Biography

Dr. Louise Ewing joined UEA in 2015. She gained her undergraduate degree, Masters (Educational and Developmental Psychology) and PhD in the School of Psychology at the University of Western Australia. Upon completion of her studies she took up a postdoctoral fellowship in the Person Perception Node of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders. In 2014 she moved to the UK to take up a postdoctoral fellowship at Birkbeck, University of London investigating face-processing strategies in typically developing children, adults and individuals with Williams syndrome. In her research she uses behavioural techniques and electroencephalography to investigate the mechanisms of face and person perception – with a particular interest in how these skills develop in typical children and atypically developing populations, e.g., individuals with autism spectrum disorder, Williams syndrome and Down syndrome. 

Indicative Publications

Ewing, L., Caulfield, F., Read, A., & Rhodes, G. (2015). Perceived trustworthiness of faces drives trust behaviour in children. Developmental Science. 18 (2), 327-334

Ewing, L., Caulfield, F., Read, A., & Rhodes, G. (2014). Appearance-based trust behaviour is reduced in children with autism spectrum disorder. Autism.19 (8), 1002-1009

Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2013). Reevaluating the selectivity of face-processing difficulties in children and adolescents with autism. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 115, 342 - 355.

Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2012). Atypical updating of face representations with experience in children with autism. Developmental Science, 16, 116 - 123. 

All Publications

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Ewing, L., Karmiloff-Smith, A., Farran, E. K., Smith, M. L.

(2017)

Developmental changes in the critical information used for facial expression processing,

in Cognition

166

pp. 56–66

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Rhodes, G., Burton, N., Jeffery, L., Read, A., Taylor, L., Ewing, L.

(2017)

Facial expression coding in children and adolescents with autism: Reduced adaptability but intact norm-based coding,

in British Journal of Psychology

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(E-pub ahead of print)


Smith, M. L., Letizia Cesana, M., Farran, E. K., Karmiloff-Smith, A., Ewing, L.

(2017)

A ‘spoon full of sugar’ helps the medicine go down: how a participant friendly version of a psychophysics task significantly improves task engagement, performance and data quality in a typical adult sample,

in Behavior Research Methods

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(E-pub ahead of print)


Rhodes, G., Neumann, M., Ewing, L., Bank, S., Read, A., Engfors, L. M., Emiechel, R., Palermo, R.

(2017)

Ensemble coding of faces occurs in children and develops dissociably from coding of individual face identities,

in Developmental Science

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(E-pub ahead of print)


Ewing, L., Farran, E. K., Karmiloff-Smith, A., Smith, M. L.

(2017)

Understanding strategic information use during emotional expression judgments in Williams syndrome,

in Developmental Neuropsychology

42

(5)

pp. 323-335

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Smith, M., Volna, B., Ewing, L.

(2016)

Distinct information critically distinguishes judgments of face familiarity and identity,

in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

42

(11)

pp. 1770-1779

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Caulfield, F., Ewing, L., Bank, S., Rhodes, G.

(2016)

Judging trustworthiness from faces: Emotion cues modulate trustworthiness judgments in young children,

in British Journal of Psychology

107

(3)

pp. 503-518

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Kloth, N., Hayward, W. G., Oxner, M., Pond, S., Rhodes, G.

(2015)

How well do computer-generated faces tap face expertise?,

in PLoS ONE

10

(11)

article no. e0141353

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Ewing, L., Caulfield, F., Read, A., Rhodes, G.

(2015)

Appearance-based trust behaviour is reduced in children with autism spectrum disorder,

in Autism

19

(8)

pp. 1002-1009

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Smith, M., Grühn, D., Bevitt, A., Ellis, M., Ciripan, O., Ewing, L.

(2015)

Emotion categorization of facial expressions: Age differences in the utilization of diagnostic features,

in Journal of Vision

15

(12)

pp. 134

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Rhodes, G., Pond, S., Burton, N., Kloth, N., Jeffery, L., Bell, J., Ewing, L., Calder, A., Palermo, R.

(2015)

How distinct is the coding of face identity and expression? Evidence for some common dimensions in face space,

in Cognition

142

pp. 123 - 137

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Ewing, L., Caulfield, F., Read, A., Rhodes, G.

(2015)

Perceived trustworthiness of faces drives trust behaviour in children,

in Developmental Science

18

(2)

pp. 327–334

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Rhodes, G., Neumann, M. F., Ewing, L., Palermo, R.

(2015)

Reduced set averaging of face identity in children and adolescents with autism,

in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

68

(7)

pp. 1391-403

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Rhodes, G., Ewing, L., Jeffery, L., Avard, E., Taylor, L.

(2014)

Reduced adaptability, but no fundamental disruption, of norm-based face-coding mechanisms in cognitively able children and adolescents with autism,

in Neuropsychologia

62

pp. 262-8

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Croydon, A., Pimperton, H., Ewing, L., Duchaine, B. C., Pellicano, E.

(2014)

The Cambridge Face Memory Test for Children (CFMT-C): A new tool for measuring face recognition skills in childhood,

in Neuropsychologia

62

pp. 60-67

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Rhodes, G., Jeffery, L., Taylor, L., Hayward, W. G., Ewing, L.

(2014)

Individual differences in adaptive coding of face identity are linked to individual differences in face recognition ability,

in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

40

(3)

pp. 897-903

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Caulfield, F., Ewing, L., Burton, N., Avard, E., Rhodes, G.

(2014)

Facial trustworthiness judgments in children with ASD are modulated by happy and angry emotional cues,

in PLoS ONE

9

(5)

article no. e97644

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Ewing, L., Leach, K., Pellicano, E., Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G.

(2013)

Reduced face aftereffects in autism are not due to poor attention,

in PLoS ONE

8

(11)

article no. e81353

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., Rhodes, G.

(2013)

Using effort to measure reward value of faces in children with autism,

in PLoS ONE

8

(11)

article no. e79493

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Rhodes, G., Jeffery, L., Taylor, L., Ewing, L.

(2013)

Autistic traits are linked to reduced adaptive coding of face identity and selectively poorer face recognition in men but not women,

in Neuropsychologia

51

(13)

pp. 2702-2708

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


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Key Research Interests

Dr Louise Ewing’s research is primarily concerned with the mechanisms driving the successful (and unsuccessful) development of face expertise in typical and atypical populations, e.g., autism spectrum disorder, Williams syndrome. Current research topics include: the impact of strategic information use during face judgments (i.e., what is the most critical information for decisions about things like identity, expression, gender); the emergence of face-related social attributions in early childhood (e.g., evaluations of trustworthiness, attractiveness); individual differences in social motivation and the development of person perception expertise; adaptive coding of face identity and expression; the own-race bias in face perception; differences in the perception of real vs computer generated faces; neural correlates of specialist face processing in Williams syndrome (EEG).

Master's and PhD Supervision Interests:

Artificial faces are encountered more in life and increasingly used in research. But how do people actually perceive these stimuli? Do we really see them as faces? Do they activate specialised face processing mechanisms? 

The other-race effect (ORE), or the finding that same-race faces are better recognized than other-race faces, is one of the best replicated phenomena in face recognition. Debate continues, however, regarding whether this reflects perceptual or more socio-cognitive factors. Could differences in the reward value of own and other race faces be a contributing factor?

Trustworthiness judgments about faces are made with strong consensus but questionable validity. Still they may be of adaptive value: providing a helpful sense that we can predict others’ personality and behavior. Do we all make these judgments in the same way? Are some people more sensitive to trust cues in faces than others?

Get in touch if you'd like to talk about working towards a PhD or would like to gain some research experience!

Teaching Interests

Lecturer (Cognitive Theme): Psychology of Individual: Development, Personality, Brain and Cognition (1st Year)

Lecturer (Cognitive Theme): Psychology: Cognition, Biology, and Individual Differences (2nd Year)

Project Supervisor:  Research Project (3rd Year)

Project Supervisor: Dissertation (Masters)

Key Responsibilities

Transitions Officer