Biography

Dr. David Milne is a historian and analyst of US foreign policy. His first monograph America’s Rasputin was published in 2008 and reviewed to acclaim in over thirty outlets, including the Wall Street Journal, The Nation, The National Interest, Diplomatic History and the American Historical Review. In 2011 the Wall Street Journal and Financial Times journalist Stephen Glain named America’s Rasputin one of his five “must-read” books on American militarism for thebrowser.com.

David’s current project explores the different ways in which humanities and social science graduates approach foreign policymaking. To give one example, the historian George Kennan and political scientist Paul Wolfowitz had very different views on the limits and possibilities of US power – the former privileged craft and intuition, the latter the ambitious testing of “theory.” Their scholarly backgrounds played a large role in shaping the approaches they advocated. A book that examines this phenomenon from the Spanish-American War to the present, The Art and Science of American Diplomacy will be published in 2014 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Dr. Milne is also a senior editor of the Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History (forthcoming with Oxford University Press in two volumes in 2013). He was a Fox International Fellow at Yale University in 2003, a senior fellow at the Gilder-Lehrman Institute for American History in New York City in 2005, and a visiting fellow at the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia in 2009. David has also secured funding from the Kennedy Library, the Johnson Library, the British Academy, and was awarded an AHRC Research Fellowship in 2011.

In addition to the above, David’s research has appeared in The Journal of Military History, Review of International Studies, International Affairs, the International Journal, and the Historical Journal. An admirer of Richard Hofstadter’s example as a public educator – a scholar who believed that historians must do more to engage with the present – David has also written for the Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and The New Statesman.

All Publications

Milne, D.

(2012)

Pragmatism or What? The Future of US Foreign Policy

in International Affairs

88.

pp. 935-951

Full Text UEA Repository

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Milne, D., Lynch, T., Nichols, C. M., Milne, D. (ed.), Lynch, T. (ed.), Nichols, C. M. (ed.)

(2012)

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Oxford University Press

ISBN 978-0199759255

UEA Repository

(Book)


Milne, D.

(2011)

How Front Organizations Played the CIA

in The Historical Journal

54.

UEA Repository

(Article)


Milne, D.

(2011)

"The 1968 Paris Peace Negotiations: A Two Level Game?"

in Review of International Studies

37.

pp. 577-599

Full Text UEA Repository

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Milne, D.

(2011)

The Kennan Diaries

In: Challenging US Foreign Policy: America and the World in the Long Twentieth Century.

Palgrave MacMillan

pp. 56-74

UEA Repository

(Chapter)


Milne, D., Ralph, J.

(2011)

George F. Kennan: American Diplomacy

In: Volumes of Influence.

Manchester University Press

pp. 152-170

ISBN 978 07190 8303 7

UEA Repository

(Chapter)


Milne, D.

(2010)

America's 'intellectual' diplomacy

in International Affairs

86(1).

Full Text UEA Repository

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Milne, D.

(2009)

Wilson Agonistes: The Battle for Woodrow Wilson

in The Nation

UEA Repository

(Article)


Milne, D.

(2008)

Which Hotshots Will Head to DC?

in Los Angeles Times

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(Article)


Milne, D.

(2008)

America's Rasputin: Walt Rostow and the Vietnam War

New York: Hill and Wang

ISBN 0374103860

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(Book)


Milne, D.

(2007)

Intellectualism in American Diplomacy: Paul Wolfowitz and his Predecessors

in International Journal

UEA Repository

(Article)


Milne, D.

(2007)

The Paul Wolfowitz of the 1960s

in Los Angeles Times

UEA Repository

(Article)


Milne, D.

(2007)

The Peculiar Career of Walt Whitman Rostow

in Vietnam Magazine

UEA Repository

(Article)


Milne, D.

(2007)

Our Equivalent of Guerrilla Warfare: Walt Rostow and the Bombing of North Vietnam, 1961-1968

in Journal of Military History

71.

UEA Repository

(Article)


Milne, D.

(2007)

Intellectualism in US Diplomacy : Paul Wolfowitz and His Predecessors

in International Journal

62.

pp. 667-680

UEA Repository

(Article)


Milne, D.

(2006)

Walt Whitman Rostow - Scribner’s Encyclopaedia of American Lives

In: EPRINTS-BOOK-TITLE.

New York: Scribner’s and Sons

UEA Repository

(Chapter)


Key Research Interests

David Milne is interested in the influence that "intellectuals" (broadly conceived) have exerted upon US foreign policy. His first book was a study of Walt Whitman Rostow, a prominent social scientist and one of the key architects of the Vietnam War. Entitled America's Rasputin ,(Averell Harriman's acid nickname for Rostow), the book was published in 2008 to reviews in The Wall Street Journal, The Miami Herald, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The National Interest, The Weekly Standard, and the Nation. The philosopher John Gray described the book as "absorbing... A book that vividly illuminates the dangers of ideology in foreign policy, America's Rasputin could not be more timely."

David is currently working on a second book which examines the interplay between eight intellectuals who played a pivotal role in shaping the way America viewed its place in the world: Alfred Thayer Mahan, Woodrow Wilson, Charles Beard, Walter Lippmann, George Kennan, Paul Nitze, Henry Kissinger, and Paul Wolfowitz. The book considers the varied reasons why US presidential administrations have been so receptive to foreign policy advice from the academy - and from prominent public intellectuals - and examines the manner in which the diplomatic pendulum has swung between Internationalism and Realism from the 1890s to the present.

Teaching Interests

David Milne teaches undergraduate and postgraduate modules on American politics and the history of its international relations. He would welcome applications from research students working in the fields of American foreign policy and history, political biography, and the way in which different knowledge-types inform diplomatic practice. Past and current PhD students have written on the Reagan presidency, US policy in Southeast Asia in the 1970s, the origins of the Powell Doctrine, and the progressive influence on the New Deal.

Key Responsibilities

Dr Milne is Research Director for the School of Political, Social and International Studies.