Biography

Janosch Prinz is a Leverhulme early career fellow at the University of East Anglia. His main research
interest is the nature and value of (realist) political and social theory. His fellowship aims at developing a diagnostic approach to democratic legitimacy. He currently explores the intersection of normative and empirical considerations in the conduct of political inquiry.

 

He holds a PhD from the University of Sheffield (2015). His thesis was entitled "Radicalizing Realism in Political Theory" (which can be accessed here). Before joining UEA, he was a temporary lecturer in political theory at Queen's University Belfast (2015-2017).

All Publications

Prinz, J.

(2017)

Book Review: Politics and the Search for the Common Good, by Hans Sluga,

in Political Theory

45

(5)

pp. 724-727

Full Text

(Book/Film/Article review)

(Published)


Prinz, J., Schetter, C.

(2017)

Conditioned Sovereignty: The Creation and Legitimation of Spaces of Violence in Counterterrorism Operations of the “War on Terror”,

in Alternatives

41

(3)

pp. 119-136

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Prinz, J., Rossi, E.

(2017)

Political realism as ideology critique,

in Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy

20

(3)

pp. 334-348

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Prinz, J.

(2016)

Raymond Geuss’ radicalization of realism in political theory,

in Philosophy and Social Criticism

42

(8)

pp. 777-796

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Meyer, R., Schetter, C., Prinz, J.

(2012)

Spatial contestation? - The theological foundations of Carl Schmitt's spatial thought,

in Geoforum

43

(4)

pp. 687-696

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Schetter, C., Prinz, J.

(2012)

Intervention light: Die konstruktion von gewalträumen im zeitalter bedingter souveränität,

in Geographische Rundschau

64

(2)

pp. 26-33

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Schetter, C., Prinz, J.

(2012)

Counterinsurgency, Anthropology, Retreat – the US Military's COIN ‘Strategy’ in Afghanistan,

in Orient

53

(2)

pp. 24-34

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Schetter, C., Prinz, J.

(2011)

Vom Krieg gegen den Terrorismus zur Aufstandsbekaempfung Zum Paradigmatischen der Interventionspolitik in Afghanistan,

in Handbuch Kriegstheorien.

VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften

pp. 522-534

ISBN 978-3-531-17933-9

Full Text UEA Repository

(Chapter)

(Published)


Schetter, C., Prinz, J.

(2011)

The Stability of Instability: State, Security, and Violent Conflicts in South Asia,

in Security in a Changing Global Environment.

Nomos Verlag

pp. 327-355

ISBN 978-3-8329-6003-2

Full Text UEA Repository

(Chapter)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

My research is driven by the goal of developing conceptual tools for interpreting and criticizing political orders. In my dissertation (2011-2015) I approached this goal through investigating what is political about contemporary political theory. I examined the contribution of current realist trends in political theory to rethinking the relationship of theory to practical politics. I offered the first sustained critical analysis of the potential of ‘realists’ to pose a challenge to the prevalent versions of political liberalism. In response to the limitations of this potential, I sketched a radical interpretation of realism. Radical realism is a tool for interpreting political concepts and actions, based on investigating the specific conditions of politics. My development of Raymond Geuss’ work in this regard appeared in Philosophy and Social Criticism and has led to several invited contributions.

Expanding on radical realism, I recently developed a toolkit for a realist approach to criticizing political ideologies (with Enzo Rossi, in CRISPP). Since 2010 I have simultaneously been engaged in interdisciplinary collaborative analyses of the legitimations of military and development interventions in the War on Terror, which introduced me to discourse analysis and ethnographic inquiry. Research in progress centres on realist accounts of legitimacy and political criticism. My next goal is to connect radical realism to democratic theory and make good on its promise to offer practical orientation for current political challenges. To achieve this I will need to experiment methodologically and probe the divisions between normative-analytical, critical-reflexive and empirical approaches to making sense of politics.