Biography

Dr. Tom Sambrook joined the School of Psychology in 2017. He read psychology at Bristol University and was later awarded an M.Sc. in cognitive science from Birmingham University and Ph.Ds from St. Andrews University (field primatology) and Plymouth University (cognitive neuroscience)

All Publications

Sambrook, T. D., Goslin, J.

(2016)

Principal components analysis of reward prediction errors in a reinforcement learning task,

in NeuroImage

124

(Part A)

pp. 276-286

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Sambrook, T. D., Goslin, J.

(2015)

A neural reward prediction error revealed by a meta-analysis of ERPs using great grand averages,

in Psychological Bulletin

141

(1)

pp. 213-235

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Sambrook, T. D., Goslin, J.

(2014)

Mediofrontal event-related potentials in response to positive, negative and unsigned prediction errors,

in Neuropsychologia

61

pp. 1-10

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Sambrook, T. D., Roser, M., Goslin, J.

(2012)

Prospect theory does not describe the feedback-related negativity value function,

in Psychophysiology

49

(12)

pp. 1533-1544

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Sambrook, T., Taylor, M.

(2000)

Data for free: How to estimate the association of non-focal subjects using a focal window,

in Behaviour

137

(9)

pp. 1257-1270

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


McKinley, J., Sambrook, T. D.

(2000)

Use of human-given cues by domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and horses (Equus caballus),

in Animal Cognition

3

(1)

pp. 13-22

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Sambrook, T.

(1998)

Does Visual Perspective Matter in Imitation?,

in Perception

27

(12)

pp. 1461-1473

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Sambrook, T., Buchanan-Smith, H.

(1997)

Control and Complexity in Novel Object Enrichment,

in Animal Welfare

6

(3)

pp. 207-216

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Sambrook, T., Whiten, A., Strum, S.

(1995)

Priority of access and grooming patterns of females in a large and a small group of olive baboons,

in Animal Behaviour

50

(6)

pp. 1667-1682

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

I’m interested in lots of things because I find lots of thing interesting.

At the moment I’m thinking about decision making (what should I do?) and reinforcement learning (how did it work out for me?). My recent papers have looked at neural correlates of these processes and increasingly tend to use computational models.

However I have worked in other areas, including field studies of primate social behaviour and assessment of bilingual language acquisition 

Teaching Interests

Seminar Leader: Research Design and Analysis (Year 2)

Lecturer: Cognitive and Biological Psychology (Year 2)

Seminar Leader: Psychology Lab Skills (M.Sc.)