddington's (UK Government Chief Scientific Adviser) 2009 analysis identifying the 'Perfect Storm' arising from the 'surge in demand for food, water and energy over the next two decades... all intimately connected'. The School is world-renowned for its interdisciplinary and rigorous approach to subject-area teaching within a wider pedagogic framework of development and environmental studies. The students will benefit from our specialist knowledge in the social and biophysical aspects of water resources, including excellent networking and fieldword opportunities.

The course is relevant for those who have recently completed undergraduate study as well as those who have already worked in the field of development. It does not require specialised prior study although students will benefit from an environmental Bachelors degree such as geology, geography or environmental sciences. People with other backgrounds oriented towards the environment, for instance in political sciences, sociology or law, or with practice experience in development work, are also strongly encouraged to apply. The course aims to prepare students for employment in a wide range of areas, including non-governmental organisations (NGOs), government aid agencies, and multilaterial organisations.

Course Profile 

Our Masters courses require students to undertake 180 credits:

  • Compulsory and Optional modules (120 credits)
  • Examination (20 credits)
  • Dissertation (40 credits)

The Compulsory modules include:

  • Water Security - Theory and Concepts (Autumn semester - 20 credits)
  • Water Security - Tools and Policy (Spring semester - 20 credits)

Students will be able to choose from a range of Optional modules. Recommended modules include:

  • Understanding Global Environmental Change
  • Catchment Water Resource Management
  • Political Ecology of Environment and Development
  • Climate Change Policy for Development
  • Globalised Agriculture and Food Systems

Students will receive detailed module outlines, including information about lectures and seminars, full reading lists and assessments once they have registered at the beginning of their course.

Professional, Employability and Practical Skills

A range of optional seminars and workshops are offered during your Masters programme for the teaching and strengthening of student skills. Sessions to support learning - in particular essay and dissertation writing - occur throughout the year. Development practice training is also provided. Please click to access further information about the Skills Training and Development Practice programme.

Course Tutors

The Course Director for the MSc Water Security and International Development degree is Mark Zeitoun. Water Security specialists who also teach on the course are: Professor Bruce Lankford, Dr Jessica Budds and Professor Kevin Hiscock. All tutors are well known internationally for their work on water and climate change, irrigation, hydrogeology, catchment management, politics, conflict and allocation.

UEA Water Security Research Centre

The University of East Anglia's Water Security Research Centre integrates world-class natural and social sciences to address the challenges. We offer unique skills and internationally-renowned researchers centred in the School of International Development and the School of Environmental Sciences. Together they address key water security and related issues from the individual to the global level.

The Water Security Centre also draws upon expertise from the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, the School of Economics, the School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice, International Development UEA, the Low Carbon Innovation Centre and the Climatic Research Unit – all based at the University of East Anglia. We go beyond studying phenomena to bring about positive change by means of engagement through extensive outreach, action research and policy formation.

Quotation

“Man is complex being; he makes deserts bloom and lakes die.”

Gill Stern

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

MSC IN WATER SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EXAM

This is a 3-hour exam taken by all students on the MSc in Water Security and International Development.

DEV-7043B

20

WATER SECURITY FOR DEVELOPMENT - THEORY AND CONCEPTS

The module 'Water Security - Tools and Policy' examines some of the ways that water security and international development challenges may be examined, unpacked and solved. The course is constructed around the belief that scientists can employ deliberative and participatory tools such as games to put water users (e.g. drawers, irrigators, households, abstractors) at the very centre of water security policy. The course will be part-experiential: we will confront and address problems and solutions through the use of models, games, role-playing and other dialogue and thinking-support tools. The emphasis is on applying the theory that has already been acquired, plus ideas through games and analytical frames, to draw up water policy and practice. Students will be expected to construct their own models or games to test and explore ideas. As such, the module also will continue to include lecture material that will support the theory introduced in the Autumn Semester and draw students into the policy sphere.

DEV-7040A

20

WATER SECURITY FOR DEVELOPMENT - TOOLS AND POLICY

The aim of 'Water Security Tools and Policy' is to investigate and provide a working familiarity with established and cutting-edge analytical, decision-making, and development tools (such as water footprinting or climate impacts assessment) for effective water security policy. It will utilise case study material, physical models, computer exercises and material brought or sourced by students to audit the water security of a system of interest (e.g. city, region, country, irrigation scheme). The students will record and assess the factors that affect water security such as laws and legal frameworks; water supply and demand volumes; institutions for managing water; climate change science and models; climate risks and adaptation; and future projections regarding societal change. Actions to address security will be discussed and formulated.

DEV-7041B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT I: SCIENCE, IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION

This module introduces students to the phenomenon of climate change, interconnections between climate change and development and theory and practice for adapting to climate change, in the context of developing countries. The first part of the module covers key aspects of climate change science necessary for a basic understanding of the causes of climate change, future projections of climate change and key impacts as well as methods for assessing these. The second part of the module focuses on adaptation to climate change by introducing the concepts of adaptation, vulnerability and resilience. National and sectoral policy making for adapting to climate change is then explored with reference to case studies. Finally the interconnections between disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation are explored. Seminars explore climate science and adaptation topics.

DEV-7042A

20

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT II: GOVERNANCE, POLICY AND SOCIETY

This module critically examines international/national climate change governance and policy and societal impacts from and responses to climate change and climate change policy. The first half of the semester (Section A) will discuss the history and politics of the international climate change negotiations and then critically examine the way the climate regime (UNFCCC) operates. The following three lectures will look in detail at two items under negotiation with significant implications for developing countries. Finally we will discuss global carbon markets. The second half of the semester (Section B) will turn to the interface of climate change and society. It will start by discussing urban responses to climate change before critically examining geoengineering and other ethical/justice related debates before examining the role of energy demand and lifestyle in tackling climate change and ending with a session on conflict and human security implications from climate change. The seminars will be interactive and enable students to better understand the international negotiating process and ways to engage positively with climate change.

DEV-7051B

20

GLOBALISED AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS

The aim of this module is to understand how forces operating at the global scale affect food and agriculture. These forces include trends in farming and trade, environmental change, policy developments, and social movements. Food security is a central theme: we explore different ways food security is defined, and how it is contested internationally, considering global institutions like FAO, interest groups, and diverse policy agendas (e.g. food sufficiency, nutrition, sustainability). The module considers a range of issues currently affecting food and farming systems: environmental change, changing diets (more meat, processed foods), `post-production' concerns with food safety or farming's impact on ecosystems, global agribusiness, agricultural innovation systems, and global-scale changes in food prices. Students will gain critical understanding of debates around these issues and of how different policy actors engage with them. These actors include firms, public RandD institutions, farmers' movements, and major donors and philanthropic organizations. An abiding concern is understanding impacts for the poor and vulnerable, particularly smallholder farmers, but also consumers in the North and South, and those involved in value chains. The module will help students develop a critical and inter-disciplinary understanding of key international policy debates that have relevance to agriculture.

DEV-7045B

20

POLITICAL ECOLOGY

This module seeks to provide students with a solid understanding of political ecology theory and enable them to apply this theory for analysing environment and development problems. After a brief introduction to the origins and beginnings of political ecology, students review key contributions to major policy fields in environment and development in a series of reading seminars, covering agriculture and biotechnology, climate change, conservation, fisheries, forestry, and water. Students also perform political ecology analyses of particular natural resource problems in small groups. The course ends with a workshop on contemporary theoretical debates in political ecology.

DEV-7033B

20

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS

The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: # Development research and research ethics # Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews # The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods # Participatory and action research # Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are taught using SPSS.

DEV-7005A

20

RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND AGRARIAN CHANGE

Rural Livelihoods and Agrarian Change is a core module for all MAARD and MAGAID students and is an option for all other masters students. It is an inter-disciplinary module that uses a social relations perspective to understand how people make a living in contexts of poverty and vulnerability. It aims to provide an overview of rural livelihoods and approaches to their analysis as well as a critical assessment of the implications of gender relations and poverty, for livelihood building. The interconnections between the wider context within which livelihoods are built, including national policies and the character of specific locations, the social structure and rules that determine entitlements, the assets or resources available to individuals and groups, and their livelihood strategies, will be examined. The links between rural and urban, farm and non-farm for the livelihoods of rural people, over time, will also be explored.

DEV-7020A

20

SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION

This module investigates the impacts of consumption on social and environmental systems, and how these might be reduced. It presents the key theories and debates around sustainable consumption, and critically examines a range of strategies for achieving it, covering governmental, business, community and individual actors. A mainstream 'green growth' policy approach to sustainable consumption is contrasted with an alternative 'new economics' 'steady state economy' model, and we examine a range of perspectives on what drives consumption patterns. Workshop exercises to apply these theories to 'real world' examples will provide experiential learning opportunities. We then critically assess a selection of sustainable consumption initiatives in detail, for example local organic food, eco-housing, Transition Towns, local currencies and community-based behaviour-change campaigns. Students will be required to critically evaluate social science theories so some background in social science is stongly recommended (although not compulsory).

ENV-7025A

20

UNDERSTANDING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This module provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the analysis and understanding of issues of environmental change, and of the relationships between environment and development. Students will have a critical understanding of social constructions of cause and effect relationships in environment and development issues, including a critical understanding of scientific assessments. They will be able to link these understandings to topics encountered in other courses, and to develop their own perspectives on environment and development issues. In particular they should understand the somewhat different perspectives in 'less developed countries' on environment and development issues. The course consists of weekly workshops and seminar sessions, which include videos and discussions oriented around core issues and readings. Assessment is based on coursework and written examination.

DEV-7014A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED QUALITATIVE RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS

The Advanced Qualitative Research and Analysis module (AQRA) is designed to provide a more advanced training in qualitative methods than its predecessor Research Skills for Social Analysis. It represents a progression from Research Techniques and Analysis in the first semester or an extension of previous experience/ training. Areas covered include bringing social theory into qualitative research, designing research using qualitative and mixed methods, data cleaning and management, data analysis, representing others, and applying qualitative research. There will be three lectures on core qualitative methods such as participant observation, however, the module assumes participants have previous experience or training.

DEV-7036B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT I: SCIENCE, IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION

This module introduces students to the phenomenon of climate change, interconnections between climate change and development and theory and practice for adapting to climate change, in the context of developing countries. The first part of the module covers key aspects of climate change science necessary for a basic understanding of the causes of climate change, future projections of climate change and key impacts as well as methods for assessing these. The second part of the module focuses on adaptation to climate change by introducing the concepts of adaptation, vulnerability and resilience. National and sectoral policy making for adapting to climate change is then explored with reference to case studies. Finally the interconnections between disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation are explored. Seminars explore climate science and adaptation topics.

DEV-7042A

20

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT II: GOVERNANCE, POLICY AND SOCIETY

This module critically examines international/national climate change governance and policy and societal impacts from and responses to climate change and climate change policy. The first half of the semester (Section A) will discuss the history and politics of the international climate change negotiations and then critically examine the way the climate regime (UNFCCC) operates. The following three lectures will look in detail at two items under negotiation with significant implications for developing countries. Finally we will discuss global carbon markets. The second half of the semester (Section B) will turn to the interface of climate change and society. It will start by discussing urban responses to climate change before critically examining geoengineering and other ethical/justice related debates before examining the role of energy demand and lifestyle in tackling climate change and ending with a session on conflict and human security implications from climate change. The seminars will be interactive and enable students to better understand the international negotiating process and ways to engage positively with climate change.

DEV-7051B

20

CONCEPTUALISING SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH

This module provides students at school and faculty level with a generic introduction to social science research. This includes introductory material on the nature of social science research, and examines the process and procedural aspects of social science research. The module is the core module for MRes Social Science Research (Faculty-wide). The module focuses on social science research in terms of research impact and complements other modules being offered in DEV and other schools on social science research methods and tools.

PSY-7000A

20

CONFLICT, CIVIL WARS AND PEACE

The number of violent intrastate conflicts has outweighed the number of violent interstate conflicts for more than five decades. Yet it was only with the end of the Cold War that academics and policy-makers started paying more attention to the possible causes and consequences of large-scale intrastate violence. Today, questions of effective conflict management, especially of large-scale civil wars, are among the top priorities of international development agencies. The aim of CCP is to critically assess the possible causes and consequences of violent intrastate conflicts as well as their implications for the wider development agenda. Key topics to be discussed in the module include distinctions of different types of conflict (week 1), core theories in the current civil wars literature (week 2), strategies and causes of terrorism (week 3), the role of gender during and after violent intrastate conflicts (week 4), the (contested) relationship(s) between natural resource wealth and civil wars (week 5), institutional approaches to conflict management, including power-sharing and territorial self-governance arrangements (weeks 7 and 8), the rationale and possible effects of third-party intervention in civil wars (week 9), and post-conflict reconstruction efforts, including state- and peace-building as well as transitional justice (weeks 10 and 11). Throughout the module, students will be expected to assess the strengths and limitations of central concepts and theories from the academic debate by applying them to relevant empirical evidence, such as e.g. the role of gender during the Rwandan genocide in 1994, the performance of Bosnia and Herzegovina's post-civil war power-sharing arrangement and the likely effects of federalism in Iraq.

DEV-7015B

20

CONTEMPORARY WORLD DEVELOPMENT

The objective of Contemporary World Development is to examine key debates around development objectives, processes and agencies. While issues discussed here are of contemporary significance, references will be made to the historical contexts in which these debates have arisen. Concerns central to development policy making will be reviewed through theoretically grounded critical perspectives. Topics covered include the Millennium Development Goals, donors and aid politics, state and NGOs, and poverty.

DEV-7000B

20

DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES

The objective of this module is to explore different theoretical ideas and debates about development, and place these in their historical and political contexts. We will critically assess the various ways in which development has been conceptualized, from the end of the Second World War to the present day. Topics covered will include modernisation theory; dependency theory; the role of the state; neo-liberalism and the Washington Consensus, neo-institutionalism and the post-Washington Consensus; poverty and basic needs; human development and capabilities; equity and justice; rights and empowerment; and sustainable development. A key point of the module is to show how ideas in development emerge and how they shape policies and practice in development in the present day.

DEV-7001A

20

ECONOMETRIC METHODS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this introductory module is to expose students to basic econometric theory and provide them with sufficient knowledge and practical skill for competent use of econometrics in empirical research. The module also enables students to understand and interpret econometric research results. By the end of the module students acquire sufficient knowledge and skill to apply multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data to a wide range of macro- and micro-economic problems of development. In addition to lectures, the module includes computer workshops on Stata (widely used econometrics software) and seminars.

DEV-7025A

20

EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND PRACTICE FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is to enable students to understand current debates on education and development and their implications for international and national education strategies. Students will critically examine education policy documents (including web-based literature), investigate policy development processes and develop the ability to locate global, national and local levels policies and practices within a range of discourses and theoretical frameworks. These processes will be investigated in relation to particular policy agendas including access and quality, educational governance, social justice and school choice, as well as areas such as education and conflict, poverty and marginalisation, gender and HIV and AIDS.

DEV-7011B

20

GENDER CONCEPTS FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aims of this module are to provide students with a solid understanding of both the theoretical perspectives and concepts that have underpinned the field of gender and development; and to enable students to understand the link between gender and key debates within development studies such as poverty, violence, religion and the role of men in gender and development. The module begins by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, as they have evolved in recent decades. It then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analysis. The second part of the module applies these concepts in examining a selection of important and policy relevant debates: the nature of the household and kinship, gender roles, power and empowerment, poverty, violence, masculinities, religion and the gendered nature of institutions. The module builds the foundation for the more applied units which follow, and whilst it touches on policy implications as they arise, it does not focus on gender policy as such.

DEV-7003A

20

GENDER DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

This module explores relations between social policies (defined broadly) and various forms of identity and difference. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries and pays particular attention to gender issues, although other aspects of diversity (such as ethnicity, disability and age) are also addressed explicitly. The module has both theoretical and more practical components, including sessions on gender planning and mainstreaming analysis. This module has a limit of 40 students.

DEV-7024B

20

GLOBALISED AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS

The aim of this module is to understand how forces operating at the global scale affect food and agriculture. These forces include trends in farming and trade, environmental change, policy developments, and social movements. Food security is a central theme: we explore different ways food security is defined, and how it is contested internationally, considering global institutions like FAO, interest groups, and diverse policy agendas (e.g. food sufficiency, nutrition, sustainability). The module considers a range of issues currently affecting food and farming systems: environmental change, changing diets (more meat, processed foods), `post-production' concerns with food safety or farming's impact on ecosystems, global agribusiness, agricultural innovation systems, and global-scale changes in food prices. Students will gain critical understanding of debates around these issues and of how different policy actors engage with them. These actors include firms, public RandD institutions, farmers' movements, and major donors and philanthropic organizations. An abiding concern is understanding impacts for the poor and vulnerable, particularly smallholder farmers, but also consumers in the North and South, and those involved in value chains. The module will help students develop a critical and inter-disciplinary understanding of key international policy debates that have relevance to agriculture.

DEV-7045B

20

GOVERNANCE, DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT

"Good governance" and durable democracy are key items on the international development agenda. However, despite their prominence in the development discourse, it remains contested not only how to achieve these political development goals, but also how to define them in the first place. The aim of GDD is to critically assess the possible definitions, contested causes and arguable consequences of "good governance" and democracy. Key topics to be discussed in the module include how to define and measure democracy and "good governance" (week 3), explanations for the emergence of democracy (week 4), theories on the survival of democracy and dictatorship (week 5), the relationships between media, good governance and democracy (week 7), aid and governance (week 8), trust and cooperation (week 9), the effects of democracy and dictatorship on prospects of economic development (week 10), and the impact of different democratic and authoritarian institutions on countries' economic performance (week 11). Throughout the module, students will be expected to assess the strengths and limitations of central concepts and theories from the academic debate by applying them to relevant empirical evidence, such as e.g. political regime trends in Venezuela, the political outcomes of the Arab Spring and the economic effects of recent elections in Kenya.

DEV-7023A

20

HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a broad introduction to health issues in a context of development. It reviews different cultural understandings of health, and relationships between health, socio-economic change, livelihoods and poverty. The module also examines health policies of particular relevance to developing countries. While the module looks at health issues in general, it pays particular attention to links between HIV/AIDS and development.

DEV-7027B

20

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY

This module provides an understanding of the economics of international trade and investment and their implications for development. It analyses the impacts of international trade, foreign investment and technology transfer on developing countries and evaluates the effects of national trade and investment policies and international economic agreements and institutions. It covers both trade theory and more applied topics such as the impact of trade on labour and the environment.

DEV-7017B

20

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of the module is for students to understand current debates on the principles and theories linking education to development in a range of social contexts. The module will introduce students to theories of education and development including international and comparative education. These are examined in relation to the broader challenges of development. Topics in the module may include: theories of human development and capabilities, human capital and rights based approaches, theories of equity, social justice and inclusive education. We will examine schooling in contexts of chronic poverty, models of schooling and de-schooling, formal and non-formal education, the challenges of linguistic and cultural diversity, inclusive education and disability, gender inequalities, and the education of nomads and other migratory groups.

DEV-7002A

20

MACROECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

Why are some countries richer than others? The objective of the module is to provide a rigorous analysis of economic growth issues and examine macroeconomic models that describe determinants of long-term growth and income. We will study the role of capital accumulation, initial income, population growth, education, technological progress, and institutions in determining different patterns of economic development. Theory and data analysis will jointly help explain why some countries embark on divergent development paths.

DEV-7029B

20

MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

In this module students will be working in the university and in the local community to design, implement and evaluate their own 'live' media and development project. The aim of this module is not only to provide students with the opportunity to gain experience of media and development in practice but also to provide the opportunity to reflect on that experience. Past projects have involved content production, audience research, social media strategy, project design and capacity building. This module is not taught through conventional lectures and seminars. Instead, there are opportunities to talk, listen and reflect on our work and the issues and processes encountered. An important element of this process is peer review.

DEV-7039B

20

MEDIA AND SOCIETY

This module is intended to provide all students studying media related postgraduate degrees with a broad, current and inter-disciplinary understanding of the media today. Our guiding philosophy is that in order properly to understand the media, whether as a lawyer, economist, development studies professional, media studies specialist or political scientist, it is essential to have a wide-ranging and multi-disciplinary understanding of the modern media. What we shall be doing over the year, therefore, is to look at the structure of media today in the UK and globally. We will consider, from several different academic perspectives, how media content is constructed, what shapes content and how content may be controlled and even censored. We will also look at the media industry, examining how it is currently organised and managed, what factors influence its current organisation and consider how it might develop. We will examine how media affects peoples and societies, particularly with the rise of social media, and review the debates about media influence and power. Finally, we will seek to draw together key aspects of modern media.

DEV-7044A

20

POLITICAL ECOLOGY

This module seeks to provide students with a solid understanding of political ecology theory and enable them to apply this theory for analysing environment and development problems. After a brief introduction to the origins and beginnings of political ecology, students review key contributions to major policy fields in environment and development in a series of reading seminars, covering agriculture and biotechnology, climate change, conservation, fisheries, forestry, and water. Students also perform political ecology analyses of particular natural resource problems in small groups. The course ends with a workshop on contemporary theoretical debates in political ecology.

DEV-7033B

20

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS

The course lectures and seminars will include the following topics: # Development research and research ethics # Research design and method; sampling, questionnaire design, interviews # The role of qualitative methods in quantitative research and mixed methods # Participatory and action research # Design and implementation of household surveys on various topics, e.g. income, consumption, employment, health, nutrition, education, etc. Basic data processing and statistical analysis and presentation are taught using SPSS.

DEV-7005A

20

RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND AGRARIAN CHANGE

Rural Livelihoods and Agrarian Change is a core module for all MAARD and MAGAID students and is an option for all other masters students. It is an inter-disciplinary module that uses a social relations perspective to understand how people make a living in contexts of poverty and vulnerability. It aims to provide an overview of rural livelihoods and approaches to their analysis as well as a critical assessment of the implications of gender relations and poverty, for livelihood building. The interconnections between the wider context within which livelihoods are built, including national policies and the character of specific locations, the social structure and rules that determine entitlements, the assets or resources available to individuals and groups, and their livelihood strategies, will be examined. The links between rural and urban, farm and non-farm for the livelihoods of rural people, over time, will also be explored.

DEV-7020A

20

RURAL POLICIES and POLITICS

Around three-quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas and the gap between poor and rich continues to widen. The fate of the rural poor can be greatly influenced by policies in areas such as agriculture, land, social protection, natural resources, health, education and trade. This module reviews key policies and issues in these and other areas. It also guides students to critically analyse policy choices within specific contexts. Rural Policies recognises the importance of looking at rural policies with consideration of particular socio-economic contexts and in relation to larger-scale trends that are affecting rural areas: globalisation, urbanisation, de-agrarianisation, rural-urban linkages, conflict, HIV/AIDS and decentralisation. At the same time, it is based on the premise that rural areas require particular policies because of the distinct conditions characterizing them.

DEV-7004B

20

SOCIAL ANALYSIS FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Over the last few years, social development has become a leading focus in international development policy. Most international agencies and many of the larger NGOs have their own departments or divisions of social development. This module offers a detailed theoretical analysis of key concepts issues in social development, such as power relations, social capital, social exclusion, participatory development and different understandings of poverty. It focuses on the experiences of developing countries.

DEV-7021A

20

TOOLS AND SKILLS IN ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

This module aims to introduce a range of tools and frameworks used by researchers, government agencies, businesses and NGOs to inform and develop their environmental management strategies in a sustainable development context. Students will gain familiarity with the most important available approaches and an understanding of the key assumptions and ideas in environment-development research, monitoring and management systems. The module is taught through workshops and practical sessions, lectures and field or study visits within Norfolk. There is an emphasis on putting concepts into practice and understanding how environmental assessments guide management actions. Both individual and team projects will be important. Tools and frameworks covered may include environmental and social impact assessments, survey techniques for land, water or biodiversity, GIS and modelling of social-ecological systems, sustainable livelihoods analysis and integrated conservation and development.

DEV-7022B

20

UNDERSTANDING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This module provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the analysis and understanding of issues of environmental change, and of the relationships between environment and development. Students will have a critical understanding of social constructions of cause and effect relationships in environment and development issues, including a critical understanding of scientific assessments. They will be able to link these understandings to topics encountered in other courses, and to develop their own perspectives on environment and development issues. In particular they should understand the somewhat different perspectives in 'less developed countries' on environment and development issues. The course consists of weekly workshops and seminar sessions, which include videos and discussions oriented around core issues and readings. Assessment is based on coursework and written examination.

DEV-7014A

20

WELFARE AND EVALUATION IN DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of impact evaluation. The focus of the module will be on issues around evidence-based policy making, approaches to wellbeing, and their practical application in terms of evaluating the effect of development interventions on the quality of people's lives. The first part discusses the notion of evidence-based policy, introduces the students to the area of evaluation and reviews the role of programme theory in evaluation. The second part addresses the theory of welfare, with particular reference to poverty, inequality, and multi-dimensional ill-being as well as cost effectiveness. The third part considers policy and evaluation in practice looking at a range of sectors and contexts.

DEV-7038A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students must select either DEV-M04X OR DEV-M06x as a compulsory selection.

Name Code Credits

DEVELOPMENT WORK PLACEMENT

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON THE FOLLOWING ROUTES ONLY; Media and International Develpment, Clmate Change and International Development and Environment and International Development. This module is offered as an alternative to the 40 credit dissertation module (DEV-M04X) that all MA/MSc students in DEV currently take. Whilst an academic dissertation will benefit most master's students, for others there may be more benefit to be gained from an appropriate, challenging work experience placement that is then linked to theory and reflected on critically in a report. Students will be responsible for finding a suitable placement but will be given a range of support from DEV which includes: giving the students access to the DEV internship host data base compiled over nearly a decade; advice on identifying appropriate placements; advice on CV design, fund-raising (where necessary), health and safety, ethical considerations etc.; facilitate communication between student and potential host, in some cases acting as a mediator. Whilst we cannot guarantee a placement we are confident that most students who take this module and apply themselves to identifying an internship, will be successful. If there are any students who cannot find a suitable internship then they will automatically transfer to the standard dissertation module.

DEV-7026X

40

DISSERTATION

Production of a short (8000-12000 words) dissertation on an approved topic.

DEV-7013B

40

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

Entry Requirements

  • Degree Subject Social Science or Natural Resource Science
  • Degree Classification 2.1 or equivalent

Entry Requirement

Applicants should normally have a good first degree from a recognised higher education institution. The University will also take into account the employment experience of applicants where relevant.

It is normal for undergraduate students to apply for entry to postgraduate programmes in their final year of study. Applicants who have not yet been awarded a degree may be offered a place conditional on their attaining a particular class of degree.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic requirements for this course, you may be able to study one of the International Graduate Diploma programmes offered by our partner INTO UEA. These programmes guarantee progression to selected masters degrees if students achieve the appropriate grade. For more details please click here:

International Graduate Diploma in International Development

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Fees and Funding

Fees for the academic year 2016/17 are:

  • UK/EU Students: £6,000 (full-time)
  • International Students: £14,500 (full-time)

International applicants from outside the EU may need to pay a deposit.

Living Expenses
Approximately £9,135 living expenses will be needed to adequately support yourself.

Scholarships and Funding

A variety of Scholarships may be offered to UK students. Please click here for more detailed information about UK/EU Scholarships and Funding.

The University offers around £1 million of Scholarships each year to support International students in their studies. Scholarships are normally awarded to students on the basis of academic merit and are usually for the duration of the period of study. Please click here for further information about funding for International students. International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

Ashton Partnership Scholarship in Water Security

A new scholarship opportunity is being offered by the Water Security Research Centre and The Ashton Partnership to an eligible candidate of the MSc in Water Security and International Development for the 2015-16 academic year. The ‘Ashton Partnership Scholarship in Water Security’ offers the scholarship recipient an award of £6,500 as a reduction to tuition fees for the academic year. Full scholarship details.

Applications are welcome from applicants from all countries and should include a CV, a covering letter and an essay on water security. Scholarship application form

Deadline for receipt of applications is 1 June 2015 and early applications are encouraged.

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can apply online, or by downloading the application form.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

    Next Steps

    Need to know more? Take a look at these pages to discover more about Postgraduate opportunities at UEA…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515

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