Biography

Elizabeth Cobbett is lecturer of international relations and international political economy at the University of East Anglia since 2013. Elizabeth completed her Ph.D. at Carleton University, Ottawa (2012) and her MPPPA (2006) and undergraduate studies at Concordia University, Montreal. Her current research project, Growth of African Financial Networks, focuses on contemporary developments in banking and finance within Africa. More specifically, her work examines the different ways in which global finance seeks profitable opportunities within localized social structures. Working within the tradition of Fernand Braudel, this analytical approach amplifies the significance of cultural and social factors that are often ignored by mainstream approaches to the political economy of global finance. Elizabeth is recipient of the ISA Robert and Jesse Cox 2012 Graduate Essay Award, a Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s CGS Doctoral Scholarship in 2007, the Senior Women Academic Administrators of Canada: Graduate Student Award of Merit in 2004, as well being the winner of the Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada essay competition: Canada’s Experience with NAFTA.

Academic Background

PhD (2012)               Carleton University, Ottawa

South Africa in the New World Order: Power, Finance and Society

MPPA (2006)              Concordia University, Montreal 

It Takes Two to Tango: Can Brazil and the U.S. Dance to the Same Regional Beat?

BA (2003)                 Concordia University, Montreal 

Political Science

All Publications

Labonté, R., Cobbett, E., Orsini, M., Spitzer, D., Schrecker, T., Ruckert, A.

(2015)

Globalization and the health of Canadians: ‘Having a job is the most important thing’,

in Globalization and Health

11

article no. 19

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cobbett, E.

(2015)

Biometric mastercard,

in Making Things International : Circuits and Motion.

University of Minnesota Press

pp. 311-327

ISBN 978-0-8166-9625-3, 978-0-8166-9626-0

UEA Repository

(Chapter)

(Published)


Cobbett, E., Friesen, E.

(2014)

Motsepe’s Gift: or how Philanthropy serves Capitalism in South Africa,

in Selected Themes in African Studies: Political Conflict and Stability.

Springer

pp. 113-124

ISBN 978-3-319-06001-9

UEA Repository

(Chapter)

(Published)


Cobbett, E.

(2013)

Johannesburg: Financial ‘Gateway’ to Africa,

in The Power of Cities in International Relations.

Routledge

UEA Repository

(Chapter)

(Published)


Cobbett, E., Germain, R.

(2012)

Occupy Wall Street and International Political Economy: insights and implications,

in Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies

(5)

pp. 110-113

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cobbett, E.

(2012)

Public Services: Making Bonds between Government(s) and Finance,

in Capitalism and Confrontation: Critical Perspectives.

Red Quill Books

pp. 137-152

UEA Repository

(Chapter)

(Published)


Cobbett, E.

(2011)

The Shaping of Islamic Finance in South Africa: Public Islam and Muslim Publics,

in Journal of Islamic Studies

pp. 29-59

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cobbett, E.

(2010)

The South African Reserve Bank and the Telling of Monetary Stories,

in Nokoko

pp. 67-98

UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cobbett, E.

(2004)

Deeper North American Integration? Putting the Horse Back before the Cart,

(Other contribution)

(Published)


Key Research Interests

My research engages with the political economy of global finance within the African context. Using a critical analytical lens, I examine the ways in which global finance seeks profitable opportunities within localised structures. This amplifies the significance of social factors often ignored by mainstream approaches. Present research focuses on the growth of key African financial hubs – South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya. The need for African financial and business gateways as a base from which firms can conduct business operations is growing, accentuated by the fact that foreign investment is no longer concentrated in isolated countries but is spreading throughout the continent. This broad project includes research on innovations in technology and finance.

Teaching Interests

Global political economy, global finance, African international relations, global political economy of emerging powers, international relations theory.  As a lecturer, I work towards creating a strong community of scholarship to foster a vibrant environment for students and to reinforce research networks and affiliations.

Administrative Posts

  • Director of Internationalisation 
  • Joint course director PSI MA International Relations and Development Studies (2014)